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Results: 121 - 150 of 2763
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
View Andrew Scheer Profile
2019-05-14 14:17 [p.27757]
Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister has finally decided to answer some questions on the Mark Norman affair. He has had plenty of time to rehearse the script and memorize the lines, and I have no doubt that he is going to talk about the specific decision to stay the charges against Mark Norman being free from political interference. However, what I would like to know is about all the evidence of other interference in this case, including his government going to great lengths to block documents from being presented to court.
Why did the government go to such efforts to prevent the truth from coming out?
View Justin Trudeau Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Justin Trudeau Profile
2019-05-14 14:18 [p.27757]
Mr. Speaker, it is important to remember where this file started. On the eve of the 2015 election, Conservatives decided to rush through a half-billion-dollar, sole-sourced project. We wanted to ensure that we did our own due diligence on this decision with the new federal cabinet. That is exactly what we did.
In regard to documents, the government met all of its obligations with respect to the third party records applications. The PMO provided all documents that responded to the subpoenas directly to the Privy Council Office, which determined the relevancy and suggested redactions. This was all subject to approval—
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
View Andrew Scheer Profile
2019-05-14 14:19 [p.27757]
Mr. Speaker, this government went to great lengths to block those documents from coming to court. There are many occasions when this government proved it was going to great lengths to prevent the truth from coming out, including coaching witnesses and departmental officials and using code words to avoid access-to-information laws.
Does the Prime Minister believe that this is normal behaviour for a government when a decorated vice-admiral is fighting for his career, his reputation and his personal freedom?
View Justin Trudeau Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Justin Trudeau Profile
2019-05-14 14:19 [p.27757]
Mr. Speaker, as everyone knows, the decision to suspend Vice-Admiral Norman was taken independently by the chief of defence staff. Any accusations otherwise are simply absurd. We fully respect the independence of the processes in place.
Again, on the documents, the government met all of its obligations with respect to third party records applications. The PMO provided all documents that responded to the subpoenas directly to the Privy Council Office, which determined relevancy and suggested redactions, subject to approval by the judge.
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
View Andrew Scheer Profile
2019-05-14 14:20 [p.27757]
Mr. Speaker, in his attempt to take a contract away from the Davie shipyard, the Prime Minister deliberately tarnished Vice-Admiral Norman's reputation. Even though 73 people were aware of what was going on, the only name he sent to the RCMP was Mark Norman's. The Prime Minister also said there would be a trial before that was actually the case.
Will the Prime Minister do the right thing and apologize to Vice-Admiral Norman?
View Justin Trudeau Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Justin Trudeau Profile
2019-05-14 14:21 [p.27757]
Mr. Speaker, it is important to remember where this all started.
On the eve of the 2015 election, the Conservatives decided to rush through a half-billion-dollar sole-sourced contract. We wanted to ensure that we did our own due diligence on this decision with the new federal cabinet. That is what we did, and it is what any government should to. The decision to suspend Vice-Admiral Norman was taken independently by the chief of defence staff.
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
View Andrew Scheer Profile
2019-05-14 14:21 [p.27757]
Mr. Speaker, once again the Prime Minister is acting as if the justice system is there to reward his friends and punish his enemies. They spent years trying to fight the release of those documents in court. There are serious allegations that need to be investigated about coaching witnesses and using code names to get around access-to-information laws.
Will the Prime Minister allow the defence committee to investigate these serious allegations, or will he pull a page right out of the SNC-Lavalin playbook and use his power to shut it down?
View Justin Trudeau Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Justin Trudeau Profile
2019-05-14 14:22 [p.27757]
Mr. Speaker, on this side of the House, we understand that committees operate independently and make their own decisions about how to proceed.
This is yet again another example of the Conservatives wanting to talk about anything other than the economy, anything other than our budget, anything other than what we have been doing to help create jobs for Canadians, to lift 825,000 Canadians out of poverty, bring in the lowest unemployment in 40 years and keep doing the things for the middle class that Canadians elected us to do.
Some hon. members: Oh, oh!
View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)
View Andrew Scheer Profile
2019-05-14 14:22 [p.27758]
Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister gave $10.5 million to Omar Khadr, a convicted terrorist, so that he would not have to fight him in court, but when it comes to a decorated naval officer who has put his career into making Canadians safe, the Prime Minister spared no expense fighting him in court. Why the double standard?
View Justin Trudeau Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Justin Trudeau Profile
2019-05-14 14:23 [p.27758]
Mr. Speaker, on this side of the House, we respect the judiciary. We respect our independent judicial process. We will not stoop to the kinds of petty and, quite frankly, distasteful political games the members opposite are engaged in right now. They are so desperate to not talk about the economic numbers, the job growth, the impact on Canadians—
Some hon. members: Oh, oh!
View Justin Trudeau Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Justin Trudeau Profile
2019-05-14 14:24 [p.27758]
Mr. Speaker, once again we see the Conservatives stuck, not being able to do anything but sling mud, because a million Canadians have new jobs, because the Canadian economy is going well.
We lowered unemployment to record levels. We are continuing to work for the middle class—
View Jagmeet Singh Profile
NDP (BC)
View Jagmeet Singh Profile
2019-05-14 14:27 [p.27758]
Mr. Speaker, once again the Liberals put their billionaire buddies ahead of doing the right thing, as in the case of Mark Norman.
Let us review. A multi-billion-dollar contract was in trouble and their rich friends again needed help, so they made Mark Norman the fall guy. The Liberals withheld key documents, even from the prosecution. Then the Prime Minister called for charges well before they were laid. The Liberals were again caught wasting millions of public dollars helping their rich friends for political gain.
Will the Prime Minister now apologize to Mark Norman and to taxpayers for this travesty?
View Justin Trudeau Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Justin Trudeau Profile
2019-05-14 14:27 [p.27758]
Mr. Speaker, once again we see the NDP jumping on the Conservative bandwagon because the NDP's approach on climate change and the economy has simply fallen flat.
We continue to respect the independence of the judiciary. We always will. Measures were brought forward against the vice-admiral at the direction of the chief of defence staff. That is known by everyone. The New Democrats are stuck, so they are slinging mud too, like the Conservatives.
View Jagmeet Singh Profile
NDP (BC)
View Jagmeet Singh Profile
2019-05-14 14:28 [p.27758]
Mr. Speaker, the Liberals are obviously still putting rich companies ahead of ordinary people and, in the process, they tarnished a man's reputation.
The Liberals are once again caught up in a political interference scandal, and once again it is all about getting re-elected. They have also wasted millions of taxpayer dollars. People deserve transparency in the Vice-Admiral Norman case.
Why are the Liberals refusing to tell the truth?
View Justin Trudeau Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Justin Trudeau Profile
2019-05-14 14:29 [p.27759]
Mr. Speaker, the NDP says it will be there for the people, but it just announced that it is against a project that would have created 10,000 jobs for British Columbians. The B.C. NDP supports the project. His colleague, the member for Skeena—Bulkley Valley supported the project. Even so, the NDP just decided it is against this project, which would be the biggest private-sector investment in this country's history.
We know that investing in the economy and protecting the environment must go hand in hand. Unfortunately, the NDP has no plan to make that happen.
View James Bezan Profile
CPC (MB)
View James Bezan Profile
2019-05-14 14:30 [p.27759]
Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister ordered documents to be withheld that could have cleared Vice-Admiral Mark Norman's name months ago. We are now learning that these documents may have been withheld from both the RCMP and the public prosecutor. How can the Liberals claim they did not interfere in this process when they refused to hand over the evidence?
View David Lametti Profile
Lib. (QC)
Mr. Speaker, I remind the hon. member that the government met all of its obligations with respect to the third party records applications. All documents in this case for priority individuals identified in February by the defence were provided to the court, over 8,000 documents from seven different departments. As the Prime Minister has just said, the decision to redact information was made by public servants in this case, and overseen by the court. We met all our obligations.
View James Bezan Profile
CPC (MB)
View James Bezan Profile
2019-05-14 14:30 [p.27759]
Mr. Speaker, it is still absurd that the defence is still waiting for documents from the government. The Liberals claim they did nothing wrong, yet the defence minister regrets the process Vice-Admiral Norman went through. What does he regret? Was it that the Liberals withheld documents from the RCMP? Was it that they withheld documents from the public prosecutor? Was it that they withheld documents from Norman's defence team?
When will the Prime Minister finally set the truth free, and will he testify at the national defence committee?
View Serge Cormier Profile
Lib. (NB)
View Serge Cormier Profile
2019-05-14 14:31 [p.27759]
Mr. Speaker, my colleague is well aware that committees operate independently from the government. We will wait for the committee's deliberations.
Regarding the legal process involving Vice-Admiral Norman, the Public Prosecution Service of Canada noted, when it stayed the charge, that no other factors were considered in this decision, nor was there any contact or influence from outside the PPSC, including political influence, in either the initial decision to prosecute Mr. Norman or in the decision to stay the charge. Any accusation to the contrary from the opposition is absurd and baseless.
View Pierre Paul-Hus Profile
CPC (QC)
Mr. Speaker, the Liberals willingly withheld documents in the Asterix file. These documents would have given the RCMP and the prosecution a more complete picture of the situation for their investigation.
Furthermore, the Liberals knew that Mark Norman's defence counsel needed those documents to make its case, but the Liberals never agreed to provide them.
Why did the Prime Minister not give these documents to all those who needed them to mount Vice-Admiral Norman's defence?
View David Lametti Profile
Lib. (QC)
Mr. Speaker, the government met all of its obligations with respect to the third party records applications. All documents in this case for priority individuals identified in February by the defence were provided to the court as required.
During this case, more than 8,000 documents from this government organization were submitted to the court. The decision to redact information was made by public servants and overseen by the court.
View Pierre Paul-Hus Profile
CPC (QC)
Mr. Speaker, they always blame others.
The Prime Minister should be ashamed for having tarnished the reputation of Admiral Norman. Instead of showing remorse, the Liberals are trying to hide their plot against Admiral Norman by staying the charges against him.
If the Prime Minister had disclosed the documents the defence requested, the RCMP and the prosecutor never would have laid charges against Admiral Norman. Is that true or false?
The Prime Minister betrayed one of our best soldiers. Will the Prime Minister let us get to the bottom of this case and allow the Standing Committee on National Defence to investigate?
View Serge Cormier Profile
Lib. (NB)
View Serge Cormier Profile
2019-05-14 14:33 [p.27759]
Mr. Speaker, again, the committees operate independently from the government, and my colleague knows it. I am sure that is hard for him to grasp, considering who was controlling the committees under the Harper government.
Again, regarding the legal process involving Vice-Admiral Norman, the Public Prosecution Service of Canada noted that no other factors were considered in that decision, nor was there any contact or influence from outside the PPSC, including political influence in either the initial decision to prosecute Mr. Norman or in the decision to stay the charge. Any accusation to the contrary is completely absurd.
Canadians can have confidence in our justice system. They must not allow themselves to be misled by the Conservatives.
View Lisa Raitt Profile
CPC (ON)
View Lisa Raitt Profile
2019-05-14 14:34 [p.27759]
Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Justice has stood here in the House and indicated that the government handed over all the documents it was asked for. That is patently untrue, and I have proof.
The counsel for Vice-Admiral Norman said, “It took six months to get documents, and as we sit here today, and as we walked out of that courtroom, we still did not have all of them.” She said there were thousands of documents they had not received.
She went on to say, “I want to make it very clear that we, the defence, had to bring this motion, at great expense to Vice-Admiral Norman, to get at those records.” She said only the government had access, and that it was obviously the government that was “standing in the way of that full disclosure”.
View David Lametti Profile
Lib. (QC)
Mr. Speaker, my department's only involvement was to provide government records in response to a request from the defence to help support the defence of Vice-Admiral Norman. The Department of Justice processed these 52 requests on behalf of seven departments.
The process of determining whether documents were relevant and whether any redactions were necessary was made and conducted by civil servants and then verified by the court. It was up to the court to make the final decision as to whether or not information would be redacted, not the government.
View Lisa Raitt Profile
CPC (ON)
View Lisa Raitt Profile
2019-05-14 14:35 [p.27760]
Mr. Speaker, all the minister does is bring up even more questions and answers we simply do not have. Perhaps we should go back to what the counsel for Vice-Admiral Norman said at the press conference:
No person in this country should ever walk into a courtroom and feel like they are fighting their elected government.
Vice-Admiral Norman himself said:
There are lots of questions that need to be asked and answered about this whole process. I think some people that have been involved in this need to reflect on what happened and why it happened, and their role in that.
What does the Minister of Justice think about his role in this cover-up?
View David Lametti Profile
Lib. (QC)
Mr. Speaker, I have full confidence in our judicial and parliamentary institutions. The process was designed to make sure that the defendant had every opportunity to access the information relevant to his case and to challenge any decision not to disclose part or all of some document. Canadians can rest assured that this process worked and that the justice system is intact.
As Vice-Admiral Norman's own counsel said, “our justice system is truly unassailable.”
View Charlie Angus Profile
NDP (ON)
View Charlie Angus Profile
2019-05-14 14:36 [p.27760]
Mr. Speaker, in the last few months the Prime Minister has lost the confidence of his former attorney general and the former president of the Treasury Board over the government's unethical conduct and interference in judicial independence.
Last week, the case against Vice-Admiral Norman fell apart just as we learned that a former star general, the Liberal MP for Orléans, was about to testify against his own government.
My question is for the Prime Minister, and it is about his credibility. If he cannot hold the trust of respected Liberals, how is he going to hold the trust of the Canadian people?
View David Lametti Profile
Lib. (QC)
Mr. Speaker, the case to which the hon. member referred was handled by the Public Prosecution Service of Canada, which is independent from the government and independent from the Department of Justice.
My office had no role whatsoever in the handling of this prosecution. That includes the decision to lay charges and the decision to stay charges, as well as the prosecution in-between.
View Charlie Angus Profile
NDP (ON)
View Charlie Angus Profile
2019-05-14 14:37 [p.27760]
Mr. Speaker, I can see why the Prime Minister does not want to answer. He is becoming the political equivalent of Monty Python's Black Knight.
He speaks of independence, but it was the Prime Minister who stated that there would be a court case against Vice-Admiral Norman, and we have seen how that ended up. Last week he was defending his decision to vet judges through a Liberal donor base; the week before that he was shrugging off a political leak on a Supreme Court nominee, and the week before that, well, I am going to give him a pass today on SNC.
I have a simple question for the Prime Minister. When is he going to apologize to Vice-Admiral Norman and the taxpayers of Canada?
Results: 121 - 150 of 2763 | Page: 5 of 93

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