Interventions in the House of Commons
 
 
 
RSS feed based on search criteria Export search results - CSV (plain text) Export search results - XML
Add search criteria
View Matthew Dubé Profile
NDP (QC)
View Matthew Dubé Profile
2019-06-07 12:27 [p.28761]
Madam Speaker, I am very pleased to rise in the House today.
I ask for the indulgence of the House and I hope no one will get up on a point of order on this, but because I am making a speech on a specific day, I did want to shout out to two of my biggest supporters.
The first is to my wife Chantale, whose birthday is today. I want to wish her a happy birthday. Even bigger news is that we are expecting a baby at the end of July. I want to shout out the fact that she has been working very hard at her own job, which is obviously a very exhausting thing, and so the patience she has for my uncomparable fatigue certainly is something that I really do thank her for and love her very much for.
I do not want to create any jealousy in the household, so I certainly want to give a shout-out to her daughter and our daughter Lydia, who is also a big supporter of mine. We are a threesome, and as I said at my wedding last year, I had the luck of falling in love twice. I wanted to take this opportunity, not knowing whether I will have another one before the election, to shout out to them and tell them how much I love them.
I thank my colleagues for their warm thoughts that they have shared with me.
On a more serious note, I would like to talk about the Senate amendments to Bill  C-59. More specifically, I would like to talk about the process per se and then come back to certain aspects of Bill  C-59, particularly those about which I raised questions with the minister—questions that have yet to be answered properly, if at all.
I want to begin by touching on a more timely issue related to a bill that is currently before the House, Bill C-98. This bill will give more authority to the Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the RCMP so that it also covers the Canada Border Services Agency. That is important because we have been talking for a long time about how the CBSA, the only agency that has a role to play in our national security, still does not have a body whose sole function is to review its operations.
Of course, there is the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians, which was created by Bill C-22, and there will soon be a committee created by Bill  C-59 that will affect the CBSA, but only with regard to its national security related activities.
I am talking about a committee whose sole responsibility would be to review the activities of the Canada Border Services Agency and to handle internal complaints, such as the allegations of harassment that have been reported in the media in recent years, or complaints that Muslim citizens may make about profiling.
It is very important that there be some oversight or further review. I will say that, as soon as an article is published, either about a problem at the border, about the union complaining about the mistreatment of workers or about problems connected to the agency, the minister comes out with great fanfare to remind everyone that he made a deep and sincere promise to create a system that would properly handle these complaints and that there would be some oversight or review of the agency.
What has happened in four whole years? Nothing at all.
For years now, every time there is a report in the news or an article comes out detailing various allegations of problems, I have just been copying and pasting the last tweet I posted. The situation keeps repeating, but the government is not doing anything.
This situation is problematic because the minister introduced a bill at the last minute, as the clock is winding down on this Parliament, and the bill has not even been referred yet to the House of Commons Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security.
I have a hard time believing that we will pass this bill in the House and an even harder time seeing how it is going to get through the Senate.
That is important because, in his speech, the minister himself alluded to the fact that in fall 2016, when the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security, of which I am a member, travelled across the country to study the issue and make recommendations ahead of introducing Bill C-59, the recommendation to create a committee tasked with studying the specific activities of the CBSA was one of the most important recommendations. As we see in BillC-98, the government did not take this opportunity to do any such thing.
It is certainly troubling, because Bill C-59 is an omnibus piece of legislation. I pleaded with the House, the minister and indeed even the Senate, when it reached the Senate, through different procedural mechanisms, to consider parts of the bill separately, because, as the minister correctly pointed out, this is a huge overhaul of our national security apparatus. The concern with that is not only the consideration that is required, but also the fact that some of these elements, which I will come back to in a moment, were not even part of the national security consultations that both his department and the committee, through the study it did, actually took the time to examine.
More specifically, coming back to and concluding the point on BillC-98, the minister does not seem to have acted in a prompt way, considering his commitments when it comes to oversight and/or a review of the CBSA. He said in his answer to my earlier question on his speech that it was not within the scope of this bill. That is interesting, not only because this is omnibus legislation, but also because the government specifically referred the legislation to committee prior to second reading with the goal of allowing amendments that were beyond the scope of the bill on the understanding that it did want this to be a large overhaul.
I have a hard time understanding why, with all the indicators being there that it wanted this to be a large, broad-reaching thing and wanted to have things beyond the scope, it would not have allowed for this type of mechanism. Instead, we find we have a bill, BillC-98, arriving at the 11th hour, without a proper opportunity to make its way through Parliament before the next election.
I talked about how this is an omnibus bill, which makes it problematic in several ways. I wrote a letter to some senators about children whose names are on the no-fly list and the No Fly List Kids group, which the minister talked about. I know the group very well. I would like to congratulate the parents for their tireless efforts on their children's behalf.
Some of the children are on the list simply because the list is racist. Basically, the fact that the names appear multiple times is actually a kind of profiling. We could certainly have a debate about how effective the list is. This list is totally outdated and flawed because so many people share similar names. It is absurd that there was nothing around this list that made it possible for airlines and the agents who managed the list and enforced the rules before the bill was passed to distinguish between a terrorist threat and a very young child.
Again, I thank the parents for their tireless efforts and for the work they did in a non-partisan spirit. They may not be partisan, but I certainly am. I will therefore take this opportunity to say that I am appalled at the way the government has taken these families and children hostage for the sake of passing an omnibus bill.
The minister said that the changes to the no-fly list would have repercussions on a recourse mechanism that would stop these children from being harassed every time they go to the airport. This part of the bill alone accounted for several hundred pages.
I asked the government why it did not split this part from the rest of the bill so it would pass sooner, if it really believed it would deliver justice to these families and their kids. We object to certain components or aspects of the list. We are even prepared to challenge the usefulness of the list and the flaws it may have. If there are any worthy objectives, we are willing to consider them. However, again, our hands were tied by the use of omnibus legislation. During the election campaign, the Liberals promised to make omnibus bills a thing of the past.
I know parents will not say that, and I do not expect them to do so. I commend them again for their non-partisan approach. However, it is appalling and unacceptable that they have been taken hostage.
Moreover, there is also BillC-21.
I will digress here for a moment. BillC-21, which we opposed, was a very troubling piece of legislation that dealt with the sharing of border information with the Americans, among others. This involved information on citizens travelling between Canada and the United States. Bill C-59 stalled in the Senate, much like Bill C-21.
As the Minister of Public Safety's press secretary was responding to the concerns of parents who have children on the no-fly list, he suddenly started talking about BillC-21 as a solution for implementing the redress system for people who want to file a complaint or do not want to be delayed at the airport for a name on the list, when it is not the individual identified. I think it is absolutely awful that these families are being used as bargaining chips to push through a bill that contains many points that have nothing to do with them and warrant further study. In my view, those aspects have not been examined thoroughly enough to move the bill forward.
I thank the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness for recognizing the work I did in committee, even though it took two attempts when he responded to my questions earlier today. In committee, I presented almost 200 amendments. Very few of them were accepted, which was not a surprise.
I would like to focus specifically on one of the Senate's amendments that the government agreed to. This amendment is important and quite simple, I would say even unremarkable. It proposes to add a provision enabling us to review the bill after three years, rather than five, and make amendments if required. That is important because we are proposing significant and far-reaching changes to our national security system. What I find intriguing is that I proposed the same amendment in committee, which I substantiated with the help of expert testimony, and the Liberals rejected my amendment. Now, all of a sudden, the Senate is proposing the same amendment and the government is agreeing to it in the motion we are debating today.
I asked the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness why the Liberals were not willing to put partisanship aside in a parliamentary committee and accept an opposition amendment that proposed a very simple measure but are agreeing to it today. He answered that they had taken the time to reflect and changed their minds when the bill was in the Senate. I am not going to spend too much of my precious time on that, but I find it somewhat difficult to accept because nothing has changed. Experts appeared before the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security, and it was very clear, simple and reasonable. Having said that, I thank the minister for finally recognizing this morning that I contributed to this process.
I also want to talk about some of what concerns us about the bill. There are two pieces specifically with regard to what was BillC-51 under the previous government, and a few aspects new to this bill that have been brought forward that cause us some concern and consternation.
There are two pieces in BillC-51 that raised the biggest concerns at the time of debate in the previous Parliament and raised the biggest concerns on the part of Canadians as well, leading to protests outside our committee hearings when we travelled the country to five major cities in five days in October 2016. The first has to do with threat disruption, and the second is the information-sharing regime that was brought in by Bill C-51. Both of those things are concerning, for different reasons.
The threat disruption powers offered to CSIS are of concern because at the end of the day, the reason CSIS was created in the first place was that there was an understanding and consensus in Canada that there had to be a separation between the RCMP's role in law enforcement, which is making arrests and the work that revolves around that, and intelligence gathering, which is the work our intelligence service has to do, so they were separated.
However, bringing us back closer to the point where we start to lose that distinction with regard to the threat disruption powers means that a concern about constitutionality will remain. In fact, the experts at committee did say that Bill C-59, while less unconstitutional than what the Conservatives brought forward in the previous Parliament, had yet to be tested, and there was still some uncertainty about it.
We still believe it is not necessary for CSIS to have these powers. That distinction remains important if we want to be in keeping with the events that led to the separation in the first place, namely the barn burnings, the Macdonald Commission and all those things that folks who have followed this debate know full well, but which we do not have time to get into today.
The other point is the sharing of information, which we are all familiar with. We opened the door to more liberal sharing of information, no pun intended, between the various government departments. That is worrisome. In Canada, one of the most highly publicized cases of human rights violations was the situation of Maher Arar while he was abroad, which led to the Arar commission. In such cases, we know that the sharing of information with other administrations is one of the factors that can lead to the violation of human rights or torture. There are places in the world where human rights are almost or completely non-existent. We find that the sharing of information between Canadian departments can exacerbate such situations, particularly when information is shared between the police or the Canadian Security Intelligence Service and the Department of Foreign Affairs.
There is an individual who was tortured abroad who is currently suing the government. His name escapes me at the moment. I hope he will forgive me. Global Affairs Canada tried to get him a passport to bring him back to Canada, regardless of whether the accusations against him were true, because he was still a Canadian citizen. However, overwhelming evidence suggests that CSIS and the RCMP worked together with foreign authorities to keep him abroad.
More information sharing can exacerbate that type of problem because, in the government, the left hand does not always know what the right hand is doing. Some information can fall into the wrong hands. If the Department of Foreign Affairs is trying to get a passport for someone and is obligated by law to share that information with CSIS, whose interests are completely different than those of our diplomats, this could put us on a slippery slope.
The much-criticized information sharing system will remain in place with Bill C-59. I do not have the time to list all the experts and civil society groups that criticized this system, but I will mention Amnesty International, which is a well-known organization that does excellent work. This organization is among those critical of allowing the information sharing to continue, in light of the human rights impact it can have, especially in other countries.
Since the bill was sent back to committee before second reading, we had the advantage of being able to propose amendments that went beyond the scope of the bill. We realized that this was a missed opportunity. It was a two-step process, and I urge those watching and those interested in the debates to go take a look at how it went down. There were several votes and we called for a recorded division. Votes can sometimes be faster in committee, but this time we took the time to do a recorded division.
There were two proposals. The Liberals were proposing an amendment to the legislation. We were pleased to support the amendment, since it was high time we had an act stating that we do not support torture in another country as a result of the actions of our national security agencies or police forces. Nevertheless, since this amendment still relies on a ministerial directive, the bill is far from being perfect.
I also proposed amendments to make it illegal to share any information that would lead to the torture of an individual in another country. The amendments were rejected.
I urge my colleagues to read about them, because I am running out of time. As you can see, 20 minutes is not enough, but I would be happy to take questions and comments.
Madame la Présidente, je suis très heureux de prendre la parole à la Chambre aujourd'hui.
Je demande à la Chambre d'être indulgente et j'espère que personne n'invoquera le Règlement, car je voudrais profiter de l'occasion qui m'est donnée de prononcer ce discours un jour particulier pour saluer deux de mes plus ferventes partisanes.
La première est mon épouse Chantale, dont c'est l'anniversaire aujourd'hui. Je veux lui souhaiter un joyeux anniversaire. Fait encore plus important, nous attendons un bébé à la fin de juillet. Je tiens à rendre hommage à mon épouse, car elle ne ménage aucun effort dans son travail à elle, qui est manifestement épuisant. Je tiens à la remercier de la grande patience dont elle fait preuve à mon égard quand je suis fatigué, même si ma fatigue n'est assurément pas comparable à la sienne. Je tiens à lui dire que je l'aime beaucoup.
Comme je ne voudrais pas susciter la jalousie dans notre foyer, je salue également notre fille, Lydia, qui est aussi une de mes grandes partisanes. Nous formons un trio et, comme je l'ai dit lors de notre mariage l'an dernier, j'ai eu la chance de tomber amoureux à deux reprises. Comme j'ignore si l'occasion se représentera avant les élections, je voulais en profiter pour les saluer et leur dire combien je les aime.
Je remercie les députés des bonnes pensées dont ils m'ont fait part.
Sur une note plus sérieuse, j'aimerais parler des amendements du Sénat au projet de loi  C-59. J'aimerais plus précisément parler du processus en tant que tel et revenir ensuite sur certains aspects du projet de loi  C-59, notamment en ce qui concerne des questions que j'ai soulevées auprès du ministre, des questions qui demeurent sans réponse ou, à tout le moins, sans réponse adéquate.
J'aimerais commencer par aborder une question plus actuelle concernant un projet de loi devant la Chambre au moment où on se parle. Il s'agit du projet de loi C-98, un projet de loi qui va donner plus de pouvoirs à la Commission civile d'examen et de traitement des plaintes relatives à la GRC pour qu'elle couvre également l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada. C'est important parce qu'on parle depuis longtemps du fait que l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada, seule agence ayant un rôle à jouer dans notre sécurité nationale, demeure sans comité qui aurait pour unique fonction l'examen de ses activités.
Bien sûr, il y a le Comité des parlementaires sur la sécurité nationale et le renseignement, qui a été créé par le projet de loi C-22, et il y aura bientôt un comité créé par le projet de loi  C-59, qui va toucher à l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada, mais seulement pour les activités concernant la sécurité nationale.
Or, j'aborde ici la question d'un comité qui serait consacré strictement à l'examen des activités de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada, mais également au traitement des plaintes à l'interne, par exemple les différentes allégations sur le harcèlement, qu'on a vues dans les médias au cours des dernières années, ou les plaintes que pourraient formuler des citoyens d'origine musulmane relativement au profilage.
Le fait qu'il existe une surveillance ou un examen plus approfondi est très important. Je peux dire que, chaque fois qu'un article est publié, que ce soit sur une situation problématique à la frontière, sur le syndicat qui se plaint du mauvais traitement de ses travailleurs ou des situations problématiques liées à l'Agence, le ministre sort en grande pompe pour rappeler que c'était une promesse profonde et un engagement important de sa part d'avoir un appareil qui ferait en sorte de traiter ces plaintes de façon adéquate et qu'il y aurait donc une surveillance ou un examen de l'Agence.
Or que s'est-il passé en quatre ans? Il ne s'est rien passé.
Chaque fois qu'il y a un reportage dans les médias, ou un article traitant des différentes allégations problématiques, j'en suis rendu à faire un copier-coller du dernier gazouillis que j'ai publié, et ce, depuis plusieurs années. En effet, la situation se répète, sans aucun geste de la part de ce gouvernement.
Si cette situation est problématique, c'est que le ministre dépose un projet de loi à minuit moins dix, qu'il reste peu de temps au Parlement actuel et que le projet de loi n'est même pas encore à l'étude au Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale de la Chambre des communes.
J'ai du mal à croire que nous pourrons adopter le projet de loi à la Chambre, et je doute encore plus qu'il chemine au Sénat.
Cela est important, parce que le ministre lui-même a fait allusion, dans son discours, au fait que, à l'automne 2016, lorsque le Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale, auquel je siège, a voyagé d'un bout à l'autre du pays pour étudier la question et formuler des recommandations en vue du dépôt du projet de loi  C-59, la recommandation de créer un comité qui soit attitré à l'examen précis des activités de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada était l'une des plus importantes. Or, comme on le voit dans le projet de loi C-98, on n'a pas profité de cette occasion pour poser des gestes en ce sens.
Il y a de quoi s'inquiéter, car le projet de loi  C-59 est une mesure législative omnibus. J'ai plaidé auprès de la Chambre, du ministre et même du Sénat, quand le projet de loi est arrivé au Sénat, en me servant de divers mécanismes de procédure, pour qu'on étudie certaines parties du projet de loi séparément parce que, comme l'a indiqué à juste titre le ministre, il est question d'un énorme remaniement de l'appareil de sécurité nationale. Ce n'est pas seulement qu'il faille prendre le temps de bien étudier la question, mais aussi que certains éléments, sur lesquels je reviendrai dans un instant, ne faisaient même pas partie des sujets examinés dans le cadre des consultations sur la sécurité nationale menées par le ministère ainsi que lors de l'étude faite par le comité.
Plus particulièrement, pour conclure au sujet du projet de loi C-98, le ministre ne semble pas avoir agi rapidement compte tenu des engagements qu'il avait pris quant à la surveillance ou l'examen des activités de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada. En réponse à la question que je lui ai posée après son discours, il a dit que cela dépassait la portée du projet de loi. Voilà qui est intéressant parce qu'il s'agit d'une mesure législative omnibus et parce que le gouvernement l'a renvoyée au comité avant l'étape de la deuxième lecture expressément dans le but de permettre des amendements dépassant la portée du projet de loi puisqu'on visait un important remaniement.
J'ai du mal à comprendre pourquoi il n'était pas possible d'intégrer ce genre de mécanisme au projet de loi actuel, puisque tout indiquait qu'on voulait un vaste projet de loi et qu'on envisageait même d'en élargir la portée. Nous nous retrouvons plutôt avec le projet de loi C-98, qui a été présenté à la dernière minute et qui ne pourra pas être adopté par le Parlement avant les prochaines élections.
J'ai parlé de la nature omnibus du projet de loi. Plusieurs aspects sont inquiétants à cet égard. J'ai écrit une lettre à des sénateurs au sujet des enfants dont le nom est sur la liste d'interdiction de vol et du groupe EnfantsInterditDeVol, dont le ministre a parlé. Je connais très bien ce groupe. J'aimerais féliciter les parents pour leurs efforts acharnés en ce qui concerne le dossier de leurs enfants.
Dans certains cas, ces enfants sont sur la liste simplement parce que cette liste est raciste. À la base, le fait que des noms se répètent est, en quelque sorte, une forme de profilage. Bien entendu, on pourrait tenir un débat sur l'efficacité de cette liste. Or elle est tout à fait désuète et défectueuse à cause de la similarité des noms qui se répètent. C'est effronté de prétendre qu'aucun élément de cette liste ne permettait, à une compagnie aérienne et aux agents qui géraient la liste et appliquaient les règles avant que ce projet de loi ne soit adopté, de faire la distinction entre une menace terroriste et un très jeune enfant.
Encore une fois, je félicite les parents pour leurs efforts acharnés et le travail qu'ils ont fait dans un esprit non partisan. Ils ne sont pas partisans, mais, moi, par contre, je le suis. Je profite donc de ma tribune pour dire que je trouve inadmissible la façon dont on a pris en otage ces familles et ces enfants pour faire adopter un projet de loi omnibus.
En effet, le ministre a dit que les changements apportés à la liste d'interdiction de vol allaient avoir des répercussions sur un système de redressement, qui permettrait à ces enfants de voyager sans se faire harceler à l'aéroport. Cette partie du projet de loi à elle seule comportait plusieurs centaines de pages.
J'ai demandé au gouvernement, s'il croyait réellement que cette partie du projet de loi rendrait justice à ces familles et à ces enfants, pourquoi il ne scindait pas le projet de loi et il ne l'adoptait pas plus rapidement. Nous nous opposons à plusieurs volets, à plusieurs aspects de la liste. Nous sommes même disposés à débattre de l'utilité de la liste et des défaillances qui peuvent exister. S'il y a des objectifs louables, nous sommes prêts à les considérer. Cependant, encore une fois, nous avons eu les mains liées par le mécanisme d'un projet de loi omnibus. Les libéraux nous avaient promis en campagne électorale que ce serait chose du passé.
Je sais que les parents ne diront pas cela, et je ne m'attends pas à ce qu'ils le fassent. Je les salue encore une fois pour leur esprit non partisan. Cependant, je trouve honteux et inadmissible qu'on les ait tenus en otage.
Par ailleurs, il y a aussi le projet de loi C-21.
J'ouvre ici une parenthèse. Le projet de loiC-21, auquel nous nous sommes opposés, était un projet de loi extrêmement inquiétant qui portait sur le partage d'informations à la frontière avec les Américains, entre autres. Il était donc question d'informations sur les citoyens qui se déplacent entre le Canada et les États-Unis. Le projet de loi  C-59 a été retardé au Sénat, tout comme le projet de loi C-21.
Au fur et à mesure que l'attaché de presse du ministre de la Sécurité publique répondait aux doléances des parents ayant des enfants sur la liste d'interdiction de vol, il parlait soudainement du projet de loi C-21 comme d'une solution de mise en œuvre du système de recours pour les personnes voulant déposer une plainte ou ne voulant pas être retardées à l'aéroport pour un nom sur la liste, alors qu'il ne s'agit pas de l'individu identifié. Je trouve absolument effrayant qu'on utilise ces familles comme monnaie d'échange pour faire cheminer un projet de loi qui touche beaucoup d'éléments qui ne les regardent pas et qui méritent une étude plus approfondie. Selon moi, ces éléments n'ont pas encore été suffisamment examinés pour faire avancer le projet de loi.
Je remercie le ministre de la Sécurité publique d'avoir reconnu le travail que j'ai fait au comité, même s'il lui a fallu deux tentatives lorsqu'il répondait à mes questions plus tôt aujourd'hui. En comité, j'ai présenté près de 200 amendements, dont très peu ont été acceptés, ce qui ne fut pas une surprise.
J'aimerais aborder plus particulièrement un des amendements du Sénat qui a été accepté par le gouvernement. Cet amendement est important et bien simple, pour ne pas dire banal. Il propose d'ajouter une disposition à la loi afin que nous puissions réexaminer le projet de loi après trois ans, plutôt que cinq, et lui apporter des modifications si cela est nécessaire. C'est important puisque nous proposons des changements importants et profonds à notre système de sécurité nationale. Ce que je trouve fascinant, c'est que j'ai proposé le même amendement en comité, que j'ai justifié à l'aide des témoignages des experts, et les libéraux ont rejeté mon amendement. Or, tout à coup, le Sénat propose le même amendement et le gouvernement l'accepte dans la motion que nous débattons aujourd'hui.
J'ai demandé au ministre de la Sécurité publique pourquoi les libéraux n'étaient pas prêts à mettre la partisanerie de côté dans un comité parlementaire et à accepter un amendement de l'opposition qui proposait une mesure bien simple, alors qu'ils l'acceptent aujourd'hui. Il m'a répondu qu'ils avaient pris le temps de réfléchir et qu'ils avaient changé d'avis lorsque le projet de loi était au Sénat. Je ne m'attarderai pas trop là-dessus puisque mon temps est précieux, mais j'ai un peu de mal à accepter cela puisque rien n'a changé. Les experts sont venus témoigner au Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale et c'était très clair, simple et raisonnable. Cela dit, je remercie le ministre d'avoir enfin reconnu, ce matin, que j'ai participé à ce processus.
J'aimerais également parler de certaines de nos préoccupations concernant le projet de loi. Deux dispositions du projet de loi actuel ayant trait au projet de loi C-51 du précédent gouvernement nous préoccupent, voire nous consternent, ainsi que quelques dispositions propres au projet de loi actuel.
Deux dispositions du projet de loi C-51 ont suscité plus de préoccupations que les autres lors du débat qui a eu lieu à la dernière législature. Ce sont elles qui préoccupaient le plus la population canadienne également, et c'est pourquoi des manifestations ont eu lieu à l'extérieur de la salle d'audience du comité dans les cinq grandes villes canadiennes qu'il a visitées en cinq jours, au cours du mois d'octobre 2016. La première disposition avait trait à la perturbation des menaces et la deuxième concernait le régime de communication d'information qui a été créé par le projet de loi C-51. Ces deux dispositions sont préoccupantes pour des raisons différentes.
Les pouvoirs de perturbation des menaces accordés au SCRS sont préoccupants, car le SCRS a initialement été créé parce qu'un consensus avait émergé au Canada autour de la nécessité de séparer le rôle d'application de la loi de la GRC, c'est-à-dire procéder à des arrestations et effectuer le travail qui s'y rapporte, de son rôle de collecte de renseignements, qui incombe désormais au SCRS. Les deux rôles ont donc été séparés.
Toutefois, en revenant à des dispositions où la distinction entre les pouvoirs n'est plus aussi nette en ce qui a trait à la perturbation de la menace, la question de la constitutionnalité se pose. D'ailleurs, les experts qui ont comparu devant le comité ont indiqué que, bien que le projet de loi  C-59 soit moins inconstitutionnel que celui qui a été présenté par les conservateurs à la législature précédente, il fallait encore le soumettre à l'épreuve des tribunaux et il restait encore une certaine incertitude à son sujet.
Nous croyons toujours qu'il n'est pas nécessaire que le SCRS ait ces pouvoirs. Il demeure important de distinguer les deux rôles compte tenu des événements qui ont mené à leur séparation, c'est-à-dire les granges incendiées, la Commission Macdonald et tous les autres événements dont les gens qui ont suivi ce débat sont bien au courant, mais dont nous n'avons pas le temps de discuter aujourd'hui.
L’autre élément, c’est le partage d’information, que nous connaissons très bien. Nous avons ouvert la porte à un partage d’information libéral, pour ne pas faire un mauvais jeu de mots, entre les différents ministères du gouvernement. C'est inquiétant. Au Canada, parmi les cas les plus médiatisés de violation des droits de la personne, il y a la situation que Maher Arar a vécue à l'étranger et qui a mené à la mise sur pied de la Commission Arar. Dans de tels cas, on sait que le partage d'information avec d'autres administrations est l'un des facteurs qui ont mené à la violation des droits de la personne ou à la torture. Il s'agit d'endroits dans le monde où les droits de la personne sont presque ou complètement inexistants. On constate que le partage d’information entre les ministères du Canada peut exacerber de telles situations, notamment lorsque cet échange a lieu entre la police ou le Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité et le ministère des Afffaires étrangères.
Il y a un citoyen qui a été torturé à l'étranger et qui poursuit actuellement le gouvernement. Son nom m'échappe, j'espère qu'il me pardonnera. Affaires mondiales Canada a tenté de lui procurer un passeport afin de le rapatrier, peu importe la véracité des accusations qui pesaient contre lui, car il demeurait un citoyen canadien. Cependant, des preuves accablantes nous portent à croire que le SCRS et la GRC auraient travaillé ensemble et avec les autorités étrangères pour le maintenir à l’étranger.
Un plus grand partage d’information peut exacerber ce genre de problème, car au gouvernement, la main gauche ne sait pas toujours ce que fait la main droite. Certaines informations peuvent tomber entre les mauvaises mains. Si le ministère des Affaires étrangères tente de procurer un passeport à un individu et qu'il est obligé par la loi de partager l’information avec le SCRS, qui a un intérêt tout autre que celui de nos diplomates, cela peut nous amener sur une pente glissante.
Avec le projet de loi  C-59, le régime de partage d’information qui a été dénoncé par plusieurs demeure donc en place. Je n’ai pas le temps de faire la liste exhaustive des experts et des groupes de la société civile qui ont critiqué cette réalité, mais je mentionnerai Amnistie internationale, qu'on connaît bien de réputation, qui fait un excellent travail. Ce groupe figure parmi ceux qui dénoncent le maintien de ce partage d’information, avec toutes les conséquences qu'il peut avoir pour les droits de la personne, surtout à l’étranger.
Comme le projet de loi a été renvoyé au comité avant la deuxième lecture, cela nous a conféré l’avantage de pouvoir proposer des amendements qui vont au-delà de sa portée. Nous avons constaté qu'une occasion a été ratée. Cette situation s'est déroulée en deux temps. J’invite les gens qui nous écoutent et ceux qui s’intéressent aux débats à aller voir comment cela s'est passé. Il y avait plusieurs votes et nous avons demandé un vote par appel nominal. En comité, les votes sont parfois plus rapides, mais cette fois-ci, nous avons pris le temps de faire un vote par appel nominal.
Il y avait deux propositions. D'une part, les libéraux proposaient un changement à la loi. Nous étions heureux de l'appuyer, car il était plus que temps que la loi contienne un énoncé disant que nous ne cautionnons pas la torture à l’étranger causée par les gestes de nos agences de sécurité nationale ou de nos forces policières ici. Néanmoins, comme ce changement à la loi repose toujours sur les directives ministérielles, la loi est bien loin d’être parfaite.
D'autre part, j’ai proposé des amendements visant à rendre illégal tout partage d’information qui mènerait à la torture à l’étranger. Ils ont été rejetés.
J'invite mes collègues à en prendre connaissance, car je suis à court de temps. Comme on peut le voir, 20 minutes, ce n'est pas suffisant, mais je serai heureux de répondre à des questions et des commentaires.
View Matthew Dubé Profile
NDP (QC)
View Matthew Dubé Profile
2018-06-18 17:36 [p.21175]
Mr. Speaker, I thank my colleagues for their speeches. Here we are again, debating Bill C-59 at third reading, and I would like to start by talking about the process of debate surrounding a bill, which started not with this government, but rather during the last Parliament with the former Bill C-51.
Contrary to what we have been hearing from the other side today and at other times as well, the NDP and the Green Party were the only ones that opposed Bill C-51 in the previous Parliament. I have heard many people talk about how they were aware that Canadians had concerns about their security, about how a balanced approach was vital, and about how they understood the bill was flawed. They took it for granted that they would come to power and then fix the many, many, many flaws in the bill. Some of those flaws are so dangerous that they threaten the rights, freedoms, and privacy of Canadians. Of course, I am talking about the Liberal Party, which supported Bill C-51 even as it criticized it. I remember that when it was before committee, the member for Malpeque, who is still an MP, spend his time criticizing it and talking about its flaws. Then the Liberal Party supported it anyway.
That is problematic because now the government is trying to use the bill to position itself as the champion of nuanced perspectives. The government keeps trying to say that there are two objectives, namely to protect Canadians and to protect Canadians' rights. I myself remember a rather different situation, which developed in the wake of the 2014 attack on Parliament. The Conservative government tried to leverage people's fear following that terrible event to make unnecessary legislative changes. I will comment further on what was really necessary to protect Canadians.
A legislative change was therefore proposed to increase the powers given to national security agencies, but nothing was done to enhance the oversight system, which already falls short of where it needs to be to ensure that their work is done in full compliance with our laws and in line with Canadians' expectations regarding their rights and freedoms. Surveys showed that Canadians obviously welcomed those measures because, after all, we were in a situation where ISIS was on the rise, and we had the attack in Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, which is not far from my region. We also had the attack right here in Parliament. They took advantage of people's fear, so there was some support for the measures presented in the bill.
To the NDP, our reflection in caucus made it very clear that we needed to stand up. We are elected to this place not only to represent our constituents, but also to be leaders on extremely difficult issues and to make the right decision, the decision that will ensure that we protect the rights of Canadians, even when that does not appear to be a popular decision.
Despite the fact that it seemed to be an unpopular decision, and despite the fact that the Liberals, seeing the polls, came out saying “We are just going to go with the wind and try and denounce the measures in the bill so that we can simultaneously protect ourselves from Conservative attacks and also try and outflank the NDP on the progressive principled stand of protecting Canadians' rights and freedoms,” what happened? The polls changed. As the official opposition, we fought that fight here in Parliament. Unlike the Liberals, we stood up to Stephen Harper's draconian BillC-51. We saw Canadians overwhelmingly oppose the measures that were in Bill C-51.
What happened after the election? We saw the Liberals try to square the circle they had created for themselves by denouncing and supporting legislation all at the same time. They said not to worry, because they were going to do what they do best, which is to consult. They consulted on election promises and things that were already debated in the previous Parliament.
The minister brought forward his green paper. The green paper was criticized, correctly and rightfully so, for going too far in one direction, for posing the question of how we could give more flexibility to law enforcement, how we could give them more tools to do their jobs, which is a complete misunderstanding of the concerns that Canadians had with Bill C-51 to begin with. It goes back to the earlier point I made. Instead of actually giving law enforcement the resources to create their tools, having a robust anti-radicalization strategy, and making sure that we do not see vulnerable young people falling through the cracks and being recruited by terrorist organizations like ISIS or the alt right that we see in these white supremacist groups, what happened?
We embarked on this consultation that was already going in one direction, and nearly two years after the Liberals coming into power, we finally see legislation tabled. The minister, in his speech earlier today, defended tabling that legislation in the dying days of a spring sitting of Parliament before the House rises for the summer by saying that we would have time to consider and contemplate the legislation over the summer. He neglected to mention that the very same powers that stood on shaky constitutional ground that were accorded to agencies like CSIS by the Conservatives' BillC-51 remain on the books, and as Michel Coulombe, the then director of CSIS, now retired, said repeatedly in committee, they are powers that were being used at that time.
It is all well and good to consult. Certainly, no one is opposed to the principles behind consultation, but when the consultation is about promises that were made to the Canadian people to fix legislation that undermined their rights while the very powers that undermined their rights are still on the books and being used, then one has to recognize the urgency to act.
The story continues because after this consultation the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security conducted a consultation. We made recommendations and the NDP prepared an excellent supplementary report, which supports the committee's unanimous recommendations, but also includes our own, in support of the bill introduced by my colleague from Esquimalt—Saanich—Sooke, which is on the Order Paper. He was the public safety critic before me and he led the charge, along with the member for Outremont, who was then the leader of the official opposition, against BillC-51. The bill introduced by my colleague from Esquimalt—Saanich—Sooke entirely repeals all of the legislation in Bill C-51.
Interestingly, the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness defended the fact that he did not repeal it all by stating that several MPs, including the member for Spadina—Fort York, said that the reason not to do so was that it would be a highly complex legislative endeavour. My colleague introduced a bill that is on the Order Paper and that does exactly that. With due respect to my colleague, it cannot be all that complex if we were able to draft a bill that achieved those exact objectives.
Bill C-59 was sent to the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security before second reading, on the pretext that this would make it possible to adopt a wider range of amendments, give the opposition more opportunities to be heard, and allow for a robust study. What was the end result? A total of 55 amendments were adopted, and we are proud of that. However, of those 55 amendments, two come from the NDP, and one of those relates to the preamble to one part of the bill. While I have no desire to impugn the Liberals' motives, the second amendment was adopted only once the wording met their approval. None of the Conservatives' amendments were adopted. Ultimately, it is not the end of the world, because we disagree on several points, but I hear all this talk about collaboration, yet none of the Green Party's amendments were adopted. This goes to show that the process was rigged and that the government had already decided on its approach.
The government is going to brag about the new part 1.1 of the legislation that has been adopted. Contrary to what the minister said when answering my question earlier today in debate, that would not create any new legal obligation in terms of how the system currently works. The ministerial directives that are adopted to prohibit—despite loopholes, it is important to note—the use of information obtained under torture will remain just that, ministerial directives. The legal obligation that the minister or the Governor in Council “may” recommend the issuing of directives to deputy heads of departments is just not good enough. If it were, the Liberals would have had no problem voting for amendments that I read into record at committee. Time does not permit me to reread the amendments into the record, but I read them into the record in my question for the minister. The amendments would have explicitly and categorically prohibited acquiring, using, or, in way, shape, or form, interacting with information, from a public safety perspective, that may have been obtained under the use of torture. That is in keeping with our obligations under international law conventions that Canada has signed on to.
On a recorded vote, on every single one of those amendments, every member of the committee, Liberal and Conservative alike, voted against them. I invite Canadians to look at that record, and I invite Canadians to listen to what the minister said in response to me. When public safety may be at risk, there is no bigger admission that they are open to using information obtained under the use of torture than saying that they want to keep the flexibility when Canadians are at risk. Let Canadians be assured that it has been proven time and again that information obtained under the use of torture is of the most unreliable sort. It not only does nothing to protect Canadians and ensure public safety, but most of the time it does the opposite, by leading law enforcement on wild goose chases with erroneous information that could put their lives at risk, and Canadian lives at risk, not to mention the abhorrent and flagrant breach of human rights here and elsewhere through having those types of provisions. Therefore, I will let the Liberals explain why they voted against those amendments to explicitly prohibit torture, and why they feel that standing on ministerial directives and words like “may”, that are anything but binding, is good enough.
The Minister of Public Safety loves to boast that he has the support of various experts, and I have the utmost respect for those experts. I took the process in committee very seriously. I tried to unpack the extremely complex elements of the bill.
My Conservative colleague mentioned the Chair's decision to apply Standing Order 69.1. In my opinion, separating the votes on the different elements of the bill amounts to an acknowledgement that it is indeed an omnibus bill. A former director of CSIS, who served as a national security advisor to Prime Minister Harper and the current Prime Minister, said that the bill was beginning to rival the Income Tax Act in terms of complexity. Furthermore, several witnesses were forced to limit their testimony to just one part of the bill. In addition, elements were added concerning the Communications Security Establishment, or CSE, and those elements fall within the scope of national defence, yet they were never mentioned during the consultations held by the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security or by the Minister of Public Safety.
Before anyone jumps on me, I want to say that we realize the CSE's statutory mandate needs to be updated. We recognize that cybersecurity threats exist. However, when a government rams something through, as the government is doing with Bill C-59, we end up with flawed definitions, in particular with respect to the information available to the public, and with vague allocation of powers. Furthermore, the government is already announcing the position of a director of a new centre that is being created, under which everything will be consolidated, even though the act that is set out in the budget and, according to the minister, should be introduced this fall, has not yet been introduced.
This bill has many parts. The committee heard from some impressive experts, including professors Carvin, Forcese, and Wark, authors of some very important and interesting briefs, all of which are well thought out and attempt to break down all of the complicated aspects of the bill, including the ones I just mentioned. In their columns in The Globe and Mail, they say that some parts of the bill are positive and others require a more in-depth study. One of these parts has to do with information sharing.
Information sharing was one of the most problematic aspects of BillC-51.
Information sharing is recognized by the experts whom the minister touts as those supporting his legislation, by civil liberties associations and others, as one of the most egregious elements of what was BillC-51, and that is changed only in a cosmetic way in this legislation.
We changed “sharing” to “disclosure”, and what does that mean? When there are consequential amendments to changing “disclosure” everywhere else in all of these acts, it does not change anything. All experts recognize that. The problematic information-sharing regime that was brought in, which is a threat to Canadians' rights and freedoms, still exists.
If we want to talk about what happened to Maher Arar, the Liberals voted down one of my amendments to include Global Affairs as one of the governmental departments that Canadians could make a complaint about to the new review agency. Yet, when it comes to consular services, when it comes to human rights breaches happening to Canadians abroad, Global Affairs and consular services have a role to play, especially when we see stories in the news of CSIS undermining efforts of consular affairs to get Canadians out of countries with horrible human rights records and back here.
This has all fallen on deaf ears. The information-sharing regime remains in place. The new powers given to CSE, in clause 24, talk about how CSE has the ability to collect. Notwithstanding the prohibition on it being able to collect information on Canadians, it can, for the sake of research and other things, and all kinds of ill-defined terms, collect information on the information infrastructure related to Canadians.
Incidentally, as a matter of fact, it voted down my amendments to have a catch-and-release provision in place for information acquired incidentally on Canadians. What does that do? When we read clause 24 of part 3 of the bill related to CSE, it says that it is for the purposes of “disclosing”. Not only are they now exempt from the explicit prohibition that they normally have in their mandate, they can also disclose.
What have the Liberals done to the information-sharing regime brought in by the Conservatives under BillC-51? It is called “disclosure” now. Members can do the math. We are perpetuating this regime that exists.
I know my time is very limited, so I want to address the issue of threat disruption by CSIS. As I said in my questions to my Conservative colleague, the very reason CSIS exists is that disruption is a police duty. As a result, leaving the power to disrupt threats granted in former Bill C-51 in the hands of CSIS still goes against the mandate of CSIS and its very purpose, even if the current government is making small improvements to the constitutionality of those powers. That is unacceptable.
I am not alone in saying this. As I said in my questions to my Conservative colleagues, I am talking about the excellent interview with former RCMP commissioner Paulson. He was interviewed by Professors Carvin and Forcese on their podcast. That interview raised concerns about that power.
In closing, I would like to talk about solutions. After all, I did begin my remarks by saying that we do not want to increase the legislative powers, which we believe are already sufficient. I am talking here about Bill C-51, which was introduced in the previous Parliament. We need to look at resources for police officers, which were cut by the previous government. The Conservatives eliminated the police recruitment fund, which allowed municipalities and provinces to recruit police officers and improve police services in their jurisdictions. I am thinking in particular of the Montreal police, or SPVM, and the Eclipse squad, which dealt with street gangs. It was a good thing the Government of Quebec was there to fill the gap left by the elimination of the funding that made it possible for the squad to exist. The current government is making some efforts in the fight against radicalization, but it needs to do more. The Conservatives are dumping on and ridiculing those efforts. The radicalization that we are seeing on social media and elsewhere targets vulnerable young people. Ridiculing and minimizing the government's efforts undermines the public safety objectives that we need to achieve.
We cannot support a bill that so deeply undermines the protection of Canadians' rights and privacy. Despite what they claim across the way, this bill does nothing to protect the safety of Canadians, which, let us be clear, is an objective all parliamentarians want to achieve. However, achieving that objective must not be done to the detriment of rights and freedoms, as was the case under the previous government and as is currently still the case with this bill.
Monsieur le Président, je remercie mes collègues de leurs discours. Nous voilà encore à étudier le projet de loi  C-59 en troisième lecture et j'aimerais tout d'abord parler du processus du débat entourant un projet de loi, qui a débuté non pas à l'arrivée de ce gouvernement, mais plutôt à la dernière législature avec l'ancien projet de loi C-51.
Contrairement aux propos entendus de l'autre côté plus tôt aujourd'hui et à d'autres moment aussi, le NPD et le Parti vert étaient les seuls à s'opposer au projet de loi C-51 à la dernière législature. Maintenant, j'entends beaucoup d'histoires pour nous dire qu'on était conscient que les Canadiens avaient des préoccupations concernant leur sécurité, qu'il fallait trouver un approche équilibrée, et qu'on comprenait que le projet de loi avait des failles. Donc, on a pris pour acquis qu'on allait accéder au pouvoir et réparer par la suite les nombreuses — je dis bien les nombreuses — failles de ce projet de loi, voire même des failles dangereuses qui représentaient des menaces pour les droits et libertés et la protection de la vie privée des Canadiens. Je parle bien sûr du Parti libéral qui a offert son appui au projet de loi C-51, tout en le dénonçant. Je me souviens à l'époque de l'étude en comité, il y avait le député de Malpeque qui est toujours député à la Chambre qui a passé son temps à dénoncer le projet de loi, à parler de toutes ses lacunes et pourtant le Parti libéral lui a donné son appui.
Cela est problématique parce qu'ultimement on essaie de présenter cette position vis-à-vis du projet de loi comme le porte-étendard des perspectives nuancées. On essaie de nous dire qu'il fallait accomplir les deux objectifs: protéger les Canadiens et protéger leurs droits. Personnellement, je me souviens d'une situation pas mal différente à l'époque, une situation découlant de l'attentat que nous avons tous vécu ici, dans l'enceinte du Parlement en 2014. Le gouvernement conservateur a tenté de profiter de la peur qui existait au sein de la population à la suite cet horrible événement pour apporter un changement législatif qui n'était pas nécessaire. Je vais revenir à ce qui était réellement nécessaire pour protéger les Canadiens.
Donc, on a proposé un changement législatif. On a voulu accroître les pouvoirs accordés aux agences de sécurité nationale sans rien faire pour un système de surveillance qui n'était déjà pas à la hauteur de ce dont elles avaient besoin pour s'assurer que leur travail était fait en tout respect et en conformité de nos lois, mais aussi des attentes que les Canadiens ont par rapport à leurs droits et libertés. On a constaté dans les sondages que les Canadiens étaient, évidemment, favorables à ces mesures parce qu'après tout on était dans une situation où il y avait la montée du groupe État islamique, l'attentat à Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu — pas loin de chez nous — et l'attentat ici même au Parlement. On a profité de cette peur et on a vu un appui pour les mesures présentes dans le projet de loi.
Au NDP, notre réflexion en caucus nous amené à nous dire que nous devions nous tenir debout. On nous envoie ici non seulement pour représenter nos concitoyens, mais pour être des leaders sur des questions extrêmement difficiles et pour prendre la bonne décision, la décision qui va vous permettre de protéger les droits des Canadiens, et ce, même si cela semble être une décision qui n'est pas populaire.
Malgré que cela semblait être une décision impopulaire, et malgré le fait que les libéraux, en voyant les sondages, se sont dit « Suivons simplement le courant et dénonçons les mesures du projet de loi, de sorte que nous puissions simultanément nous protéger des attaques des conservateurs et faire mieux que le NPD sur la position de principe progressiste de la protection des droits et libertés des Canadiens », que s’est-il passé? L’opinion publique a changé. À titre d’opposition officielle, nous avons fait ce combat ici, au Parlement. À la différence des libéraux, nous avons tenu tête à Stephen Harper sur le projet de loi radical qu'était le C-51. Nous avons vu les Canadiens s’opposer farouchement aux mesures se trouvant dans le projet de loi C-51.
Qu’est-il arrivé après les élections? Nous avons vu les libéraux tenter de résoudre le problème qu’ils s’étaient créé en dénonçant et en appuyant tout à la fois le projet de loi. Ils ont dit de ne pas s’inquiéter parce qu’ils allaient faire ce qu’ils font le mieux, c’est-à-dire consulter. Ils ont consulté sur des promesses électorales et des choses dont on avait déjà débattu au cours de la précédente législature.
Le ministre a déposé son livre vert. Le livre vert a été critiqué, à bon droit, parce qu’il allait trop loin dans une direction, parce qu'il demandait comment nous pourrions accorder plus de souplesse aux organismes d’application de la loi, leur donner plus d’outils pour faire leur travail, ce qui dénote une incompréhension totale des craintes que les Canadiens avaient au départ à l’égard du projet de loi C-51. On revient à l’argument que j’ai exposé tout à l’heure. Plutôt que de donner aux organismes d’application de la loi les ressources qui leur permettraient de créer leurs propres outils, de mettre au point une solide stratégie de prévention de la radicalisation et de veiller à ce que des jeunes gens vulnérables ne tombent pas entre les mailles du filet pour être recrutés par des organisations terroristes — telles que Daech ou la droite alternative militant pour la suprématie blanche — qu'a-t-on fait?
Nous avons participé à ces consultations qui étaient déjà orientées, et presque deux ans après l’arrivée au pouvoir des libéraux, nous voyons enfin le dépôt du projet de loi. Le ministre, dans son allocution de tout à l’heure, a défendu le dépôt du projet de loi dans les derniers jours d’une session du printemps du Parlement, juste avant que la Chambre des communes n’ajourne, en disant que nous aurions le temps au cours de l’été d’examiner la loi et d’y réfléchir. Il a oublié de mentionner que les pouvoirs accordés par le projet de loi C-51, sur des bases constitutionnelles fragiles, à des agences telles que le SCRS, restent en vigueur et que, comme l’a dit de manière répétée devant le comité M. Michel Coulombe, le directeur de l’époque du SCRS qui est maintenant à la retraite, ce sont des pouvoirs dont on se servait déjà à ce moment.
C’est très bien de consulter. Sans nul doute, personne ne s’objecte aux principes qu’incarnent les consultations, mais, lorsque ces consultations portent sur des promesses faites au peuple canadien de corriger une loi qui mine leurs droits, alors que les pouvoirs mêmes minant ces droits demeurent en vigueur et qu’on les utilise, il faut être conscient de l’urgence d’agir.
L'histoire se poursuit, car après cette consultation, le Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale a mené une consultation. Nous avons fait des recommandations et le NPD a produit un excellent rapport supplémentaire, qui appuie les recommandations unanimes du Comité mais qui ajoute les nôtres aussi, en appui au projet de loi de mon collègue de Esquimalt—Saanich—Sooke, qui est au Feuilleton. Il était porte-parole en matière de sécurité publique avant moi et il a mené la charge, avec le député d'Outremont, qui était à ce moment chef de l'opposition officielle, contre le projet de loi C-51. Le projet de loi de mon collègue de Esquimalt—Saanich—Sooke abroge complètement tous les éléments qui étaient contenus dans le projet de loi C-51.
C'est intéressant, parce que le ministre de la Sécurité publique et de la Protection civile s'est défendu de ne pas complètement abroger ces éléments en disant que plusieurs députés de la Chambre, dont le député de Spadina—Fort York, ont dit que la raison pour laquelle on n'abrogeait pas tous ces éléments, c'était parce que ce serait un exercice législatif trop compliqué. Mon collègue a déposé un projet de loi, qui est au Feuilleton, et qui fait exactement cela. En tout respect envers mon collègue, cela ne peut pas être si compliqué que cela si on a été capable de rédiger un projet de loi qui atteint exactement ces objectifs.
On a renvoyé le projet de loi  C-59 au Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale avant la deuxième lecture en disant que cela permettrait d'adopter un plus grand éventail d'amendements, que cela permettrait à l'opposition d'être entendue et que cela permettrait de faire une étude robuste. Qu'est-ce que cela a donné? Ce sont 55 amendements qui ont été adoptés, et on est bien fier. Or, sur ces 55 amendements, deux proviennent du NPD, dont un qui concerne le préambule d'une partie du projet de loi. Sans vouloir nier la bonne foi des libéraux, le deuxième amendement a été adopté avec une formulation qui faisait leur affaire. Aucun amendement des conservateurs n'a été adopté. Ultimement, ce n'est pas la fin du monde, parce que nous sommes en désaccord sur plusieurs points, mais néanmoins, on parle de collaboration et on n'a adopté aucun amendement du Parti vert. Cela reflète le fait que les jeux étaient faits et que le gouvernement avait déjà déterminé son approche.
Le gouvernement va se vanter de la nouvelle partie 1.1 de la loi qui a été adoptée. Contrairement à ce que le ministre a dit en répondant à ma question pendant le débat d’aujourd’hui, cela ne créerait aucune obligation juridique en ce qui a trait au fonctionnement actuel du système. Les directives ministérielles adoptées afin d’interdire — malgré les échappatoires, il importe de le souligner — l’utilisation de renseignements obtenus par la torture ne seront toujours que cela: des directives ministérielles. L’obligation juridique selon laquelle le ministre ou le gouverneur en conseil « peut » donner des instructions aux administrateurs généraux des ministères n’est pas suffisante. Si elle l’était, les libéraux n’auraient eu aucune réticence à voter pour les amendements que j’ai proposés au comité. Le temps qui me reste ne me permet pas de relire ces amendements, mais je l'ai fait dans ma question au ministre. Les amendements auraient explicitement et catégoriquement interdit l’acquisition ou l’utilisation, d’une façon ou d’une autre, d’information qui, du point de vue de la sécurité publique, pourrait avoir été obtenue par la torture. C’est conforme à nos obligations aux termes des conventions en droit international que le Canada a signées.
Lors d'un vote par appel nominal, tous les membres du comité, libéraux et conservateurs, on voté contre chacun de ces amendements sans exception. J’invite les Canadiens à consulter ce compte rendu et j’invite les Canadiens à écouter la réponse que le ministre m’a faite. Lorsque la sécurité publique est en danger, il n’existe pas d’admission plus flagrante qu’ils sont prêts à utiliser de l’information obtenue par la torture que de dire qu’ils veulent conserver de la latitude si les Canadiens sont en péril. Je veux assurer aux Canadiens qu’il a été prouvé maintes et maintes fois que l’information obtenue par la torture est la moins fiable. Non seulement elle n’a aucune utilité pour protéger les Canadiens et assurer la sécurité publique, mais elle a la plupart du temps l’effet contraire en lançant les organismes d’application de la loi sur de fausses pistes à partir de renseignements erronés, ce qui peut mettre en danger les membres de ces organismes ainsi que la vie des Canadiens, sans parler de la violation abjecte et flagrante des droits de la personne, ici et ailleurs, permise par ce genre de dispositions. Je laisserai par conséquent les libéraux expliquer pourquoi ils ont voté contre ces amendements visant explicitement à interdire la torture, et pourquoi ils croient que se fier à des directives ministérielles et à des mots tel que « peut », qui n’ont rien de contraignant, est suffisant.
Le ministre de la Sécurité publique aime bien se vanter de l'appui qu'il a eu de plusieurs experts, et je respecte beaucoup ceux-ci. J'ai pris le processus en comité très au sérieux. J'ai tenté de décortiquer les éléments extrêmement complexes du projet de loi.
Par ailleurs, mon collègue conservateur a mentionné la décision de la présidence d'appliquer l'article 69.1 du Règlement. Selon moi, en séparant les votes sur divers éléments du projet de loi, on reconnaît par le fait même la nature omnibus de celui-ci. L'ancien directeur du SCRS, qui a été le conseiller en matière de sécurité nationale du premier ministre Harper et du premier ministre actuel, a dit que le projet de loi était quasiment plus compliqué que les lois sur l'impôt. Plusieurs témoins ont quant à eux dû se limiter à une partie du projet de loi. De plus, on a ajouté des éléments concernant le CST, le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications, qui sont du ressort de la défense nationale et qui n'ont jamais été mentionnés lors des consultations menées par le Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale ou par le ministre de la Sécurité publique.
Avant qu'on me critique là-dessus, j'aimerais dire que nous reconnaissons la nécessité de mettre à jour le mandat législatif du CST. Nous reconnaissons qu'il y a des menaces à la cybersécurité. Cependant, en précipitant l'exercice comme on l'a fait avec le projet de loi  C-59, on se retrouve avec des définitions défaillantes, notamment en ce qui concerne l'information disponible au public, et avec l'attribution de pouvoirs nébuleux. De plus, on annonce déjà le poste de directeur d'un nouveau centre qu'on est en train de créer et où on va tout consolider sous un toit, alors que la loi qui est prévue par le budget et qui, selon le ministre, devait être déposée cet automne n'a pas encore été déposée.
Bref, ce projet de loi contient de nombreux éléments. Des experts impressionnants, comme les professeurs Carvin, Forcese et Wark, ont témoigné devant le comité et ont écrit des textes extrêmement importants et intéressants. Ils les ont conçus avec beaucoup d'intérêt et ont tenté de décortiquer tous les éléments complexes, dont ceux que je viens de mentionner. Dans leurs chroniques du Globe and Mail, ils disent que certains éléments du projet de loi sont positifs et que d'autres méritent une étude plus approfondie. Un de ces éléments est le partage d'information.
L'échange d'information était l'un des éléments les plus problématiques du projet de loi C-51
La communication d’information est reconnue par les experts dont le ministre se targue d'avoir le soutien pour son projet de loi ainsi que par les associations de défense des libertés civiles et autres comme l’un des éléments les plus notables de ce qui était le projet de loi C-51, et cela n’est changé que de manière cosmétique dans le présent projet de loi.
On a remplacé la « communication » par la « divulgation », et qu’est-ce que cela signifie? Lorsqu’il y a des modifications corrélatives au changement de « divulgation » partout ailleurs dans toutes ces lois, cela ne change rien. Tous les experts le reconnaissent. Le régime problématique de communication d’information qui a été amené, qui menace les droits et les libertés des Canadiens, existe encore.
Si nous voulons parler de ce qui est arrivé à Maher Arar, les libéraux ont rejeté l’un de mes amendements visant à inclure Affaires mondiales Canada parmi les ministères auxquels les Canadiens pourraient présenter une plainte concernant le nouvel Office de surveillance. Pourtant, lorsqu’il s’agit des services consulaires, lorsqu’il s’agit de violations des droits de la personne subies par les Canadiens à l’étranger, Affaires mondiales Canada et les services consulaires ont un rôle à jouer, particulièrement quand nous voyons des reportages aux nouvelles à propos du SCRS, qui mine les efforts des affaires consulaires pour sortir les Canadiens des pays dont les bilans en matière de droits de la personne sont horribles et pour les ramener ici.
Tout cela est tombé dans l’oreille d’un sourd. Le régime de communication d’information demeure en place. Les nouveaux pouvoirs conférés au CST, à l'article 24, expliquent comment le CST peut recueillir des renseignements. Malgré l’interdiction de recueillir des renseignements sur les Canadiens qui lui est imposée, il peut, à des fins de recherche et autres, et au regard d’une panoplie de termes mal définis, recueillir des renseignements sur l’infrastructure de l’information en lien avec les Canadiens.
Soit dit en passant, il a rejeté mes amendements visant à mettre en place un principe de saisie et de rejet des renseignements sur les Canadiens obtenus de manière incidente. Qu’est-ce que cela fait? Quand on lit l'article 24 de la partie 3 du projet de loi liée au CST, on voit que c’est aux fins de « divulguer ». Non seulement sont-ils exemptés maintenant de l’interdiction explicite qui figure normalement dans leur mandat, mais ils peuvent aussi divulguer de l’information.
Qu’est-ce que les libéraux ont fait du régime de communication d’information mis en place par les conservateurs en vertu du projet de loi C-51? On l’appelle maintenant « divulgation ». Les députés peuvent tirer les conclusions qui s’imposent. Nous perpétuons le régime existant.
Je sais que mon temps de parole est très limité, alors je vais aborder la question des perturbations faites par le SCRS. Comme je l'ai dit dans mes questions à mon collègue conservateur, l'existence même du SCRS repose sur le fait que le pouvoir de perturbation est un devoir policier. Par conséquent, le fait de maintenir le pouvoir de perturbation, qui a été accordé par l'ancien projet de loi C-51, dans les mains du SCRS, même si on améliore légèrement la possible constitutionnalité de ces pouvoirs, va tout de même à l'encontre du mandat du SCRS et de sa raison d'être. Selon nous, c'est inacceptable.
Je ne suis pas le seul à le dire. Comme je l'ai dit dans mes questions à mes collègues conservateurs, je parle de l'excellente entrevue avec l'ancien commissaire de la GRC, le commissaire Paulson, qui a été interviewé par les professeurs Carvin et Forcese, sur leur balado. Cette entrevue soulève des inquiétudes par rapport à ce pouvoir.
En terminant, je vais parler des solutions. Après tout, j'ai dit d'entrée de jeu que nous ne voulons pas augmenter les pouvoirs législatifs, qui sont déjà suffisants, à notre avis. Je parle ici du projet de loi C-51 déposé lors de la dernière législature. Il faut examiner les ressources pour les policiers, qui ont été réduites par le gouvernement précédent. On a éliminé le fonds de recrutement de la police, qui permettait aux municipalités et aux provinces de recruter des policiers et de bonifier les services policiers sur leur territoire. On pense notamment au SPVM et à l'Escouade Éclipse, qui s'attaquait aux gangs de rue. Une chance que le gouvernement du Québec était là pour combler la brèche créée par l'élimination de ce fonds qui permettait l'existence de cette escouade. Dans la lutte contre la radicalisation, le gouvernement actuel déploie des efforts, mais ils devraient être bonifiés. Les conservateurs crachent sur ces efforts et essaient de les ridiculiser. La radicalisation que nous voyons sur les réseaux sociaux et ailleurs concerne des jeunes qui sont vulnérables. Ridiculiser ces efforts et les minimiser va à l'encontre des objectifs de sécurité publique que nous devons atteindre.
Nous ne pouvons pas appuyer un projet de loi qui crée autant de brèches dans la protection des droits des Canadiens, dans la protection de leur vie privée. Malgré ce qu'on plaide de l'autre côté, il ne fait rien pour réellement protéger la sécurité des Canadiens qui — disons-le franchement, ne mélangeons pas les choses — est un objectif partagé par tous les parlementaires. Toutefois, l'atteinte de cet objectif ne doit pas se faire au détriment des droits et libertés, comme ce fut le cas sous le gouvernement précédent et comme ce l'est toujours actuellement avec cette mesure législative.
Results: 1 - 2 of 2