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Results: 1 - 6 of 6
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-11-08 14:49 [p.23465]
Mr. Speaker, it is not just a matter of investments. This goes beyond the government's broken promises to veterans. We are talking about red tape and a lack of respect within Veterans Affairs Canada itself for the calls it receives from our brave men and women in uniform. I have heard stories from people who, every year anew, have to provide proof of having lost their arm in Afghanistan.
Does the government think it is right or fair to do that to our dedicated soldiers who often continue to serve here or abroad?
The Prime Minister needs to understand and commit today to reduce the department's red tape and burdensome rules.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
The minister says he wants to help veterans, and that is a good thing. Therefore, he must get rid of the department's sometimes abusive bureaucracy once and for all, as it is characterized by a structure that too often dismisses veterans' requests and needs.
We must acknowledge one irrefutable fact: our veterans suffered in battle and they often return with problems that give rise to terrible mental health issues or physical conditions. These men and women in uniform not only made personal sacrifices. Above all, they dedicated their lives to serving Canada by defending our political principles, which from time to time vacillate even here in the House.
That is why those who are forced to leave the Canadian Armed Forces for medical reasons more often than not feel bitter and betrayed and as though they have lost their country's support for their commitment and ultimately for themselves.
The current veterans' movement includes a multitude of groups and claims often involving an increase in financial benefits.
I truly believe that these financial claims are motivated by injuries that go much deeper and require systemic help that goes far beyond any specific amount of money.
Veterans want respect from their own department, Veterans Affairs Canada. This department, which is the main source of assistance for our veterans in need, has to make major changes to its administrative approach and its established culture. The government needs to take real action on this, not just make announcements with no real meaning.
I believe that the Minister of Veterans Affairs needs to launch a comprehensive review of his department's administrative culture, including a review of staff conduct and of the regulations and structures that determine employees' everyday practices as well as the type and nature of services offered to veterans.
The minister needs to change the status quo. That is the real task he needs to undertake.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2016-05-06 13:18 [p.3022]
Mr. Speaker, I thank my hon. colleague for his excellent question.
What I was trying to say in my speech is that the Liberals are implementing measures to increase financial benefits, which we did. It must be done because that is what veterans' advocacy groups want.
I am going farther than that today. I am saying that although the system that has been in place in Canada for the past 15 years is important because benefits have to be there, it must do more. We have to tackle one of the other problems veterans are facing, and that is their everyday relationship with Veterans Affairs Canada officials. Not only is the transition problematic, but there is a problem with having to fill in forms and the department's attitude toward veterans.
We have no choice but to tackle this issue. We are doing so in committee, and that is why I am talking about it today.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2016-05-04 15:08 [p.2865]
Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Veterans Affairs has created six advisory groups whose mandate will apparently be to assess various urgent issues affecting our veterans and to advise the minister accordingly.
However, veterans themselves find that the mandate and membership of those groups remain nebulous. On April 22, 2016, right here in the House, the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Veterans Affairs remained silent when I asked her questions about this.
Can the minister share a few salient details about these advisory groups with the members of this House, in order to provide some clarity?
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2016-04-22 11:47 [p.2594]
Madam Speaker, the Liberal government recently announced that it was setting up six ministerial advisory groups at Veterans Affairs Canada. Veterans are wondering about that and are talking to me about it more and more.
Can the minister explain to the House the precise mandate of these groups?
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2016-04-22 11:48 [p.2595]
Madam Speaker, that is very good and quite commendable.
Nonetheless, beyond the mandate of these six advisory groups, the veterans want to know the following. Who will be part of these groups? What qualifications are needed to sit on them? Do members of the group have to sign non-disclosure agreements?
Veterans expect transparency. They want to know why the list of members of each of these advisory groups has not been made public yet.
Results: 1 - 6 of 6

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