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2021-05-07 [p.908]
— by Mr. Harris (St. John's East), one concerning the correctional system (No. 432-00925) and one concerning employment and labour (No. 432-00926);
2021-05-06 [p.904]
— by Mr. Johns (Courtenay—Alberni), one concerning health (No. 432-00924).
2021-05-05 [p.899]
Q-562 — Mr. Garrison (Esquimalt—Saanich—Sooke) — With regard to the government’s commitment to address the practice of conversion therapy in Canada: (a) what steps are being taken, at the federal level, to prevent this practice from taking place; (b) how, and through which programs, is the government proactively promoting and applying the Canadian Guidelines on Sexual Health Education, as an upstream prevention strategy, for affirming the sexual orientation and gender identities of LGBTQ2 young people before they may be exposed to conversion therapy; (c) what resources will the government be providing to survivors who have experienced psychological trauma and other negative effects from conversion therapy, through interventions such as counselling and peer supports programs; (d) how is the government planning to work with faith leaders, counsellors, educators and other relevant service providers to equip individuals with tools to identify and stop conversion therapy; and (e) what steps is the government taking to address numerous recommendations received from the United Nations to harmonize sexuality education curricula across jurisdictions in Canada? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-562.
2021-05-05 [p.900]
Pursuant to Standing Order 52, Ms. McPherson (Edmonton Strathcona) asked leave to move the adjournment of the House for the purpose of discussing a specific and important matter requiring urgent consideration, namely, the COVID-19 situation in Alberta.
The Speaker decided that the matter was proper to be discussed and, pursuant to Standing Order 52(9), directed that it be considered later today, at the ordinary hour of daily adjournment.
2021-05-05 [p.901]
Pursuant to Standing Order 52(10), the House proceeded to the consideration of a motion to adjourn the House for the purpose of discussing an important matter requiring urgent consideration, namely, the COVID-19 situation in Alberta.
Ms. McPherson (Edmonton Strathcona), seconded by Ms. Mathyssen (London—Fanshawe), moved, — That this House do now adjourn.
Debate arose thereon.
At midnight, the Speaker declared the motion adopted.
2021-05-04 [p.888]
Mr. Harris (St. John's East), seconded by Mr. Davies (Vancouver Kingsway), moved, — That, in the opinion of the House, the government should establish a federal dental care plan as soon as possible for Canadian families earning less than $90,000 per year who are not covered by a dental care plan, as an interim measure toward the inclusion of full dental care in Canada’s healthcare system. (Private Members' Business M-62)
Debate arose thereon.
2021-05-03 [p.880]
Pursuant to Standing Orders 68(2) and 69(1), on motion of Mr. MacGregor (Cowichan—Malahat—Langford), seconded by Ms. Blaney (North Island—Powell River), Bill C-292, An Act to establish Canadian Armed Forces Members Day, was introduced, read the first time, ordered to be printed and ordered for a second reading at the next sitting of the House.
2021-04-30 [p.870]
— by Ms. Blaney (North Island—Powell River), one concerning Indigenous affairs (No. 432-00896);
2021-04-30 [p.870]
— by Mr. Johns (Courtenay—Alberni), one concerning food and drink (No. 432-00899);
2021-04-29 [p.861]
Pursuant to Standing Orders 68(2) and 69(1), on motion of Ms. Kwan (Vancouver East), seconded by Mr. Boulerice (Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie), Bill C-291, An Act to amend the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act, was introduced, read the first time, ordered to be printed and ordered for a second reading at the next sitting of the House.
2021-04-28 [p.853]
Mr. Duvall (Hamilton Mountain), seconded by Mr. Masse (Windsor West), moved the following amendment, — That the motion be amended by replacing paragraph (d) with the following:
“(d) if the bill is adopted at the second reading stage, it shall be deemed referred to a committee of the whole, deemed considered in committee of the whole, deemed reported with the following amendment:
That Bill C-29, in Clause 11, be amended:
(a) by replacing line 39 on page 4 to line 10 on page 5 with the following: “such matter, hear the parties on the matter, arbitrate the matter and render a decision in respect of the matter; and”;
(b) by deleting lines 15 to 17 on page 5;
(c) by replacing lines 25 to 36 on page 5 with the following: “(4) Every decision of the mediator-arbitrator under paragraph (1)(b) must be worded in appropriate contractual language so as to allow its incorporation into a new collective agreement.”;
deemed concurred in at report stage, as amended, and deemed read a third time and passed;”.
Debate arose thereon.
2021-04-26 [p.821]
Pursuant to Standing Orders 68(2) and 69(1), on motion of Mr. MacGregor (Cowichan—Malahat—Langford), seconded by Mr. Garrison (Esquimalt—Saanich—Sooke), Bill C-290, An Act respecting soil conservation and soil health, was introduced, read the first time, ordered to be printed and ordered for a second reading at the next sitting of the House.
2021-04-26 [p.821]
— by Ms. McPherson (Edmonton Strathcona), one concerning foreign affairs (No. 432-00871);
2021-04-26 [p.821]
Pursuant to Standing Order 39(7), Mr. Lamoureux (Parliamentary Secretary to the President of the Queen’s Privy Council for Canada and Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs and to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons) presented the returns to the following questions made into orders for return:
Q-479 — Ms. Blaney (North Island—Powell River) — With regard to consultations held by the Minister of Economic Development and Official Languages since January 2021 to launch a regional economic development agency for British Columbia: (a) how many meetings were held; (b) who attended each meeting; (c) what was the location of each meeting; (d) excluding any expenditures which have yet to be finalized, what are the details of all expenditures related to each meeting, broken down by meeting; (e) what is the itemized breakdown of the expenditures in (d), broken down by (i) venue or location rental, (ii) audiovisual and media equipment, (iii) travel, (iv) food and beverages, (v) security, (vi) translation and interpretation, (vii) advertising, (viii) other expenditures, indicating the nature of each expenditure; (f) how much was spent on contractors and subcontractors; (g) of the contractors and subcontractors in (f), what is the initial and final value of each contract; and (h) among the contractors and subcontractors in (f), what is the description of each service contract? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-479.
2021-04-26 [p.825]
Q-505 — Mr. Blaikie (Elmwood—Transcona) — With regard to call centres across the government, from fiscal year 2019-20 to date, broken down by fiscal year, department and call centre: (a) what is the rate of inaccurate information provided by call agents; (b) what is the annual funding allocated; (c) how many full-time call agents have been assigned; (d) how many calls could not be directed to a call agent; (e) what is the wait time target set; (f) what is the actual performance against the wait time target; (g) what is the average wait time to speak to a call agent; (h) what is the established call volume threshold above which callers are directed to the automated system; and (i) what is the method used to test the accuracy of responses given by call agents to callers? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-505.
2021-04-26 [p.825]
Q-506 — Mr. Blaikie (Elmwood—Transcona) — With regard to the compliance monitoring of the Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy (CEWS) since its inception, broken down by period of eligibility, category of eligible employers (corporation, trust, charity other than a public institution, partnership, non-resident corporation), value of claim (less than $100,000, $100,000 to $1 million, $1 million to $5 million, and over $5 million), size of business (small, medium and large), and industry sector: (a) how many prepayment review audits were conducted; (b) of the audits in (a), what is the average audit duration; (c) how many postpayment audits were conducted; (d) of the audits in (c), what is the average audit duration; (e) how many times has the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) determined that an amount of the CEWS is an overpayment; (f) to date, what is the total amount of the CEWS overpayment; (g) how many notices of determination for overpayment have been issued; (h) what is the total amount and interest refunded to date as a result of the notices of determination for overpayment; (i) how many applications for the CEWS have been denied; (j) of the applications denied in (i), how many were subject to a second level review; (k) of the second level reviews in (j), what was the average processing time for the review; (l) of the second level reviews in (j), in how many cases was the original decision upheld; (m) of the cases in (l), how many of the applications were the subject of a notice of objection or an appeal to the Tax Court of Canada; (n) what was the rate of non-compliance; (o) excluding applications from businesses convicted of tax evasion, does the CRA also screen applications for aggressive tax avoidance practices, and, if so, how many applications were denied because the applicant engaged in aggressive tax avoidance; (p) among the businesses receiving the CEWS, has the CRA verified whether each business has a subsidiary or subsidiaries domiciled in a foreign jurisdiction of concern for Canada as defined by the CRA, and, if so, how many of the businesses that received the CEWS have a subsidiary or subsidiaries in foreign jurisdictions of concern for Canada; and (q) among the businesses in (p), has the CRA cross-referenced the data of businesses submitted for the CEWS application and their level of risk of non-compliance with tax laws? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-506.
2021-04-26 [p.826]
Q-509 — Mr. Angus (Timmins—James Bay) — With regard to the Fall Economic Statement 2020 and the additional $606 million over five years, starting in 2021-22, to enable the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) to fund new initiatives and extend existing programs aimed at international tax evasion and abusive tax avoidance, broken down by year: (a) how does the CRA plan to allocate the additional funding, broken down by CRA programs and services; (b) what is the target number of auditors to be hired in terms of full-time equivalents, broken down by auditor category; (c) what portion of the additional funding is solely directed to combating international tax evasion; and (d) what portion of the additional funding is solely directed to aggressive international tax avoidance? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-509.
2021-04-26 [p.826]
Q-510 — Mr. Angus (Timmins—James Bay) — With regard to the government's commitment to launch consultations in the coming months on modernizing Canada's anti-avoidance rules as stated in the Fall Economic Statement 2020: (a) is funding already allocated to the consultation process, and, if so, what is the amount; (b) are staff already assigned, and, if so, how many full-time equivalents are assigned; (c) what is the anticipated list of issues and proposed changes to the consultation process; and (d) when is the consultation process expected to begin? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-510.
2021-04-26 [p.827]
Q-511 — Mr. Angus (Timmins—James Bay) — With regard to budget 2016 and the government's commitment to provide $350 million per year in ongoing funding to enable the Canada Revenue Agency to combat tax evasion and abusive tax avoidance, broken down by fiscal year, from 2016 to date: (a) how much of this annual funding has gone to programs and services for (i) high-risk audits, (ii) international large business sector, (iii) high net worth compliance, (iv) flow-through share audits, (v) the foreign tax whistleblower program; (b) has this annual funding resulted in the hiring of additional auditors, and, if so, how many additional auditors have been hired, broken down by the programs and services in (a); (c) has this annual funding resulted in an increase in audits, and, if so, how many audits have been completed, broken down by the programs and services in (a); (d) has this annual funding resulted in an increase in assessments, and, if so, how many reassessments have been issued; (e) has this annual funding resulted in an increase in the number of convictions for international tax evasion, and, if so, how many convictions for international tax evasion have occurred; and (f) how much of this annual funding was not spent, and, if applicable, why? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-511.
2021-04-26 [p.830]
Q-535 — Mr. Angus (Timmins—James Bay) — With regard to the Canada Infrastructure Bank, since May 2019: (a) what is the number of meetings held with Canadian and foreign investors, broken down by (i) month, (ii) country, (iii) investor class; (b) what is the complete list of investors met; (c) what are the details of the contracts awarded by the Canada Infrastructure Bank, including the (i) date of the contract, (ii) initial and final value of the contract, (iii) vendor name, (iv) file number, (v) description of services provided; (d) how many full-time equivalents were working at the bank in total, broken down by (i) month, (ii) job title; (e) what are the total costs of managing the bank, broken down by (i) fiscal year, from 2019-20 to date, (ii) leases costs, (iii) salaries of full-time equivalents and corresponding job classifications, (iv) operating expenses; (f) how many projects have applied for funding through the bank, broken down by (i) month, (ii) description of the project, (iii) value of the project; (g) of the projects in (f), how many have been approved; (h) how many projects assigned through the bank have begun operations, broken down by region; (i) of the projects in (h), what is the number of jobs created, broken down by region; (j) what is the renumeration range for its board of directors and its chief executive officer, broken down by fiscal year, from 2019-20 to date; (k) were any performance-based bonuses or incentives distributed to the board of directors and the chief executive officer, and, if so, how much, broken down by fiscal year from 2019-20 to date? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-535.
2021-04-26 [p.831]
Q-542 — Mr. Green (Hamilton Centre) — With regard to Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) high net worth compliance program, broken down by year, from November 2015 to date : (a) how many audits were completed; (b) what is the number of auditors; (c) how many new files were opened; (d) how many files were closed; (e) of the files in (d), what was the average time taken to process the file before it was closed; (f) of the files in (d), what was the risk level of non-compliance of each file; (g) how much was spent on contractors and subcontractors; (h) of the contractors and subcontractors in (g), what is the initial and final value of each contract; (i) among the contractors and subcontractors in (g), what is the description of each service contract; (j) how many reassessments were issued; (k) what is the total amount recovered; (l) how many taxpayer files were referred to the CRA's Criminal Investigations Program; (m) of the investigations in (l), how many were referred to the Public Prosecution Service of Canada; and (n) of the investigations in (m), how many resulted in convictions? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-542.
2021-04-26 [p.833]
Q-547 — Mr. Duvall (Hamilton Mountain) — With regard to the proposal, as indicated in the 2020 Fall Economic Statement, for an additional $606 million over five years, beginning in 2021-22, to enable the Canada Revenue Agency to fund new initiatives and extend existing programs aimed at international tax evasion and abusive tax avoidance: (a) what specific modeling was used by the government to support its assertion that these measures to combat international tax evasion and abusive tax avoidance will recover $1.4 billion in revenue over five years; (b) who did the modeling in (a); (c) what were the modeling projections; and (d) does the $1.4 billion estimate come solely from the proposed additional $606 million over five years or does it also come from the 2016 budget commitment of $350 million per year? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-547.
2021-04-26 [p.833]
Q-548 — Mr. Duvall (Hamilton Mountain) — With regard to events hosted by Facebook, Google, Netflix, and Apple that ministers have attended, since November 2015, broken down by each company, year, and department: (a) what is the number of events each minister attended; (b) of the attendance in (a), what were the costs associated with (i) lodging, (ii) food, (iii) any other expenses, including a description of each expense; and (c) what are the details of any meetings the minister and others attended, including (i) the date, (ii) the summary or description, (iii) attendees, (iv) topics discussed? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-548.
2021-04-26 [p.833]
Q-551 — Ms. Kwan (Vancouver East) — With regard to loans approved by the Canada Enterprise Emergency Funding Corporation (CEEFC) under the Large Employer Emergency Financing Facility, broken down by approved loan for each borrower: (a) what are the terms and the conditions of the loan in terms of (i) dividends, (ii) capital distributions and share repurchases, (iii) executive compensation; (b) for the terms and conditions of the loan in (a), from what date do these terms apply and until what date do they expire; (c) what are the consequences provided for in the terms and conditions of the loan if a company does not comply with one or more of the terms and conditions in (a); (d) by what process does the CEEFC verify that the company complies with the terms and the conditions in (a); and (e) has the CEEFC appointed an observer to the board of directors of each of the borrowers, and, if so, what is the duration of his mandate? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-551.
2021-04-26 [p.834]
Q-552 — Ms. Kwan (Vancouver East) — With regard to housing: (a) since 2010, broken down by year, how much insured lending did the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation approve for rental financing and refinancing to real estate income trusts and large capital equity funds; (b) of the insured lending in (a), how much is associated with the purchase of existing moderate-rent assets; (c) broken down by project receiving funding in (a), what is the (i) average rent of units prior to the acquisition, (ii) average rent of units for each year following the acquisition up until the most current average rent; (d) broken down by province, funding commitment status (e.g. finalized agreement, conditional commitment), whether funding has been advanced and type of funding (grant or loan), what is the total funding that has been provided through the (i) National Co-Investment Fund, (ii) Rental Construction Financing Initiative, (iii) application stream of the Rapid Housing Initiative? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-552.
2021-04-26 [p.834]
Q-553 — Ms. Kwan (Vancouver East) — With regard to the government’s contracting of visa application services: (a) on which dates did Public Works and Government Services Canada and Public Services and Procurement Canada each become aware that Beijing Shuangxiong is owned by the Beijing Public Security Bureau; (b) since learning of the ownership structure of Beijing Shuangxiong, what reviews have been conducted in response to this information, and when did they begin; (c) regarding the process that resulted in the awarding of the contract to VFS Global in 2018, (i) how many bids were submitted, (ii) did any other companies win the contract prior to it being awarded to VFS Global, (iii) what was assessed in the consideration of these contracts, (iv) was the Communications Security Establishment or the Canadian Security Intelligence Service involved in the vetting of the contracts; (d) is there an escape clause in this VFS Global’s contract that would allow the government to unilaterally exit the contract; and (e) the government having tasked VFS Global with the creation of digital services, what measures are being taken to ensure that the government is not providing VFS Global with a competitive advantage in future bids? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-553.
2021-04-23 [p.814]
— by Mr. Boulerice (Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie), one concerning employment and labour (No. 432-00859);
2021-04-23 [p.815]
Q-474 — Ms. Blaney (North Island—Powell River) — With regard to Gender-Based Analysis Plus (GBA+) training at Veteran Affairs Canada (VAC), broken down by staff position, office location and year since 2010: (a) how many employees have taken the online GBA+ course offered by the Department for Women and Gender Equality; (b) how many employees have taken the GBA+ premium course offered by the Canadian School of Public Service; (c) how many staff have taken the half-day enhanced senior leadership training; (d) who is leading or delivering the training sessions; (e) how many training sessions have been offered; (f) has the enhanced senior leadership training been established as a requirement for onboarding of new senior leadership members; (g) has VAC developed or adapted tailored GBA+ tools; (h) how much was spent for training; (i) how much was spent on contractors and subcontractors; (j) of the contractors and subcontractors in (i), what is the initial and final value of each contract; (k) of the contractors and subcontractors in (i), what is the description of each service contract; and (l) have any applications for training been denied, and, if so, how many and why? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-474.
2021-04-21 [p.798]
— by Mr. Green (Hamilton Centre), one concerning social affairs and equality (No. 432-00851).
2021-04-21 [p.798]
Pursuant to Standing Order 39(7), Mr. Lamoureux (Parliamentary Secretary to the President of the Queen’s Privy Council for Canada and Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs and to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons) presented the returns to the following questions made into orders for return:
Q-452 — Ms. Mathyssen (London—Fanshawe) — With regard to Old Age Security, Employment Insurance, the Guaranteed Income Supplement and all programs designed to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic: (a) was a gender-based analysis plus carried out prior to the implementation of the program, and, if not, has one been carried out since, and if so, when was it carried out; and (b) for each program, what were the conclusions of this analysis? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-452.
2021-04-21 [p.798]
Q-453 — Ms. Mathyssen (London—Fanshawe) — With regard to the Safe Return to Class Fund: (a) what is the total amount that each province or territory (i) has received, (ii) will be receiving; (b) of the funds in (a), broken down by province or territory, how much has been used to purchase (i) masks and face shields, (ii) high efficiency particulate air filters, (iii) heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems, (iv) liters of hand and surface sanitizers; (c) broken down by province or territory, how many (i) new teachers and education workers have been hired, (ii) new cleaners and janitors have been hired; (d) broken down by province or territory, how many (i) new sinks have been installed, (ii) barriers and screens have been installed; and (e) broken down by province or territory, how many alternative teaching spaces have been rented? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-453.
2021-04-21 [p.799]
Q-464 — Mr. Julian (New Westminster—Burnaby) — With regard to government contracts since March 13, 2020, and broken down by registered lobbyists and their affiliated firms: (a) how many contracts have been awarded to registered lobbyists; and (b) what are the details of contracts awarded, including (i) the date of the contract, (ii) the initial and final value of the contract, (iii) the name of the supplier, (iv) the reference number, (v) the description of the services rendered? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-464.
2021-04-21 [p.799]
Q-465 — Mr. Julian (New Westminster—Burnaby) — With regard to claimed stock option deductions, between fiscal years 2012-13 and 2020-21 inclusively, broken down by each fiscal year: (a) what is the number of individuals who claimed the stock option deduction whose total annual income is (i) less than $60,000, (ii) less than $100,000, (iii) less than $200,000, (iv) between $200,000 and $1 million, (v) more than $1 million; (b) what is the average amount claimed by an individual whose total annual income is (i) less than $60,000, (ii) less than $100,000, (iii) less than $200,000, (iv) between $200,000 and $1 million, (v) more than $1 million; (c) what is the total amount claimed by individuals whose total annual income is (i) less than $60,000, (ii) less than $100,000, (iii) less than $200,000, (iv) between $200,000 and $1 million, (v) more than $1 million; and (d) what is the percentage of the total amount claimed by individuals whose total annual income is more than $1 million? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-465.
2021-04-21 [p.801]
Q-471 — Ms. Blaney (North Island—Powell River) — With regard to the international and large business sector of the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA), since November 2015, and broken down by year: (a) how many audits were completed; (b) what is the number of auditors, broken down by category of auditors; (c) how many new files were opened; (d) how many files were closed; (e) of the files in (d), what was the average time it took to process the file before it was closed; (f) of the files in (d), what was the risk level of each file; (g) how much was spent on contractors and subcontractors; (h) of the contractors and subcontractors in (g), what is the initial and final value of each contract; (i) among the contractors and subcontractors in (g), what is the description of each service contract; (j) how many reassessments were issued; (k) what is the total amount recovered; (l) how many taxpayer files were referred to the CRA's Criminal Investigations Program; (m) of the files in (l), how many were referred to the Public Prosecution Service of Canada; and (n) of the files in (m), how many resulted in convictions? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-471.
2021-04-16 [p.780]
— by Ms. Blaney (North Island—Powell River), one concerning the environment (No. 432-00816);
2021-04-15 [p.769]
Pursuant to Standing Orders 68(2) and 69(1), on motion of Mr. Davies (Vancouver Kingsway), seconded by Ms. Kwan (Vancouver East), Bill C-286, An Act to amend the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act and to enact the Expungement of Certain Drug-related Convictions Act and the National Strategy on Substance Use Act, was introduced, read the first time, ordered to be printed and ordered for a second reading at the next sitting of the House.
2021-04-15 [p.770]
— by Ms. Kwan (Vancouver East), one concerning foreign affairs (No. 432-00805);
2021-04-14 [p.767]
Pursuant to Standing Order 52, Mr. Angus (Timmins—James Bay) asked leave to move the adjournment of the House for the purpose of discussing a specific and important matter requiring urgent consideration, namely, the future of Laurentian University.
The Speaker decided that the matter was proper to be discussed and, pursuant to Standing Order 52(9), directed that it be considered later today, at the ordinary hour of daily adjournment.
2021-04-14 [p.768]
Pursuant to Standing Order 52(10), the House proceeded to the consideration of a motion to adjourn the House for the purpose of discussing an important matter requiring urgent consideration, namely, the future of Laurentian University.
Mr. Angus (Timmins—James Bay), seconded by Ms. Mathyssen (London—Fanshawe), moved, — That this House do now adjourn.
Debate arose thereon.
At midnight, the Speaker declared the motion adopted.
2021-04-13 [p.755]
Pursuant to Standing Orders 68(2) and 69(1), on motion of Ms. Blaney (North Island—Powell River), seconded by Mr. MacGregor (Cowichan—Malahat—Langford), Bill C-283, An Act to establish National Food Waste Awareness Day and to provide for the development of a national strategy to reduce food waste in Canada, was introduced, read the first time, ordered to be printed and ordered for a second reading at the next sitting of the House.
2021-04-13 [p.756]
— by Mr. MacGregor (Cowichan—Malahat—Langford), one concerning transportation (No. 432-00786).
2021-04-12 [p.743]
Q-429 — Mr. Green (Hamilton Centre) — With regard to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP), for fiscal years 2020-21, 2019-20, 2018-19, 2017-18, and 2016-17, broken down by year: (a) what is the net change in the number of regular members who (i) self-identified as visible minorities (persons of colour), (ii) self-identified as Indigenous persons, (iii) did not self-identify as a member of an Employment Equity Act group; (b) what is the number of regular member applicants who (i) self-identified as visible minorities (persons of colour), (ii) self-identified as Indigenous persons, (iii) did not self-identify as a member of an Employment Equity Act group; (c) what is the number of regular member applicants selected to attend the RCMP training academy (Depot) who (i) self-identified as visible minorities (persons of colour), (ii) self-identified as Indigenous persons, (iii) did not self-identify as a member of an Employment Equity Act group; (d) how many regular member applicants graduated from the RCMP training academy (Depot) who (i) self-identified as visible minorities (persons of colour), (ii) self-identified as Indigenous persons, (iii) did not self-identify as a member of an Employment Equity Act group; (e) how many of the regular members who applied for promotion, broken down by rank (Corporal to Staff Sergeant), (i) self-identified as visible minorities (persons of colour), (ii) self-identified as Indigenous persons, (iii) did not self-identify as a member of an Employment Equity Act group; (f) how many regular member promotion applicants, who reached the short list (top seven), broken down by rank (Corporal to Staff Sergeant), (i) self-identified as visible minorities (persons of colour), (ii) self-identified as Indigenous persons, (iii) did not self-identify as a member of an Employment Equity Act group; and (g) how many regular member promotions were awarded to regular members, broken down by rank (Corporal to Staff Sergeant), who (i) self-identified as visible minorities (persons of colour), (ii) self-identified as Indigenous persons, (iii) did not self-identify as a member of an Employment Equity Act group? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-429.
2021-04-12 [p.745]
Q-434 — Mr. Boulerice (Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie) — With regard to the federal deductions that apply to the taxable income of individuals, between fiscal years 2012-13 and 2020-21, inclusively, broken down by each deduction and each fiscal year: (a) what is the number of individuals who claimed each deduction whose total annual income is (i) less than $60,000, (ii) less than $100,000, (iii) less than $200,000, (iv) between $200,000 and $1 million, (v) more than $1 million; (b) what is the average amount claimed by an individual whose total annual income is (i) less than $60,000, (ii) less than $100,000, (iii) less than $200,000, (iv) between $200,000 and $1 million, (v) more than $1 million; (c) what is the total amount claimed by individuals whose total annual income is (i) less than $60,000, (ii) less than $100,000, (iii) less than $200,000, (iv) between $200,000 and $1 million, (v) more than $1 million; and (d) what is the percentage of the total amount claimed by individuals whose total annual income is more than $1 million? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-434.
2021-04-12 [p.745]
Q-435 — Mr. Boulerice (Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie) — With regard to the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) advertising since November 4, 2015: (a) how much has CRA spent on advertising (i) on Facebook, (ii) on Xbox, Xbox 360 or Xbox One, (iii) on YouTube, (iv) in sponsored tweets on Twitter, (v) on Instagram; (b) for each advertisement, what was its (i) nature, (ii) purpose, (iii) target audience or demographic profile, (iv) cost; (c) what was the media authorization number of each advertisement; (d) what are the reference numbers of the documents, reports and memoranda concerning each advertisement or its after-the-fact evaluation; and (e) does the CRA compare the cost of advertising placement in traditional media with the media in (a), and, if so, what is the difference in cost for each of the advertisements in (b)? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-435.
2021-04-12 [p.746]
Q-442 — Ms. Gazan (Winnipeg Centre) — With regard to Canada’s Poverty Reduction Strategy and the target of 20 per cent reduction in poverty from the base year of 2015: has the government met its target, and, if not, by how much has the poverty rate in 2020 fallen from the base year of 2015? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-442.
2021-04-12 [p.746]
Q-444 — Mr. Johns (Courtenay—Alberni) — With regard to Motion M-225, adopted by the House on June 13, 2019: (a) has the government set a goal to prevent and end veterans homelessness in Canada by 2025; (b) what progress has the Minister of Families, Children and Social Development made towards developing a plan to present to the House to end veterans homelessness, and, if so, when will this plan be presented to the House; (c) broken down by fiscal year since 2015-16, how much funding has been put towards preventing and ending veterans homelessness through (i) Employment and Social Development Canada, (ii) Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, (iii) the Canadian Armed Forces, (iv) the Royal Canadian Mounted Police; and (d) broken down by fiscal year since 2018-19, how much federal funding was directed towards the (i) Veterans Emergency Fund, (ii) Veterans and Family Well-Being Fund? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-444.
2021-04-12 [p.746]
Q-445 — Mr. Johns (Courtenay—Alberni) — With regard to the government’s Blue Economy Strategy: (a) how does the government define a blue economy, and is land-based aquaculture a part of that definition; (b) what consultations has the Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard attended or plan to attend, broken down by date; and (c) for each consultation meeting in (b), which organizations, companies, and individuals attended or plan to attend those meetings? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-445.
2021-04-12 [p.747]
Q-446 — Mr. Johns (Courtenay—Alberni) — With regard to the Marine Communications and Traffic Services, broken down by centre and year since 2012: (a) what is the annual budget for each centre; (b) how many full-time staff are employed at each centre; (c) how much overtime has been claimed at each station; and (d) what is the total number of distress and safety calls that each centre responded to? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-446.
2021-04-12 [p.747]
Q-447 — Mr. Johns (Courtenay—Alberni) — With regard to volunteer firefighter and search and rescue volunteer services: (a) broken down by line and fiscal year between 2015-16 and 2019-20, (i) how many individuals claimed amounts on lines 362 and 395 of their individual tax returns, (ii) what was the total amount claimed in (a)(i); and (b) broken down by line and fiscal year since 2019-20, (i) how many individuals claimed amounts on lines 31220 and 31240 on their individual tax returns, (ii) what was the total amount claimed in (i)? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-447.
2021-03-26 [p.726]
— by Ms. Kwan (Vancouver East), two concerning citizenship and immigration (Nos. 432-00738 and 432-00739);
2021-03-25 [p.695]
— by Mr. Angus (Timmins—James Bay), one concerning health (No. 432-00732);
2021-03-25 [p.695]
— by Ms. Kwan (Vancouver East), one concerning health (No. 432-00733) and one concerning social affairs and equality (No. 432-00734).
2021-03-24 [p.677]
Pursuant to order made Monday, January 25, 2021, the House proceeded to the taking of the deferred recorded division on the motion of Ms. Gazan (Winnipeg Centre), seconded by Ms. Collins (Victoria), — That Bill C-232, An Act respecting a Climate Emergency Action Framework, be now read a second time and referred to the Standing Committee on Environment and Sustainable Development.
The question was put on the motion and it was negatived on the following division:
(Division No. 74 -- Vote no 74) - View vote details.
YEAS: 61, NAYS: 272
2021-03-24 [p.679]
Pursuant to order made Monday, January 25, 2021, the House proceeded to the taking of the deferred recorded division on the motion of Mr. MacGregor (Cowichan—Malahat—Langford), seconded by Mr. Boulerice (Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie), — That Bill C-231, An Act to amend the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board Act (investments), be now read a second time and referred to the Standing Committee on Finance.
The question was put on the motion and it was negatived on the following division:
(Division No. 75 -- Vote no 75) - View vote details.
YEAS: 61, NAYS: 273
2021-03-24 [p.688]
Pursuant to Standing Orders 68(2) and 69(1), on motion of Mr. Bachrach (Skeena—Bulkley Valley), seconded by Ms. Ashton (Churchill—Keewatinook Aski), Bill C-280, An Act to amend the Income Tax Act (residents of northern or intermediate zones), was introduced, read the first time, ordered to be printed and ordered for a second reading at the next sitting of the House.
2021-03-23 [p.670]
Pursuant to Standing Orders 68(2) and 69(1), on motion of Mr. Masse (Windsor West), seconded by Mr. Bachrach (Skeena—Bulkley Valley), Bill C-278, An Act to amend the Civil Air Navigation Services Commercialization Act, was introduced, read the first time, ordered to be printed and ordered for a second reading at the next sitting of the House.
2021-03-23 [p.671]
Pursuant to order made Monday, January 25, 2021, the House proceeded to the taking of the deferred recorded division on the motion of Mr. Singh (Burnaby South), seconded by Ms. Kwan (Vancouver East), — That, given that,
(i) during the first wave, 82% of COVID deaths in Canada happened in long-term care, the highest proportion in the OECD,
(ii) there have been over 12,000 long-term care resident and worker deaths in Canada since the beginning of the pandemic,
(iii) residents and workers in for-profit long-term care homes have a higher risk of infection and death than those in non-profit homes,
the House call upon the government to ensure that national standards for long-term care which are currently being developed fully remove profit from the sector, including by:
(a) immediately bringing Revera, a for-profit long-term care operator owned by a federal agency, under public ownership;
(b) transitioning all for-profit care to not-for-profit hands by 2030;
(c) working with provinces and territories to stop licensing any new for-profit care facilities, and making sure that measures are in place to keep all existing beds open during the transition; and
(d) investing an additional $5 billion over the next four years in long-term care, with funding tied to respect for the principles of the Canada Health Act, to boost the number of non-profit homes.
The question was put on the motion and it was negatived on the following division:
(Division No. 73 -- Vote no 73) - View vote details.
YEAS: 28, NAYS: 305
2021-03-22 [p.657]
The order was read for the consideration of the business of supply.
Mr. Singh (Burnaby South), seconded by Ms. Kwan (Vancouver East), moved, — That, given that,
(i) during the first wave, 82% of COVID deaths in Canada happened in long-term care, the highest proportion in the OECD,
(ii) there have been over 12,000 long-term care resident and worker deaths in Canada since the beginning of the pandemic,
(iii) residents and workers in for-profit long-term care homes have a higher risk of infection and death than those in non-profit homes,
the House call upon the government to ensure that national standards for long-term care which are currently being developed fully remove profit from the sector, including by:
(a) immediately bringing Revera, a for-profit long-term care operator owned by a federal agency, under public ownership;
(b) transitioning all for-profit care to not-for-profit hands by 2030;
(c) working with provinces and territories to stop licensing any new for-profit care facilities, and making sure that measures are in place to keep all existing beds open during the transition; and
(d) investing an additional $5 billion over the next four years in long-term care, with funding tied to respect for the principles of the Canada Health Act, to boost the number of non-profit homes.
Debate arose thereon.
2021-03-22 [p.661]
— by Ms. McPherson (Edmonton Strathcona), one concerning natural resources and energy (No. 432-00681);
2021-03-22 [p.662]
Pursuant to Standing Order 39(7), Mr. Lamoureux (Parliamentary Secretary to the President of the Queen’s Privy Council for Canada and Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs and to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons) presented the returns to the following questions made into orders for return:
Q-363 — Mr. Garrison (Esquimalt—Saanich—Sooke) — With regard to the Royal Canadian Navy’s frigate replacement program and the National Shipbuilding Strategy: (a) how critical is progress on the modernization of the Royal Canadian Navy to the defence of Canada and its allies; (b) what is the status of the Canadian Surface Combatant procurement project, including the (i) timelines, (ii) costs, (iii) target dates for the Royal Canadian Navy to take delivery of the frigates; (c) has the government conducted an inquiry in regards to the management, costs and associated production delays of the Canadian Surface Combatant procurement project and, if not, will the government commit to holding such an inquiry and make the results public; (d) what measures are being taken by the government to make sure that the National Shipbuilding Strategy remains on track to provide Canada’s armed forces personnel with the equipment they need to do their work in a timely and cost-effective manner; and (e) has the government considered appointing a single minister responsible for defence procurement, similar to our allies in the United Kingdom and Australia, in order to streamline military procurement and to provide better accountability to the public and, if not, will the government commit to establishing such a position? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-363.
2021-03-22 [p.665]
The House resumed consideration of the motion of Mr. Singh (Burnaby South), seconded by Ms. Kwan (Vancouver East), in relation to the business of supply.
The debate continued.
2021-03-22 [p.665]
The question was put on the motion and, pursuant to order made Monday, January 25, 2021, the recorded division was deferred until Tuesday, March 23, 2021, at the expiry of the time provided for Oral Questions.
2021-03-22 [p.665]
Pursuant to section 12(1) of the Conflict of Interest Code for Members of the House of Commons, the member for Edmonton Strathcona sent to the clerk a disclosure of a private interest and, pursuant to section 12(3) of the code, the clerk referred the disclosure to the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner.
2021-03-12 [p.651]
— by Mr. Blaikie (Elmwood—Transcona), one concerning education and training (No. 432-00670);
2021-03-12 [p.653]
The House resumed consideration of the motion of Mr. MacGregor (Cowichan—Malahat—Langford), seconded by Mr. Boulerice (Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie), — That Bill C-231, An Act to amend the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board Act (investments), be now read a second time and referred to the Standing Committee on Finance.
The debate continued.
2021-03-11 [p.634]
Pursuant to Standing Orders 68(2) and 69(1), on motion of Mr. Julian (New Westminster—Burnaby), seconded by Mr. Boulerice (Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie), Bill C-274, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (criminal interest rate), was introduced, read the first time, ordered to be printed and ordered for a second reading at the next sitting of the House.
2021-03-11 [p.634]
Pursuant to Standing Orders 68(2) and 69(1), on motion of Mr. Duvall (Hamilton Mountain), seconded by Mr. Boulerice (Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie), Bill C-275, An Act to amend the Income Tax Act (travel expenses deduction for tradespersons), was introduced, read the first time, ordered to be printed and ordered for a second reading at the next sitting of the House.
2021-03-11 [p.635]
— by Mr. MacGregor (Cowichan—Malahat—Langford), one concerning economics and finance (No. 432-00655);
2021-03-11 [p.640]
The House resumed consideration of the motion of Ms. Gazan (Winnipeg Centre), seconded by Ms. Collins (Victoria), — That Bill C-232, An Act respecting a Climate Emergency Action Framework, be now read a second time and referred to the Standing Committee on Environment and Sustainable Development.
The debate continued.
2021-03-10 [p.627]
— by Ms. McPherson (Edmonton Strathcona), one concerning foreign affairs (No. 432-00632);
2021-03-10 [p.627]
— by Mr. Cannings (South Okanagan—West Kootenay), one concerning the environment (No. 432-00637);
2021-02-26 [p.599]
— by Ms. Mathyssen (London—Fanshawe), one concerning civil and human rights (No. 432-00601) and one concerning social affairs and equality (No. 432-00602);
2021-02-26 [p.599]
Pursuant to Standing Order 39(7), Mr. Lamoureux (Parliamentary Secretary to the President of the Queen’s Privy Council for Canada and to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons) presented the revised return to the following question made into an order for return:
Q-314 — Mr. Green (Hamilton Centre) — With regard to government business finance programs and government contracts, broken down by funding program, contracts and fiscal year, since 2011: (a) what is the total funding for (i) Facebook, (ii) Google, (iii) Amazon, (iv) Apple, (v) Netflix? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-314-01.
2021-02-25 [p.594]
— by Mr. Green (Hamilton Centre), one concerning health (No. 432-00558) and one concerning the environment (No. 432-00559);
2021-02-25 [p.594]
— by Mr. Johns (Courtenay—Alberni), one concerning health (No. 432-00566);
2021-02-24 [p.569]
Pursuant to order made Monday, January 25, 2021, the House proceeded to the taking of the deferred recorded division on the motion of Mr. Julian (New Westminster—Burnaby), seconded by Mr. Boulerice (Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie), — That Bill C-213, An Act to enact the Canada Pharmacare Act, be now read a second time and referred to the Standing Committee on Health.
The question was put on the motion and it was negatived on the following division:
(Division No. 57 -- Vote no 57) - View vote details.
YEAS: 32, NAYS: 295
2021-02-17 [p.536]
— by Mr. Cannings (South Okanagan—West Kootenay), one concerning justice (No. 432-00518);
2021-02-17 [p.536]
The House resumed consideration of the motion of Mr. Julian (New Westminster—Burnaby), seconded by Mr. Boulerice (Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie), — That Bill C-213, An Act to enact the Canada Pharmacare Act, be now read a second time and referred to the Standing Committee on Health.
The debate continued.
2021-02-05 [p.512]
Pursuant to Standing Orders 68(2) and 69(1), on motion of Mr. Julian (New Westminster—Burnaby), seconded by Ms. Collins (Victoria), Bill C-266, An Act regarding the right to know when products contain toxic substances, was introduced, read the first time, ordered to be printed and ordered for a second reading at the next sitting of the House.
2021-02-04 [p.505]
Pursuant to Standing Orders 68(2) and 69(1), on motion of Mr. Johns (Courtenay—Alberni), seconded by Mr. Duvall (Hamilton Mountain), Bill C-264, An Act to amend the Income Tax Act (volunteer firefighting and search and rescue volunteer services), was introduced, read the first time, ordered to be printed and ordered for a second reading at the next sitting of the House.
2021-02-04 [p.506]
— by Mr. Boulerice (Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie), one concerning foreign affairs (No. 432-00483);
2021-02-04 [p.506]
— by Mr. Johns (Courtenay—Alberni), one concerning taxation (No. 432-00484);
2021-02-04 [p.506]
— by Ms. Ashton (Churchill—Keewatinook Aski), one concerning justice (No. 432-00487).
2021-01-28 [p.475]
— by Mr. Johns (Courtenay—Alberni), one concerning Indigenous affairs (No. 432-00451);
2021-01-27 [p.472]
The House resumed consideration of the motion of Mr. Scarpaleggia (Lac-Saint-Louis), seconded by Mr. Ellis (Bay of Quinte), — That the Standing Committee on Environment and Sustainable Development be instructed to undertake a comprehensive study of federal policies and legislation relating to freshwater, and more specifically focusing on: (a) the key legislative instruments of federal freshwater policy, including but not limited to the Canada Water Act, the Fisheries Act, the Migratory Birds Convention Act, the Canadian Navigable Waters Act, the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, and the Impact Assessment Act; (b) the key organizational components of federal freshwater policy, including but not limited to Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Health Canada, Natural Resources Canada, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Infrastructure Canada, Transport Canada, Public Safety Canada, Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada, Indigenous Services Canada, and Global Affairs Canada; (c) the relationship between the federal government and the provinces, territories, Indigenous peoples, and local governments relating to freshwater protection and management; (d) various international treaties governing Canada's freshwater interests and obligations; (e) present and future research needs relating to freshwater management and protection; (f) the pressures on Canada's freshwater resources, including with respect to climate change, flooding and drought; and (g) the creation of a Canada Water Agency; and that the committee (i) begin its study no later than 30 days after the adoption of this motion, (ii) schedule no fewer than 10 meetings, (iii) report its findings and recommendations to the House within one year following the adoption of this motion; (Private Members' Business M-34)
And of the amendment of Ms. Collins (Victoria), seconded by Mr. Davies (Vancouver Kingsway), — That the motion be amended by deleting subsection (i) and by replacing the words “(ii) schedule no fewer than 10 meetings, (iii)” with the words “(i) schedule no fewer than seven meetings, (ii)”.
The debate continued.
2021-01-25 [p.434]
Q-230 — Mr. Davies (Vancouver Kingsway) — With regard to the federal tobacco control strategy for fiscal year 2019-20: (a) what was the budget for the strategy; (b) how much of that budget was spent within the fiscal year; (c) how much was spent on each component of the strategy, specifically, (i) mass media, (ii) policy and regulatory development, (iii) research, (iv) surveillance, (v) enforcement, (vi) grants and contributions, (vii) programs for Indigenous Canadians; (d) were any other activities not listed in (c) funded by the strategy and, if so, how much was spent on each of these activities; and (e) was part of the budget reallocated for purposes other than tobacco control and, if so, how much was reallocated? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-230.
2021-01-25 [p.447]
Q-296 — Mr. Boulerice (Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie) — With regard to investments in Canada Revenue Agency tax compliance measures to crack down on international tax evasion, since the 2016–17 fiscal year, broken down by fiscal year: (a) how many auditors specializing in foreign accounts have been hired; (b) how many audits have been conducted; (c) how many notices of assessment have been sent; (d) what was the amount recovered; (e) how many cases were referred to the Public Prosecution Service of Canada; and (f) how many criminal charges have been laid? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-296.
2021-01-25 [p.447]
Q-297 — Mr. Boulerice (Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie) — With regard to the design and implementation of programs and spending measures relating to COVID-19, broken down by program and spending measure: (a) have contracts been awarded to private-sector suppliers and, if so, how many; and (b) what are the details for each contract in (a), including the (i) date the contract was awarded, (ii) description of goods or services, (iii) volume, (iv) final contract amount, (v) supplier, (vi) country of the supplier? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-297.
2021-01-25 [p.447]
Q-300 — Mr. Julian (New Westminster—Burnaby) — With regard to the temporary suspension of some programs and services of the Canada Revenue Agency, since the month of March 2020: (a) what is the name of each suspended program and service; and (b) for each program and service in (a), what is the (i) suspension date and resumption date, (ii) what are the reasons for the suspension? — Sessional Paper No. 8555-432-300.
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