Interventions in the House of Commons
 
 
 
RSS feed based on search criteria Export search results - CSV (plain text) Export search results - XML
Add search criteria
View François Choquette Profile
NDP (QC)
View François Choquette Profile
2018-06-07 13:17 [p.20437]
Mr. Speaker, it is important to rise to speak to this fundamental bill. As I mentioned earlier, at 138 pages, Bill C-59, an act respecting national security matters, is a real omnibus bill. Unfortunately, there are still problems with this bill. That is why we are going to have to oppose it. It does not meet all our expectations.
We opposed BillC-51. We were the only ones to support compliance with the Charter of Rights and Freedoms in order to safeguard Canadians' rights and freedoms in 2015. The Liberals and the Conservatives voted for that bill, which was condemned by all Canadians. That is the reason why the Liberals later stated in their campaign that the bill made no sense and that they would rescind it if they were elected. They have finally woken up three years later. Unfortunately, the bill does not deliver on those promises.
There are elements missing. For example, the Liberals promised to fully repeal BillC-51, and they are not doing that. Another extremely important thing that I want to spend some time talking about is the fact that they should have replaced the existing ministerial directive on torture in order to ensure that Canada stands for an absolute prohibition on torture. A lawful society, a society that respects the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and the UN Charter of Rights, should obviously not allow torture. However, once again, Canada is somewhat indirectly complicit in torture that is happening around the world. We have long been calling on the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness to repeal and replace the 2010 directive on torture to ensure that Canada stands for an absolute prohibition on torture. More specifically, we want to ensure that, under no circumstances, will Canada use information from foreign countries that could have been obtained using torture or share information that is likely to result in torture. We have bad memories of the horrors endured by some Canadians such as Maher Arar, Abdullah Almaki, Amhad Abou El Maati, and Muayyed Nureddin. Canadians have suffered torture, so we are in some way complicit. It is very important that we resolve this problem, but unfortunately, the new directive, issued in October 2017, does not forbid the RCMP, CSIS, or the CBSA from using information that may have been obtained through torture in another country.
The new instructions feature not a single semantic change, since they authorize the use of information obtained by torture in certain cases. That is completely unacceptable. Canada should take a leading role in preventing torture and should never agree to use or share information that is likely to result in torture in other countries around the world. We should be a leader on this issue.
There is another extremely important file that I want to talk about that this bill does not address and that is the infamous no-fly list. This list and the unacceptable delays in funding redress mechanisms are regrettable. There is currently no effective redress mechanism to help people who suffer the consequences from being added to this list. Some Canadian families are very concerned. They want to protect their rights because children are at risk of being detained by airport security after mistakenly being added to the list, a list that prevents them from being able to fly.
We are very worried about that. We are working with No Fly List Kids. We hope that the Liberal government will wake up. It should have fixed this situation in this bill, especially considering that this is an omnibus bill.
Speaking of security, I want to mention two security-related events that occurred in Drummond that had a significant impact. The first was on May 29 and was reported by journalist Ghyslain Bergeron, who is very well known in Drummondville. A dozen or so firefighters from Saint-Félix-de-Kingsey were called to rescue a couple stranded on the Saint-François river. Led by the town's fire chief, Pierre Blanchette, they headed to the area and courageously rescued the couple. It is extremely important to acknowledge acts of bravery when we talk about the safety our our constituents.
I also want to talk about Rosalie Sauvageau, a 19-year-old woman who received a certificate of honour from the City of Drummondville after an unfortunate event at a party in Saint-Thérèse park. A bouncy castle was blown away by the wind, and she immediately rushed the children out of the bouncy castle, bringing them to safety. Not long after, a gust of wind blew one of the bouncy castles into Rivière Saint-François. Fortunately, Rosalie Sauvageau had the presence of mind, the quickness, and the courage to keep these children safe. I mentioned these events because the safety and bravery of our fellow citizens is important.
To come back to the bill, I must admit that there are some good things in it, but there are also some parts that worry us, in particular the new definition of an activity that undermines the security of Canada. This definition was amended to include any activity that threatens the lives or the security of individuals, or an individual who has a connection to Canada and who is outside Canada. This definition is pernicious and dangerous, because it will now include activities that involve significant or widespread interference with critical infrastructure.
The Liberal government just recently purchased the Kinder Morgan pipeline, a 65-year-old pipeline that the company originally bought for $500,000. The government bought it for the staggering price of $4.5 billion, with money from the taxes paid by Canadians and the people of greater Drummond, and claimed that it was essential to Canada.
Does that mean that the Liberal government could tell the thousands of people protesting against this pipeline that they are substantially obstructing essential infrastructure?
We are rather concerned about that. This clause of the bill creates potential problems for people who peacefully protest projects such as the Kinder Morgan pipeline. That is why we are voting against this bill. The Liberals have to go back to the drawing board. We must improve this bill and ensure that the Charter of Rights and Freedoms is upheld.
Monsieur le Président, c'est important de prendre la parole sur ce projet de loi fondamental. Comme je le mentionnais tout à l'heure, le projet de loi  C-59, Loi concernant des questions de sécurité nationale est un véritable projet de loi omnibus de 138 pages. Malheureusement, il y a encore des problèmes qui n'ont pas été résolus dans ce projet de loi. C'est pour cela que nous allons devoir nous opposer au projet de loi. C'est un projet de loi qui ne répond pas à toutes nos attentes.
Nous nous sommes opposés au projet de loi C-51. Nous étions parmi les seuls à nous tenir debout pour respecter la Charte des droits et libertés veiller à garantir les droits des Canadiens et Canadiennes en 2015. Les libéraux et les conservateurs avaient voté en faveur de ce projet de loi qui avait été décrié par tous les Canadiens et les Canadiennes. C'est pour cela que, par la suite, les libéraux ont dit en campagne électorale que ce projet de loi n'avait pas de sens qu'ils le renverseraient lorsqu'ils seraient au pouvoir. Trois ans plus tard, enfin ils se réveillent. Malheureusement, le projet de loi n'accomplit pas les promesses.
Il manque des aspects. Par exemple, ils avaient promis d'abroger complètement la loi C-51, et ils ne font pas. Ce qui est extrêmement important aussi et sur quoi je vais m'attarder, c'est qu'ils auraient dû remplacer la directive ministérielle actuelle au sujet de la torture afin de s'assurer que le Canada adopte une position qui interdit la torture de manière absolue. Une société de droit, une société qui respecte la Charte canadienne des droits, mais aussi les droits des Nations unies ne doit pas accepter la torture, cela va de soi. Malheureusement, d'une manière un peu détournée, encore une fois, le Canada est complice de la torture qui se passe partout dans le monde. Nous avons demandé depuis longtemps au ministre de la Sécurité publique et de la Protection civile d'abroger et de remplacer la directive de 2010 sur la torture pour veiller à ce que le Canada défende l'interdiction absolue de la torture, plus particulièrement qu'on n'utilise en aucun cas des renseignements que d'autres pays auraient pu obtenir sous la torture ni qu'on communique des renseignements susceptibles de donner lieu à de la torture. Nous avons des souvenirs désagréables concernant les horreurs qu'ont subies certains Canadiens comme Maher Arar, Abdullah Almaki, Amhad Abou El Maati et Muayyed Nureddin. Des Canadiens qui ont souffert de torture dont nous sommes, en quelques sortes, un peu complice. C'est très important qu'on puisse régler ce problème, mais malheureusement la nouvelle directive, introduite en octobre 2017, n'interdit pas à la GRC, aux espions ni aux agences frontalières d'utiliser les renseignements qui ont possiblement été obtenus à l'étranger au moyen de la torture.
Les nouvelles instructions ne contiennent aucun changement sémantique puisqu'elles autorisent l'utilisation de renseignements obtenus par la torture dans certains cas. C'est totalement inacceptable. Le Canada devrait être un chef de file pour lutter contre la torture et ne devrait jamais accepter d'utiliser ou de donner des renseignements susceptibles d'entraîner de la torture partout dans le monde. Nous devrions être un chef de file dans ce dossier.
Il y a aussi un dossier extrêmement important duquel je veux parler et qui n'est pas réglé dans ce projet de loi, c'est le fameux problème de la liste d'interdiction de vol. On ne peut que déplorer cette liste et les retards inacceptables en matière de financement de mécanismes de recours. Il n'y a pas de mécanisme de recours efficace présentement pour venir en aide aux gens qui souffrent de cette inscription. Il y a des familles canadiennes qui sont très préoccupées. Elles veulent protéger leurs droits, parce qu'il y a des enfants qui pourraient être retenus par des agents de sécurité à l'aéroport parce qu'ils sont inscrits par erreur sur la liste. Une liste qui les place en interdiction de vol.
Nous sommes très inquiets par rapport à cela. Nous travaillons d'ailleurs avec le groupe No Fly List Kids. Nous espérons que le gouvernement libéral va se réveiller. Il aurait dû remédier à cette situation dans ce projet de loi. Comme c'est un projet de loi omnibus, il pouvait le faire.
En parlant de sécurité, je voudrais mentionner deux événements relatifs à la sécurité qui ont eu lieu dans Drummond et qui ont eu un impact important. Le premier est survenu le 29 mai dernier et a été rapporté par le journaliste Ghyslain Bergeron, qui est très connu dans Drummondville. Une dizaine de pompiers de Saint-Félix-de-Kingsey ont été appelés à sauver un couple qui était pris sur la rivière Saint-François. Avec le directeur du service d'incendie de la municipalité, Pierre Blanchette, ils se sont dirigés là-bas pour courageusement venir en aide à ce couple. Il est extrêmement important de souligner ces actes courageux lorsqu'on parle de la sécurité de nos concitoyens.
Ensuite, je veux parler d'une jeune dame de 19 ans, Rosalie Sauvageau, qui a reçu un certificat honorifique de la part de la Ville de Drummondville après un événement malheureux survenu dans le cadre d'une fête au parc Saint-Thérèse. Un jeu gonflable s'est envolé à la suite d'une rafale et elle est tout de suite intervenue auprès des jeunes pour leur dire de sortir des jeux rapidement, les mettant ainsi en sécurité. Peu après, une rafale a emporté un des jeux gonflables dans la rivière Saint-François. Heureusement, Rosalie Sauvageau a eu l'esprit, la vivacité et le courage de s'occuper de la sécurité des jeunes. Je tenais à souligner ces événements, parce que la sécurité et la bravoure de nos concitoyens sont importantes.
Pour revenir au projet de loi, je dois dire qu'il contient de bonnes choses, mais il y a tout de même des éléments qui nous préoccupent, notamment la nouvelle définition des activités portant atteinte à la sécurité du Canada. Celle-ci a été modifié afin d'inclure les activités qui menacent la vie ou la sécurité de la population au Canada ou des personnes qui ont un lien avec le Canada et qui se trouvent à l'étranger. Cette définition est pernicieuse et dangereuse, parce qu'elle comprendra dorénavant les activités ayant pour effet d'entraver de manière considérable ou à grande échelle le fonctionnement d'infrastructures essentielles.
On sait que le gouvernement libéral vient d'acheter l'oléoduc de Kinder Morgan, un vieux pipeline de 65 ans que cette compagnie avait payé 500 000 $. Il l'a acheté au prix faramineux de 4,5 milliards de dollars, et ce, avec les taxes et les impôts des Canadiens des Canadiennes et des gens du Grand Drummond, en disant qu'il était essentiel pour le Canada.
Est-ce que cela signifie que le gouvernement libéral pourra dire aux manifestants qui s'opposeraient à ce pipeline — et il y en a des milliers — qu'ils entravent de manière considérable une infrastructure essentielle?
Cela nous préoccupe beaucoup. Cet article du projet de loi crée des possibilités dangereuses pour les manifestants pacifiques qui s'opposent à des projets comme celui de Kinder Morgan. C'est pourquoi nous allons voter contre ce projet de loi. Les libéraux doivent refaire leur travail. Il faut améliorer ce projet de loi et s'assurer que la Charte des droits et libertés est respectée.
Result: 1 - 1 of 1