Interventions in the House of Commons
 
 
 
RSS feed based on search criteria Export search results - CSV (plain text) Export search results - XML
Add search criteria
View Ralph Goodale Profile
Lib. (SK)
View Ralph Goodale Profile
2018-06-18 16:43 [p.21168]
moved:
That Bill C-59, An Act respecting national security matters, be read the third time and passed.
He said: Mr. Speaker, as I open this final third reading debate on Bill C-59, Canada's new framework governing our national security policies and practices, I want to thank everyone who has helped to get us to this point today.
Historically, there were many previous studies and reports that laid the intellectual groundwork for Bill C-59. Justices Frank Iacobucci, John Major, and Dennis O'Connor led prominent and very important inquiries. There were also significant contributions over the years from both current and previous members of Parliament and senators. The academic community was vigorously engaged. Professors Forcese, Roach, Carvin, and Wark have been among the most constant and prolific of watchdogs, commentators, critics, and advisers. A broad collection of organizations that advocate for civil, human, and privacy rights have also been active participants in the process, including the Privacy Commissioner. We have heard from those who now lead or have led in the past our key national security agencies, such as the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, the RCMP, the Communications Security Establishment, the Canada Border Services Agency, Global Affairs Canada, the Privy Council Office, and many others. While not consulted directly, through their judgments and reports we have also had the benefit of guidance from the Federal Court of Canada, other members of the judiciary, and independent review bodies like the Security Intelligence Review Committee, and the commissioner for the Communications Security Establishment.
National security issues and concerns gained particular prominence in the fall of 2014, with the attacks in Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu and here in Ottawa, which spawned the previous government's BillC-51, and a very intense public debate.
During the election campaign that followed, we undertook to give Canadians the full opportunity to be consulted on national security, actually for the first time in Canadian history. We also promised to correct a specific enumerated list of errors in the old BillC-51. Both of those undertakings have been fulfilled through the new bill, Bill C-59, and through the process that got us to where we are today.
Through five public town hall meetings across the country, a digital town hall, two national Twitter chats, 17 engagement events organized locally by members of Parliament in different places across the country, 14 in-person consultations with a broad variety of specific subject matter experts, a large national round table with civil society groups, hearings by the House of Commons Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security, and extensive online engagement, tens of thousands of Canadians had their say about national security like never before, and all of their contributions were compiled and made public for everyone else to see.
Based upon this largest and most extensive public consultation ever, Bill C-59 was introduced in Parliament in June of last year. It remained in the public domain throughout the summer for all Canadians to consider and digest.
Last fall, to ensure wide-ranging committee flexibility, we referred the legislation to the standing committee before second reading. Under the rules of the House, that provides the members on that committee with a broader scope of debate and possible amendment. The committee members did extensive work. They heard from three dozen witnesses, received 95 briefs, debated at length, and in the end made 40 different amendments.
The committee took what all the leading experts had said was a very good bill to start with, and made it better. I want to thank all members of the committee for their conscientious attention to the subject matter and their extensive hard work.
The legislation has three primary goals.
First, we sought to provide Canada with a modern, up-to-date framework for its essential national security activity, bearing in mind that the CSIS Act, for example, dates back to 1984, before hardly anyone had even heard of the information highway or of what would become the World Wide Web. Technology has moved on dramatically since 1984; so have world affairs and so has the nature of the threats that we are facing in terms of national security. Therefore, it was important to modify the law, to bring it up to date, and to put it into a modern context.
Second, we needed to correct the defects in the old BillC-51, again, which we specifically enumerated in our 2015 election platform. Indeed, as members go through this legislation, they will see that each one of those defects has in fact been addressed, with one exception and that is the establishment of the committee of parliamentarians, which is not included in Bill C-59. It was included, and enacted by Parliament already, in BillC-22.
Third, we have launched the whole new era of transparency and accountability for national security through review and oversight measures that are unprecedented, all intended to provide Canadians with the assurance that their police, security, and intelligence agencies are indeed doing the proper things to keep them safe while at the same time safeguarding their rights and their freedoms, not one at the expense of the other, but both of those important things together.
What is here in Bill C-59 today, after all of that extensive consultation, that elaborate work in Parliament and in the committees of Parliament, and the final process to get us to third reading stage? Let me take the legislation part by part. I noticed that in a ruling earlier today, the Chair indicated the manner in which the different parts would be voted upon and I would like to take this opportunity to show how all of them come together.
Part 1 would create the new national security and intelligence review agency. Some have dubbed this new agency a “super SIRC”. Indeed it is a great innovation in Canada's security architecture. Instead of having a limited number of siloed review bodies, where each focused exclusively on one agency alone to the exclusion of all others, the new national security and intelligence review agency would have a government-wide mandate. It would be able to follow the issues and the evidence, wherever that may lead, into any and every federal department or agency that has a national security or intelligence function. The mandate is very broad. We are moving from a vertical model where they have to stay within their silo to a horizontal model where the new agency would be able to examine every department of government, whatever its function may be, with respect to national security. This is a major, positive innovation and it is coupled, of course, with that other innovation that I mentioned a moment ago: the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians created under BillC-22. With the two of them together, the experts who would be working on the national security and intelligence review agency, and the parliamentarians who are already working on the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians, Canadians can have great confidence that the work of the security, intelligence, and police agencies is being properly scrutinized and in a manner that befits the complexity of the 21st century.
This scrutiny would be for two key purposes: to safeguard rights and freedoms, yes absolutely, but also to ensure our agencies are functioning successfully in keeping Canadians safe and their country secure. As I said before, it is not one at the expense of the other, it is both of those things together, effectiveness coupled with the safeguarding of rights.
Then there is a new part in the legislation. After part 1, the committee inserted part 1.1 in Bill C-59, by adding the concept of a new piece of legislation. In effect, this addition by the committee would elevate to the level of legislation the practice of ministers issuing directives to their agencies, instructing them to function in such a manner as to avoid Canadian complicity in torture or mistreatment by other countries. In future, these instructions would be mandatory, not optional, would exist in the form of full cabinet orders in council, and would be made public. That is an important element of transparency and accountability that the committee built into the new legislation, and it is an important and desirable change. The ministerial directives have existed in the past. In fact, we have made them more vigorous and public than ever before, but part 1.1 would elevate this to a higher level. It would make it part of legislation itself, and that is the right way to go.
Part 2 of the new law would create the new role and function of the intelligence commissioner. For the first time ever, this would be an element of real time oversight, not just a review function after the fact. The national security and intelligence review agency would review events after they have happened. The intelligence commissioner would actually have a function to perform before activities are undertaken. For certain specified activities listed in the legislation, both the Canadian security intelligence agency and the Communications Security Establishment would be required to get the approval of the intelligence commissioner in advance. This would be brand new innovation in the law and an important element of accountability.
Part 3 of Bill C-59 would create stand-alone legislative authority for the Communications Security Establishment. The CSE has existed for a very long time, and its legislation has been attached to other legislation this Parliament has previously passed. For the first time now, the CSE would have its own stand-alone legal authorization in new legislation. As Canada's foreign signals intelligence agency, CSE is also our centre for cybersecurity expertise. The new legislation lays out the procedures and the protection around both defensive and active cyber-operations to safeguard Canadians. That is another reason it is important the CSE should have its own legal authorization and legislative form in a stand-alone act.
Part 4 would revamp the CSIS Act. As I mentioned earlier, CSIS was enacted in 1984, and that is a long time ago. In fact, this is the largest overall renovation of the CSIS legislation since 1984. For example, it would ensure that any threat reduction activities would be consistent with the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. It would create a modern regime for dealing with datasets, the collection of those datasets, the proper use of those datasets, and how they are disposed of after the fact. It would clarify the legal authorities of CSIS employees under the Criminal Code and other federal legislation. It would bring clarity, precision, and a modern mandate to CSIS for the first time since the legislation was enacted in 1984.
Part 5 of the bill would change the Security of Canada Information Sharing Act to the security of Canada information disclosure act. The reason for the wording change is to make it clear that this law would not create any new collection powers. It deals only with the sharing of existing information among government agencies and it lays out the procedure and the rules by which that sharing is to be done.
The new act will clarify thresholds and definitions. It will raise the standards. It will sharpen the procedures around information sharing within the government. It will bolster record keeping, both on the part of those who give the information and those who receive the information. It will clearly exempt, and this is important, advocacy and dissent and protest from the definition of activities that undermine national security. Canadians have wanted to be sure that their democratic right to protest is protected and this legislation would do so.
Part 6 would amend the Secure Air Travel Act. This act is the legislation by which Canada establishes a no-fly list. We all know the controversy in the last couple of years about false positives coming up on the no-fly list and some people, particularly young children, being prevented from taking flights because their name was being confused with the name of someone else. No child is on the Canadian no-fly list. Unfortunately, there are other people with very similar names who do present security issues, whose names are on the list, and there is confusion between the two names. We have undertaken to try to fix that problem. This legislation would establish the legal authority for the Government of Canada to collect the information that would allow us to fix the problem.
The other element that is required is a substantial amount of funding. It is an expensive process to establish a whole new database. That funding, I am happy to say, was provided by the Minister of Finance in the last budget. We are on our way toward fixing the no-fly list.
Part 7 would amend the Criminal Code in a variety of ways, including withdrawing certain provisions which have never been used in the pursuit of national security in Canada, while at the same time creating a new offence in language that would more likely be utilized and therefore more useful to police authorities in pursuing criminals and laying charges.
Part 8 would amend the Youth Justice Act for the simple purpose of trying to ensure that offences with respect to terrorism where young people are involved would be handled under the terms of the Youth Justice Act.
Part 9 of the bill would establish a statutory review. That is another of the commitments we made during the election campaign, that while we were going to have this elaborate consultation, we were going to bring forward new legislation, we were going to do our very best to fix the defects in BillC-51, and move Canada forward with a new architecture in national security appropriate to the 21st century.
We would also build into the law the opportunity for parliamentarians to take another look at this a few years down the road, assess how it has worked, where the issues or the problems might be, and address any of those issues in a timely way. In other words, it keeps the whole issue green and alive so future members of Parliament will have the chance to reconsider or to move in a different direction if they think that is appropriate. The statutory review is built into Part 9.
That is a summary of the legislation. It has taken a great deal of work and effort on the part of a lot of people to get us to this point today.
I want to finish my remarks with where I began a few moments ago, and that is to thank everyone who has participated so generously with their hard work and their advice to try to get this framework right for the circumstances that Canada has to confront in the 21st century, ensuring we are doing those two things and doing them well, keeping Canadians safe and safeguarding their rights and freedoms.
propose;
Que le projet de loi  C-59, Loi concernant des questions de sécurité nationale, soit lu pour la troisième fois et adopté.
— Monsieur le Président, au moment d'entreprendre l'étape de la troisième lecture du projet de loi  C-59, le nouveau cadre fédéral régissant les politiques et les pratiques en matière de sécurité nationale, je tiens à remercier tous ceux qui ont contribué à ce que nous en arrivions là aujourd'hui.
Par le passé, de nombreuses études et de nombreux rapports ont jeté les bases intellectuelles du projet de loi  C-59. Les juges Frank Iacobucci, John Major et Dennis O’Connor ont dirigé des enquêtes très importantes. Au fil des ans, les députés et les sénateurs actuels et ceux qui les ont précédés ont également apporté des contributions importantes. Le milieu universitaire s’est beaucoup engagé. Les professeurs Forcese, Roach, Carvin et Wark figurent parmi les chiens de garde, les commentateurs, les critiques et les conseillers les plus constants et les plus prolifiques. Une vaste gamme d’organisations qui se portent à la défense des droits civils, des droits de la personne et du droit à la vie privée ont aussi participé activement au processus, y compris le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée. Nous avons pris connaissance du point de vue de ceux qui dirigent maintenant ou ont dirigé par le passé nos principaux organismes de sécurité nationale, comme le Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité, la GRC, le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications, l’Agence des services frontaliers du Canada, Affaires mondiales Canada, le Bureau du Conseil privé, et bien d’autres. Même s’ils n’ont pas été consultés directement, des représentants de la Cour fédérale du Canada et d’autres représentants de la magistrature et d’organismes d’examen indépendants, comme le Comité de surveillance des activités de renseignement de sécurité, ainsi que le commissaire du Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications, nous ont aussi fait profiter de leurs conseils grâce à leurs jugements et à leurs rapports.
Les questions et les préoccupations en matière de sécurité nationale ont pris une importance particulière à l’automne 2014, avec les attaques commises à Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu et ici, à Ottawa, qui ont entraîné la création du projet de loi C-51 du gouvernement précédent et qui ont suscité un débat public très intense.
Pendant la campagne électorale qui a suivi, nous nous sommes engagés à donner aux Canadiens la possibilité d’être consultés au sujet de la sécurité nationale, ce qui constituait une première dans l’histoire du Canada. Nous avons également promis de corriger une liste d’erreurs dans l’ancien projet de loi C-51. Ces deux engagements ont été respectés grâce au nouveau projet de loi  C-59 et au processus qui nous a menés là où nous sommes aujourd’hui.
Dans le cadre de cinq assemblées publiques locales tenues un peu partout au pays, d’une assemblée publique numérique, de deux séances de clavardage nationales sur Twitter, de 17 activités organisées localement par des députés dans différentes régions du pays, de 14 consultations sur place auprès d’une gamme d’experts spécialisés, d’une grande table ronde nationale avec des groupes de la société civile, d’audiences du Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale de la Chambre des communes, ainsi que d’une vaste consultation en ligne, des dizaines de milliers de Canadiens ont eu leur mot à dire sur la sécurité nationale, comme jamais cela ne s’était produit auparavant, et toutes leurs contributions ont été compilées et rendues publiques au bénéfice de tous.
Le projet de loi  C-59 a été présenté au Parlement, en juin dernier, par suite de la consultation publique la plus vaste et la plus exhaustive jamais tenue. Il est resté dans le domaine public tout au long de l’été pour que tous les Canadiens puissent l’examiner et l’assimiler.
L’automne dernier, afin de donner une plus grande marge de manoeuvre au comité, nous lui avons renvoyé le projet de loi avant l'étape de la deuxième lecture. Cette façon de faire, autorisée par le Règlement de la Chambre, permet d'élargir, pendant l'étude en comité, la portée des débats et des amendements. Les membres du comité ont accompli beaucoup de travail. Ils ont entendu près d'une quarantaine de témoins, reçu 95 mémoires, débattu en profondeur et, finalement, adopté 40 amendements.
Le comité s'est employé à améliorer un projet de loi dont tous les grands spécialistes avaient dit qu'il s'agissait d'un très bon début. Je tiens à remercier tous les membres du comité de leur excellent travail et d'avoir étudié consciencieusement la question.
Le projet de loi a trois objectifs.
Premièrement, nous voulions moderniser le cadre du Canada en ce qui concerne les activités essentielles en matière de sécurité nationale, sachant, par exemple, que la Loi sur le Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité remonte à 1984, soit à une époque où pratiquement personne n'avait entendu parler de l'autoroute de l'information ou de ce qui allait devenir le Web. La technologie a énormément évolué depuis 1984, tout comme les affaires mondiales et la nature des menaces à la sécurité nationale auxquelles nous sommes confrontés. Il était donc important de modifier la loi, de la moderniser pour l'adapter à la réalité actuelle.
Deuxièmement, nous devions corriger les lacunes de l'ancien projet de loi C-51, ce qui, encore une fois, faisait expressément partie des engagements énumérés dans notre programme électoral de 2015. Ainsi, les députés constateront que, dans ce projet de loi, nous avons corrigé toutes les lacunes, à l'exception d'une seule, celle ayant trait au comité de parlementaires. Le projet de loi  C-59 n'aborde pas ce point puisque le Parlement y a déjà remédié en adoptant le projet de loi C-22.
Troisièmement, nous avons lancé la nouvelle ère de transparence et de reddition de comptes dans le domaine de la sécurité nationale à l'aide de mesures d'examen et de surveillance sans précédent. Ces mesures visent à donner aux Canadiens l'assurance que leurs forces policières et leurs organismes de sécurité et de renseignement prennent bel et bien les bonnes mesures pour garantir leur sécurité et protéger leurs droits et leurs libertés et qu'ils s'efforcent d'atteindre ces deux objectifs simultanément au lieu d'en favoriser l'un aux dépens de l'autre.
Après avoir mené de vastes consultations, effectué des travaux complexes au Parlement ainsi qu'aux comités parlementaires et suivi le processus final menant à l'étape de la troisième lecture, quelles sont les dispositions incluses dans le projet de loi  C-59 aujourd'hui? Je vais décortiquer le projet de loi partie par partie. Dans une décision qu'il a rendue plus tôt aujourd'hui, la présidence a indiqué la façon dont la Chambre sera appelée à voter sur les différentes parties. J'aimerais profiter de cette occasion pour expliquer les liens entre toutes les parties.
La partie 1 créerait le nouvel Office de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité nationale et de renseignement. Certains ont qualifié cette nouvelle agence de « super CSARS ». En fait, l’Office constitue une grande innovation dans l’architecture de sécurité du Canada. Au lieu d’avoir un nombre limité d’organismes d’examen cloisonnés, où chacun se concentre exclusivement sur une seule organisation à l’exclusion de toutes les autres, le nouvel organisme de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité nationale et de renseignement aurait un mandat pangouvernemental. Il serait en mesure d’assurer le suivi des problèmes et des données probantes, peu importe où cela peut mener, dans tous les ministères ou organismes fédéraux qui ont une fonction de sécurité nationale ou de renseignement. Le mandat est très large. Nous passons d’un modèle vertical où chaque organisme doit fonctionner en vase clos, à un modèle horizontal où la nouvelle agence serait en mesure d’examiner chaque ministère, quelle que soit sa fonction, sous l’angle de la sécurité nationale. Il s’agit d’une innovation importante et positive qui s’ajoute, bien sûr, à l’autre innovation dont je parlais il y a un instant, soit le Comité des parlementaires sur la sécurité nationale et le renseignement créé en vertu du projet de loi C-22. Avec ces deux groupes réunis, les experts qui travailleraient à l’Office de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité nationale et de renseignement, et les parlementaires qui travaillent déjà au Comité des parlementaires sur la sécurité nationale et le renseignement, les Canadiens pourront avoir l’assurance que le travail des organismes de sécurité, de renseignement et de police sera scruté à la loupe et d’une manière qui correspond à la complexité du XXIe siècle.
Cet examen viserait deux objectifs clés, soit protéger les droits et libertés, effectivement, mais aussi veiller à ce que nos organismes réussissent à assurer la sécurité des Canadiens et de leur pays. Comme je l’ai déjà dit, un objectif ne sera pas atteint au détriment de l’autre. Ces deux objectifs, l’efficacité et la protection des droits, iront de pair.
Ensuite, il y a une nouvelle partie dans la loi. Après la partie 1, le comité a inséré la partie 1.1 dans le projet de loi C-59, en ajoutant le concept d’une nouvelle loi. En fait, cet ajout du comité porterait au niveau législatif la pratique des ministres qui donnent des directives à leurs organismes, leur ordonnant de fonctionner de manière à éviter la complicité du Canada dans la torture ou les mauvais traitements infligés par d’autres pays. À l’avenir, ces instructions seraient obligatoires, et non facultatives, elles existeraient sous forme de décrets du Cabinet et elle seraient rendues publiques. C’est un élément important de la transparence et de la reddition de comptes que le comité a intégré à la nouvelle loi, et c’est un changement important et souhaitable. Les directives ministérielles ont déjà existé. En fait, nous les avons rendues plus vigoureuses et publiques que jamais auparavant, mais la partie 1.1 rehausserait ce niveau. Elle ferait partie de la loi en soi, et c’est la bonne façon de procéder.
La partie 2 du projet de loi créerait le rôle et la fonction de commissaire au renseignement. Pour la toute première fois, il s'agirait d'exercer une surveillance en temps réel et non plus de réaliser un examen après coup. L’Office de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité nationale et de renseignement examinerait les événements après le fait. Le commissaire au renseignement aurait une fonction à remplir avant que ces activités n’aient lieu. Pour certaines activités désignées dans le projet de loi, l’Agence canadienne du renseignement de sécurité et le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications seraient tenus d’obtenir l’approbation préalable du commissaire au renseignement. Ce serait là une véritable innovation législative et un élément primordial en matière de reddition de comptes.
La partie 3 du projet de loi  C-59 créerait un pouvoir législatif indépendant pour le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications. Ce centre existe depuis très longtemps, et la loi qui le régit est rattachée à d’autres mesures législatives déjà adoptées par le Parlement. Pour la première fois, le Centre aurait son propre régime d’autorisation indépendant en vertu de la nouvelle loi. En tant qu’organisme canadien du renseignement électromagnétique étranger, le Centre est aussi notre centre d’expertise en matière de cybersécurité. Le projet de loi énonce les procédures et les mesures de protection entourant les cyberopérations aussi bien défensives qu'actives visant à protéger les Canadiens. Voilà une raison de plus qui justifie la nécessité pour le Centre d'avoir son propre régime d’autorisation et sa propre forme législative aux termes d’une loi indépendante.
La partie 4 moderniserait la Loi sur le Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité. Comme je l’ai dit précédemment, cette loi a été adoptée en 1984, c'est-à-dire il y a bien longtemps. En fait, il s’agit de la refonte la plus exhaustive de la Loi depuis son adoption. Par exemple, le projet de loi ferait en sorte que toute activité de réduction de la menace soit conforme à la Charte canadienne des droits et libertés. Il créerait un régime moderne pour traiter les ensembles de données, leur collecte, leur utilisation judicieuse et leur élimination ultérieure. Il préciserait les pouvoirs juridiques des employés du Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité en vertu du Code criminel et d’autres lois fédérales. Pour la première fois depuis l’adoption de la Loi, en 1984, le Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité aurait un mandat clair, précis et moderne.
La partie 5 du projet de loi modifierait le libellé anglais de la Loi sur la communication d’information ayant trait à la sécurité du Canada en remplaçant le mot « sharing » par le mot « disclosure ». Le nouveau libellé préciserait clairement que cette loi ne crée aucun nouveau pouvoir de collecte d'information. Elle ne concerne que la mise en commun de données existantes entre des organismes gouvernementaux et elle énonce la procédure et les règles à suivre pour communiquer de l’information.
La nouvelle loi clarifiera les seuils et les définitions. Elle rehaussera les normes. Elle précisera les procédures relatives à la communication de renseignements au sein de l'appareil gouvernemental. Ces mesures amélioreront la tenue de dossiers, tant par ceux qui fournissent l’information que par ceux qui la reçoivent. Il est important de souligner que les activités de défense d'une cause, de manifestation d'un désaccord ou de protestation seront expressément exclues de la définition des activités portant atteinte à la sécurité nationale. Les Canadiens veulent que leur droit démocratique de manifester soit protégé, et ce projet de loi leur en donne l’assurance.
La partie 6 modifierait la Loi sur la sûreté des déplacements aériens. Cette loi est celle par laquelle le Canada établit une liste d’interdiction de vol. Nous avons tous entendu parler de la controverse des deux ou trois dernières années au sujet des faux positifs sur la liste d’interdiction de vol et du fait que certaines personnes, surtout des jeunes enfants, n’ont pu prendre l’avion parce que leur nom a été confondu avec celui de quelqu’un d’autre. Aucun enfant ne figure sur la liste canadienne d’interdiction de vol. Malheureusement, il y a d’autres personnes qui ont des noms très semblables et qui sont associées à des problèmes de sécurité dont le nom figure sur la liste, et il y a confusion entre les deux noms. Nous nous sommes engagés à essayer de régler ce problème. Cette mesure législative donnerait au gouvernement du Canada le pouvoir juridique de recueillir des renseignements qui nous permettraient de régler le problème.
L’autre élément qui est nécessaire, c’est un financement substantiel. Établir une toute nouvelle base de données coûte cher. Je suis heureux de dire que ce financement a été octroyé par le ministre des Finances dans le dernier budget. Nous sommes en voie de corriger la liste d’interdiction de vol.
La partie 7 modifierait le Code criminel de diverses façons, notamment en retirant certaines dispositions qui n’ont jamais été utilisées pour assurer la sécurité nationale au Canada, tout en créant une nouvelle infraction dans un libellé qui serait plus probablement utilisé et donc plus utile aux autorités policières pour poursuivre les criminels et porter des accusations.
La partie 8 modifierait la Loi sur le système de justice pénale pour les adolescents dans le seul but de faire en sorte que les infractions liées au terrorisme commises par des jeunes soient traitées en vertu de la Loi sur le système de justice pénale pour les adolescents.
La partie 9 du projet de loi prévoit un examen législatif. C’est un autre des engagements que nous avons pris pendant la campagne électorale, à savoir que, même si nous allions tenir cette vaste consultation, nous allions présenter un nouveau projet de loi et faire de notre mieux pour corriger les lacunes du projet de loi C-51 et faire progresser le Canada au moyen d’une nouvelle architecture de sécurité nationale adaptée au XXIe siècle.
Nous inclurons également dans la loi la possibilité pour les parlementaires d’examiner de nouveau cette question quelques années plus tard, d’évaluer comment cela a fonctionné, où les problèmes pourraient se trouver et régler ces problèmes en temps opportun. Autrement dit, cela permet de garder toute la question à l’avant-plan afin que les futurs députés aient la possibilité de revoir la loi ou d’aller dans une autre direction s’ils le jugent approprié. L’examen prévu par la loi est intégré à la partie 9.
Voilà qui résume le projet de loi. Il a fallu beaucoup de travail et d’efforts de la part de beaucoup de gens pour en arriver là aujourd’hui.
Je veux terminer mon intervention en reprenant là où j’ai commencé il y a quelques instants, c’est-à-dire en remerciant tous ceux qui ont participé si généreusement et qui ont donné des conseils pour essayer de mettre en place un cadre adéquat pour la situation à laquelle le Canada doit faire face au XXIe siècle, pour veiller à ce que nous réalisions bien nos deux grands objectifs, soit assurer la sécurité des Canadiens et protéger leurs droits et libertés.
View Ralph Goodale Profile
Lib. (SK)
View Ralph Goodale Profile
2018-05-28 17:57 [p.19769]
Mr. Speaker, at this point in the proceedings, we can get back to the topic of Bill C-59 for what is really, under our procedures, both a report stage debate and a second reading debate.
I am very pleased today to rise in support of Bill C-59, as it has emerged from the standing committee, the government's proposed legislation to update and modernize our country's national security framework. This landmark bill covers a number of measures that were informed very throughly by the views and opinions of a broad range of Canadians during extensive public consultations in 2016.
It was in that same spirit of openness, engagement, and transparency that Bill C-59 was referred to the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security before second reading. The committee recently finished its study of the bill.
I want to thank members of that committee for their diligent and thorough examination of the legislation, both during their consideration of the bill, and indeed, during their pre-study of this subject matter in 2016, which contributed significantly to the drafting of Bill C-59 itself.
An even stronger bill, with over 40 amendments accepted, is now back before the House. The amendments would bring greater clarity, transparency, accountability, and public reporting. One of the major changes made by the committee was the addition of a new act in the bill, entitled avoiding complicity in mistreatment by foreign entities act.
Last fall we undertook to enhance and make public a previously secret 2011 ministerial directive to both CSIS and the RCMP that dealt with how those agencies should share and receive information with and from foreign entities when there was a risk that the information may have been derived by, or could result in, torture or mistreatment. Obviously, it is important to have ministerial directives governing such a serious topic.
The goal of my directive was to establish strong safeguards to ensure that information shared by Canada would not lead to mistreatment and that Canada would not use any information that could be tainted by mistreatment, with one exception. That is when it is essential to prevent the loss of life or serious injury.
The new avoiding complicity in mistreatment by foreign entities act would go a step further than ministerial directives. It would create a statutory requirement for such directives to exist in the form of orders in council, and not just for CSIS and the RCMP but for all departments and agencies that deal with national security. It would also require that each of those directives in the orders in council be made public.
This amendment, which is now in Bill C-59, is another example of how this legislation would strive constantly to achieve two things simultaneously. This bill would strengthen Canada's ability to effectively address and counter 21st-century threats while safeguarding the rights and freedoms we cherish as Canadians.
Bill C-59 is the result of the most comprehensive review of Canada's national security framework since the passing of the original CSIS Act more than 30 years ago. That review included unprecedented open and transparent public consultations on national security undertaken by Public Safety Canada and by the Department of Justice.
Several issues were covered, including countering radicalization to violence, oversight, and accountability, threat reduction and the Anti-terrorism Act, 2015, the former Bill C-51. All Canadians were invited and encouraged to take part in the consultations, which were held between September and December of 2016.
The response to the consultations was tremendous. Citizens, community leaders, experts, academics, non-governmental organizations, and parliamentarians alike made their views and ideas known over the course of that consultation period. In the end, tens of thousands of views were received, all of which were valuable in shaping the scope and the content of Bill C-59.
With almost 59,000 responses received, the online consultation was what generated by far the largest volume of input. In addition to that, there were nearly 18,000 submissions received by email. In addition, public town halls were held in five Canadian cities: Halifax, Markham, Winnipeg, Vancouver, and Yellowknife. This gave citizens across the country a chance to share their thoughts and opinions in person.
The Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security held numerous meetings on the consultations. It even travelled across the country to hear testimony not only from expert witnesses, but also general members of the public who were invited to express their views.
A digital town hall and two Twitter chats were also organized.
Members of the public also had the opportunity to make their voices heard at 17 other engagement events led by different members of Parliament at the constituency level.
In addition, 14 in-person sessions were held with academics and experts across the country, as well as a large round table with experts from civil society.
I simply make the point that there was an extensive effort to be open, to be inclusive, to ensure that every Canadian who had something to say on this topic could have the opportunity to do that. This was not a process reserved for politicians in Parliament or for experts in ivory towers. This was an open, public, inclusive process, and Canadians let their voices be heard.
After all of that information was collected, the next step was to carefully analyze every comment, every submission, every letter, and all of the other forms of input. All of the views that had been expressed to the various consultative mechanisms have now been published on the Government of Canada's open data portal, so anyone interested in actually seeing who said what to whom throughout the whole consultation process can look it up and see what the dialogue was like.
In addition to that, an independently prepared report provides an overview of what was heard during the consultations.
While it would be difficult to summarize everything that we heard from Canadians in a consultation process that massive, I can speak to a few of the key themes and ideas that emerged.
As one might expect, given the thousands of submissions, there were widely differing opinions. That is what we would expect from Canadians who are very engaged in an important discussion. Certainly that was the case in these consultations.
The results make one thing perfectly clear. Canadians want accountability. They want transparency and effectiveness from their security and intelligence agencies. They want all three of those things, accountability, transparency, and effectiveness, together. They want the government and Parliament to achieve all of those things at once. Bill C-59 goes farther and better than any other piece of legislation in Canadian history to accomplish those three things together.
Canadians expect their rights, their freedoms, and their privacy to be protected at the same time as their security is protected.
Consistent with what we heard, Bill C-59 would modernize and enhance Canada's security and intelligence laws to ensure our agencies would have the tools they needed to protect us and it would do so within a clear legal and constitutional framework that would comply with the Charter of Rights and Freedoms.
There is no doubt in my mind that the legislation before the House today has been strengthened and improved by the result of the close work that was done by the standing committee. All the scrutiny and clause-by-clause analysis and consideration, all the debate around all of those various amendments has resulted in a better product.
When we tabled this legislation, and before the committee did its work, many of the most renowned experts in the country said that it was very good legislation and that it accomplished more in the field of national security than any other proposal since the CSIS Act was first introduced. That was a great compliment coming from the imminent experts who made those observations. However, now, after the debate, after all of the input, after all of the amendments, the legislation is even better.
One of the things I am most proud of with respect to Bill C-59 is how it represents a dynamic shift in the review and accountability structure for our entire national security apparatus. Currently, some of our agencies that deal in national security have a review body that examines their work. CSIS of course has the Security Intelligence Review committee, SIRC. The RCMP has the Civilian Review and Complaints Commission, CRCC. Those are a couple of examples. However, there is no unified review body that can look beyond one agency at a time and actually follow the evidence as it moves across government from agency to agency.
For the first time, Bill C-59 would fix this problem by creating the national security and intelligence review agency, or NSIRA. NSIRA is largely modelled on the often discussed idea of a “super-SIRC”, which would have the authority to review all matters of national security, whether they are with CSIS, or CBSA, or IRCC, or the RCMP, or Global Affairs, or DND, or anywhere else in the Government of Canada.
When we link that to the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians, which was recently created by the passage of BillC-22, Canadians can be assured that we have a review architecture in place that is required for the 21st century. It involves parliamentarians, through the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians. It involves expert review through NSIRA. In addition to that, it involves, for the first time ever, a brand new innovation that we have introduced, a new element of actual real-time oversight, which has never existed before, through the work of the new intelligence commission, which is also created by virtue of this legislation, Bill C-59.
We also worked to ensure that the Charter of Rights and Freedoms is the central principle behind Bill C-59. This is perhaps nowhere more evident than the changes we have made to the former BillC-51's threat reduction measures.
When BillC-51 created these threat reduction measures, it created an open-ended, seemingly limitless course of possible action for CSIS to take. This bill would create a closed list of specific actions that CSIS could apply to a federal court for permission to undertake. It is open, it is transparent, while at the same time gives CSIS the tools it needs to keep Canadians safe.
Another part of the former BillC-51 that we have undertaken to dramatically improve is the Security of Canada Information Sharing Act, or SCISA. After Bill C-59 is enacted, this new legislation will be renamed to the security of Canada information disclosure act, and it will not grant any new powers to collect information on Canadians. Rather it is a roadmap for how existing information related to a threat to the security of Canada can and should be shared between departments and agencies in order to mitigate or eliminate that threat.
It clarifies that advocacy, protest, dissent, or artistic expression are not activities that undermine the security of Canada, and it creates a robust review framework to ensure that information is being disclosed to other departments appropriately, with proper record-keeping at both ends of the process.
Next I want to touch on an issue that I believe almost every member of the House supports, and that is the fixing of the passenger protect program, or what is sometimes known as the “no-fly list”.
I imagine that virtually every member of the chamber has met with a member of the group called “No-Fly List Kids” at some point during this Parliament. To be clear, there are currently no children on Canada's passenger protect list. However, there are children and adults who may share a name with someone who is on the list. Former defence minister Bill Graham famously had to deal with this very problem when someone sharing his name was actually listed.
Fixing the problem involves both funding and new legislation. Bill C-59 will play an important role, allowing the government to collect domestic passenger manifests and screen the list itself, rather than sharing our passenger protect list with over 100 airlines around the world. What this means is that once the government is collecting the passenger manifests, it will be able to issue redress numbers to people who share a name with a listed individual. Anyone who has booked a flight to the United States in the past few years has probably noticed that their system has a box for a unique redress number. Once Canada's system is up and running, it will operate in a very similar fashion.
I would also note that we got the necessary funding to develop this new system this past March, in the most recent budget. This measure is another excellent example of ensuring that the rights of Canadians are respected while at the same time safeguarding national security.
There are many other important parts of Bill C-59 that I will not have the time in 20 minutes to go through in detail. However, I would like to just mention some of the others—for example, the new stand-alone legislation to modernize Canada's Communications Security Establishment. It has needed this modernization. It has needed this new legislation for a long time. Bill C-59 introduces that legislation.
There are also important changes to the Youth Criminal Justice Act, which ensures that protections are afforded to young Canadians in respect of recognizance orders.
Changes in the Criminal Code would, among other things, require the Attorney General to publish an annual report setting out the number of terrorism recognizances entered into during the course of the year. Also, there are very important changes to the CSIS Act that would ensure that our security agents are confident they have the legal and constitutional authority to undertake their essential work on behalf of all Canadians, including, for example, the complex matter of handling data sets, taking into account the advice and judgments of recent decisions in the federal courts.
Should Bill C-59 pass, this historic piece of legislation would enhance Canada’s national security, keep its citizens safe, and safeguard Canadians’ constitutionally protected rights and freedoms.
For all these reasons, I would encourage all hon. colleagues to join me in supporting Bill C-59. I am glad it enjoys strong support among Canadians generally and among some of our country's most distinguished experts in national security and civil liberties. We have been very fortunate to have the benefit of their advice as we have moved this legislation through the parliamentary process.
Monsieur le Président, conformément à la procédure, nous amorçons le débat sur le projet de loi  C-59 à l'étape du rapport et de la deuxième lecture.
Je suis donc ravi de prendre la parole aujourd'hui pour appuyer le projet de loi  C-59, qui nous a été renvoyé par le comité permanent. Il s'agit du projet de loi du gouvernement visant à mettre à jour et à moderniser le cadre de sécurité nationale du Canada. Ce projet de loi historique traite de plusieurs mesures grandement inspirées des points de vue et des opinions exprimés par un grand nombre de Canadiens lors des vastes consultations publiques tenues en 2016.
C'est dans ce même esprit d'ouverture, d'engagement et de transparence que le projet de loi  C-59 a été présenté au Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale avant la deuxième lecture. Le Comité a récemment terminé son étude du projet de loi.
Je tiens à remercier les membres de ce comité pour l'examen rigoureux et diligent qu'ils ont effectué lorsque le projet de loi  C-59 en était à l'étape de l'étude par le comité et lors de l'étude préalable ayant eu lieu en 2016 qui a grandement contribué à la rédaction du projet de loi.
Après l'adoption de plus de 40 amendements, un projet de loi encore plus solide est de retour devant la Chambre. Les amendements améliorent la clarté, la transparence, la reddition de comptes et la procédure de publication de rapports. L'un des principaux changements apportés par le comité est l'ajout, dans le projet de loi, d'une nouvelle loi intitulée Loi visant à éviter la complicité dans les cas de mauvais traitements infligés par des entités étrangères.
L'automne dernier, nous avons entrepris d'améliorer et de publier une directive ministérielle de 2011 qui était auparavant secrète et qui était destinée au SCRS et à la GRC. Elle indiquait à ces organismes les règles à suivre pour communiquer et recevoir de l'information venant d'entités étrangères lorsqu'il y avait un risque que l'information ait été obtenue par la torture ou des mauvais traitements ou encore qu'elle entraîne de la torture ou des mauvais traitements. Évidemment, il est important qu'une directive ministérielle régisse cette question sérieuse.
Le but de ma directive était d'établir de solides garanties pour que l'information communiquée par le Canada ne cause pas de mauvais traitements et pour que le Canada n'utilise aucune information entachée par le recours à de mauvais traitements, sauf dans un cas, soit lorsque c'est essentiel pour prévenir une perte de vie ou une blessure grave.
La nouvelle Loi visant à éviter la complicité dans les cas de mauvais traitements infligés par des entités étrangères irait un peu plus loin que les directives ministérielles. Elle créerait l'obligation légale de donner de telles instructions sous forme de décrets, non seulement au SCRS et à la GRC, mais bien à tous les ministères et organismes qui s'occupent de sécurité nationale. Elle exigerait également que toutes les directives ainsi données par voie de décret soient rendues publiques.
Cette modification, que l'on trouve maintenant dans le projet de loi  C-59, montre comment cette mesure législative tendrait constamment à faire deux choses simultanément, soit renforcer la capacité du Canada à contrer efficacement les menaces du XXIe siècle tout en protégeant les libertés et les droits si chers aux Canadiens.
Le projet de loi  C-59 fait suite à l'étude la plus exhaustive du cadre de sécurité nationale du Canada depuis l'adoption de la première version de la Loi sur le SCRS, il y a plus de 30 ans. Pour cette étude, Sécurité publique Canada et le ministère de la Justice ont mené des consultations publiques ouvertes et transparentes sans précédent.
Plusieurs questions ont été abordées, y compris la lutte contre la radicalisation de la violence, la supervision et la responsabilisation, la diminution des menaces et la Loi antiterroriste de 2015, l'ancien projet de loi C-51. Tous les Canadiens ont été invités et encouragés à prendre part à ces consultations qui ont eu lieu entre septembre et décembre 2016.
La participation aux consultations a été phénoménale. Tant des citoyens, des dirigeants communautaires, des experts, des universitaires et des représentants d'organisations non gouvernementales que des parlementaires ont fait connaître leur opinion et leurs idées au cours de cette période de consultation. En définitive, on a reçu des dizaines de milliers de commentaires, qui ont tous été utiles pour façonner la portée et le contenu du projet de loi  C-59.
La consultation en ligne, qui a reçu près de 59 000 réponses, est celle qui a généré le plus grand volume de commentaires, et de loin. Qui plus est, on a reçu près de 18 000 mémoires par courriel. De plus, on a tenu des assemblées publiques dans cinq villes canadiennes: Halifax, Markham, Winnipeg, Vancouver et Yellowknife. Grâce à ces assemblées, les citoyens du pays ont eu la chance d'exprimer leurs idées et leur opinion en personne.
Le Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale a tenu de nombreuses rencontres portant sur ces consultations. Il a même parcouru le pays pour entendre le témoignage non seulement de témoins experts, mais aussi des membres du grand public qui étaient invités à exprimer leur point de vue.
On a aussi organisé une assemblée publique numérique et deux séances de clavardage sur Twitter.
Les membres du public ont aussi eu l'occasion de se faire entendre lors de 17 autres activités de consultation organisées par différents députés dans leur circonscription.
De plus, 14 séances de consultation en personne ont été tenues auprès d'universitaires et d'experts partout au pays, et il y a eu une grande table ronde avec des experts de la société civile.
J'affirme simplement qu'un effort considérable d'ouverture et d'inclusion a été déployé pour donner voix au chapitre à tous les Canadiens ayant quelque chose à dire sur le sujet. Le processus n'a pas été réservé aux politiciens du Parlement ou à des experts dans une tour d'ivoire. Il a été ouvert, inclusif et public et les Canadiens ont pu se faire entendre.
Une fois toutes ces informations amassées, il a fallu ensuite analyser attentivement tous les mémoires, toutes les lettres et tous les commentaires soumis sous d'autres formes. Tous les points de vue recueillis par l'intermédiaire des divers mécanismes de consultation ont été publiés dans le portail des données ouvertes du gouvernement du Canada. Tous ceux qui souhaitent savoir qui a dit quoi à quelle personne au cours du processus peuvent visiter le portail et voir comment le dialogue s'est déroulé.
En outre, un rapport indépendant a été préparé afin de présenter un aperçu de ce qui a été exprimé durant les consultations.
Il serait difficile de résumer tout ce que nous avons entendu durant des consultations d'une telle ampleur, mais je peux tout de même aborder quelques-uns des principaux thèmes et idées qui en ont émergé.
Compte tenu de la multitude de mémoires recueillis, les opinions diffèrent beaucoup, comme on s'y attendait. Il était facile de le prévoir, étant donné l'importance qu'accordent les Canadiens à la discussion, et cela a certainement été le cas ici.
Cela dit, les résultats sont clairs. Ils montrent que les Canadiens tiennent à la reddition de comptes. Ils s'attendent à ce que les organismes de sécurité et de renseignement soient transparents et efficaces. Reddition de comptes, transparence et efficacité doivent aller de pair; les Canadiens tiennent à ce que le gouvernement et le Parlement accomplissent ces trois choses en même temps. Dans toute l'histoire du Canada, aucun projet de loi n'a fait davantage pour accomplir ces trois choses que le projet de loi  C-59.
Les Canadiens s'attendent à ce que leurs droits, leurs libertés et leur vie privée soient protégés, et leur sécurité aussi.
Conformément à ce que nous avons entendu, le projet de loi  C-59 moderniserait et améliorerait les lois canadiennes en matière de sécurité et de renseignement afin que les organismes de sécurité et de renseignement du Canada disposent des outils dont ils ont besoin pour nous protéger tout en respectant un cadre juridique et constitutionnel clair, conforme à la Charte des droits et libertés.
Il ne fait aucun doute, selon moi, que le travail minutieux effectué par le comité permanent a permis de renforcer et d'améliorer la mesure législative dont la Chambre est saisie aujourd'hui. Grâce à l'examen attentif du comité, à l'étude article par article et aux débats entourant les divers amendements, nous avons maintenant une meilleure mesure législative.
Lorsque nous avons présenté ce projet de loi, donc avant que le comité n'effectue son travail, plusieurs experts parmi les plus éminents au pays disaient déjà qu'il s'agissait d'une très bonne mesure législative, qui accomplissait davantage dans le domaine de la sécurité nationale que toute autre proposition depuis la présentation de la Loi sur le SCRS. C'est là un compliment remarquable que nous ont fait ces experts éminents. Maintenant, grâce aux commentaires, aux débats et aux amendements, cette mesure législative est encore meilleure qu'auparavant.
L'un des aspects du projet de loi  C-59 dont je suis le plus fier, c'est sa façon de changer de manière dynamique la structure d'examen et de reddition de comptes de tout l'appareil de sécurité nationale. À l'heure actuelle, certains organismes de sécurité nationale sont surveillés par un organisme d'examen qui se penche sur leur travail. Évidemment, pour le SCRS, il s'agit du Comité de surveillance des activités de renseignement de sécurité, ou CSARS. Dans le cas de la GRC, il s'agit de la Commission civile d'examen et de traitement des plaintes, ou CCETP. Ce ne sont là que deux exemples. Cependant, il n'y a pas d'organisme d'examen qui se penche sur l'ensemble du processus de surveillance, qui ne se contente pas de surveiller un seul organisme à la fois et qui examine les activités de tous les organismes gouvernementaux concernés.
Pour la première fois, le projet de loi  C-59 corrigerait ce problème en créant l'Office de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité nationale et de renseignement, ou OSASNR. L'OSASNR se fonde en grande partie sur l'idée de créer ce qu'on appelle souvent un « super CSARS », lequel serait autorisé à se pencher sur toutes les questions relatives à la sécurité nationale, qu'elles relèvent du SCRS, de l'ASFC, d'IRCC, de la GRC, du ministère des Affaires mondiales, du ministère de la Défense nationale ou de n'importe quel autre organisme du gouvernement du Canada.
En jumelant cet office au Comité des parlementaires sur la sécurité nationale et le renseignement, créé récemment après l'adoption du projet de loi C-22, nous pouvons donner aux Canadiens l'assurance que le pays sera doté d'une structure de surveillance digne du XXIe siècle. Cette structure relève à la fois des parlementaires, dans le cadre du Comité des parlementaires sur la sécurité nationale et le renseignement, et des experts, dans le cadre de l'OSASNR. En outre, pour la première fois, nous proposons d'intégrer à cette structure une toute nouvelle innovation, soit un véritable processus de surveillance en temps réel sans précédent qui relèvera du titulaire du nouveau poste de commissaire au renseignement, également créé aux termes du projet de loi  C-59.
Nous avons également fait en sorte que la Charte des droits et libertés soit le principe central sur lequel s'appuie le projet de loi  C-59. Ces efforts sont probablement le plus visibles dans les changements que nous avons apportés à l'ancien projet de loi C-51 au sujet des mesures de réduction de la menace.
En créant ces mesures de réduction de la menace, le projet de loi C-51 avait ouvert la porte à une quantité apparemment illimitée de mesures sans bornes pouvant être prises par le Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité. Le projet de loi à l'étude dresse la liste des mesures que le Service pourra prendre après avoir obtenu l'aval d'un tribunal fédéral. Cette façon de faire est ouverte et transparente et donne au Service les outils pour assurer la sécurité des Canadiens.
Une autre partie de l'ancien projet de loi C-51 que nous avons voulu grandement améliorer est celle concernant la Loi sur la communication d'information ayant trait à la sécurité du Canada. Une fois le projet de loi  C-59 adopté, la Loi sur la communication d’information ayant trait à la sécurité du Canada sera renommée et elle ne conférera aucun pouvoir de recueillir des renseignements sur les Canadiens. Elle indiquera plutôt la façon de communiquer des renseignements existants concernant une menace à la sécurité du Canada entre ministères et organismes afin d'atténuer cette menace ou de la contrer.
Le projet de loi précise que les activités de défense d’une cause, de protestation, de manifestation d’un désaccord ou d’expression artistique ne sont pas des activités portant atteinte à la sécurité du Canada, et il crée un cadre d'examen robuste pour que la communication d'information à d'autres ministères se fasse suivant une procédure adéquate de conservation des documents par les deux parties.
Je voudrais maintenant parler d'un élément que la plupart des députés appuient selon moi: la refonte du Programme de protection des passagers, que nous appelons parfois la « liste d'interdiction de vol ».
Je crois que, depuis le début de la présente législature, la plupart des députés ont déjà rencontré quelqu'un faisant partie de l'organisation appelée les Enfants sur la liste d'interdiction de vol. Soyons clairs, il n'y a présentement aucun enfant qui figure au Programme de protection des passagers du Canada. Il y a cependant peut-être des enfants et des adultes qui ont le même nom qu'une personne inscrite sur la liste. On se rappelle que l'ancien ministre de la Défense, Bill Graham, s'était trouvé dans cette fâcheuse situation.
La résolution de ce problème nécessite à la fois des fonds et une nouvelle mesure législative. Le projet de loi  C-59 jouera un rôle déterminant en permettant au gouvernement de recueillir les manifestes de passagers des vols intérieurs et d'examiner lui-même les noms, au lieu de communiquer la liste du Programme de protection des passagers à une centaine de compagnies aériennes partout dans le monde. Cela signifie que, une fois que le gouvernement aura recueilli les manifestes de passagers, il pourra attribuer un numéro de recours aux gens qui ont le même nom qu'une personne inscrite sur la liste. Toute personne ayant réservé un billet d'avion pour les États-Unis au cours des dernières années a probablement remarqué que leur système possède une case dans laquelle chaque passager peut inscrire son numéro de recours unique. Lorsque le système canadien sera opérationnel, il fonctionnera d'une façon très semblable.
Je signale aussi que nous avons obtenu les fonds nécessaires pour mettre au point ce nouveau système en mars dernier, dans le cadre du dernier budget. Cette mesure constitue un autre excellent moyen d'assurer le respect des droits des Canadiens tout en protégeant la sécurité nationale.
Le projet de loi  C-59 comporte de nombreux autres éléments importants que je n'aurais pas le temps d'aborder en détail en 20 minutes. Cependant, j'aimerais en mentionner quelques-uns, par exemple la nouvelle mesure législative distincte visant à moderniser le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications du Canada. Ce centre avait besoin d'être modernisé. Cela fait longtemps qu'il attend la nouvelle loi présentée dans le projet de loi  C-59.
D'importants changements sont également prévus à la Loi sur le système de justice pénale pour les adolescents afin de garantir la protection des jeunes Canadiens face aux ordonnances d'engagement.
Les modifications au Code criminel obligeraient, entre autres, le procureur général à publier un rapport annuel indiquant le nombre d'ordonnances d'engagement concernant le terrorisme qui ont été rendues pendant l'année. De plus, les changements importants à la Loi sur le SCRS assureraient que les agents de la sécurité aient les pouvoirs juridiques et constitutionnels nécessaires pour faire le travail qu'ils font au nom des Canadiens, notamment gérer des ensembles de données, une tâche complexe, tout en tenant compte des conseils et des dernières décisions rendues par les cours fédérales.
Si le projet de loi  C-59 est adopté, ce projet de loi historique permettra d'améliorer la sécurité nationale du Canada, de maintenir ses citoyens en sûreté et de sauvegarder les droits et libertés constitutionnels des Canadiens.
Pour toutes ces raisons, j'invite tous les députés à se joindre à moi pour appuyer le projet de loi  C-59. Je suis ravi qu'il jouisse d'un fort appui au sein de la population canadienne en général et de la part de certains des experts les plus distingués en matière de sécurité nationale et de libertés civiles du Canada. Nous avons eu la chance de profiter de leurs conseils tout au long de l'étude du projet de loi.
View Ralph Goodale Profile
Lib. (SK)
View Ralph Goodale Profile
2017-10-06 11:45 [p.14038]
Mr. Speaker, in fact, the details of Bill C-59 have been examined by the most eminent experts in the field. Every single one of them has said that this represents a major step forward in terms of transparency, scrutiny, and accountability, including real-time oversight and the creation, for the first time, of the office of the intelligence commissioner that will examine the activities of security agencies before those activities are undertaken, as well as having them reviewed afterward.
Monsieur le Président, en fait, les détails du projet de loi C-59 ont été étudiés par les plus éminents experts du domaine. Chacun d'entre eux a déclaré qu'il représente un progrès majeur en matière de transparence, d'examen, de reddition de comptes et de surveillance en temps réel, notamment grâce à la création du bureau du commissaire au renseignement, chargé d'examiner les activités des organismes de sécurité, avant et après coup.
View Ralph Goodale Profile
Lib. (SK)
View Ralph Goodale Profile
2017-06-20 14:43 [p.12995]
Mr. Speaker, in his judgment last fall, Justice Noël of the Federal Court indicated that the Canadian Security Intelligence Service Act, in his view, was out of date in relation to new technology and other developments over the last 25 years. We have taken his judgment to heart and in fact implemented in this legislation the kind of framework to ensure that the law and the Constitution are properly respected.
The difficulty is that Canadians have made it very clear that they do not trust the NDP with their safety and they do not trust the Conservatives with their rights.
Monsieur le Président, dans son jugement à l'automne dernier, le juge Noël de la Cour fédérale a affirmé que la Loi sur le Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité était désuète, à son avis, en ce qui concerne les nouvelles technologies et d'autres innovations au cours des 25 dernières années. Nous avons pris ce jugement au sérieux et avons inclus dans le projet de loi un cadre qui nous permettra de faire en sorte que la loi et la Constitution soient bien respectées.
Le problème, c'est que les Canadiens ont fait savoir très clairement qu'ils ne sont pas convaincus que les néo-démocrates assureront leur sécurité ni que les conservateurs respecteront leurs droits.
Results: 1 - 4 of 4