Hansard
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 1 of 1
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
2018-11-05 13:21 [p.23245]
Mr. Speaker, I am so pleased to rise today to speak to issues concerning our Canadian Armed Forces veterans in response to the opposition supply day motion put forward by my colleague, the member for Courtenay—Alberni.
I enjoy serving with him on the Standing Committee on Veterans Affairs. I appreciate the opportunities we have to collaborate on ways that have the potential to see our veterans better served, if the government were to implement our recommendations.
The motion before us states:
That, in the opinion of the House, the government should automatically carry forward all annual lapsed spending at the Department of Veterans Affairs to the next fiscal year, for the sole purpose of improving services for Canadian veterans, until the Department meets or exceeds its 24 self-identified service standards.
Today, in response to the motion, we have heard from the Liberals and they tell us that lapsed funding does not result in anyone receiving less than they should. They have said that it is just how the government keeps its books. They have said that nothing nefarious is going on. The Liberals have explained that most spending at Veterans Affairs is statutory and that the government needs to be prepared to cover the cost of these benefits, whether 10 or 10,000 eligible veterans make a claim.
The Liberals have advised us that each year the spending estimates for Veterans Affairs are put before the House, based predominantly on those very same statutory requirements. In other words, the funding that has lapsed will be in the spending estimates this year and the year after that and the year after that.
The Liberals are saying that the motion is a moot point. Actually, for the most part, they are right. However, I know they hope veterans will forget that when in opposition, the Liberals sung a very different tune.
It is true that the funding for Veterans Affairs is regulated by statute. It seems the Minister of Veterans Affairs is aware of this fact now. The other day, he was explaining to Global News that he was statutorily obligated to provide programs and services owed to veterans, so any lapsed funding would not affect services to veterans. A Veterans Affairs spokesperson agreed with the minister and said that lapsed funding did not result in anyone receiving less than they should, that it was simply an administrative process.
Services from the Department of Veterans Affairs, under the Liberals, is demand driven, just as it was during the previous Conservative government. The hypocrisy here is that when the same thing happened in the past, the Liberals falsely claimed that the then government was stealing from veterans. Now when they find themselves in government and are faced with the exact same situation, the Liberals say that they are not stealing, that they are following an administrative process.
I am not going to come to the House today and claim that lapsed funding in the Department of Veterans Affairs under the Liberal government is somehow stealing from veterans, because it is not and it never was. However, I will ask the minister, now that he and the Liberal government are aware of how Veterans Affairs budgets work, if they will apologize for accusing my former colleagues of thievery? Will they apologize to Canadians for completely misrepresenting in the past how this Veterans Affairs budget works? Will they apologize to veterans for the stress they caused them by suggesting the former government was taking money from their benefits, when they knew it was not true?
The department makes estimates for what it expects to spend and in the event that all the money is not spent, it lapses. The way the department is set up, it is required to have enough money for the demands of our veterans, each and every year. This motion by the member for Courtenay—Alberni is somewhat moot. However, there are many areas of concern where my colleague and I are of one mind that I believe are the force behind his intent today.
What are the reasons this funding remains there at the end of the budget year? Why does it fail to reach veterans? There are two significant reasons why that happens. One is incredible inefficiencies within the department, an inability when it creates programs to get them through the door and out to the veterans. The other reason is a significant culture of denial. Veterans always have to fight for something they should be able to receive without an increased level in their mental health problems, without an increased level of PTSD and struggling through the transition process and without an increase in the number of veterans who contemplate or actually go through with suicide and homicides because they simply cannot take another problem added on to the problems they are already facing.
For example, the fact that $37 million taxpayer dollars abused by the Prime Minister to fight veterans in court was a blow to the guts, the hearts and the minds of our veterans. When asked why we were fighting certain veteran groups in court, the Prime Minister responded, at the Edmonton town hall, in February 2018, with this statement, “Because they're asking for more than we are able to give.”
The previous Conservative minister of Veterans Affairs had worked with Equitas, firing the government lawyer and instead putting the case in abeyance, with the goodwill to work together to move toward acceptable solutions to improve outcomes for injured veterans, as they were requesting.
The outcomes this motion is trying to achieve are very important. I am very disturbed by the increasing backlog of applications for disability benefits. Despite the $10 billion the minister is always quoting, the backlog is 29,000 and growing.
The government sees itself as succeeding, because it indicates that cases are being processed and moved to VRAB, the Veterans Review and Appeal Board, more quickly. How could any government claim this as a success, that basically, initial request from veterans are moving quickly to an appeal board, where once again they have to go through the process for applying and requesting that funding? In most cases, once they make it through that process, it is provided. Why are we putting our veterans through this added difficulty that causes them great angst and only means they are not receiving their funding or their services in a timely manner?
When VAC finally communicates to Canadian Armed Forces members, veterans and their families using veterans-centric plain language and when it ensures all veterans have a clear understanding of every benefit they qualify for upon release and every benefit they may need to access over time, we will be on the road to succeeding to care more effectively and efficiently for our veterans.
One of the biggest challenges to veterans receiving their benefits is an over-complicated chain of command, where upper management does not embrace change and case managers are not empowered to do what is best for veterans as quickly as possible. There does not appear to be a desire to work with DND to create a seamless transition for our veterans if it means a change to the structure or the composition of VAC.
There continues to be a culture that insists VAC must determine if medical release is due to service before VAC will provide benefits, when DND already makes the determination when a member no longer meets universality of service and is released. Yes, of course future decisions by VAC will need to be made as veterans age. However, upon medical release, there is complete clarity already provided by DND on whether they qualify for services from VAC. It is already there at release.
Timely service and peace of mind for an injured veteran should be the determining factors, not protecting the turf of a department. The truth is that the majority of the cohort of case managers the Liberals claim they have put in place, 400 of those 470, were already budgeted for by the previous Conservative government.
At the Standing Committee on Veterans Affairs, we heard that case managers were not properly trained and up to speed on veterans benefits. They are overworked, stressed and often feeling helplessly caught between veterans in dismay and those up the chain of command. VAC needs to stop operating like an insurance program.
VAC needs to be transparent in what it is actually providing to veterans. Today, we heard one of the members of the Liberal Party talk about the education benefit, $40,000 for someone who has served for six years and $80,000 for someone who has served for 12 years. Unfortunately, that is not a transparent presentation to veterans or Canadians because those funds are a taxable benefit.
Therefore, when veterans think they are going to get $40,000 to go to school, at the end of the year they find out that it is a taxable benefit and they owe the government in taxes. I wonder if the government has come to any decision as to how much of that benefit it hands out is actually clawed back and how much it gets back through taxes from our veterans. It is misleading.
As well, the member across the way said that with the education benefit, veterans would get to go to the school of their choice. I have been approached by many veterans who wanted to take advantage of that program. One of them was actually okayed to go ahead and registered with the institution. The veteran then heard back through the case manager that the people higher up did not think the school qualified. It was devastating.
As well, the member across the way said that the emergency funds were available 24/7. What he is saying is that people can call in 24/7, but he did not tell truthfully how long it took for the department to actually get those funds out the door to a veteran who was in an emergency crisis situation. Our committee should take a look at that.
Under no circumstances should the men and women who have served and have come home physically or mentally injured find themselves fighting for benefits they were told would be there for them and their families when they signed on, willing to die for their country.
The minister has indicated on numerous occasions that the backlog is because veterans are better informed and they have more services to apply for. I hope there is a certain amount of truth to that. However, in actuality what is not being said is that the backlog is going to get even worse, as VAC is facing a significant increase of service members ready to retire now after serving 25 years. The department is not prepared.
It is no secret that there is no clarity for veterans or service and case managers with the rollout fast approaching of the so-called pension for life. The plan provides no new funds. Instead it consolidates and rolls in existing benefits.
In an article in Esprit de Corps Canadian military magazine, dated April 18, Sean Bruyea and Robert Smol, comparing the old Pension Act and the Liberals' new so-called pension for life, stated:
Furthermore, under the same category of non-taxable benefits for pain and suffering, injured veterans will have a choice between a lump-sum payment of up to $360,000 and a monthly “Pension for Life” up to a maximum of $1,150 to compensate for their injuries. There are no additional amounts for spouses or children. The average “Pension for Life” likely will be around $200 per month. For the 60,000 veteran recipients still receiving the Pension Act, they are paid an average of $680 per month plus amounts for spouses and children.
In the announcement of the Liberals' budget for 2018, with the new life-long pension included, the example that was given was of someone who had served the full 25 years and ended up at the last moment having a very horrific injury, including major loss of limbs. That individual qualifies for the maximum amount. There are many of our boots on the ground who get injured and never make it to 25 years. It is misleading in that document.
Another glaring problem is the inability of VAC to administer funds in a timely manner. One example is the emergency relief fund. It takes days, not hours, to get the funds to a veteran in a crisis situation. I am going to mention an organization called “Veterans Emergency Transition Services”, known as VETS Canada. It is operated by veterans for veterans. A non-profit corporation with volunteers across Canada, it provides emergency aid and comfort to veterans who are in crisis and who are at risk of becoming homeless.
If a veteran or someone on their behalf reaches out to VETS Canada, it can have a person at their door very quickly with help. If it gets a call about a homeless veteran, it works that same day to get them off the street. The new VETS Canada drop-in centre is just blocks from Parliament Hill and it is so effective in its mandate that we heard that 65 of its emergency clients went there in its first two months of operation.
The problem at Veterans Affairs is not a lack of money. We all know that the minister says he has $10 billion to spend, because he says that at every opportunity, yet it seems the desire of the government is to get dollars out the door elsewhere, providing taxpayer dollars to colonize overseas countries, to get Canadians to submit to its attestation values, to pay out terrorists and help murderers, rather than focusing on our veterans, elderly and those working hard to join the middle class.
Veterans want to see more veterans as caseworkers so that they can talk to people who understand military service and speak their language. They want transparency when they file a claim, with an honest, accurate estimation provided as to how long it will take. Veterans want to be made aware of available services. For example, I recently returned from a committee trip up north and discovered that 89% of our Canadian Rangers are not aware of their Canadian Armed Forces health care entitlements or their veterans benefits. An excellent recommendation came forward in the north that a VAC service agent simply be included with the existing team at the Service Canada building in Yellowknife.
Understanding that Veteran Affairs services need to start shortly after enlistment with ongoing contact, we need to ensure that when an forces member retires or is released from the Canadian Armed Forces and becomes a veteran, he or she is armed and trained with the clear, concise information that empowers them to access everything they need and deserve as they transition from serving in our military.
Monsieur le Président, je suis très heureuse de prendre la parole aujourd'hui au sujet de questions touchant les anciens combattants des Forces armées canadiennes en réponse à la motion de l'opposition présentée par mon collègue le député de Courtenay—Alberni.
J'aime bien siéger avec lui au Comité permanent des anciens combattants. Si le gouvernement accepte de mettre en oeuvre nos recommandations, nous serons heureux de collaborer avec lui sur les mesures qui pourraient améliorer les services aux anciens combattants.
La motion dont nous sommes saisis indique ceci:
Que, de l’avis de la Chambre, le gouvernement devrait automatiquement reporter toutes les dépenses annuelles inutilisées du ministère des Anciens Combattants à l’exercice financier suivant, à la seule fin d’améliorer les services aux anciens combattants du Canada, jusqu’à ce que le ministère atteigne ou dépasse les 24 normes de service qu’il a lui-même déterminées.
Aujourd'hui, en réponse à la motion, les libéraux ont déclaré que, même si des fonds sont inutilisés, cela ne signifie pas que des gens reçoivent moins qu'ils ne le devraient. Ils ont indiqué qu'il s'agit uniquement de la façon dont le gouvernement administre les finances publiques. Ils ont affirmé qu'il n'y avait rien de louche là-dedans. Les libéraux ont expliqué que la plupart des dépenses d'Anciens Combattants sont des dépenses législatives et que le gouvernement doit être prêt à couvrir le coût de ces prestations, peu importe que 10 ou 10 000 anciens combattants admissibles présentent une demande.
Ils nous ont indiqué que le budget des dépenses d'Anciens Combattants Canada présenté à la Chambre chaque année est fondé principalement sur ces exigences législatives. Autrement dit, les fonds non utilisés se retrouveront dans le budget des dépenses cette année, puis l'an prochain et l'année suivante.
Selon les libéraux, la motion ne sert à rien. Ils ont en bonne partie raison en fait. Cela dit, je sais qu'ils espèrent que les anciens combattants vont oublier que, lorsqu'ils étaient dans l'opposition, les libéraux ne chantaient pas du tout la même chanson.
Il est vrai que l'affectation de fonds à Anciens Combattants Canada est régie par la loi. Il semblerait que le ministre des Anciens Combattants soit maintenant conscient de ce fait. L'autre jour, il expliquait à Global News qu'il était tenu par la loi de fournir aux anciens combattants les programmes et les services auxquels ils ont droit et que les montants non utilisés n'auraient donc pas de répercussions sur les services offerts. Un porte-parole du ministère a aussi indiqué que le fait que des fonds restent inutilisés ne privait aucune personne de ce à quoi elle a droit et qu'il s'agissait simplement d'un processus administratif.
Les services fournis par le ministère des Anciens Combattants sous le gouvernement libéral sont axés sur la demande, tout comme c'était le cas sous le gouvernement conservateur précédent. L'hypocrisie dans ce contexte, c'est que, lorsque la même situation est survenue par le passé, les libéraux ont prétendu à tort que le gouvernement de l'époque volait les anciens combattants. Maintenant qu'ils sont au pouvoir et qu'ils se trouvent exactement dans la même situation, les libéraux affirment qu'ils n'ont rien volé et qu'ils suivent un processus administratif.
Je ne vais pas me servir de mon intervention à la Chambre aujourd'hui pour prétendre que les fonds inutilisés du ministère des Anciens Combattants sous le gouvernement libéral représentent en quelque sorte une somme volée aux anciens combattants, car ce n'est pas le cas et cela ne l'a jamais été. Cependant, maintenant que le ministre et le gouvernement libéral savent comment fonctionnent les budgets des Anciens Combattants, je demande au ministre s'ils vont s'excuser d'avoir accusé mes anciens collègues de vol. Vont-ils présenter des excuses aux Canadiens pour avoir complètement déformé le fonctionnement du budget des Anciens Combattants par le passé? S'excuseront-ils auprès des anciens combattants pour le stress qu'ils leur ont causé en laissant entendre que le gouvernement précédent prenait de l'argent dans leurs prestations lorsqu'ils savaient que ce n'était pas le cas?
Le ministère établit des prévisions budgétaires selon ce qu'il estime devoir dépenser, et l'argent qui n'est pas utilisé est remis au Trésor. Le ministère doit prévoir suffisamment d'argent, année après année, pour répondre aux demandes des anciens combattants. La motion du député de Courtenay—Alberni est quelque peu discutable. Cependant, je partage largement les préoccupations de mon collègue qui sont à l'origine de cette motion.
Pour quelles raisons reste-t-il de l'argent dans l'enveloppe à la fin de chaque année financière? Pourquoi cet argent ne bénéficie-t-il pas aux anciens combattants? C'est essentiellement pour deux raisons principales. Premièrement, c'est à cause des incroyables lacunes du ministère, qui est incapable de rendre les programmes qu'il a créés accessibles aux anciens combattants. Deuxièmement, c'est à cause d'une culture du déni qui est profondément ancrée. Les anciens combattants doivent se battre pour obtenir ce qu'ils devraient recevoir sans avoir à risquer d'aggraver leurs problèmes de santé mentale, notamment lorsqu'ils souffrent du trouble de stress post-traumatique, sans qu'on leur rende la transition plus difficile et sans que n'augmente le nombre d'anciens combattants qui se suicident, qui commettent un homicide ou qui envisagent de passer à l'acte parce qu'ils craquent sous la pression lorsqu'un problème de plus s'ajoute à ceux qu'ils doivent déjà affronter.
Par exemple, les 37 millions de dollars issus des poches des contribuables que le premier ministre a utilisés abusivement pour financer sa bataille judiciaire contre les anciens combattants leur ont porté un dur coup au coeur et à l'âme. Lorsque, à l'occasion d'une assemblée publique à Edmonton, en février 2018, on a demandé au premier ministre pourquoi le gouvernement s'opposait à certains groupes d'anciens combattants devant les tribunaux, il a répondu que c'était parce que les anciens combattants réclamaient davantage que ce que le gouvernement avait les moyens de leur donner.
L'ancien ministre conservateur des Anciens Combattants a collaboré avec Equitas et renvoyé l'avocat du gouvernement, décidant plutôt de mettre la cause en suspens. Il avait la volonté de travailler ensemble pour trouver des solutions acceptables visant à améliorer le sort des anciens combattants blessés, tel que ces derniers le demandaient.
Les résultats escomptés par cette motion revêtent une grande importance. Je suis très troublée par l'arriéré grandissant de demandes de prestations d'invalidité. En dépit des fameux 10 milliards dont parle sans cesse le ministre, l'arriéré a atteint 29 000 cas et ne fait qu'augmenter.
Le gouvernement s'imagine engagé sur la voie du succès, et indique à titre de preuve que des demandes sont traitées et acheminées plus rapidement au TACRA, le Tribunal des anciens combattants (révision et appel). Comment un gouvernement peut-il prendre en compte la situation actuelle et crier victoire? Les anciens combattants doivent soumettre leur demande initiale, qui est acheminée rapidement vers un tribunal d'appel, en effet, mais ils doivent ensuite reprendre le processus de demande de prestations. Dans la plupart des cas, lorsqu'ils ont réussi à franchir toutes les étapes du processus, les prestations leur sont accordées. Pourquoi obliger nos anciens combattants à passer par un processus aussi compliqué et anxiogène, et qui ne leur permet même pas d'obtenir leurs prestations et leurs services dans les meilleurs délais?
Le jour où le ministère des Anciens Combattants se décidera à utiliser un langage clair et efficace pour communiquer avec les membres des Forces armées canadiennes, les vétérans et leurs proches et qu'il fera le nécessaire pour que tous les vétérans sachent clairement à quelles prestations ils ont droit au moment où ils sont libérés et auxquelles ils pourraient un jour avoir droit, là nous pourrons commencer à dire que nous prenons soin d'eux de manière efficace et efficiente.
La chaîne de commandement au sein du ministère est inutilement compliquée, ce qui explique en bonne partie pourquoi les vétérans ont autant de mal à obtenir les prestations auxquelles ils ont droit. La haute direction est réfractaire au changement, et les gestionnaires de cas, de leur côté, n'ont pas les pouvoirs nécessaires pour prendre rapidement les moyens de répondre aux besoins des vétérans. La volonté de collaborer avec le ministère de la Défense nationale pour que la transition vers la vie civile se fasse sans heurts semble complètement absente du moment où cela pourrait entraîner un changement de structure au ministère des Anciens Combattants.
Le ministère des Anciens Combattants continue d'insister pour procéder à sa propre évaluation afin de déterminer si la libération pour motifs médicaux d'un vétéran est liée à ses fonctions, alors que le ministère de la Défense nationale détermine déjà quand un militaire ne répond plus aux exigences en matière d'universalité du service et doit quitter les forces. Bien sûr, c'est le ministère des Anciens Combattants qui devra prendre les autres décisions, celles qui viendront au fur et à mesure que le vétéran prendra de l'âge, mais au moment où celui-ci est libéré pour motifs médicaux, toutes les évaluations nécessaires pour déterminer s'il a droit à ses services ont déjà été faites par le ministère de la Défense nationale. Tout est là.
Offrir un service rapide aux anciens combattants blessés et assurer leur tranquillité d'esprit: voilà ce sur quoi il faudrait fonder les décisions, et non pas sur la volonté de protéger la chasse gardée d'un ministère. La vérité, c'est que la majorité des gestionnaires de cas que les libéraux prétendent avoir embauchés, soit 400 des 470 nouveaux employés, étaient déjà prévus dans le budget du gouvernement conservateur précédent.
Au Comité permanent des anciens combattants, nous avons appris que les gestionnaires de cas ne reçoivent pas une formation adéquate et qu'ils ne sont pas au courant des mesures de soutien destinées aux vétérans. Surchargés de travail et stressés, ils se sentent souvent impuissants, coincés entre les anciens combattants en plein désarroi et leurs supérieurs hiérarchiques. Le ministère des Anciens Combattants doit cesser de fonctionner comme un programme d'assurance.
Le ministère doit communiquer en toute transparence ce qu'il offre aux vétérans. Aujourd'hui, un député libéral a parlé de l'allocation pour études, qui peut atteindre 40 000 $ pour les vétérans qui ont 6 années de service et 80 000 $ pour ceux qui en ont 12. Malheureusement, ce n'est pas une explication transparente pour les vétérans ou les Canadiens parce que ces fonds sont un avantage imposable.
Par conséquent, alors que les anciens combattants pensent qu'ils vont recevoir 40 000 $ pour des études, à la fin de l'année, ils découvrent que la somme est imposable et qu'ils doivent de l'impôt au gouvernement. Je me demande si le gouvernement a déterminé quelle portion de la somme qu'il donne est en fait récupérée et combien il récupère au moyen de l'impôt payé par les anciens combattants. C'est trompeur.
De plus, le député en face a dit que, grâce à l'allocation pour études, les anciens combattants pourraient fréquenter l'établissement de leur choix. J'ai été approchée par un grand nombre d'anciens combattants qui voulaient profiter de ce programme. L'un d'eux a été accepté il et s'est inscrit à un établissement. La personne qui gère son dossier lui a alors appris que ses supérieurs ne pensaient pas que l'établissement était admissible. Ce fut désastreux pour lui.
De plus, le député en face a dit que des fonds d'urgences pouvaient être demandés 24 heures sur 24, 7 jours sur 7. Ce qu'il dit, c'est que les gens peuvent appeler 24 heures sur 24, 7 jours sur 7, sauf qu'il n'a pas précisé combien de temps il faudra au ministère pour verser les fonds à un ancien combattant en situation de crise. Notre comité devrait se pencher là-dessus.
Les militaires qui reviennent de mission avec des blessures physiques ou psychologiques ne devraient en aucune circonstance avoir à se battre pour obtenir des mesures de soutien qu'on leur avait promis, à eux et à leur famille, lorsqu'ils se sont engagés, prêts à risquer leur vie pour leur pays.
Le ministre a indiqué à maintes occasions que les arriérés étaient causés par le fait que les anciens combattants sont mieux informés et qu'il existe un plus grand nombre des services pour lesquels il faut présenter une demande. J'ose espérer que c'est en partie vrai. On ne souligne pas, cependant, que les arriérés vont s'aggraver, étant donné qu'il y a une nette augmentation du nombre de militaires qui s'adressent à Anciens Combattants Canada après 25 ans de service. Le ministère n'est pas prêt.
Personne n'ignore que les anciens combattants, les gestionnaires de services et les gestionnaires de cas ne savent pas exactement quoi faire par rapport au régime de présumée pension à vie, dont la mise en oeuvre approche à grands pas. Le plan ne comporte aucun nouveau financement. En fait, il inclut et consolide des prestations existantes.
Dans un article publié le 18 avril dans le magazine militaire canadien Esprit de Corps, Sean Bruyea et Robert Smol comparent l'ancienne Loi sur les pensions au nouveau régime libéral de la présumée pension à vie. Je cite:
De plus, toujours dans la même catégorie de prestations non imposables pour la douleur et la souffrance, les anciens combattants blessés pourront choisir entre un paiement forfaitaire pouvant atteindre 360 000 $ et une « pension à vie » d'un montant maximal de 1 150 $ par mois comme indemnisation pour leurs blessures. Il n'y a pas de montant supplémentaire pour les conjoints ou les enfants. La « pension à vie » sera probablement d'environ 200 $ par mois en moyenne. Pour ce qui est des 60 000 anciens combattants qui reçoivent toujours des prestations au titre de la Loi sur les pensions, ils reçoivent 680 $ en moyenne, en plus de montants pour les conjoints et les enfants.
Dans l'annonce du budget de 2018 des libéraux, où on faisait mention de la nouvelle pension à vie, l'exemple fourni était celui d'une personne qui subit une très grave blessure, la perte de membres, après 25 années de service. Cette personne est admissible au montant maximal. Beaucoup de militaires sur le terrain se blessent et ne se rendent pas à 25 ans de service. L'exemple du document est trompeur.
Un autre problème flagrant est l'incapacité du ministère des Anciens Combattants d'accorder rapidement les fonds. Le fonds d'urgence en est un exemple. Il ne faut pas des heures, mais bien des jours pour que les fonds soient acheminés à un ancien combattant en crise. Je vais parler d'un organisme qui s'appelle Veterans Emergency Transition Services, communément appelé VETS Canada. L'organisme est dirigé par d'anciens combattants pour les anciens combattants. Il s'agit d'une entreprise sans but lucratif qui compte des bénévoles dans l'ensemble du Canada. Elle offre de l'aide d'urgence et du réconfort aux anciens combattants en crise et à risque de devenir sans-abri.
Si un ancien combattant ou son représentant fait appel à VETS Canada, une personne pourra se présenter rapidement chez lui pour l'aider. Si l'organisme reçoit un appel au sujet d'un ancien combattant sans abri, il travaille le jour même pour lui trouver un logement. La nouvelle halte-accueil de VETS Canada est située à quelques pâtés seulement de la Colline du Parlement et elle remplit son mandat avec une telle efficacité qu'elle aurait traité 65 cas d'urgence au cours de ses deux premiers mois d'activité.
Le problème au ministère n'est pas un manque de fonds. Nous savons tous que le ministre dit avoir 10 milliards de dollars à dépenser, puisqu'il le dit dès qu'il en a l'occasion. Pourtant, le gouvernement semble vouloir utiliser l'argent des contribuables à d'autres fins, comme pour coloniser des pays étrangers, pour amener les Canadiens à se soumettre à son attestation relative aux valeurs, pour payer des terroristes et aider des meurtriers, plutôt que d'accorder la priorité aux anciens combattants, aux aînés et à ceux qui travaillent fort pour faire partie de la classe moyenne.
Les anciens combattants veulent voir plus d'anciens combattants travaillant comme chargés de cas afin de pouvoir parler à des gens qui comprennent le service militaire et qui parlent leur langage. Ils veulent voir de la transparence lorsqu'ils déposent une demande, et avoir une estimation honnête et juste du délai qu'il faudra pour la traiter. Les anciens combattants veulent être mis au courant des services offerts. Par exemple, je viens de revenir d'un voyage dans le Nord aux fins des travaux du comité. J'ai découvert que 89 % des Rangers canadiens ne sont pas au courant qu'ils ont droit à des soins de santé des Forces armées canadiennes ou à une allocation aux anciens combattants. Une excellente recommandation a été formulée dans le Nord: inclure tout simplement un agent des services d'Anciens Combattants Canada dans l'équipe en poste au centre de Service Canada à Yellowknife.
L'éducation au sujet des services d'Anciens Combattants Canada doit commencer peu après l'enrôlement au moyen d'une communication continue. Nous devons nous assurer que, lorsqu'un membre des Forces armées canadiennes prend sa retraite ou est libéré et devient un ancien combattant, il est armé d'information claire et concise qui lui permet d'accéder à tout ce dont il a besoin et à tout ce qu'il mérite alors qu'il effectue la transition entre le service militaire et la vie civile.
Result: 1 - 1 of 1

Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data