Interventions in the House of Commons
 
 
 
RSS feed based on search criteria Export search results - CSV (plain text) Export search results - XML
Add search criteria
View Ed Fast Profile
CPC (BC)
View Ed Fast Profile
2018-06-07 12:16 [p.20428]
Mr. Speaker, I appreciate the opportunity to speak to Bill C-59. Listening to our Liberal friends across the way, one would assume that this is all about public safety, that Bill C-59 would improve public safety and the ability of our security agencies to intervene if a terrorist threat presented itself. Nothing could be further from the truth.
Let us go back and understand what this Prime Minister did in the last election. Whether it was his youth, or ignorance, he went out there and said that he was going to undo every single bit of the Stephen Harper legacy, a legacy I am very proud of, by the way. That was his goal.
One of the things he was going to undo was what BillC-51 did. Bill C-51 was a bill our previous Conservative government brought forward to reform and modernize how we approach terrorist threats in Canada. We wanted to provide our government security agencies with the ability to effectively, and in a timely way, intervene when necessary to protect Canadians against terrorist threats. Bill C-51 was actually very well received across the country. Our security agencies welcomed it as providing them with additional tools.
I just heard my Liberal colleagues chuckle and heckle. Did members know that the Liberals, in the previous Parliament, actually supported BillC-51? Here they stand saying that somehow that legislation did not do what it was intended to do. In fact, it did. It made Canadians much safer and allowed our security agencies to intervene in a timely way to protect Canadians. This bill that has come forward would do nothing of the sort.
The committee overseeing this bill had 16 meetings, and at the end of the whole process, there were 235 amendments brought forward. That is how bad this legislation was. Forty-three of those amendments came from Liberals themselves. They rushed forward this legislation, doing what Liberals do best: posture publicly, rush through legislation, and then realize, “What have we done? My goodness.” They had 43 amendments of their own, all of which passed, of course. There were 20-some Conservative amendments, and none of them passed, even though they were intelligently laid-out improvements to this legislation. That is the kind of government we are dealing with here. It was all about optics so that the government would be able to say, “We are taking that old BillC-51 that was not worth anything, although we voted in favour of it, and we are going to replace it with our own legislation.” The reality is that Bill C-51 was a significant step forward in protecting Canadians.
This legislation is quite different. What it would do is take one agency and replace it with another. That is what Liberals do. They take something that is working and replace it with something else that costs a ton of money. In fact, the estimate to implement this bill is $100 million. That is $100 million taxpayers do not have to spend, because the bill would not do one iota to improve the protection of Canadians against terrorist threats. There would be no improved oversight or improved intelligence capabilities.
The bill would do one thing we applaud, which is reaffirm that Canada will not torture. Most Canadians would say that this is something Canada should never do.
The Liberals went further. They ignored warnings from some of our intelligence agencies that the administrative costs were going to get very expensive. In fact, I have a quote here from our former national security adviser, Richard Fadden. Here is what he said about Bill C-59: “It is beginning to rival the Income Tax Act for complexity.” Canadians know how complex that act has become.
He said, “There are sub-sub-subsections that are excluded, that are exempted. If there is anything the committee can do to make it a bit more straightforward, [it would be appreciated].” Did the committee, in fact, do that? No, it did not make it more straightforward.
There is the appointment of a new intelligence commissioner, which is, of course, the old one, but again, with additional costs. The bill would establish how a new commissioner would be appointed. What the Liberals would not do is allow current or past judges to fill that role. As members know, retired and current judges are highly skilled in being able to assess evidence in the courtroom. It is a skill that is critical to being a good commissioner who addresses issues of intelligence.
Another shortcoming of Bill C-59 is that there is excessive emphasis on privacy, which would be a significant deterrent to critical interdepartmental information sharing. In other words, this legislation would highlight privacy concerns to the point that our security agencies and all the departments of government would now become hamstrung. Their hands would become tied when it came to sharing information with other departments and our security agencies, which could be critical information in assessing and deterring terrorist threats.
Why would the government do this? The Liberals say that they want to protect Canadians, but the legislation would actually take a step backwards. It would make it even more difficult and would trip up our security agencies as they tried to do the job we have asked them to do, which is protect us. Why are we erring on the side of the terrorists?
We heard testimony, again from Mr. Fadden, that this proposed legislation would establish more silos. They were his nightmare when he was the national security director. We now have evidence from the Air India bombing. The inquiry determined that the tragedy could have been prevented had one agency in government not withheld critical information from our police and security authorities. Instead, 329 people died at the hands of terrorists.
Again, why are we erring on the side of terrorists? This proposed legislation is a step backward. It is not something Canadians expected from a government that had talked about protecting Canadians better.
There are also challenges with the Criminal Code amendments in Bill C-59. The government chose to move away from criminalizing “advocating or promoting terrorism” and would move towards “counselling” terrorism. The wording has been parsed very carefully by security experts, and they have said that this proposed change in the legislation would mean, for example, that ISIS propaganda being spread on YouTube would not be captured and would not be criminalized. Was the intention of the government when it was elected, when it made its promises to protect Canadians, to now step backward, to revise the Criminal Code in a way that would make it less tough on terrorists, those who are promoting terrorism, those who are advocating terrorism, and those who are counselling terrorism? This would be a step backward on that.
In closing, I have already stated that the Liberals are prepared to err on the side of terrorists rather than on the side of Canadian law enforcement and international security teams. The bill would create more bureaucracy, more costs, and less money and security for Canadians.
When I was in cabinet, we took security very seriously. We trusted our national security experts. The proposed legislation is essentially a vote of non-confidence in those experts we have in government to protect us.
Finally, the message we are sending is that red tape is more important than sharing information and stopping terrorism. That is a sad story. We can do better as Canadians.
Monsieur le Président, je suis ravi d'avoir l'occasion d'intervenir sur le projet de loi  C-59. Les députés libéraux prétendent que le projet de loi permettra d'améliorer la sécurité publique et de renforcer la capacité de nos agences de sécurité d'intervenir en cas de menace terroriste. Or, rien n'est plus faux.
Faisons un retour dans le passé pour tenter de comprendre ce qu'a fait le premier ministre au cours de la dernière campagne électorale. Peut-être était-ce à cause de sa jeunesse ou de son ignorance, mais toujours est-il qu'il a manifesté le désir de démanteler totalement l'héritage de Stephen Harper, héritage dont je suis fier, soit dit en passant. C'était l'objectif du premier ministre.
Il s'est engagé notamment à annuler les mesures prévues dans le projet de loi C-51. Il s'agit du projet de loi que le gouvernement conservateur précédent avait présenté pour réformer et moderniser les mécanismes de lutte contre le terrorisme au Canada. Nous souhaitions habiliter les agences de sécurité de l'État à intervenir de manière efficace et opportune pour protéger les Canadiens contre la menace terroriste, le cas échéant. Le projet de loi C-51 avait suscité des commentaires très positifs partout au pays. Nos agences de sécurité l'ont accueilli favorablement, car il leur permettait d'obtenir des outils supplémentaires.
Je viens d'entendre mes collègues libéraux glousser et chahuter. Les députés savent-ils qu'au cours de la dernière législature, les libéraux étaient, en fait, favorables au projet de loi C-51? Et les voilà qui disent que cette mesure législative n'a, en quelque sorte, pas eu l'effet escompté. En fait, c'est le contraire. Elle a beaucoup rehaussé la sécurité des Canadiens et a permis à nos organismes chargés de la sécurité d'intervenir rapidement pour protéger la population. Le projet de loi à l'étude ne ferait rien de tel.
Le comité responsable de ce projet de loi a tenu 16 réunions et, à la fin du processus, ses membres ont proposé 235 amendements. La mesure législative était à ce point médiocre. De ce nombre, 43 ont été proposés par les libéraux mêmes. Ils ont précipité le dépôt de ce projet de loi et fait ce qu'ils font de mieux: ils ont pris des grands airs en public et déposé le projet de loi à la hâte pour ensuite se demander « Qu'avons-nous fait? Mon Dieu ». Ils ont eux-mêmes proposé 43 amendements, qui ont tous été adoptés, bien sûr. En revanche, la vingtaine d'amendements conservateurs ont été rejetés, même s'il s'agissait d'améliorations judicieuses de ce projet de loi. Voilà le type de gouvernement auquel nous avons ici affaire. Tout était une question d'apparences pour que le gouvernement puisse dire « Nous reprenons l'ancien projet de loi C-51 dont il n'y avait rien à tirer, bien que nous ayons voté en sa faveur, et nous allons le remplacer par notre propre mesure législative ». En réalité, le projet de loi C-51 représentait une importante avancée pour protéger les Canadiens.
Cette mesure est très différente. Elle ne fait que prendre une agence et la remplacer par une autre. C’est ce que les libéraux font. Ils prennent quelque chose qui fonctionne et le remplacent par quelque chose d’autre qui coûte une montagne d’argent. De fait, on estime que mettre en œuvre ce projet de loi coûtera 100 millions de dollars. Ce sont 100 millions de dollars que les contribuables n’ont pas à dépenser, parce que ce projet de loi n’améliore en rien la protection des Canadiens contre les menaces terroristes. Il n’améliore en rien la surveillance, pas plus que les capacités de renseignement.
Ce projet de loi fait une seule chose que nous applaudissons; il réaffirme le fait que le Canada ne pratiquera pas la torture. La plupart des Canadiens seraient d’avis que c’est une chose que le Canada ne devrait jamais faire.
Les libéraux ont été plus loin. Ils ont ignoré les avertissements que leur ont donnés certaines de nos agences du renseignement, qui leur ont dit que les coûts administratifs seraient très élevés. De fait, j’ai une citation ici de notre ancien conseiller à la sécurité nationale, Richard Fadden. Il a dit, en parlant du projet de loi  C-59 « [qu’]il commence à rivaliser de complexité avec la Loi de l’impôt sur le revenu. » Les Canadiens savent à quel point cette loi est devenue complexe.
Il a dit: « Certains sous-alinéas sont exclus. S’il y a quelque chose que le comité peut faire, c’est le simplifier un peu. » Le comité l’a-t-il fait? Non, il ne l’a pas simplifié.
Il prévoit la nomination d’un nouveau commissaire au renseignement, celui-ci étant, bien sûr, le même que l’ancien, mais là encore, avec plus de coûts. Le projet de loi établit la façon dont un nouveau commissaire est nommé. Les libéraux ne permettraient pas que celui-ci soit choisi parmi les anciens juges ou les juges actuels. Comme les députés le savent, les juges actuels ou à la retraite sont experts dans l’évaluation des preuves au tribunal. C’est une compétence qu’un bon commissaire doit absolument avoir pour pouvoir traiter des questions de renseignement.
Une autre lacune du projet de loi  C-59 consiste en son insistance excessive sur la confidentialité, ce qui découragerait considérablement le partage de renseignements cruciaux entre les ministères. En d’autres termes, ce projet de loi insiste tellement sur les questions de confidentialité que nos agences de sécurité et tous les ministères s’en trouveraient paralysés. Ils auraient les mains liées quand il s’agit de partager des renseignements avec d’autres ministères et nos agences de sécurité, des renseignements qui pourraient être cruciaux dans l’évaluation et la dissuasion des menaces terroristes.
Pourquoi le gouvernement fait-il cela? Les libéraux disent qu’ils veulent protéger les Canadiens, mais le projet de loi nous fait faire un pas en arrière. Il rend la tâche encore plus difficile et mettrait des bâtons dans les roues de nos agences de sécurité, les empêchant de faire le travail que nous leur avons demandé de faire, soit nous protéger. Pourquoi penchons-nous du côté des terroristes?
M. Fadden a dit, dans son témoignage, que ce projet de loi créerait encore plus de cloisonnement. Ce cloisonnement était un cauchemar pour lui quand il était directeur de la sécurité nationale. Nous avons maintenant des preuves dans le cas de l’attentat à la bombe contre Air India. L’enquête a déterminé que la tragédie aurait pu être évitée si une agence du gouvernement ne s’était pas abstenue de communiquer des enseignements cruciaux à nos forces policières et organismes de sécurité. Résultat: 329 personnes ont péri aux mains de terroristes.
Une fois de plus, pourquoi penchons-nous du côté des terroristes? Ce projet de loi est un pas en arrière. Ce n’est pas ce à quoi les Canadiens s’attendraient d’un gouvernement qui parlait de mieux les protéger.
Il y a aussi des problèmes en ce qui concerne les modifications au Code criminel proposées dans le projet de loi  C-59. Le gouvernement a choisi de remplacer l'Infraction de « préconiser ou fomenter la commission d’une infraction de terrorisme » par l'infraction de « conseiller » la commission d’infractions de terrorisme. Des experts en matière de sécurité ont analysé très soigneusement la formulation et sont arrivés à la conclusion que ce changement dans le projet de loi signifierait, par exemple, qu’une propagande du groupe État islamique sur YouTube ne serait pas saisie et ne serait pas criminalisée. Le gouvernement avait-il l’intention, quand il a été élu, quand il a promis de protéger les Canadiens, de faire un pas en arrière, de réviser le Code criminel d’une façon qui le rendrait moins sévère pour les terroristes, ceux qui préconisent le terrorisme et ceux qui conseillent la commission d’infractions de terrorisme? Ce serait un pas en arrière.
Pour terminer, j’ai déjà dit que les libéraux sont prêts à pencher du côté des terroristes plutôt que du côté des organismes d’application de la loi canadiens et des équipes de sécurité internationale. Le projet de loi créerait plus de lourdeurs administratives et plus de coûts, mais il permet moins d'investissement et de sécurité pour les Canadiens.
Quand j’étais au Cabinet, nous prenions la sécurité très au sérieux. Nous faisions confiance à nos experts en sécurité nationale. Le projet de loi représente, en fait, un vote de non-confiance à l’égard de ces experts qui sont au gouvernement pour nous protéger.
Enfin, nous envoyons ainsi le message que la paperasserie est plus importante que la communication des renseignements et l’élimination du terrorisme. C’est bien triste. En tant que Canadiens, nous pouvons faire mieux.
Result: 1 - 1 of 1