Interventions in the House of Commons
 
 
 
RSS feed based on search criteria Export search results - CSV (plain text) Export search results - XML
Add search criteria
View Marjolaine Boutin-Sweet Profile
NDP (QC)
View Marjolaine Boutin-Sweet Profile
2017-12-08 11:25 [p.16192]
Mr. Speaker, the Liberals promised to fix the problems in the Conservatives' anti-terrorism bill, which was an unprecedented attack on Canadians' civil rights.
The Privacy Commissioner sounded the alarm on the Liberals' Bill  C-59 yesterday in committee. The thresholds for sharing information about Canadians among departments are still too low and must be more limited.
Will the government finally agree to amend its bill to protect Canadians' civil rights?
View Mark Holland Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Mark Holland Profile
2017-12-08 11:25 [p.16192]
Mr. Speaker, yesterday, the Privacy Commissioner said that Canada was moving from the back of the pack and catching up with the rest of the international community. In fact, he said that Canada was moving to the lead as a result of the legislation, Bill C-59.
The fact is that the legislation is putting us at the vanguard, that we are ensuring two things equally: one, the protection of Canadians; and two, making sure that their rights are protected.
View Scott Duvall Profile
NDP (ON)
View Scott Duvall Profile
2017-12-08 11:26 [p.16192]
Mr. Speaker, the Liberals are claiming it is not possible to repeal the Conservative BillC-51. My colleague from Esquimalt—Saanich—Sooke is proposing just that with his BillC-303 to fully protect Canadians' rights.
Under the 138-page Liberal Bill C-59, CSIS still has extensive and invasive powers. The privacy of Canadians is still under threat and oversight of government agencies is insufficient.
Will the government divide Bill C-59 into separate bills so they can be properly studied? Canadians' rights are at stake.
View Mark Holland Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Mark Holland Profile
2017-12-08 11:26 [p.16192]
Mr. Speaker, Bill C-59 was preceded by the most exhaustive public consultation across Canada ever on national security. There was an opportunity by the public safety and national security committee to ensure there was a review of the security framework. That led to the legislation before us today, which would see finally the oversight that was talked about for so many years, including when I was the critic in opposition and pushing for it.
We have waited for over a decade. It is time to move forward with appropriate oversight.
View Matthew Dubé Profile
NDP (QC)
View Matthew Dubé Profile
2017-10-06 11:44 [p.14038]
Mr. Speaker, Canadians' overall distrust of our security agencies is a direct consequence of the fact that we have no mechanism to provide real-time oversight and accountability.
The government is currently in court with environmental groups it has accused of spying. Even the watchdog tasked with monitoring CSIS operations failed in its duty by dismissing their complaint and throwing a cloak of total secrecy over the whole case.
Bill C-59 does nothing to fix these problems, but pays lip service to them. When will the minister truly take steps to make real-time oversight, fix these problems, limit the excessive powers of CSIS, and truly protect the rights of Canadians to peaceful protests?
View Ralph Goodale Profile
Lib. (SK)
View Ralph Goodale Profile
2017-10-06 11:45 [p.14038]
Mr. Speaker, in fact, the details of Bill C-59 have been examined by the most eminent experts in the field. Every single one of them has said that this represents a major step forward in terms of transparency, scrutiny, and accountability, including real-time oversight and the creation, for the first time, of the office of the intelligence commissioner that will examine the activities of security agencies before those activities are undertaken, as well as having them reviewed afterward.
View Matthew Dubé Profile
NDP (QC)
View Matthew Dubé Profile
2017-06-20 14:43 [p.12995]
Mr. Speaker, the committee of parliamentarians does not have full access; the consultation took nearly two years, while CSIS continued to use these new abusive powers that it has. The promise was to fix a bill as a way to hide from the fact that they endorsed the Conservatives' draconian agenda. The Federal Court ruled a few months ago that it was illegal for CSIS to retain bulk metadata. What we see in Bill C-59 is simply formalizing and legalizing what the court deemed illegal.
Could the minister explain where in the consultations he was told by experts and Canadians that it was the right thing to do?
View Ralph Goodale Profile
Lib. (SK)
View Ralph Goodale Profile
2017-06-20 14:43 [p.12995]
Mr. Speaker, in his judgment last fall, Justice Noël of the Federal Court indicated that the Canadian Security Intelligence Service Act, in his view, was out of date in relation to new technology and other developments over the last 25 years. We have taken his judgment to heart and in fact implemented in this legislation the kind of framework to ensure that the law and the Constitution are properly respected.
The difficulty is that Canadians have made it very clear that they do not trust the NDP with their safety and they do not trust the Conservatives with their rights.
Results: 1 - 8 of 8