Committee
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 60 of 5476
View Kody Blois Profile
Lib. (NS)
View Kody Blois Profile
2021-06-15 15:33
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
As you know, last week we were unable to meet because of the resources available to the committees as the extension of sittings in the House has continued, so we had conversations. I sent an email to my colleagues on Friday, expressing that I thought it was important to finish all three of the panels we had agreed upon and move to clause-by-clause on Thursday. I've had conversations with Ms. Rood, Mr. MacGregor and Mr. Perron, and I'll now move:
That, notwithstanding the motions adopted by the committee on Tuesday, May 11, 2021, regarding Bill C-205, an act to amend the Health of Animals Act, the witnesses that were scheduled to appear on Thursday, June 10, 2021 be rescheduled to Tuesday, June 15, 2021; that clause-by-clause consideration of this bill commence on Thursday, June 17, 2021; and that amendments be submitted to the clerk of the committee no later than 12:00 p.m. (EDT) on Wednesday, June 16, 2021.
That is the text of the motion. I believe it has been distributed to my colleagues.
Mr. Chair, I would also say to my colleagues as we go to vote on this, that given the conversations I've had with my colleagues, I understand the clerk has prepared for the adoption of this motion, and I would ask that we go forward with that at this time.
Thank you.
View Kody Blois Profile
Lib. (NS)
View Kody Blois Profile
2021-06-15 15:36
I thank Ms. Rood. We want to focus on getting this bill back to the House, and my hope is that we'll be able to do that concretely once we finish up on Thursday.
I would note that Mr. Komal is here from the CFIA. My understanding, and the clerk can explain this, is that there were supposed to be two witnesses for the first panel. I think it was Ms. Lazare who was unable to be here today.
If it pleases the committee and the other members, perhaps if Mr. Komal is willing, he could sit and be available. I believe he has testified. If that goes against what the committee wants, it certainly will not proceed in that way, or if that's what Mr. Komal doesn't want either. However, given the fact that he was here on the basis that the motion might or might not have passed, he does have some expertise from CFIA. If not, I'm happy just to proceed with what the clerk has available.
View Kody Blois Profile
Lib. (NS)
View Kody Blois Profile
2021-06-15 16:17
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Thank you, Dr. Pritchard, for providing great testimony here today.
I know you don't have the legislation in front of you, but for my colleagues and for you, right now there are provisions under the Health of Animals Act regarding notice forbidding entry, which is basically, as we have talked about and Mr. MacGregor mentioned, the signage and the biosecurity risks that are already highlighted.
There is a prohibition under the act that already says:
No person shall knowingly enter a building or other enclosed place in contravention of a notice affixed under this section, unless the person has a right of entry or way into the building or place or any part thereof or an inspector or officer has authorized the entry.
That language is very similar to what we have here in Mr. Barlow's bill, and the penalties under the act are very similar. You just said that sometimes it's about the will to enforce the provisions. Do you think that perhaps we just need to try to have more will to enforce what might already be in the act?
View Kody Blois Profile
Lib. (NS)
View Kody Blois Profile
2021-06-15 16:19
Was that the federal government?
View Kody Blois Profile
Lib. (NS)
View Kody Blois Profile
2021-06-15 16:20
I know you don't have the act in front of you. I think we as a committee will have to reflect on whether or not there have to be clear instructions regarding the provisions that might already be in there.
You mentioned in your testimony earlier that you had conversations with some animal and health care groups as part of your background and your history. What impression did you get from those conversations about the activists' knowledge that they might be putting biosecurity at risk by going on a farm?
Obviously, as much as I might not intrinsically agree with some of the ideology, some activists think that this is something that's beneficial to the animals. You've mentioned the harm that can occur. How adept are these particular organizations or individuals at knowing that they are indeed putting biosecurity at risk when they carry out these particular acts?
View Kody Blois Profile
Lib. (NS)
View Kody Blois Profile
2021-06-15 16:22
Ms. Pritchard, I'm sorry, but I have about 45 seconds.
View Kody Blois Profile
Lib. (NS)
View Kody Blois Profile
2021-06-15 16:22
No, no. It's okay. I guess what I'm hearing is that as part of the education, there's more of an awareness once people realize.
I have one final question in my last 35 seconds. You mentioned at one point that farmers are not going to do this themselves. You mentioned, of course, the intrinsic support that farmers offer one another.
Do you have any idea why there seems to be a hesitation? We've heard this from other witnesses. Why don't farmers press charges or try to encourage the authorities to use the full provisions that might be there? Do you have any comments on that for the committee?
View Andy Fillmore Profile
Lib. (NS)
View Andy Fillmore Profile
2021-06-14 17:12
I'll start by saying thanks to the witnesses and to those who have served in the CAF, and to Mrs. Moss for your service as well with dogs.
I want to start by chatting with you, Mr. Webb. I don't know if you prefer Bill, Sergeant Webb or Mr. Webb. If you give an indication, I'll follow that.
You mentioned a few things, and I know it's all clear in your head, but if you could help it get clear in our heads, that would be wonderful.
You mentioned that there are predatory trainers out there. You said that we've gone from eight dog training providers to 132, and that gives us some indication that there is some interest in the dollars. You also said that the training that your dog received is not accepted by the B.C. government for transit operators and that kind of thing. What I'm trying to understand—and forgive me—is whether the problem is that the training your dog received wasn't good enough or that provincial governments and other organizations don't accept it because it doesn't have the right stamp on it.
View Andy Fillmore Profile
Lib. (NS)
View Andy Fillmore Profile
2021-06-14 17:15
You feel that the Canada General Standards Board's attempt failed because there were some predatory training organizations.
View Andy Fillmore Profile
Lib. (NS)
View Andy Fillmore Profile
2021-06-14 17:16
I see that.
View Andy Fillmore Profile
Lib. (NS)
View Andy Fillmore Profile
2021-06-14 17:16
View Andy Fillmore Profile
Lib. (NS)
View Andy Fillmore Profile
2021-06-14 17:17
Thank you both.
View Darrell Samson Profile
Lib. (NS)
Thank you, Chair, and thank you for your service, all of you, and for the excellent presentations you made today.
It's only been four meetings, but it seems as though we've had info from all different angles, and sometimes I have questions.
On July 20, 1969, we went to the moon, and in 2021, we still can't establish standards. That's unbelievable. We've got to get through this, and we've got to get through this as quickly as we can to support our veterans in their communities. It's got to be a top priority as we move forward.
Mr. Webb, I really enjoyed your presentation. It was very factual, clear and concise, but I'd like you to expand.
Throughout the last two or three years, really, it's been evident that the service provider seems to have been the cause of the.... The Canadian General Standards Board was the problem. You seem to make that clear.
Mr. Webb, if you were the decision-maker today, what would you do? How are we going to get through this? Tomorrow or next month, how are we going to have standards? You talked about getting Veterans Affairs out of there. Could you tell me in one minute how you would do this? How would you establish standards?
View Darrell Samson Profile
Lib. (NS)
Thank you. I like that. Share, and if you don't share, too bad; we move on. We've just got to cut the mustard, if you'll allow me. I know Scott would appreciate that.
When you talk about access, it kills me. I know that Nova Scotia has done some really good work about access with your service dog. Your being denied is just a sad story. That's such an important part. I'll give you 30 seconds on that one.
View Darrell Samson Profile
Lib. (NS)
View Darrell Samson Profile
Lib. (NS)
Thank you.
Monsieur Lapointe, you made the reference—and I think we've heard it right through the four meetings—that service dogs are crucial for people with PTSD and veterans with PTSD. It works. I've spoken to a number of veterans and I've seen with my own two eyes veterans with their service dogs and how it really helps them. I think we know that. Now we just have to get to the task.
Monsieur Lapointe, you brought up a couple of points. I think maybe you want to expand on them, but I really enjoyed hearing you talk about that funding insurance that the Americans are paying for, and also that veterans survey. Those two sound good. Do you want to expand on those very quickly?
View Darrell Samson Profile
Lib. (NS)
I find this idea compelling. It would involve providing insurance, as is done for a number of other things.
I was going to fire at Carl, because I really liked the passport. I hope we're—
View Chris d'Entremont Profile
CPC (NS)
Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.
To our witnesses today, welcome to the health committee.
Welcome for the second time, Mr. Labrie.
My first question is for Mr. Ahmed.
When it comes to long-term care, it continues to interest me to see how different provinces look at long-term care standards. There was a tremendous move in Nova Scotia a number of years ago to come up with a standard that makes sense. It's not necessarily included in the building codes, but it was knowing their square footage per patient and making sure there isn't an opportunity for different pathogens to go from one patient to another.
Have you looked across Canada to see who is doing this and what other provinces may not be doing it?
View Chris d'Entremont Profile
CPC (NS)
Thank you.
Ultimately, if we're all doing sort of the same things, then hopefully infection control will be maintained across the system. Whether each has an individual room and an individual bathroom—those kinds of things make a big difference to what infection control actually is within our long-term care facilities.
View Chris d'Entremont Profile
CPC (NS)
Thank you very much.
I'm going to move on to ask a few questions on the PMPRB.
Mr. Labrie, were you involved in the consultations held by the PMPRB over the past few years?
View Chris d'Entremont Profile
CPC (NS)
When they appeared before our committee, various patient associations told us that the PMPRB collaboration was neither satisfactory nor sufficient.
Did you have an opportunity to pay close attention to it?
View Chris d'Entremont Profile
CPC (NS)
In your research, did you see any forms of collaboration, or anything else, that we could draw upon to ensure that all parties are sitting at the same table and can have a useful discussion?
View Chris d'Entremont Profile
CPC (NS)
The pharmaceutical companies told us that they had already had the launch of some medicines sidelined or at least slowed down by a few years.
Is that because of the regulations being considered or the uncertain outcome of the discussion that has been going on for three years already?
View Chris d'Entremont Profile
CPC (NS)
Thank you.
View Sean Fraser Profile
Lib. (NS)
View Sean Fraser Profile
2021-06-10 17:04
How much time do I have, Chair?
View Sean Fraser Profile
Lib. (NS)
View Sean Fraser Profile
2021-06-10 17:04
I may not need it, and I apologize in advance if I ask a question that's already been asked, as I did not participate in the first few segments of the meeting.
I will put a question to our officials.
The Finance Minister, as part of conversations with her G7 counterparts, has recently made news over the issue of a proposed agreement to establish a global minimum corporate tax rate at 15%, which is Canada's federal rate of corporate tax today.
I'm curious whether you can shed some light on the impact that kind of multilateral agreement will have on business practices, where multinationals are trying to shift the income from one jurisdiction to another, without shifting the work, in order to avoid tax that otherwise would properly be paid in a country like Canada.
View Sean Fraser Profile
Lib. (NS)
View Sean Fraser Profile
2021-06-10 17:08
This may have been asked, given the stakeholders some of us have probably met with before. I'm just curious. I heard previously from union representatives for public employees who work in this space, who indicated that the lack of human resources in the regional offices at CRA is a barrier to enforcement. Do you agree with that point of view, and what do you think could be done to actually beef up CRA levels on the ground to help combat tax evasion?
View Lenore Zann Profile
Lib. (NS)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Minister Bennett, I have a number of questions I'd like to ask you in a short amount of time.
First of all, I want to say thank you for all of your hard work. I know it's not easy to change everything that has happened overnight.
Here in Nova Scotia, the Sipekne'katik First Nation community has already started to search with an archeological team on the grounds of the former residential school there. We are hoping that no bodies are found, but they believe there were 16 children who died, and they had already started looking last weekend.
The National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation has listed these names, and the search will be led by archeologists of St. Mary's and the Mi'kmaq cultural heritage curator, Roger Lewis, who is also a member of Sipekne'katik First Nation. These are the types of things that obviously need to be done in order to find truth and reconciliation with indigenous peoples across Canada.
Given the possibility of police investigations that involve criminal behaviour in some of these situations, what impact do you think police investigations will have on the current and future community-led investigations?
View Lenore Zann Profile
Lib. (NS)
I totally agree, and I think the sad part is that many of the stories are anecdotal, people remembering things, people remembering when somebody ran away and then was beaten or disappeared.
It's heartbreaking, and I'm sure you have been going through a lot yourself with all of this latest news. Truth and reconciliation has unearthed so much information and there is just so much more to be addressed, and it is very disturbing for residential school survivors and their families to be retraumatized with all of this news.
Minister, you've said that the $27 million in funding to support communities is flexible, so can you explain exactly what kinds of activities or initiatives would be eligible under this program?
View Jaime Battiste Profile
Lib. (NS)
Thank you for joining us, Minister.
Sitting here listening to the questions, I can't help but reflect. I've been in first nation advocacy and leadership for 20 years, and I remember a time when all of the issues related to indigenous people were under one minister. Now we have two, and you could add Minister Vandal as a third. I couldn't imagine a time as we progress where the fact that we have two ministers would not, to me, be a great thing and a good thing moving forward in terms of making sure that we have a lot of different people looking at the important issues of indigenous people in Canada.
I also want to thank you for your speech in the House during the debate on how we move forward past the findings out in the Kamloops Indian Residential School, the 215 children's bodies. I thought it was very powerful when you spoke the names. I did some smudging in my house when you were talking about those names, and I really thought that was powerful.
All across the country, we have communities grieving, and we have communities triggered by the findings. In my community, we have a crisis centre, Eskasoni crisis centre, and they've been having a sacred fire outside and helping survivors who need to talk and helping people. It really shows the importance of and reason for continuing to fund mental health.
I want to get a sense from you. Can you speak to the need and some of the supports that we're offering for mental health in first nations communities across Canada?
View Jaime Battiste Profile
Lib. (NS)
Minister, I don't have a lot of time, so I'll try to be brief with this question. The Eskasoni crisis centre in my community has been looking for funding. I'm not asking for funding, but do you feel the best approaches towards mental health in communities are the ones that are community-based and culturally relevant and that promote the languages in the various first nations across Canada?
Please answer in 30 seconds. Thank you.
View Lenore Zann Profile
Lib. (NS)
View Darren Fisher Profile
Lib. (NS)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
I was going to say what Joël said. I thought we had sort of agreed, on behalf of the Bloc Québécois, that we would do the border.
Also, Mr. Chair, Mr. Harris moved his motion really, really quickly. I'm looking to see if it came by email. I don't know whether he has to submit in English and French when he's doing it from the floor. Perhaps he doesn't have to. I know that Madam Normandin would probably appreciate seeing it in French, especially if it's going to replace something that this committee agreed to, as a request by the Bloc.
I'm not certain I have a lot of interest in supporting this unless we have time to actually discuss it.
View Kody Blois Profile
Lib. (NS)
View Kody Blois Profile
2021-06-08 15:58
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Thank you to our witnesses for their testimony here today.
The big take-away, from what I've heard as a member of this committee, is that there's huge power in looking at the natural solutions that are offered and the work that farmers can continue in this space and, of course, augment within their existing practices.
My first question is for Farmers Edge and Mr. Barnes.
I had the opportunity to visit your website—very well indeed. One of the titles is “Enrich Soil and Your Bank Account”, and you spoke to this in some of your testimony. I assume that you're working directly with farmers to create programming to enable them to verify some of their results such that they can take advantage of some of the corporate opportunities that are out there and, of course, the offset by ECCC in the days ahead. Is that fair?
View Kody Blois Profile
Lib. (NS)
View Kody Blois Profile
2021-06-08 16:00
Okay.
I want to get into verification. When I have conversations with stakeholders across the country, that becomes a big piece. Obviously, your company is in that space. I presume there are others who might also be in that realm in the private sector.
Do you see it as government's role to play a helping hand with farmers, or is this something that the private sector can take a leading role in, in terms of the verification of farmers' meeting some of these protocols, to take advantage of these opportunities?
View Kody Blois Profile
Lib. (NS)
View Kody Blois Profile
2021-06-08 16:01
Mr. Barnes, beyond the regulatory approach of actually auditing the pieces, it's the tools, on farm, for farmers to be able to illustrate some of this work that you're talking about.
I hear you on the regulatory piece, but in terms of the actual tools on farm, is that best delivered by private companies like yours that can help digitize some of this, or does government have a role in incentivizing that behaviour?
View Kody Blois Profile
Lib. (NS)
View Kody Blois Profile
2021-06-08 16:02
Okay.
Mr. Gilvesy, I appreciate your testimony. One of the things you talked about is that we need to make sure there is technical advice in our local communities. You obviously highlighted the work that ALUS is doing in that domain. If there isn't an ALUS, let's say, perhaps in my own community in Nova Scotia, how do we make sure that the technical expertise exists? What advice would you have for government to ensure that happens?
There was a lot in the budget and the fall economic statement around supporting the types of efforts that you're undertaking as an organization, but how do we get that expertise such that, if I am a farmer, I can turn to someone if there is no ALUS in my backyard?
View Kody Blois Profile
Lib. (NS)
View Kody Blois Profile
Lib. (NS)
View Kody Blois Profile
2021-06-08 16:04
Okay.
Mr. Barnes, I want to go back to you with one more question. I have about 45 seconds as per my clock.
You talked about BRM, and of course, you mentioned the United States using their crop insurance program to incentivize that digitization. I heard from your comments more that this is not only good for the environment, but it can include reduced risks by shoring up margins and protecting the overall viability of farms.
Is that what you were getting at in your comments?
View Kody Blois Profile
Lib. (NS)
View Kody Blois Profile
2021-06-08 16:04
Thank you very much.
I think that's my time, Mr. Chair.
View Kody Blois Profile
Lib. (NS)
View Kody Blois Profile
2021-06-08 11:22
Thank you, Madam Chair, and thank you to our witnesses for appearing before our committee again. You've been very generous with your time. Obviously we have a role as parliamentarians to hold the government to account, but to Mr. Sabia and Mr. Gallivan and others, we know you're busy trying to drive government programming today as well.
Perhaps I'll just continue with Mr. Gallivan, because he was answering some of the questions from Mr. Lawrence. Mr. Lawrence was talking about some of the early projections or numbers relating to the CEWS program and some of the concerns around the uncertainty that existed.
Is it fair to say that the numbers that were being quoted on those pages were from the early midst of the pandemic, when there was a lot of uncertainty about the extent of the economic harm that could have been caused to the economy and also about what this was going to represent for small businesses across the country?
View Kody Blois Profile
Lib. (NS)
View Kody Blois Profile
2021-06-08 11:24
Okay. That's helpful in terms of the date.
I think all parliamentarians can appreciate the nuance of not knowing every month how the health response was going to pan out across the country and how that would really dictate some of the viability of those small businesses and their ability to pay back the money that the government was trying to provide to bridge businesses through to the other side of this pandemic. Based on the vaccine rollout and the way we're moving forward, that will be relatively soon, hopefully.
Obviously we're talking about the report from the Auditor General about the wage subsidy, so I had the ability to go back. Of course, as parliamentarians, we only get a short time to ask questions—five or six minutes per round—so I want to revisit some of the elements that were in that report. One of the recommendations was recommendation 7.35, which talked about a full auditing and accounting of these programs.
Again, as Mr. Sabia mentioned in his remarks, these programs are still ongoing, at least until September. I understand that there's a legislative authority to extend them if necessary. Hopefully, that won't be the case. Can you speak to the full accounting? I presume that work may already be started, but it's going to be largely finished once the actual program winds up in September, presumably.
Maybe that's a question for Mr. Sabia.
View Kody Blois Profile
Lib. (NS)
View Kody Blois Profile
2021-06-08 11:27
Thank you, Mr. Sabia.
I'll move to Mr. Hamilton.
I don't have the blues right in front of me, but one thing that caught my interest last time was that a lot of committee members were talking about social insurance numbers and whether that was something we could tie in to make sure there was an accounting. I know the government systems are complex. Even department to department, there is not always perfect harmony between the systems that we operate. Certainly, I know that the government is working to be able to bridge those gaps.
Can you speak about the nuances and what your perspective was and what you remember back during this time in late March, early April, when things were really changing day by day? Every time that we put a particular nuance on a program, I presume it could slow the program in its response even by a day or two, depending on the nature of said nuance, as we try to make sure we have that accounting in place.
View Kody Blois Profile
Lib. (NS)
View Kody Blois Profile
2021-06-08 12:56
Madam Chair, I have four minutes on my clock right now. Our translators do a tremendous job, and we should give them a four-minute break to stretch their legs and get a coffee. I thank them for the work they do.
View Mike Kelloway Profile
Lib. (NS)
Thank you, Chair.
Hello, colleagues.
I'd like to say a special thank you to the witnesses for some important testimony today.
Before I begin, I just want to say that my heart and the hearts of all the people in my riding of Cape Breton—Canso go out to the victims of the shooting in London, Ontario, and their families. It is an immense tragedy.
Dr. Wemmers, the night of April 18 into the morning of April 19, my province, Nova Scotia, fell victim to a horrific tragedy that is known as the worst mass shooting in Canada's history. The gunman entered 16 small rural communities across my province, killing 22 people and injuring three others, including members of the RCMP. It's an exceptionally sad, sad chapter in Nova Scotian and Canadian history. Just 10 days after this tragedy, our government announced an immediate ban on some 1,500 makes and models of military-grade, assault-style weapons.
I think we all know that victims who survive such violence are often left with emotional and physical trauma.
Doctor, what does this ban mean for these sorts of victims of gun violence, or victims of other forms of crime, like domestic violence? You spoke to this at some detail in your opening statement, but this is a chance for you to unpack some of those points that you made. Do you think our government could be doing more to support victims of gun violence or their families, moving forward?
View Mike Kelloway Profile
Lib. (NS)
It does. I really appreciate that feedback.
Dr. Wemmers, Bill C-51, an act to amend the Criminal Code and the Department of Justice Act and to make consequential amendments to another act, recently amended the Criminal Code to provide complainants in sexual assault cases with the right to participate and be represented in proceedings to determine the admissibility of evidence about their sexual history. Our government considers this an important change to support victims of sexual assault.
Again, along the same lines as the last one, are there further ways, through the Canadian Victims Bill of Rights or otherwise, in which our government could support victims of sexual assault?
View Mike Kelloway Profile
Lib. (NS)
Dr. Wemmers, I wrote down what you said, that “victims' rights are human rights”. I think that is profoundly impactful. It just completely resonates with me.
Is there anything else with respect to adding support beyond the compensation you referenced, and of course that victims' rights are human rights? Are there other tweaks we could look at to strengthen this? You say we're going down the right path, which is amazing and important, but what else could we be doing beyond some of the things you mentioned?
Perhaps you could take the next 30 seconds to provide us with some insight on that.
View Mike Kelloway Profile
Lib. (NS)
Thank you, Dr. Wemmers.
View Geoff Regan Profile
Lib. (NS)
I call this meeting to order.
Welcome to meeting number 28 of the Special Committee on Canada-China Relations. Pursuant to the order of reference of Wednesday, September 23, 2020, the committee is meeting on its study of Canada-China relations.
Pursuant to the motion adopted by the House on January 25, 2021, this meeting is in hybrid format.
I would like to welcome Marc Garneau, Minister of Foreign Affairs.
Thank you for being here this evening, Mr. Garneau.
I'd also like to welcome your officials from the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development, or, as we know it, Global Affairs Canada: Marta Morgan, deputy minister; Daniel Costello, assistant deputy minister, international security; and Weldon Epp, director general, North Asia and Oceania bureau.
Thanks to all of you for being here.
Minister Garneau, please proceed with your opening remarks. You have five minutes.
View Geoff Regan Profile
Lib. (NS)
Excuse me, Minister, but your five minutes are up. We need to start the first round of questions.
Thank you very much.
I turn now for our first round to Mr. Chong for six minutes, please.
View Geoff Regan Profile
Lib. (NS)
Thank you, Mr. Chong.
We'll go now to Ms. Yip for six minutes, please.
View Geoff Regan Profile
Lib. (NS)
Minister, I'm sorry. We'll have to wait for the other three C's, because Ms. Yip is out of time.
Mr. Bergeron, you have the floor for six minutes.
View Geoff Regan Profile
Lib. (NS)
Thank you very much, Mr. Bergeron.
We'll now go to Mr. Harris, for six minutes.
View Geoff Regan Profile
Lib. (NS)
Thank you very much, Mr. Harris.
View Geoff Regan Profile
Lib. (NS)
We will now begin the second round of questions.
Mr. Paul-Hus, you have the floor for five minutes.
View Geoff Regan Profile
Lib. (NS)
Thank you very much. Forgive me for interrupting you.
Mr. Dubourg, you now have the floor for five minutes.
View Geoff Regan Profile
Lib. (NS)
Thank you very much, Mr. Dubourg.
Mr. Bergeron, go ahead for two and a half minutes.
View Geoff Regan Profile
Lib. (NS)
Unfortunately we don't have time, as the 10 and a half minutes are up.
View Geoff Regan Profile
Lib. (NS)
I may be to blame. I did not express myself well.
Now we will go to Mr. Harris for two minutes and 30 seconds, please.
View Geoff Regan Profile
Lib. (NS)
Thank you.
Results: 1 - 60 of 5476 | Page: 1 of 92

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
>
>|
Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data