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Results: 1 - 60 of 14466
View John Barlow Profile
CPC (AB)
View John Barlow Profile
2021-06-15 15:46
Thank you, Mr. Chair. Thank you, Ms. Pritchard. Don't feel any pressure whatsoever that you are literally in the spotlight for the next hour. Certainly, it's great to have somebody with your experience and knowledge in this field to provide us with some great insights.
I wanted to touch on some of the things we've heard so far and to get your opinion on what you feel is possible. We heard from CFIA officials that Bill C-205 would be difficult to implement and enforce due to current resources.
You talked about the avian flu that was in the Fraser Valley in 2014, and we've seen the impact of BSE and the concerns with African swine fever. I also kind of tie it back to COVID, where, if we've learned anything, it's that when you prioritize something from government officials and they're given the right direction and adequate resources, you can overcome some obstacles.
Do you feel that with the right resources, and understanding the potential risk that is there with the right priorities, Bill C-205 could be implemented and enforced?
View John Barlow Profile
CPC (AB)
View John Barlow Profile
2021-06-15 15:49
Thank you for that.
I want to go back to the last comment you made in your introduction about these acts being nothing short of cruel, and that you want to support anything that would address the stress, mental health and anxiety issues that this has on a farm family and processors, but also on the animals themselves.
How important is it, Dr. Pritchard, in your opinion and in your experience, that the federal government show some leadership here and have this type of legislation that would, if anything, act as a deterrent and show those activist groups that there are consequences when they do not follow biosecurity protocol and they cross that line, going onto private property and into enclosed spaces to do this unlawful activity? How important is it for the federal government to show leadership here and have those deterrents in place?
View John Barlow Profile
CPC (AB)
View John Barlow Profile
2021-06-15 15:51
Yes, I think that's something we've certainly spoken about at this committee. Some provinces, like B.C. for example, are in the process of putting in legislation to address trespassing, but in B.C. and Manitoba, it hasn't passed yet. Alberta and Ontario, from my understanding, are the only two, so you have no consistency across the country, which I think is why this is so important.
You've also touched on the fact that.... One of the instances we had was a group of protesters going from a hog farm in Abbotsford to a turkey farm in Alberta. From your experience, can you just explain what the risks are of these protesters going from one farm to another—this was within a couple of days—potentially harming animals but also spreading infectious diseases or other dangerous bacteria or viruses?
View Michael Cooper Profile
CPC (AB)
Thank you very much, Madam Chair.
I move:
That, pursuant to Standing Order 108(2), the committee conduct a study of at least one committee meeting to review judicial appointments and the process utilized by this government including the use of the government’s partisan database known as “Liberalist”; the committee should invite the Minister of Justice to appear; and that the committee report its findings to the House.
That is my motion.
View Michael Cooper Profile
CPC (AB)
I will circulate it to the members.
View Michael Cooper Profile
CPC (AB)
Thank you, Madam Chair.
I think that over the last number of months there have been allegations that have been substantiated about political interference directed by the PMO with respect to the appointment of judges. Those allegations surfaced last year, first by François Landry, a political aide who worked directly on the judicial appointment process in the office of the Minister of Justice, David Lametti.
Emails of his surfaced that warned of partisan considerations that have created the “potential for a scandal”. He later publicly denounced those practices and noted that they “raised serious ethical issues.”
Former attorney general Jody Wilson-Raybould validated those concerns of political interference directed by the PMO when she noted, “During my time as minister, there were people in the centre, the Prime Minister's Office, other ministers, Liberal partisans, who would take great interest in the appointments process”.
She went on to say, “There is a sense that some people still carry that appointments, whether they be to the bench or otherwise, that you can curry favour if you are a partisan or if you have done something to benefit the party”. That is, of course, the Liberal Party.
Last fall questions arose over the appointment of Philippe Bélanger to the Quebec Superior Court, who, in 2014, donated $1,400 to Minister Lametti's nomination campaign and another $1,500 in 2018 to Minister Lametti's Liberal riding association of LaSalle—Émard—Verdun. That's almost $3,000 donated to the minister's riding association and nomination campaign, and then suddenly there was an appointment to the Quebec Superior Court.
The minister has said that there was no partisanship in his decision-making process. He has claimed that only he has made recommendations as to who is appointed to the bench, but it turns out that simply is not true. We have received confirmation and reports, as of last week, that, in fact, the Liberal Party's donor base Liberalist was routinely used by the PMO. This is a list of Liberal Party members, supporters, volunteers and donors.
This raises questions about whether certain candidates for appointment were being given preferential treatment. In other words, the chances of being appointed to the bench increase based upon who you know and how much you donate to the Liberal Party of Canada. The fact that a private list was being used for the purpose of making public appointments raises serious ethical concerns.
I note that Patrick Taillon, a professor of law at Université Laval, characterized it as “a serious problem involving duelling roles...a private party database that was used in the government's decision-making process.”
Similarly, it was denounced by the Canadian Bar Association, when the allegations first surfaced, in a letter of November 6 that said that the federal process is “open to speculation about political interference” and that, “By continuing a process that is open to speculation about political interference, the government risks eroding the confidence of the public in the independence and fairness of the justice system itself”.
Madam Chair, Canadians deserve to know that the judges who are appointed are the best qualified to serve on the bench. They deserve to know that candidates are not being preferred or that the scales are not being tilted in favour of certain candidates based upon how much they donated to the Liberal Party of Canada.
At the very least there is a perception that the process has been tainted by politics, that it has not been fair, that it has not been transparent and that it has been entirely politicized. On that basis, I think it is entirely appropriate that we convene at least one meeting to investigate, to inquire, to call the minister before us so that the questions Canadians have can be addressed.
I have to say that in the face of these substantiated allegations the minister has been less than forthcoming and less than transparent. He has more or less tried to deny that anything untoward took place, and said that, no, Liberalist was not being used, and that, no, partisan considerations were not involved, until the evidence continued to mount. Now we know that for six years Liberalist was used to vet 100% of candidates for judicial appointment. We further know that 25% of the judicial appointments made by this government just happen to be Liberal donors. What a coincidence.
In the House over the past week, in light of the confirmation that Liberalist has been used and now it's supposedly not being used, the minister has, instead of providing fulsome answers, instead of addressing the issue, been regurgitating talking points asserting that the process is open, transparent and fair.
Madam Chair, very simply, that isn't good enough. This committee has a responsibility to get to the bottom of exactly what happened. That starts by convening at least one hearing where we can hear from the minister.
Thank you, Madam Chair.
View Kelly McCauley Profile
CPC (AB)
I'm sorry. I had to listen to Mr. Maloney but I don't get to vote? That's horrible.
Anyway, thanks for having me for a short bit.
View Kelly McCauley Profile
CPC (AB)
Thanks, Mr. Chair.
Mr. Dyck and Mr. Guitor, thanks very much for joining us today, and thanks for your stories.
Mr. Guitor, I grew up in the hotel and restaurant business. A lot of my friends are still suffering badly from this. I'm really appreciative of the efforts you made to reach out and hire hospitality workers. Thank you very much.
Mr. Dyck, my wife used to have a wine distribution and spirits distribution business in B.C., and is still involved in the industry in Alberta. She wanted to pass on her compliments on the absinthes, bitters and fruit brandies that you do. While I'm saying that, there is a distillery in my riding, Hansen Distillery, that does incredible whiskies and moonshine. I'll give a shout-out to them at the same time.
Again, gentlemen, thanks for providing the information. I know that my colleagues on the government side as well as the NDP and the Bloc probably agree and want to move forward with this. I think you'll find some friendly faces asking questions today. Obviously, we want to see these items addressed.
I'm wondering if either one of you could let us know who you reached out to within the government.
Mr. Dyck, I think you said that you reached out several times and just heard crickets. Did you go through the procurement process, filling out the forms and applying online to sell the product? I'm just wondering where the roadblock was.
View Kelly McCauley Profile
CPC (AB)
Did anyone that you're aware of have any luck selling to the federal government ?
View Kelly McCauley Profile
CPC (AB)
Let me interrupt you there.
How much would it have cost just for your distillery, say, to convert to produce this?
View Kelly McCauley Profile
CPC (AB)
You mentioned that you heard crickets. Did people bid on contracts and then just did not hear back? We heard previously that the government was invoking security exemptions in order to sole-source contracts to companies outside of Canada. Did you hear anything?
View Kelly McCauley Profile
CPC (AB)
Especially with the amount of money you donated.
View Jag Sahota Profile
CPC (AB)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
I want to thank both of you for being here today and stepping up to the plate in a time of need. You exemplify true Canadian spirit—no pun intended—and you should be proud. I believe your testimony here today, in addition to the CBC article that came out in December, is very important. I hope it will further illuminate some very serious problems in the government's procurement practices that are consistently leaving Canadians in the dark, unless they happen to be close friends of the Prime Minister.
When the pandemic hit, he recognized the need for hand sanitizer and pivoted alcohol distilleries to meet the demand. Many distillers made and distributed sanitizer for free. While Canadian distillers were working around the clock disrupting their businesses and trying to fulfill a need for their fellow Canadians, the government was spending more than $570 million on hand sanitizer outside the country and later signed contracts with large companies here but ignored bids from these distillers who had already been producing for months.
In the CBC article, you were quoted as saying, “It really is like a sucker punch in the gut.” Can you explain what you meant by that?
View Jag Sahota Profile
CPC (AB)
Thank you, Mr. Dyck.
Your company, Okanagan Spirits Craft Distillery, spent over $200,000 donating sanitizers. You alluded to this before in your testimony and your statement saying that it cost the government twice as much, in terms of the money that was spent outside of Canada getting sanitizer while losing jobs here in Canada.
What would this local national contract have meant for distillers within the country in terms of jobs and our economy?
View Jag Sahota Profile
CPC (AB)
Mr. Guitor, do you have anything to add?
View Jag Sahota Profile
CPC (AB)
My next question is for you, Mr. Guitor.
You said that you couldn't get a contract with the federal government no matter how hard you tried. You explained some of the attempts you made. Could you elaborate on that? Did you receive any communication or explanation from the government as to why you couldn't get a contract?
View Dane Lloyd Profile
CPC (AB)
Thank you, Mr. Chair; and thank you to all the witnesses for coming out today.
I'm most interested in starting with our friends from Air Products Inc. I'm very excited to see your $1.3-billion announcement in the Alberta industrial heartland, which is partially in my riding of Sturgeon River—Parkland.
Why did your company believe the Alberta industrial heartland was the best place to make this investment? What were the factors that played into that decision?
View Dane Lloyd Profile
CPC (AB)
Drilling down into that, one thing in this part of the country is that we do have some renewable power, such as windmills and solar panels, but Alberta is very well known for its natural gas resources and those energy sources. We've been debating and talking with witnesses about the merits of blue hydrogen and grey hydrogen versus green hydrogen.
I presume you're using blue hydrogen. Did the blue hydrogen play a role in your investment decision?
View Dane Lloyd Profile
CPC (AB)
Thank you.
Something that you remarked on interested me. You were talking about the Q45 tax credit. That's something I've brought up numerous times in this committee.
Can you describe to us, with regard to the United States Q45 tax credit, the differences that concern you between that and what has been proposed in the recent budget? What would you propose that would be more helpful for your industry?
View Dane Lloyd Profile
CPC (AB)
Thank you.
My next question is for our friends from Ballard Power. I seem to be getting a theme here with this trucking job that's coming out of Alberta.
I was wondering if you could talk about how many years we are looking at before we see a significant market share for hydrogen fuel cells in large trucks in Canada. How many years do you think we are away from that?
View Dane Lloyd Profile
CPC (AB)
Thank you.
One more quick—
View Greg McLean Profile
CPC (AB)
Thank you, Mr. Chair, and thanks to all our witnesses.
The main thing I'm hearing, which I really enjoy today, is that we are talking about decarbonizing and not just shifting one polluting mechanism to another.
I'm going to drill into some of the data that Mr. Romano provided here.
First of all, Mr. Romano, how much net profit has Hyundai made in Canada these past two years?
View Greg McLean Profile
CPC (AB)
Okay. Can you share them with the committee?
View Greg McLean Profile
CPC (AB)
Okay, thank you. Would it be more or less than $25 million per year, Canada and international?
View Greg McLean Profile
CPC (AB)
The reason I ask, of course, is that you've taken $50 million in subsidies from the Canadian government in getting your vehicles on the road. I'm just trying to put this in a relevance perspective in terms of what you're contributing to your bottom line and what you're actually receiving in contribution from the Canadian government.
View Greg McLean Profile
CPC (AB)
Okay. Thank you very much. It's much appreciated.
There's an issue around CAFE standards, which of course were stalled by many administrations in the United States, and Canada follows the U.S. on these CAFE standards. Twenty years ago, if we'd stuck to our CAFE standards, would the industry have moved towards more of a hybrid model, as Toyota has in Canada, as opposed to this rapid shift, such as GM is making right now, and this virtue signalling to go to zero-emission vehicles directly, as opposed to steadily reducing the amount of fuel required in the automobile fleet in North America?
View Greg McLean Profile
CPC (AB)
Yes, I hear you.
View Greg McLean Profile
CPC (AB)
The issue, I'm saying, is if your own industry had actually abided by CAFE standards, we would not be in the position we're in right now. Effectively, your industry is becoming much more of a rent seeker from government than a profitable industry in Canada. You can challenge that if you want, but I do see a lot of money flowing from the government for your agenda.
Let's go into what you talked about. You just mentioned the whole issue of getting these chargers in all these equations, everywhere they need to be delivered. Who's going to pay for those chargers?
View Greg McLean Profile
CPC (AB)
I've talked to gas stations. Usually they talk about the issue around getting these chargers put into their stations in, let's say, Red Deer, which is halfway between Edmonton and Calgary, and it makes zero economic sense. I know the “if you build it, they will come” scenario. However, everybody who is looking at it is saying that the only reason this makes sense is that somebody else is going to pay for it.
That being the case, or that being the situation that's been presented, at what point in time do we start recognizing that the cost of these chargers is actually being borne by the taxpayer? Also, if I can drill down a little further, every bit of this infrastructure has a CO2 footprint that we're duplicating, and it is additional to the CO2 that the variable part of the equation is actually producing as well.
Can you comment on that at all?
View Greg McLean Profile
CPC (AB)
When you produce this charger, when it's going through the production process, you have copper, you have aluminum. You have all kinds of building that happens. You have construction. You have cables. Everything has to be built. All of these have a CO2 footprint to get towards the location. It's the front-end CO2 expense, if you will.
Do you have any comment on that?
View Greg McLean Profile
CPC (AB)
Okay. I have one last question.
How much does your—
View Greg McLean Profile
CPC (AB)
Okay.
How much does your electric vehicle weigh compared to comparable non-electric vehicles?
View Greg McLean Profile
CPC (AB)
Thank you.
View Greg McLean Profile
CPC (AB)
Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.
Mr. Moore, thank you very much for all you've added here today. You talked about the carbon capture utilization credit needing to look like the 45Q in the States, and you know the government is going through some consultations on that process right now. Can you tell us what your investments in Canada will look like compared to those in the U.S. if we don't have a similar type of tax credit in Canada?
View Greg McLean Profile
CPC (AB)
Thank you.
I wanted to talk about the transportation of hydrogen. You're proposing to build a plant in Edmonton that is going to supply a vast area. Can you tell us about the economics of distribution of produced hydrogen?
View Greg McLean Profile
CPC (AB)
You're going to be producing hydrogen in Edmonton and distributing it to obviously a vast area. When is it better to establish a plant in, say, Saskatoon? What are the economics of a local build versus a big build?
View Greg McLean Profile
CPC (AB)
Then it's $1.3 billion to support one thousand buses?
View Greg McLean Profile
CPC (AB)
No worries. Thank you very much.
I'm going to move back to Mr. Romano.
Mr. Romano, one of the things about hydrocarbon consumption in vehicles is there is a big excise tax collection from government. It's billions of dollars per year, distributed between the federal government and municipal governments. When you're comparing apples to apples, how do you think this infrastructure money's going to be replaced when you go down the road and we replace these vehicles with zero-emission vehicles?
View Greg McLean Profile
CPC (AB)
It's safe to say that there's a social cost here that the hydrocarbon consumption industry is bearing right now that isn't built into the equation of what we're replacing it with. We're going to have to figure that out.
View Greg McLean Profile
CPC (AB)
Thank you. I appreciate that very much.
I have a question for Mr. Pocard.
I really appreciate that you understood that the battery buses reduce GHGs at different places, depending on the local source of power. You save 50% in Alberta. Is that life cycle, or is that just in the power that's produced in the bus alone?
View Greg McLean Profile
CPC (AB)
Thank you.
I hope I have enough time to squeeze one more question in for Mr. Moore.
Mr. Moore, you talked about the $7-billion export facility you're building in Saudi Arabia. The benefits there, of course, are the wind and the sun, which we have in abundance in western Canada as well, but for some reason....
Can you tell us what it would take to have an export facility of that magnitude built in Canada?
View Greg McLean Profile
CPC (AB)
Mr. Chair, thank you very much. I've finished.
View Heather McPherson Profile
NDP (AB)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
I would also like to bring forward the motion that I have given notice of. I'll read it, if that's your pleasure.
View Heather McPherson Profile
NDP (AB)
View Heather McPherson Profile
NDP (AB)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
It's nice to see everybody on this Monday morning.
I will read the motion, and then I can discuss a bit why I think it is something we should be supportive of. The motion is:
That the Department of Canadian Heritage table with the committee, no later than June 20, 2021, a copy of the initial agreement, including any subsequent amendments, in both official languages, between Canadian Heritage and Netflix Canada, signed in 2017 and entered into under the Investment Canada Act.
I have brought this motion forward because I have some concerns, having seen the exemption for Netflix in the 2021 budget, and I'm worried that without being able to understand what is in that agreement, without being able to understand what is being given or what gifts are being given to Netflix, it's very difficult for us to understand whether it's an appropriate playing field, a level playing field, for the broadcasting sector.
From my perspective, it is worrying to see Netflix being excluded. I think that for us as committee members to do our job, it's important that we have an opportunity to examine this and ensure that it meets the highest standards that we would expect to be undertaken for this. That's why I've brought the motion forward. I can answer any questions anyone might have, but I think it is part of our job to make sure our broadcasting sector is not disproportionately privileging one company over others, and certainly not a company that is not a Canadian company over others. That's my motion. I'd like your support, please.
View Heather McPherson Profile
NDP (AB)
I just have a very quick question about this. From my understanding, the scope of this motion is that it would look particularly at artistic swimming, but we know that athletes across Canada in a number of different sports would actually be impacted in similar ways. It is not something that is unique to artistic swimming. Would there be scope to examine this outside of that, or, because of the time constraints we have, will we be looking solely at one sport as opposed to any others?
View Heather McPherson Profile
NDP (AB)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
I just brought up the House calendar. We would have one meeting in September before the deadline, so I just wanted to clarify that it would be possible to have a meeting.
View Heather McPherson Profile
NDP (AB)
Certainly this is a topic that is very important to me, and it's very important to all members on this committee, I am sure, that we examine this. Unfortunately, as many have said, the work on Bill C-10 took much longer than we anticipated, and we have not been able to get to our other pieces of work.
The only thing I want to raise, which I think is important, is the motion Mr. Waugh brought forward regarding the minister visiting or the officials visiting with regard to the children who were found in Kamloops.
I say that because, of course, it's urgent; it's timely, and it's something we need to look at. I would not want the committee to let that fall off either, though I recognize that we are looking down the barrel of three meetings and that is all we have left together.
View Michelle Rempel Garner Profile
CPC (AB)
Thank you, Chair.
My questions will be for Dr. Kohler.
Dr. Kohler, our committee has had a great degree of difficulty obtaining details around the contracts that were signed by the federal government with vaccine manufacturers. One small example would be that I don't think Canada has received a single dose of vaccine from AstraZeneca, in spite of our bilateral contracts.
Based on your research, is there any reason why we as parliamentarians shouldn't be getting access to that?
View Michelle Rempel Garner Profile
CPC (AB)
Can I just get in on that?
Do you think that happened because they came late to the table? Once upon a time I used to work in something like that space, and that's really the only reason I can surmise.
View Michelle Rempel Garner Profile
CPC (AB)
I'm sorry to cut you off, but I have a very short period of time.
I've read some of your work, and I know you do a lot of work on anti-corruption and accountability. Do you have any comments on what potentially went wrong between CanSino and the federal government on that vaccine contract?
View Michelle Rempel Garner Profile
CPC (AB)
The other thing the committee is looking at right now, in the context of both PMPRB reform and access to vaccines, is the concept of the government's role and what the government has done in terms of supporting research and pharmaceutical research, particularly in the private sector in Canada, and then what the trade-off should be.
In bullet-point format, in 30 seconds or less, what are the types of subsidies that government would give to pharma right now, including intellectual property protection frameworks?
View Michelle Rempel Garner Profile
CPC (AB)
No, no; it's good. I think we have to talk about intellectual property rights in a broader context here.
In that context, I know that therapeutics for infectious diseases and vaccine development are normally on the low end of the priority list for pharma development. What are the incentives, and what are the reasons for that? Is it our IP protection model or what?
View Michelle Rempel Garner Profile
CPC (AB)
I have just a last question. I'm sorry. I'd love for you to table any recommendations that you have with our committee.
It's on a different subject, but it's related. The COVID Alert exposure app has only been downloaded a few million times. One expert called this ludicrously low, but a lot of government resources have been attached to it.
You talk about value for money. Do you think additional resources for this app at this time are a good idea? This is another thing that is before our committee in terms of supplementary estimates.
View Ziad Aboultaif Profile
CPC (AB)
Thank you, Mr. Forsyth and other witnesses.
Thank you, Madam Chair.
With different markets and different conditions when you negotiate trade deals, you have to have flexibility and you have to have options in order to be able to achieve agreements. I know that Bill C-216 is aiming to somehow further protect supply management or preserve it, as Mr. Forsyth just said, but in the meantime, it carries risk, which Mr. Forsyth also stated in his opening remarks.
What I'm interested in is this. Although we've signed so many trade agreements without having to really jeopardize the supply management system and we have successfully done that throughout its history—and we have so many trade agreements that I don't have to mention it at the moment—the question is, are there any live examples out there that can advise us on what the consequences will be in the long run if Bill C-216 is implemented, since we know that we will lose that flexibility and we will be limiting our team of negotiators on the road when they try to achieve trade agreements with countries in the world?
View Ziad Aboultaif Profile
CPC (AB)
View Ziad Aboultaif Profile
CPC (AB)
Okay.
There are other sectors. We offer a wide variety of products and solutions to the world. What would you see as the reaction of other sectors if something like Bill C-216 went forward? What would you see as the reaction as far as opportunities on the world stage with trade go?
View Ziad Aboultaif Profile
CPC (AB)
Yes, I mean Canadian stakeholders.
View Ziad Aboultaif Profile
CPC (AB)
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