Interventions in the House of Commons
 
 
 
RSS feed based on search criteria Export search results - CSV (plain text) Export search results - XML
Add search criteria
View Arif Virani Profile
Lib. (ON)
View Arif Virani Profile
2018-06-18 18:07 [p.21179]
Mr. Speaker, I will be splitting my time with the member for Oakville North—Burlington this evening.
I rise today to speak in support of Bill C-59. With this bill, our government is entrenching our commitment to balancing the primacy of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms with protecting our national security. We are enhancing accountability and transparency. We are correcting the most problematic elements of the Harper government's old BillC-51.
Our government conducted an unprecedented level of public consultation with Canadians about our national security in order to effectively develop the bill. Canadians told us loudly and clearly that they wanted a transparent, accountable, and effective national security framework. That is exactly what we will accomplish with Bill C-59.
The minister took the rare step of referring Bill C-59 to the Standing Committee on Public Safety after first reading, underscoring our government's commitment to Canadians to ensure that we got this important legislation right. Prior to the bill returning to this chamber, it underwent an extensive four-month study, hearing from nearly 100 witnesses. I would like to thank the members of the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security for their hard work in studying the bill extensively and for their comprehensive report.
Fundamental to our promise to bring our national security framework into the 21st century, we are fixing the very flawed elements of the old BillC-51, which I heard so much about from my constituents in Parkdale—High Park during the 2015 electoral campaign.
I am proud to support this evidence-based, balanced legislation, and I am reassured to see positive reactions from legal and national security experts right around the country, including none other than Professors Craig Forcese and Kent Roach, two of the foremost legal academics in Canada who have been at the centre of concerns about the overreach of the Harper government's old BillC-51.
Professors Forcese and Roach have said, “ Bill C-59 is the biggest overhaul in Canadian national security since the creation of the Canadian Security and Intelligence Service (CSIS) in 1984—and it gets a lot of things right."
Bill C-59 builds on our commitment to enhance accountability, which started with our government's introduction of BillC-22 in 2016. Bill C-22, which has received royal assent established an all-party committee of parliamentarians, representatives elected by the Canadian public, to review and critically analyze security and intelligence activities. For the first time in history, a multi-party group of members of this chamber as well as the Senate are now holding Canada's security apparatus to account.
We are building on BillC-22 with the current bill, Bill C-59, which would establish a national security and intelligence review agency. The NSIRA, as it would be known, would function as a new expert review body with jurisdiction across the entire government to complement the efforts of the recently established parliamentary oversight committee, which I just mentioned. This feature would incorporate one of the important recommendations of the Maher Arar inquiry, which called on the government to, and I am citing recommendation 16 from the Maher Arar inquiry, “develop a protocol to provide for coordination and coherence across government in addressing issues that arise” respecting national security.
With the establishment of a parliamentary oversight committee in BillC-22, and a new arm's-length review body in Bill C-59, we would be addressing the glaring gap that exists in our review bodies for national security agencies. Currently, some agencies do not have a review body or are in charge of reviewing themselves. We cannot allow the lack of such fundamental oversight to continue, especially with regard to the safety and security of Canadians.
As Professors Forcese and Roach have observed, with respect to Bill C-59:
the government is finally redressing the imbalance between security service powers and those of the review bodies that are supposed to hold them to account. Bill C-59 quite properly supplements the parliamentary review committee...with a reformed expert watchdog entity. Expert review will be liberated from its silos as the new review agency has a whole-of-government mandate.
This is a critical piece in our government's work, providing my constituents in Parkdale—High Park and indeed Canadians right around this country, with a comprehensive and responsible national security framework.
In addition to establishing the NSIRA, Bill C-59 calls for increased and improved communication between this organization and other relevant review bodies, such as the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada. This will not only boost efficiency and avoid duplication and unnecessary use of resources, but also promote a more holistic approach to protecting privacy and security at the federal level.
While speaking with the residents of Parkdale—High Park in 2015, I heard about the Harper government's old BillC-51 over and over again at the doors. The major concern the residents expressed to me was about the threat posed by the previous government's Bill C-51 to their constitutional rights and freedoms. The residents of my community are an intelligent and engaged group of citizens, and they were on to something. The federal government, under the guise of “public security”, cannot be permitted to infringe on the rights and freedoms that are fundamental to our very society, to what it means to be Canadian.
Yes, ensuring public safety is the pre-eminent responsibility of any government, but it is simply not acceptable to pursue security at any cost. My constituents, and indeed all Canadians, expect a government that respects fundamental constitutional rights, a government that will put in place mechanisms and safeguards to protect those rights.
That is precisely what Bill C-59 would achieve. How? First, it would tighten the definition of what constitutes “terrorist propaganda”. The narrower and more targeted definition would ensure that the sacrosanct protection of freedom of expression under section 2(b) of our charter is observed, and that our security laws in Canada are not so overreaching as to limit legitimate critique and debate.
Second, as a corollary to this point, Bill C-59 would also protect the right of all Canadians to legitimate protest and advocacy. One of the most searing criticisms of the Harper government's old BillC-51 was that bona fide protestors who dared to disagree with the government of the day could be caught up in a web of security sweeps, all in the name of public safety.
That is not how our Liberal government operates. We respect the charter and the right of all Canadians to engage in legitimate protest and advocacy, whether they represent a group with charitable status that opposes a government policy, or a gathering of students on a university campus who take up the call for more aggressive investment of federal funds to support the expansion of women's rights internationally.
That kind of advocacy is not a threat to our public security. To the contrary, it is an enhancement of our democracy. It is civil society groups and public citizens doing exactly what they do best, challenging government to do, and to be, better.
In Bill C-59, we recognize this principle. We are saying to Canadians that they have constitutional rights to free speech and protest, and that we are going to affirm and protect those rights by correcting the balance between protecting safety and respecting the charter.
Third, Bill C-59 would also upgrade procedures as they relate to the no-fly list. We know that the no-fly list is an important international mechanism for keeping people safe, but its use has expanded to the point of encroaching on Canadians' rights. In Bill C-59, we are determined to address this imbalance.
Our changes to the no-fly list regime would do the following. They would require the destruction of information provided to the minister about a person who was, or was expected to be, on board an aircraft within seven days following the departure or cancellation of the flight. It would also authorize the minister to collect information from individuals for the purpose of issuing a unique identifier to them to assist with pre-flight verification of their identity.
This is a critical step that would provide us with the legislative tools needed to develop a domestic redress mechanism. The funding for a domestic redress mechanism was delivered by our government this year, specifically $81.4 million in budget 2018. However, in order to start investing this money in a way that would allow Canadians, including children, who are false positives on the no-fly list to seek redress, we need legislative authority. Bill C-59 would provide that legislative authority.
Finally, with Bill C-59 we would re-establish the paramountcy of the charter. I speak now as a constitutional lawyer who practised in this area for 15 years prior to being elected. It is unfortunate that the paramountcy of the Constitution needs to be entrenched in law. As a lawyer, I know, and we should all know, that the Constitution is always the paramount document against which all other laws are measured. Nevertheless, the previous government's disdain for the charter has made this important step necessary.
Through Bill C-59, we would entrench, in black and white, that any unilateral action by CSIS to collect data in a manner that might infringe on the Constitution is no longer permitted. Instead, under Bill C-59, any such proposals would have to come before a judge, who must evaluate the application in accordance with the law, where protecting charter rights would be the paramount concern. Our party helped establish the charter in 1982, and our government stands behind that document and all the values and rights it protects.
As I and many others have said before in the House, the task is to balance rights and freedoms while upholding our duty to protect the safety of Canadians. That is not an easy task, but I am confident that Bill C-59, in partnership with BillC-22, would provide a comprehensive and balanced approach to national security. It is respectful of the charter and our Constitution. That is why I support this bill, and I ask all members to do the same.
Monsieur le Président, je partagerai mon temps de parole avec la députée d'Oakville-Nord—Burlington ce soir.
Je prends la parole pour appuyer le projet de loi  C-59. Avec ce projet de loi, le gouvernement enchâsse notre engagement à concilier la primauté de la Charte des droits et libertés et la protection de notre sécurité nationale. Nous améliorons la reddition de comptes et la transparence. Nous corrigeons les éléments les plus problématiques de l'ancien projet de loi C-51 du gouvernement Harper.
Le gouvernement a mené une consultation publique d'une portée sans précédent auprès des Canadiens à l’égard de notre sécurité nationale afin d'élaborer efficacement ce projet de loi. Les Canadiens nous ont dit haut et fort qu'ils voulaient un cadre de sécurité nationale transparent, responsable et efficace. C'est exactement ce que nous allons leur offrir avec le projet de loi  C-59.
La ministre a pris la rare mesure de renvoyer le projet de loi  C-59 au Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale après la première lecture, soulignant ainsi l'engagement du gouvernement envers les Canadiens à faire en sorte que ce projet de loi soit bien fait. Avant que le projet de loi ne revienne à la Chambre, il a fait l'objet d'une étude approfondie de quatre mois au cours de laquelle on a entendu près de 100 témoins. J'aimerais remercier les membres du Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale pour leur travail acharné dans l'étude approfondie du projet de loi et pour leur rapport complet.
À la base de notre promesse de faire entrer notre cadre de sécurité nationale dans le XXIe siècle, nous corrigeons les éléments très défectueux de l'ancien projet de loi C-51, dont j'ai tant entendu parler par mes électeurs de Parkdale—High Park pendant la campagne électorale de 2015.
Je suis fier d'appuyer ce projet de loi équilibré et fondé sur des données probantes, et je suis rassuré de constater les réactions positives d'experts en droit et en sécurité nationale partout au pays, dont nul autre que les professeurs Craig Forcese et Kent Roach, deux des plus éminents universitaires canadiens qui ont été au cœur des préoccupations au sujet de la portée excessive de l'ancien projet de loi C-51 du gouvernement Harper.
Les professeurs Forcese et Roach ont dit: « Le projet de loi  C-59 est la plus importante réforme de la sécurité nationale du Canada depuis la création du Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité (SCRS) en 1984, et il traite de beaucoup de choses de la bonne façon. »
Le projet de loi  C-59 s'appuie sur notre engagement à améliorer la reddition de comptes, qui a commencé avec la présentation par le gouvernement du projet de loi C-22 en 2016. Le projet de loi C-22, qui a reçu la sanction royale, a établi un comité composé de parlementaires de tous les partis, des représentants élus par la population canadienne, pour examiner et analyser de façon critique les activités de sécurité et de renseignement. Pour la toute première fois, un groupe multipartite de députés et de sénateurs demande maintenant des comptes à l'appareil de sécurité du Canada.
Le projet de loi  C-59, qui prend appui sur le projet de loi C-22, créera l’Office de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité nationale et de renseignement, un nouvel organisme de surveillance qui aura également compétence à l’échelle du gouvernement et dont le travail viendra compléter celui du comité des parlementaires dont je viens de parler. La création de cet organisme repose sur l'une des recommandations importantes issues de l’enquête sur l’affaire Maher Arar, qui demande au gouvernement, et je cite la recommandation 16 du rapport d'enquête, d'« élaborer un protocole assurant la coordination et la cohérence entre toutes les instances gouvernementales face aux questions survenant [...] » dans le contexte de la sécurité nationale.
Grâce à l'établissement d'un comité de surveillance parlementaire dans le cadre du projet de loi C-22 et d'un nouvel organisme de surveillance indépendant dans le projet de loi  C-59, nous comblerions une lacune flagrante qui existe au chapitre des comités de surveillance des organismes de sécurité nationale. À l'heure actuelle, certains organismes ne sont dotés d'aucun comité de surveillance ou bien ils sont responsables de leur propre surveillance. Nous ne pouvons plus tolérer une lacune de cette ampleur, surtout lorsqu'il s'agit de la santé et de la sécurité des Canadiens.
Comme les professeurs Forcese et Roach l'ont indiqué relativement au projet de loi  C-59, et je les cite:
[...] le gouvernement corrige enfin le déséquilibre entre les pouvoirs des services de sécurité et ceux des organismes de surveillance qui sont censés leur demander des comptes. Le projet de loi  C-59 vient compléter le travail du comité des parlementaires [...] par l'entremise d'une entité de surveillance spécialisée remaniée. La fonction de surveillance ne se fera plus en vase clos, puisque le nouvel office aura un mandat pangouvernemental.
Il s'agit d'un élément essentiel des efforts déployés par le gouvernement pour s'assurer d'avoir un cadre de sécurité nationale exhaustif et responsable pour le bien de mes concitoyens de Parkdale—High Park et des Canadiens de partout au pays.
En plus d'installer un organisme de surveillance auprès de l'OSSNR, le projet de loi  C-59 exige une communication accrue et améliorée entre cet organisme et d'autres organismes de surveillance pertinents comme le Commissariat à la protection de la vie privée du Canada. Cela permettra non seulement d'accroître l'efficacité du travail, d'éviter la duplication des efforts et la dépense inutile des ressources, mais aussi de favoriser une approche plus holistique de la protection de la vie privée et de la sécurité au niveau fédéral.
Quand j'ai fait du porte à porte à Parkdale—High Park en 2015, j'ai beaucoup entendu parler de l'ancien projet de loi C-51 du gouvernement Harper. Les gens étaient principalement préoccupés par la menace que le projet de loi C-51 du gouvernement précédent faisait peser sur leurs droits et libertés constitutionnels. Les habitants de ma collectivité forment un groupe de citoyens intelligents et engagés, et ils avaient mis le doigt sur un risque important. Le gouvernement fédéral ne peut, au nom de la « sécurité publique », être autorisé à porter atteinte aux droits et libertés qui sont le fondement de notre société, à l'identité canadienne.
Oui, assurer la sécurité publique est la responsabilité première de tout gouvernement, mais il est tout simplement inacceptable d'assurer la sécurité à n'importe quel prix. Les gens de ma circonscription, à l'instar de tous les Canadiens, s'attendent à ce que le gouvernement respecte les droits constitutionnels fondamentaux et mette en place des mécanismes et des mesures de protection pour protéger ces droits.
C'est précisément ce que le projet de loi C-59 permettra d'accomplir. Comment? Premièrement, en renforçant la définition de ce qui constitue de la « propagande terroriste ». La définition plus étroite et plus ciblée garantira le respect de la sacro sainte protection de la liberté d'expression en vertu de l'alinéa 2b) de la Charte et éviteront que les lois sur la sécurité au Canada n'aillent trop loin en limitant la critique et les débats légitimes.
Deuxièmement, pour faire suite à ce que je viens de dire, le projet de loi C-59 protégera également le droit de tous les Canadiens de manifester et de défendre leurs droits. L'une des critiques les plus virulentes de l'ancien projet de loi C-51 du gouvernement Harper portait sur le fait que des manifestants de bonne foi qui osaient être en désaccord avec le gouvernement de l'époque pouvaient être pris en souricière dans des opérations de sécurité, au nom de la sécurité publique.
Ce n'est pas ainsi que fonctionne le gouvernement libéral. Nous respectons la Charte et le droit de tous les Canadiens de participer à des manifestations légitimes et à des activités de défense des droits, qu'ils représentent un groupe ayant le statut d'organisme de bienfaisance qui s'oppose à une politique gouvernementale ou un rassemblement d'étudiants sur un campus universitaire qui réclame davantage d'investissement de fonds fédéraux pour appuyer l'expansion des droits des femmes à l'échelle internationale.
De telles manifestations ne constituent pas une menace à la sécurité publique. Au contraire, elles renforcent la démocratie. Les groupes de la société civile et les citoyens font exactement ce qu'ils doivent faire, soit mettre le gouvernement au défi de se dépasser.
Dans le projet de loi C-59, nous reconnaissons ce principe. Nous disons aux Canadiens qu'ils ont le droit constitutionnel de s'exprimer librement et de manifester, et que nous allons affirmer et protéger ces droits en rétablissant l'équilibre entre la sécurité et le respect de la Charte.
Troisièmement, le projet de loi C-59 améliorera également les procédures relatives à la liste des personnes interdites de vol. Nous savons que la liste d'interdiction de vol est un mécanisme international important pour assurer la sécurité des gens, mais son utilisation s'est étendue au point d'empiéter sur les droits des Canadiens. Avec le projet de loi C 59, nous sommes déterminés à remédier à ce déséquilibre.
Les modifications que nous proposons au régime de la liste des personnes interdites de vol auraient les effets suivants. Elles exigeraient la destruction, dans les sept jours suivant le départ ou l'annulation du vol, des renseignements fournis au ministre au sujet d'une personne qui se trouvait ou devait se trouver à bord d'un aéronef. Elles autoriseraient également le ministre à recueillir des renseignements auprès des particuliers afin de leur délivrer une carte d'identité unique afin de faciliter la vérification de leur identité avant un vol.
Il s'agit d'une étape critique qui nous fournira les outils législatifs nécessaires à l'élaboration d'un mécanisme de recours national. Dans le budget de 2018, le gouvernement a prévu un financement de 81,4 millions de dollars au titre d'un mécanisme national de recours. Toutefois, pour commencer à investir cet argent de façon à permettre aux Canadiens, y compris les enfants, qui sont de faux positifs sur la liste des personnes interdites de vol, de demander des mesures correctives, il nous faut un pouvoir légal. Le projet de loi C-59 nous conférera ce pouvoir légal.
Enfin, le projet de loi  C-59 rétablirait la primauté de la Charte. Je revêts maintenant mes habits de constitutionnaliste ayant exercé sa profession pendant 15 ans avant d'être élu député. Il est malheureux que l'on doive inscrire dans des lois des dispositions assurant la primauté de la Charte. En tant qu'avocat, je le sais, et tout le monde devrait le savoir: la Constitution est toujours le texte fondamental à l'aulne duquel les autres lois doivent être jugées. Toutefois, en raison du mépris pour la Charte manifesté par le gouvernement précédent, il est nécessaire d'adopter le projet de loi actuel.
Grâce au projet de loi  C-59, nous comptons inscrire noir sur blanc, dans la loi, qu'il ne sera plus permis au SCRS de recueillir unilatéralement des données en violation de la Constitution. Il faudra dorénavant que toute collecte de renseignements du genre soit autorisée par un juge après qu'il en ait évalué la conformité à la loi et tout particulièrement dans l'optique de la protection des droits garantis par la Charte. Notre parti a contribué à l'adoption de la Charte en 1982, et le gouvernement a l'intention de défendre ce texte de loi sans réserve ainsi que les valeurs et les droits qu'il protège.
Comme bien d'autres députés et moi l'avons dit dans cette enceinte, la Chambre doit trouver le juste équilibre entre les droits et libertés des Canadiens et notre devoir d'assurer leur sécurité. Ce n'est pas facile, mais je suis convaincu que le projet de loi  C-59 et le projet de loi C-22 définissent, en matière de sécurité nationale, une approche globale et équilibrée qui respecte la Charte et la Constitution. C'est la raison pour laquelle j'appuie le projet de loi  C-59 et je demande à tous les députés de faire de même.
Result: 1 - 1 of 1