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Results: 16 - 30 of 429
View Sonia Sidhu Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Thank you to all of the witnesses for being here today and for all of the hard work you are doing on the front line.
My first question is for Dr. Lucas.
Dr. Lucas, while PCR tests are the gold standard, rapid tests are important tools in our arsenal and so far the federal government has provided millions of rapid tests to provinces and territories. How many rapid tests have been procured for the provinces and territories? How many have been procured for Ontario?
View Sonia Sidhu Profile
Lib. (ON)
What role can rapid tests play in certain high-mobility settings? How can provinces and territories use them effectively?
View Sonia Sidhu Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you.
The next question is for Dr. Tam.
Dr. Tam, you talked about community-based approaches. I'm from Brampton in the Peel region, and about 60% of the adult population have received a first dose. It's now being made available to anyone over the age of 12. The vaccine has been made available through alternative clinics, such as those targeting specific culture groups for people working high-risk workplaces.
Can you speak to the importance of these alternative clinics in the efforts to reach all the population?
View Sonia Sidhu Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you.
The next question is for Mr. Matthews. The government said back in December that every Canadian who wanted a vaccine would be fully vaccinated by September. How many doses have been administered so far, and how many people have been vaccinated? Do you believe that we are on track to meet this goal?
View Sonia Sidhu Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you.
To Dr. Lucas, how does Canada compare with the United States and comparable countries in the G7 and G20 in terms of vaccination rates?
View Sonia Sidhu Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
My question is for Mr. Stewart or Dr. Tam.
There's a concern among Canadians about the effectiveness of vaccines against the variants of concern, based on real world data.
Can you tell us about the effectiveness of vaccines against the variants of concern?
View Sonia Sidhu Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you.
Dr. Tam, you talked about communication being the key. You mentioned some of the initiatives you are working on to increase vaccine updates, such as connecting to Canadians through social media. The federal government recently launched an advertising campaign on vaccinations and their benefits called the “Ripple Effect” campaign.
What can you tell us about the message this campaign hopes to share with Canadians across the country?
View Sonia Sidhu Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you.
We heard that approximately 58% of adults have received at least one dose, with that number continuing to climb.
My question is to Mr. Matthews.
How does our vaccine procurement portfolio ensure that we are able to provide so many vaccines in such a short amount of time?
View Sonia Sidhu Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you, Madam Chair.
It is important for me to speak today. As a member of the Standing Committee on the Status of Women, I know how serious the issue we are discussing here is.
Here's the main point: I believe we have to go above politics here and focus on survivors. I'm disappointed to see the politicization of this issue. It's so hurtful, Madam Chair.
View Sonia Sidhu Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you, Madam Chair, for giving me the opportunity.
It is so important for me to speak today. As a member of the Standing Committee on the Status of Women, I know how serious this issue is that we're discussing here today.
Here's the main point: I believe we have to go above politics here and focus on survivors. I'm disappointed to see the politicization of this issue. It is so hurtful, Madam Chair.
Since March we have been conducting our own study on the same issue, following up on another study that we conducted in 2019. So far we have had eight meetings and heard from 36 witnesses, including the Minister of National Defence, Justice Deschamps, senior CF officials, law enforcement and over a dozen survivors of sexual assault in the military.
These stories have been difficult to listen to, and I heartily commend all the survivors for coming forward. Having heard from the witnesses in FEWO, I agree that we need to work with the witnesses and work with the survivors, not play politics. Madam Chair, let me be clear: The survivors need solutions, not politics.
First I want to focus on the solution, Madam Chair. I have been encouraged by the amount of political will shown by the government, including the Prime Minister, the Minister of National Defence, and my friend the parliamentary secretary, who joined us in these meetings in FEWO in their sincere commitment to reform the culture of the armed forces and to better support survivors.
When the minister appeared on March 23, he acknowledged that a great deal of work needs to be done. He said:
Sexual misconduct, harassment and inappropriate behaviour are not acceptable. We must call them out for what they are: an abuse of power. Such behaviour is contrary to our values as Canadians and harmful to the Canadian Forces operational effectiveness. We want to prevent it. We want to be there for survivors and their support networks. We want to ensure that those who come forward feel safe, supported and confident that they will be heard when they report sexual misconduct and harassment.
There is obviously more work to be done, but the government has taken several key steps to ending sexual misconduct in the armed forces as part of Operation Honour. We have passed a declaration of victims' rights, created the sexual misconduct response centre, and the government is implementing the Path to Dignity and Respect, a strategy for long-term culture change to eliminate sexual misconduct within the Canadian Armed Forces.
Following this, the Government of Canada initiated an independent external comprehensive review led by former Supreme Court Justice Louise Arbour. This review will look into harassment and sexual misconduct in the CF and will examine policies, procedures, programs, practices and culture within national defence and make recommendations for improvement.
The minister said:
Eliminating all forms of misconduct and abuse of power and creating a safe work environment for everyone in the defence team has always been a top priority for me as Minister of National Defence. However, recent media reports show that many members of the Canadian Armed Forces still do not feel safe to come forward. We know we must do more to make sure that every Canadian Armed Forces member feels safe to come forward and that we will be ready to support them when they do.
He went on to say:
Beyond the SMRC, members can also reach out to chaplain services, military family resource centres, the employee assistance program and the family information line....
and continued:
These resources are critical to supporting those affected by sexual misconduct, but they are just part of our larger efforts to build a safe and inclusive workplace for all members of our defence team. We're working to eliminate the toxic masculinity that forms part of our military culture and keeps us from moving forward, the outdated and toxic traditions that valorize toughness and aggression over emotional intelligence and co-operation, and any part of our culture that contributes to bullying, harassment and other inappropriate behaviours.
In our committee we made a conscious choice to keep the study survivor-centric. We recognized that we are not investigators, and it is not our place to risk interfering in investigations. The goal was not to look backward and find out who knew what and when, although all of those questions have been repeatedly and clearly answered in this committee. As a legislative committee, the goal was to make recommendations that would improve conditions for women in the Canadian Armed Forces going forward.
It was encouraging to hear that work has already begun on this issue. When I asked Lieutenant-General Wayne Eyre, he said he had spoken directly to survivors in the short time since he became the acting chief of the defence staff. He said that many had reached out to him and that he had carefully listened to their stories. He said the following:
One thing that is apparent to me is that we need to bring in some mechanism whereby survivors can achieve closure, perhaps where they don't necessarily want to follow a legal process. I am very keen to learn more and to see the wider restorative engagement efforts as part of a final settlement coming and perhaps as a learning opportunity to bring in some form of reconciliation process. There's much more to learn here.
Madam Chair, once again, the issue we're discussing is heartbreaking. We have to be asking questions. How can we help the survivors? As I've heard from my colleagues today, these questions are being asked by some members on the committee. I encourage everyone to focus on survivors and culture change in the Canadian Armed Forces.
Thank you, Madam Chair.
View Sonia Sidhu Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you, Madam Chair.
Thank you to the witnesses for being here.
I believe that our study needs to be focused on the survivor's perspective, so, Dr. West, thank you for your sensitive testimony.
My question is for Dr. West.
What gaps presently exist throughout the reporting process, and what do you think could be done better to close them?
View Sonia Sidhu Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you, Dr. West. Your input is very valuable to us.
The next question is for General Carignan.
What is your vision for your new role as the chief of professional conduct and culture?
View Sonia Sidhu Profile
Lib. (ON)
To follow up, General Carignan, what are the immediate and long-term steps that you will be taking to ensure meaningful and long-lasting culture change in the Canadian Armed Forces and the Department of National Defence?
View Sonia Sidhu Profile
Lib. (ON)
Thank you, Madam Chair.
Thank you to all the witnesses for being with us, and thank you for your testimony.
My question is for Ms. Campbell.
What is presently being done to support the retention of midwives across Canada?
View Sonia Sidhu Profile
Lib. (ON)
How do you think the two levels of government can better collaborate when it comes to the midwifery program? Do you have examples from other federated countries?
I would ask both of you to speak on that.
Results: 16 - 30 of 429 | Page: 2 of 29

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