Interventions in the House of Commons
 
 
 
RSS feed based on search criteria Export search results - CSV (plain text) Export search results - XML
Add search criteria
View Pierre Paul-Hus Profile
CPC (QC)
Mr. Speaker, I thank the minister for his speech.
On June 20, 2017, almost a year ago to the day, the minister introduced Bill C-59 in the House. Shortly after that, he said that, instead of bringing it back for second reading, it would be sent straight to the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security so the committee could strengthen and improve it. Opposition members thought that was fantastic. We thought there would be no need for political games for once. Since this bill is about national security, we thought we could work together to ensure that Bill C-59 works for Canadians. When it comes to security, there is no room for partisanship.
Unfortunately, the opposition soon realized that it was indeed a political game. The work we were asked to do was essentially pointless. I will have more to say about that later.
The government introduced BillC-71, the firearms bill, in much the same way. It said it would sever the gun-crime connection, but this bill does not even go there. The government is targeting hunters and sport shooters, but that is another story.
Getting back to Bill C-59, we were invited to propose amendments. We worked very hard. We got a lot of work done in just under nine months. We really took the time to go through this 250-page omnibus bill. We Conservatives proposed 45 specific amendments that we thought were important to improve Bill C-59, as the minister had asked us to do. In the end, none of our amendments were accepted by the committee or the government. Once again, we were asked to do a certain job, but then our work was dismissed, even though everything we proposed made a lot of sense.
The problem with Bill C-59, as far as we are concerned, is that it limits the Canadian Security Intelligence Service's ability to reduce terrorist threats. It also limits the ability of government departments to share data among themselves to protect national security. It removes the offence of advocating and promoting terrorist offences in general. Finally, it raises the threshold for obtaining a terrorism peace bond and recognizance with conditions. One thing has been clear to us from the beginning. Changing just two words in a 250-page document can sometimes make all the difference. What we found is that it will be harder for everyone to step in and address a threat.
The minister does indeed have a lot of experience. I think he has good intentions and truly wants this to work, but there is a prime minister above him who has a completely different vision and approach. Here we are, caught in a bind, with changes to our National Security Act that ultimately do nothing to enhance our security.
Our allies around the world, especially those in Europe, have suffered attacks. Bill C-51 was introduced in 2014, in response to the attacks carried out here, in Canada. Right now, we do not see any measures that would prevent someone from returning to the Islamic State. This is a problem. Our act is still in force, and we are having a hard time dealing with Abu Huzaifa, in Toronto. The government is looking for ways to arrest him—if that is what it truly wants to do—and now it is going to pass a law that will make things even harder for our security services. We are having a hard time with this.
Then there is the whole issue of radicalization. Instead of cracking down on it, the government is trying to put up barriers to preventing it. The funny thing is that at the time, when they were in the opposition, the current Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness and Prime Minister both voted with the government in favour of BillC-51. There was a lot of political manoeuvring, and during the campaign, the Liberals said that they would address Bill C-51, a bill they had supported. At the time, it was good, effective counter-terrorism legislation. However, the Liberals listened to lobby groups and said during the campaign that they would amend it.
I understand the world of politics, being a part of it. However, there are certain issues on which we should set politics aside in the interest of national security. Our allies, the Five Eyes countries are working to enhance their security and to be more effective.
The message we want to get across is that adding more red tape to our structures makes them less operationally effective. I have a really hard time with that.
Let me share some examples of amendments we proposed to Bill C-59. We proposed an amendment requiring the minister to table in Parliament a clear description of the way the various organizations would work together, namely, the NSIC, CSE, CSIS, the new committee of parliamentarians, as well as the powers and duties of the minister.
In our meetings with experts, we noticed that people had a hard time understanding who does what and who speaks to whom. We therefore drafted an amendment that called on the minister to provide a breakdown of the duties that would be clear to everyone. The answer was no. The 45 amendments we are talking about were not all ideological in nature, but rather down to earth. The amendments were rejected.
It was the Conservative government that introduced Bill C-51 when it was in office. Before the bill was passed, the mandate of CSIS prevented it from engaging in any disruption activities. For example, CSIS could not approach the parents of a radicalized youth and encourage them to dissuade their child from travelling to a war zone or conducting attacks here in Canada. After Bill C-51 was passed, CSIS was able to engage in some threat disruption activities without a warrant and in others with a warrant. Threat disruption refers to efforts to stop terrorist attacks while they are still in the planning stages.
Threat disruption activities not requiring a warrant are understood to be any activities that are not contrary to Canadian laws. Threat disruption activities requiring a warrant currently include any activity that would infringe on an individual's privacy or other rights and any activity that contravenes Canada's laws. Any threat disruption activities that would cause bodily harm, violate sexual integrity, or obstruct justice are specifically prohibited.
Under BillC-51, warrants were not required for activities that were not against Canadian law. BillC-51 was balanced. No one could ask to intervene if it was against the law to do so. When there was justification, that worked, but if a warrant was required, one was applied for.
At present, Bill C-59 limits the threat reduction activities of CSIS to the specific measures listed in the bill. CSIS cannot employ these measures without a warrant. At present CSIS requires a warrant for these actions, which I will describe. First, a warrant is required to amend, remove, replace, destroy, disrupt, or degrade a communication or means of communication. Second, a warrant is also required to modify, remove, replace, destroy, degrade, or provide or interfere with the use or delivery of all or part of something, including files, documents, goods, components, and equipment.
The work was therefore complicated by the privacy objectives of Canadians. BillC-51 created a privacy problem. Through careful analysis and comparison, it eventually became clear that the work CSIS was requesting was not in fact a privacy intrusion, as was believed. Even the privacy commissioners and witnesses did not analyze the situation the same way we are seeing now.
BillC-51 made it easier to secure peace bonds in terrorism cases. Before BillC-51, the legal threshold for police to secure a peace bond was that a person had to fear that another person will commit a terrorism offence.
Under BillC-51, a peace bond could be issued if there were reasonable grounds to fear that a person might commit a terrorism offence. It is important to note that Bill C-59 maintains the lower of the two thresholds by using “may”. However, Bill C-59 raises the threshold from “is likely” to “is necessary”.
Earlier when I mentioned the two words that changed out of the 250 pages, I was referring to changing “is likely” to “is necessary”. These two words make all the difference for preventing a terrorist activity, in order to secure a peace bond.
It would be very difficult to prove that a peace bond, with certain conditions, is what is needed to prevent an act of terrorism. This would be almost as complex as laying charges under the Criminal Code. What we want, however, is to get information to be able to act quickly to prevent terrorist acts.
We therefore proposed an amendment to the bill calling for a recognizance order to be issued if a peace officer believes that such an order is likely to prevent terrorist activities. The Liberals are proposing replacing the word “likely” with the words “is necessary”. We proposed an amendment to eliminate that part of the bill, but it was refused. That is the main component of Bill  C-59 with respect to managing national security.
Bill  C-59 has nine parts. My NDP colleague wanted to split the bill, and I thought that was a very good idea, since things often get mixed up in the end. We are debating Bill  C-59 here, but some parts are more administrative in nature, while others have to do with young people. Certain aspects need not be considered together. We believe that the administrative parts could have been included in other bills, while the more sensitive parts that really concern national security could have been dealt with publicly and separately.
Finally, the public and the media are listening to us, and Bill C-59 is an omnibus bill with so many elements that we cannot oppose it without also opposing some aspects that we support. For example, we are not against reorganizing the Communications Security Establishment. Some things could be changed, but we are not opposed to that.
We supported many of the bill's elements. On balance, however, it contains some legislation that is too sensitive and that we cannot support because it touches on fundamental issues. In our view, by tinkering with this, security operations will become very bureaucratic and communications will become difficult, despite the fact the the main goal was to simplify things and streamline operations.
The Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security heard from 36 witnesses, and several of them raised this concern. The people who work in the field every day said that it complicated their lives and that this bill would not simplify things. A huge structure that looks good on paper was put in place, but from an operational point of view, things have not been simplified.
Ultimately, national security is what matters to the government and to the opposition. I would have liked the amendments that we considered important to be accepted. Even some administrative amendments were rejected. We believe that there is a lack of good faith on the part of the government on this file. One year ago, we were asked to work hard and that is what we did. The government did not listen to us and that is very disappointing.
Monsieur le Président, je remercie le ministre de son discours.
Le 20 juin 2017, il y a un an presque jour pour jour, le ministre a déposé le projet de loi  C-59 à la Chambre. Peu de temps après, il a dit qu'au lieu d'en faire la deuxième lecture, on l'enverrait immédiatement au Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale, afin de le renforcer et de l'améliorer. Nous, dans l'opposition, avions dit que c'était fantastique, et que pour une fois, nous n'aurions pas à faire de jeux politiques. En outre, comme cela concernait la sécurité nationale, nous pourrions travailler ensemble pour nous assurer de l'efficacité du projet de loi  C-59 pour les Canadiens. Lorsque nous parlons de sécurité, il n'y a pas d'enjeu partisan avec cela.
Malheureusement, l'opposition a rapidement constaté qu'il s'agissait encore d'un jeu politique. Le travail qu'on nous a demandé n'a pas réellement servi. J'en parlerai un peu plus longuement.
On présente le projet de loi C-71, concernant les armes à feu, un peu de la même façon, en disant qu'on va enlever l'aspect criminel entourant les armes à feu, alors qu'il n'y a absolument rien sur cela dans le projet de loi. On s'attaque aux chasseurs et aux tireurs sportifs, mais c'est une autre histoire.
Concernant le projet de loi  C-59, on nous a invités à proposer des amendements. Nous avons travaillé très fort. Nous avons fait beaucoup de travail pendant presque neuf mois. Nous avons vraiment pris le temps de passer à travers ce projet de loi omnibus de 250 pages. Nous, les conservateurs, avons proposé 45 amendements qui étaient précis, et que nous considérions importants pour améliorer le projet de loi  C-59, comme le ministre nous avait demandé de le faire. Au bout du compte, aucun de nos amendements n'a été retenu par le comité et par le gouvernement. Encore une fois, on nous a demandé de faire un travail, et on n'a pas considéré ce que nous avons fait, alors que tout ce que nous avions proposé avait beaucoup de sens.
En ce qui nous concerne, le problème avec le projet de loi  C-59, c'est qu'il limite la capacité du Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité à réduire les menaces terroristes, ainsi que la capacité des ministères à partager des données pour protéger la sécurité nationale, en plus d'éliminer l'infraction de préconiser et de promouvoir les infractions de terrorisme en général, et d'augmenter le seuil pour l'obtention d'un engagement de paix et d'un engagement de terrorisme avec des conditions. Pour nous, depuis le début, c'est clair: sur 250 pages, il suffit parfois de changer deux mots et cela fait toute la différence. Ce que nous avons constaté, c'est que ce sera plus difficile pour tout le monde d'intervenir pour contrer la menace.
Le ministre est en effet un homme d'expérience. Je pense que son intention est louable et qu'il a vraiment l'objectif que cela fonctionne, mais au-dessus de lui, il y a un premier ministre qui a une vision et une façon de voir les choses totalement différentes. On se retrouve donc dans un étau, avec des changements à notre Loi sur la sécurité nationale qui, au bout du compte, ne font rien pour améliorer notre sécurité.
Des attentats se sont produits chez nos alliés partout dans le monde, notamment dans différents pays d'Europe. Chez nous, le projet de loi C-51 a été déposé en 2014, à la suite des attentats perpétrés ici, au Canada. Or nous ne voyons actuellement pas de mesures qui empêcheraient, par exemple, les gens de retourner auprès du groupe État islamique. C'est un problème. Notre loi est encore en vigueur et nous avons de la difficulté à intervenir auprès du fameux Abu Huzaifa qui est à Toronto. Le gouvernement cherche des moyens de l'arrêter — s'il veut bien l'arrêter —, et on va maintenant adopter une loi qui va compliquer encore plus les choses pour le service de sécurité. Nous avons beaucoup de difficulté avec cela.
En outre, il y a tout ce qui concerne la radicalisation. Au lieu de la réprimer, on cherche à mettre des barrières pour en empêcher le contrôle. Ce qui est plus drôle encore, c'est qu'à l'époque, l'actuel ministre de la Sécurité publique et de la Protection civile et le premier ministre, qui étaient dans l'opposition, avaient voté avec le gouvernement en faveur du projet de loi C-51. Il y a eu différentes tractations politiques, et en campagne électorale, les libéraux ont dit qu'ils s'attaqueraient au projet de loi C-51, alors qu'ils avaient voté en faveur de ce projet de loi. À l'époque, c'était une loi bonne et efficace pour contrer le terrorisme. Toutefois, pour écouter les groupes de pression, les libéraux ont dit en campagne électorale qu'ils changeraient cela.
La politique est une réalité que je comprends, car j'en fais partie. Toutefois, il y a des choses pour lesquelles on devrait laisser la politique de côté et travailler dans l'intérêt de la sécurité nationale. Nos alliés, les pays des « Five Eyes », travaillent à renforcer leur sécurité et à être plus efficaces.
Quant à nous, on passe le message que, finalement, on crée des structures, mais en les rendant plus administratives, on réduit l'efficacité opérationnelle. C'est un côté qui me fatigue énormément.
Voici des exemples d'amendements que nous avons proposés pour le projet de loi  C-59. Par exemple, nous avons proposé un amendement qui exigeait que le ministre dépose au Parlement une description claire de la façon dont toutes les organisations travailleraient ensemble, en occurrence, le CSNR, le CST, le SCRS, le nouveau comité des parlementaires, ainsi que les pouvoirs et les fonctions du ministre.
Au cours de nos rencontres avec les experts, nous avons constaté que les gens avaient de la difficulté à comprendre qui fait quoi et qui parle à qui. Nous avons donc rédigé un amendement qui demandait au ministre de donner une description de tâches claire à tout le monde. La réponse a été non. Pourtant, les 45 amendements dont nous parlons n'étaient pas tous liés à des choses idéologiques, mais plutôt terre à terre. Les amendements ont été rejetés.
C'est le gouvernement conservateur qui avait proposé le projet de loi C-51, à l'époque. Avant que ce projet de loi ne soit adopté, le mandat du SCRS l'empêchait de participer à des activités de perturbation. À titre d'exemple, le SCRS ne pouvait pas approcher les parents d'un jeune radicalisé et les encourager à dissuader leur enfant de se rendre dans une zone de guerre ou de mener des attaques, ici, au Canada. Avec l'adoption du projet de loi C-51, le SCRS a obtenu le pouvoir de participer à certaines activités de perturbation des menaces sans mandat, et certaines activités de perturbation des menaces exigeant un mandat. La perturbation de la menace fait référence aux efforts visant à arrêter les attaques terroristes, alors qu'elles sont encore en cours de planification.
La perturbation de la menace qui ne nécessite pas de mandat doit être comprise comme une activité qui n'est pas contraire à la loi canadienne. Les activités de perturbation des menaces qui nécessitent un mandat comprennent actuellement toute activité qui porterait atteinte à la vie privée ou à d'autres droits d'une personne ou à toute autre activité contraire à la loi canadienne. En outre, la perturbation de la menace interdisait spécifiquement toute atteinte corporelle, toute atteinte à l'intégrité sexuelle ou toute entrave à la justice.
En vertu du projet de loi C-51, des mandats n'étaient pas requis pour les activités qui n'étaient pas contraire à la loi canadienne. Le projet de loi C-51 était équilibré. On ne pouvait pas demander d'intervenir si c'était contraire à la loi de le faire. Quand c'était logique, cela fonctionnait, mais quand il y avait le besoin de demander un mandat, on en demandait un.
Actuellement, le projet de loi  C-59 limite les activités de perturbation des menaces du SCRS à des mesures précises énumérées dans le projet de loi. Présentement, le SCRS ne peut prendre ces mesures qu'avec un mandat. Je vais mentionner les points où le SCRS a effectivement besoin d'un mandat. Premièrement, il en a besoin pour modifier, supprimer, remplacer, détruire, perturber ou dégrader une communication ou des moyens de communication. Deuxièmement, il en a aussi besoin pour modifier, enlever, remplacer, détruire, dégrader ou fournir ou interférer avec l'utilisation ou la livraison de tout ou partie d'une chose, y compris des dossiers, des documents, des biens, des composantes et de l'équipement.
Par conséquent, le travail était compliqué par les objectifs de la population canadienne par rapport à la vie privée. Le projet de loi C-51 créait un problème concernant la vie privée. En analysant et en comparant tout cela, on se rend finalement compte que le travail demandé par le SCRS ne s'ingérait pas dans la vie privée de la population, comme on le croyait. Même les commissaires à la vie privée et les gens qui sont venus témoigner ne faisaient pas la même analyse de la situation que celle que nous voyons actuellement.
À l'époque, le projet de loi C-51 avait facilité l'obtention de l'engagement de ne pas troubler l'ordre public en cas de terrorisme. Avant le projet de loi C-51, la loi indiquait qu'il fallait craindre qu'un individu commette une infraction terroriste, avant que la police puisse obtenir un engagement de ne pas troubler l'ordre public.
En vertu du projet de loi C-51, l'engagement de ne pas troubler l'ordre public pourrait être émis s'il y avait des motifs raisonnables de craindre qu'une personne puisse commettre une infraction terroriste. Il est important de noter que le projet de loi  C-59 maintient le seuil inférieur de ces deux critères de « s'engager » à « peut s'engager ». Cependant, le projet de loi  C-59 augmente le seuil de « est susceptible » à « est nécessaire ».
Comme je le disais tantôt, sur 250 pages, cela fait partie des deux mots qui changent: « est susceptible » à « est nécessaire ». Cela vient tout changer pour empêcher une activité terroriste, afin d'obtenir un engagement de paix.
Il est très difficile de prouver qu'un engagement de ne pas troubler la paix, assorti de certaines conditions, est nécessaire pour empêcher un acte de terrorisme. Ce serait presque aussi complexe que de déposer des accusations en vertu du Code criminel. Pourtant, ce qu'on veut, c'est obtenir de l'information pour intervenir rapidement afin d'empêcher des actes terroristes.
Nous avons donc proposé un amendement à ce projet de loi visant à ce qu'une ordonnance d'engagement puisse être délivrée si un agent de la paix estime qu'une telle ordonnance est susceptible d'empêcher des activités terroristes. Les libéraux proposent de remplacer les mots « est susceptible » par « est nécessaire ». Nous, nous avons proposé un amendement qui éliminerait cette partie du projet de loi, mais cela a été refusé. C'est l'élément principal du projet de loi  C-59 en ce qui concerne la gestion de la sécurité nationale.
Le projet de loi  C-59 comporte neuf parties. Mon collègue du NPD voulait les séparer, et je trouvais que c'était une très bonne idée, car on finit par mélanger les choses. Ici, nous débattons du projet de loi  C-59, mais il y a des parties plutôt administratives et d'autres qui concernent les jeunes. Certains éléments n'ont pas à être évalués ensemble. Selon nous, les parties administratives auraient pu faire partie d'autres projets de loi, tandis que les parties plus délicates qui concernent vraiment la sécurité nationale auraient pu être traitées publiquement et séparément.
En fin de compte, les gens et les médias nous écoutent, et le projet de loi  C-59 est un projet de loi omnibus qui contient tellement d'éléments que nous ne pouvons nous y opposer sans nous opposer également à certaines idées que nous appuyons. Par exemple, nous ne sommes pas contre celle de refaire la structure du Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications. Certaines choses pourraient être changées, mais nous ne sommes pas fondamentalement contre cela.
Nous étions en faveur de plusieurs éléments du projet de loi, mais dans son ensemble, il contient des éléments trop délicats que nous ne pouvons appuyer parce qu'ils touchent des questions fondamentales. Selon nous, en jouant avec cela, on va faire de la sécurité un monde où il y aura beaucoup de bureaucratie et où la communication sera complexe, alors que le but premier était de simplifier les choses et de faciliter les opérations.
Au Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale, nous avons rencontré 36 témoins, et plusieurs d'entre eux ont soulevé cette préoccupation. Les gens qui travaillent sur le terrain tous les jours ont dit que cela leur compliquait la vie et que ce projet de loi n'allait pas simplifier les choses. On a mis en place une immense structure qui paraît bien sur papier, mais d'un point de vue opérationnel, on n'a pas simplifié les choses.
Finalement, c'est la sécurité nationale qui est importante, tant pour le gouvernement que pour les gens de l'opposition. J'aurais aimé que les amendements que nous considérions importants soient acceptés. Il y a même des amendements de nature administrative qui ont été refusés. Nous croyons que la bonne foi du gouvernement dans ce dossier fait défaut. Il y a un an, on nous a demandé de travailler fort, et c'est ce que nous avons fait. On ne nous a pas écoutés, et c'est très décevant.
View Pierre Paul-Hus Profile
CPC (QC)
At the time, the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness decided not to give Bill  C-59 second reading and sent it directly to the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security. He said that committee meetings were needed to get additional information in order to improve the bill, so that is what we did.
During the committee's study of Bill  C-59, 235 amendments were proposed. The Conservative Party proposed 29 and the Green Party 45. The Liberals rejected all of them. Four NDP amendments and 40 Liberal amendments were adopted. Twenty-two of the Liberal amendments had more to do with the wording and with administrative issues. The Liberals also proposed one very important amendment that I will talk about later on.
The committee's mandate was to improve the bill. We, the Conservatives, undertook that work in good faith. We proposed important amendments to try to round out and improve the bill presented at second reading. The Liberal members on the committee rejected all of our amendments, even though they made a lot of sense. The Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security held 16 meetings on the subject and heard from a number of witnesses, including people from all walks of life and key stakeholders in the security field. In the end, the government chose to reject all of our amendments.
There were two key points worth noting. The first was that under Bill  C-59, our security agencies will have fewer tools to combat the ongoing terrorist threat around the world. The second was that our agencies will have a harder time sharing information.
One important proposal made in committee was the amendment introduced by the Liberal member for Montarville regarding the perpetration of torture. Every party in the House agrees that the use of torture by our intelligence or security agencies is totally forbidden. There is no problem on that score. However, there is a problem with the part about torture, in that our friends across the aisle are playing political games because they are still not prepared to tell China and Iran to change their ways on human rights. One paragraph in the part about torture says that if we believe, even if we do not know for sure, that intelligence passed on by a foreign entity was obtained through torture, Canada will not make use of that intelligence. For example, if another country alerts us that the CN Tower in Toronto is going to be blown up tomorrow, but we suspect the information was extracted through some form of torture, we will not act on that intelligence if the law remains as it is. That makes no sense. We believe we should protect Canadians first and sort it out later with the country that provided the intelligence.
It is little things like that that make it impossible for us to support the bill. That element was proposed at the end of the study. Again, it was dumped on us with no notice and we had to vote on it.
There are two key issues. The national security and intelligence review agency in part 1 does not come with a budget. The Liberals added an entity, but not a budget to go with it. How can we vote on an element of the bill that has no number attached to it?
Part 2 deals with the intelligence commissioner. The Liberals rejected changes to allow current judges, who would retire if appointed, and retirees from being considered, despite testimony from the intelligence commissioner who will assume these new duties. Currently, only retired judges are accepted. We said that there are active judges who could do the work, but that idea was rejected. It is not complicated. It makes perfect sense. We could have the best people in the prime of their lives who may have more energy than those who are about to retire and may be less interested in working 40 hours a week.
In part 3 on the Communications Security Establishment, known as CSE, there are problems concerning the restriction of information. In fact, some clauses in Bill C-59 will make capturing data more complicated. Our intelligence agencies are facing additional barriers. It will be more difficult to obtain information that allows our agencies to take action, for example against terrorists.
Part 4 concerns the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, or CSIS. The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and the privacy issue often come up in connection with CSIS. A common criticism of BillC-51 is that this bill would allow agencies to breach people's privacy. Witnesses representing interest groups advocating for Canadians' privacy and people whose daily work is to ensure the safety of Canadians appeared before the committee. For example, Richard Fadden said that the agencies are currently working in silos. CSIS, the CSE, and the RCMP work in silos, and the situation is too complex. There is no way to share information, and that is not working.
Dr. Leuprecht, Ph.D., from the Royal Military College, Lieutenant-General Michael Day from the special forces, and Ray Boisvert, a former security adviser, all made similar comments. Conservative amendment No. 12 was rejected. That amendment called for a better way of sharing information. In that regard, I would like to remind members of the Air India bombing in 1985. We were given the example of that bombing, which killed more than 200 people on a flight from Toronto to Bombay. It was determined that this attack could have been prevented had it been easier to share information at the time.
The most important thing to note about part 7, which deals with the Criminal Code, is that it uses big words to increase the burden for obtaining arrest warrants to prevent terrorist acts. Amendments were made regarding the promotion of terrorism. Section 83.221 of the Criminal Code pertains to advocating or promoting the commission of terrorism offences. The Liberals changed the wording of that section with regard to unidentified terrorist offences, for example, ISIS videos on YouTube. They therefore created section 83.221.
That changes the recognizance orders for terrorism and makes it more difficult to control threats. Now, rather than saying “likely”, it says “is necessary”. Those are just two little words, but they make all the difference. Before, if it was likely that something would happen, our security agencies could intervene, whereas now, intervention must be necessary. It is a technicality, but we cannot support Bill C-59 because of that change in wording. This bill makes it harder for security agencies and police to do their work, when it should be making it easier for them.
We are not opposed to revising our national security legislation. All governments must be prepared to do that to adapt. BillC-51, which was introduced at the time by the Conservatives, was an essential tool in the fight against terrorist attacks in Canada and the world. We needed tools to help our agents. The Liberals alluded to BillC-51 during the election campaign and claimed that it violated Canadians' freedoms and that it did not make sense. They promised to introduce a new bill and here it is before us today, Bill C-59.
I would say that Bill C-59, a massive omnibus bill, is ultimately not much different from Bill C-51. There are a number of parts I did not mention, because we have nothing to say and we agree with their content. We are not against everything. What we want, no matter the party, is to be effective and to keep Canadians safe. We agree on that.
Nevertheless, some parts are problematic. As I said earlier, the government does not want to accept information from certain countries on potential attacks, because this information could have been obtained through torture. This would be inadmissible. Furthermore, the government is changing two words, which makes it harder to access the information needed to take action. We cannot agree with this.
Now the opposite is being done, and most of the witnesses who came to see us in committee, people in the business of privacy, did not really raise any issues. They did not show up and slam their fists on the desk saying that it was senseless and had to be changed. Everyone had their views to express, but ultimately, there were not that many problems. Some of the witnesses said that Bill C-59 made no sense, but upon questioning them further, we often reached a compromise and everyone agreed that security is important.
Regardless, the Liberals rejected all of the Conservatives' proposed amendments. I find that hard to understand because the minister asked us to do something, he asked us to improve Bill C-59 before bringing it back here for second reading—it is then going to go to third reading. We did the work. We did what we were supposed to do, as did the NDP, as did the Green Party. The Green Party leader had 45 amendments and is to be commended for that. I did not agree with all her amendments, but we all worked to improve Bill C-59, and in turn, to enhance security in Canadians' best interest, as promised. Unfortunately, that never happened. We will have to vote against this bill.
Since I have some time left, I will give you some quotes from witnesses who appeared before the committee. For example, everyone knows Richard Fadden, the Prime Minister's former national security adviser. Mr. Fadden said that Bill  C-59 was “beginning to rival the Income Tax Act for complexity. There are sub-sub-subsections that are excluded, that are exempted. If there is anything the committee can do to make it a bit more straightforward”, it would help. Mr. Fadden said that to the committee. If anyone knows security, it is Canada's former national security adviser. He said that he could not understand Bill  C-59 at all and that it was worse than the Income Tax Act. That is what he told the committee. We agreed and tried to help, but to no avail. It seems like the Liberals were not at the same meeting I was at.
We then saw the example of a young man who goes by the name Abu Huzaifa. Everyone knows that two or three weeks ago, in Toronto, this young man boasted to the New York Times and then to CBC that he had fought as a terrorist for Daesh in Iraq and Syria. He admitted that he had travelled there for the purposes of terrorism and had committed atrocities that are not fit to be spoken of here. However, our intelligence officers only found out that this individual is currently roaming free in Toronto from a New York Times podcast. Here, we can see the limitations of Bill  C-59 in the specific case of a Canadian citizen who decided to fight against us, to go participate in terrorism, to kill people the Islamic State way—everyone here knows what I mean—and then to come back here, free as a bird. Now the Liberals claim that the law does not allow such and such a thing. When we tabled Bill C-51, we were told that it was too restrictive, but now Bill  C-59 is making it even harder to get information.
What do Canadians think of that? Canadians are sitting at home, watching the news, and they are thinking that something must be done. They are wondering what exactly we MPs in Ottawa are being paid for. We often see people on Facebook or Twitter asking us to do something, since that is what we are paid for. We in the Conservative Party agree, and we are trying; the government, not so much. Liberal members are hanging their heads and waiting for it to pass. That is not how it works. They need to take security a little more seriously.
This is precisely why Canadians have been losing confidence in their public institutions and their politicians. This is also why some people eventually decide to take their safety into their own hands, but that should never happen. I agree that this must not happen. That would be very dangerous for a society. When people lose confidence in their politicians and take their safety into their own hands, we have the wild west. We do not want that. We therefore need to give our security officers, our intelligence officers, the powerful tools they need to do their jobs properly, not handcuff them. Handcuffs belong on terrorists, not on our officers on the ground.
Christian Leuprecht from Queen's University Royal Military College said that he respected the suggestion that CSIS should stick to its knitting, or in other words, not intervene. In his view, the RCMP should take care of some things, such as disruption. However, he also indicated that the RCMP is struggling on so many fronts already that we need to figure out where the relative advantage of different organizations lies and allow them to quickly implement this.
The questions that were asked following the testimony focused on the fact that the bill takes away our intelligence officers' ability to take action and asks the RCMP to take on that responsibility in CSIS's place, even though the RCMP is already overstretched. We only have to look at what is happening at the border. We have to send RCMP officers to strengthen border security because the government told people to come here. The RCMP is overstretched and now the government is asking it to do things that it is telling CSIS not to do. Meanwhile, western Canada is struggling with a crime wave. My colleagues from Alberta spoke about major crimes being committed in rural communities.
Finland and other European countries have said that terrorism is too important an issue and so they are going to allow their security agencies to take action. We cannot expect the RCMP to deal with everything. That is impossible. At some point, the government needs to take this more seriously.
After hearing from witnesses, we proposed amendments to improve Bill  C-59, so that we would no longer have any reason to oppose it at second reading. The government could have listened to reason and accepted our amendments, and then we would have voted in favour of the bill. However, that is not what happened, and in my opinion it was because of pure partisanship. When we are asked to look at a bill before second or third reading and then the government rejects all of our proposals, it is either for ideological reasons or out of partisanship. In any case, I think it is shameful, because this is a matter of public safety and security.
When I first joined the Canadian Armed Forces, in the late 1980s, we were told that the military did not deal with terrorism, that this was the Americans' purview. That was the first thing we were told. At the time, we were learning how to deal with the Warsaw Pact. The wars were highly mechanized and we were not at all involved in fighting terrorism.
However, times have changed. Clearly, everything changed on September 11, 2001. Canada now has special forces, which did not exist back then. JTF2, a special forces unit, was created. Canada has had to adapt to the new world order because it could also be a target for terrorist attacks. We have to take off our blinders and stop thinking that Canada is on another planet, isolated from any form of wickedness and cruelty. Canada is on planet Earth and terrorism knows no borders.
The G7 summit, which will soon be under way, could already be the target of a planned attack. We do not know. If we do not have tools to prevent and intercept threats, what will happen? That is what is important. At present, at the G7, there are Americans and helicopters everywhere. As we can see on the news, U.S. security is omnipresent. Why are there so many of them there? It is because confidence is running low. If Americans are not confident about Canadians' rules, military, and ability to intervene, they will bring everything they need to protect themselves.
That is why we need to take a position of strength. Yes, of course we have to show that we are an open and compassionate country, but we still need to be realistic. We have to be on the lookout and ready to take action.
À cette époque, le ministre de la Sécurité publique a décidé de ne pas faire la deuxième lecture et d'envoyer directement le projet de loi  C-59 au Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale. Selon lui, il fallait tenir des rencontres pour avoir encore plus d'informations afin d'améliorer le projet de loi, et c'est ce qu'on a fait.
Pendant l'étude du projet de loi  C-59 en comité, 235 modifications ont été proposées: le Parti conservateur en a soumis 29 et le Parti vert, 45. Toutes ont été défaites par les libéraux. Quatre modifications proposées par le NPD et 40 modifications présentées par les libéraux ont été adoptées. Celles des libéraux concernaient plus des questions de libellé, soit 22 modifications, et des questions d'administration. Les libéraux ont aussi proposé une modification très importante dont je vais parler plus tard.
Le mandat du Comité était d'améliorer le projet de loi. Nous, les conservateurs, avons entrepris ce travail de bonne foi. Nous avons proposé des amendements importants pour que le projet de loi présenté à l'étape de la deuxième lecture soit plus complet et meilleur. Les membres libéraux du comité ont refusé d'adopter tous nos amendements, qui avaient beaucoup de bon sens. Le Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale a tenu 16 réunions sur ce sujet lors desquelles nous avons reçu plusieurs témoins: des gens de tous les horizons et des personnalités importantes de la sécurité. Finalement, le gouvernement a préféré dire non à nos amendements.
Nous retenons deux choses importantes. Premièrement, avec le projet de loi  C-59, il y aura moins d'outils pour nos agences de la sécurité, alors que la menace terroriste demeure présente dans notre monde. Deuxièmement, les agences auront encore plus de difficultés à s'échanger de l'information.
Une des choses importantes qui ont été proposées lors des réunions du comité, c'est l'amendement déposé par le député libéral de Montarville qui concerne la perpétration de la torture. Tous les partis à la Chambre s'entendent pour dire que l'utilisation de la torture par nos différentes agences de renseignement ou de sécurité est absolument interdite. Là-dessus, il n'y a aucun problème. Par contre, dans la partie sur la torture, il y a actuellement un problème et un jeu politique alors que nos amis d'en face ne sont pas encore prêts à dire à la Chine et à l'Iran de changer leurs façons de faire en ce qui concerne les droits de la personne. Dans un paragraphe de la partie sur la torture, il est écrit que si on pense — sans vraiment le savoir — qu'un renseignement qui provient de l'étranger a été obtenu par la torture, le Canada n'utilisera pas l'information. Par exemple, si un pays nous avertit qu'un attentat se prépare pour faire sauter demain la Tour CN, à Toronto, et qu'on pense que l'information a été soutirée par une forme de torture, on ne fera rien avec l'information si la loi reste comme cela. Cela n'a aucun sens. Nous pensons qu'il faut protéger les Canadiens d'abord et régler le problème avec le pays concerné après.
Ce sont des petits éléments comme celui-là qui font que nous ne pouvons pas appuyer le projet de loi. Cet élément a été proposé à la fin de l'étude. Encore une fois, il a été garroché sans avis, et nous avons dû voter.
Il y a des enjeux clés. Dans la partie 1 qui porte sur l'Office de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité nationale et de renseignement, il n'y a aucun budget prévu. Les libéraux ont donc augmenté la structure, mais n'y ont pas associé de budget. Comment pouvons-nous voter sur un élément du projet de loi alors qu'aucun chiffre n'y est rattaché?
Dans la partie 2, il est question du commissaire au renseignement. Les libéraux ont rejeté les modifications visant à permettre aux juges actuels, qui prendront leur retraite à leur nomination, et aux retraités d'être considérés, et ce, malgré le témoignage du commissaire au renseignement qui assumera ces nouvelles fonctions. Actuellement, on prend seulement des juges retraités. Nous avons dit qu'il y a des juges en fonction qui pourraient faire le travail, mais cela a été refusé. Pourtant, ce n'est rien de compliqué, c'est plein de bon sens. On pourrait avoir les meilleures personnes, dans la force de l'âge, qui ont une énergie peut-être plus grande que celle des personnes qui prennent leur retraite et qui sont moins intéressées à travailler 40 heures par semaine.
Dans la partie 3 sur le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications ou CST, il y a des problèmes relatifs à la restriction de l'information. En effet, dans le projet de loi  C-59, des clauses font en sorte que la capture de l'information sera plus compliquée. Nos agences de renseignement font face à des barrières supplémentaires. Il sera donc plus difficile d'obtenir l'information qui permet à nos agences d'engager des actions, entre autres contre des terroristes.
La partie 4 porte sur le Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité ou SCRS. En ce qui concerne le SCRS, on a souvent fait référence à la Charte canadienne des droits et libertés, ainsi qu'à la vie privée. On a souvent reproché cela au projet de loi C-51; on disait qu'en vertu de ce projet de loi, on pouvait interférer dans la vie privée des gens. Des témoins, qui représentaient les groupes d'intérêts pour les droits à la vie privée des gens, et des personnes qui travaillent quotidiennement pour assurer la sécurité des Canadiens, ont comparu. Par exemple, Richard Fadden a dit qu'on travaillait actuellement en silo. Le SCRS, le CST et la GRC travaillent en silo, et c'est trop compliqué. Il n'y a pas moyen de faire un partage d'information, cela ne fonctionne pas.
Ces commentaires ont été faits également par M. Leuprecht, Ph.D., du Collège militaire, par le lieutenant-général Michael Day, des forces spéciales, et par Ray Boisvert, ancien conseiller à la sécurité. L'amendement 12 des conservateurs a été rejeté. Cet amendement demandait une meilleure façon de faire pour le transfert d'information. À ce sujet, je rappelle l'attentat d'Air India en 1985. On nous a donné l'exemple de cet attentat qui a tué plus de 200 personnes dans un vol en partance de de Toronto pour Bombay. Il a été déterminé que si le transfert d'information avait été plus facile à l'époque, on aurait pu éviter cet attentat.
Le point le plus important dans la partie 7 qui traite du Code criminel est le fait d'augmenter le fardeau pour l'obtention de mandats d'arrestation afin d'empêcher des actes terroristes, en se servant de mots importants, Des mesures ont été prises pour modifier la promotion du terrorisme. À l'article 83.221 concernant l'incitation au terrorisme, libéraux ont changé une partie du libellé pour les activités terroristes non identifiées, comme par exemple les vidéos du groupe État islamique sur Youtube. Ils ont donc créé l'article 83.221.
Avec cela, on modifie les ordonnances d'engagement pour terrorisme, afin qu'il soit plus difficile de contrôler les menaces. Maintenant, au lieu de dire « probable », on dit « est nécessaire ». Ce sont tout simplement deux mots, mais ils font toute la différence. Avant, si c'était probable que quelque chose arrive, on pouvait intervenir, alors que maintenant, il faut que ce soit nécessaire. C'est un aspect technique, mais ces deux mots font en sorte que l'ensemble du projet de loi  C-59 ne peut être acceptable pour nous. En effet, on augmente la difficulté, alors qu'on devrait aider les agences et nos policiers à faire leur travail.
Nous ne sommes pas contre l'idée de remanier notre projet de loi sur la sécurité nationale. Tout gouvernement a besoin de le faire pour s'adapter à la situation. Le projet de loi C-51, déposé à l'époque par les conservateurs, était un outil essentiel dans les cas d'attentat terroriste au Canada et partout dans le monde. Nous avions besoin d'outils pour aider nos agents. En campagne électorale, les libéraux se sont servis du projet de loi C-51, disant qu'il allait à l'encontre de la liberté des Canadiens, que c'était un outil qui n'avait pas de bon sens. Ils ont d'ailleurs promis de déposer un nouveau projet de loi et nous l'avons devant nous aujourd'hui, le projet de loi  C-59.
Au bout du compte, je dirais que le projet de loi  C-59, un projet de loi omnibus et majeur, n'est pas nécessairement trop différent du projet de loi C-51. Il y a plusieurs parties dont je n'ai pas parlé, parce que nous n'avons rien à dire et que nous sommes d'accord avec ce qu'elles contiennent. Nous sommes pas contre tout dans la vie. Ce que nous voulons, c'est d'être efficaces et d'assurer la sécurité des Canadiens, peu importe le parti. On s'entend là-dessus.
Par contre, certains éléments sont problématiques. Comme je l'ai dit tantôt, on ne voudra pas accepter de l'information sur des attentats possibles provenant de certains pays, parce qu'elle a peut-être été obtenue sous la torture. Cela ne peut pas être admissible. De plus, on change deux mots, ce qui complique l'accès à l'information afin d'intervenir. On ne peut pas être d'accord avec cela.
Actuellement, on fait le contraire et la plupart des témoins qui sont venus nous voir au Comité, des gens qui s'occupent de la vie privée, n'avaient pas vraiment de problèmes à signaler. Ils ne sont pas arrivés en tapant sur le bureau, en disant que cela n'avait pas de bon sens, qu'il fallait changer cela. Tout le monde y allait de ses propositions, mais enfin de compte il n'y avait pas tant de problèmes. Oui, certains sont arrivés en disant que C-51 était insensé, mais quand on posait nos questions en contre-argument, on arrivait souvent à un compromis et tout le monde disait que la sécurité était importante.
Il demeure que les amendements proposés par les conservateurs ont tous été défaits par les libéraux. Je ne peux pas le comprendre alors que le ministre nous a demandé de faire un travail, d'aider à améliorer C-59 avant de l'amener ici en deuxième lecture — par la suite il va être en troisième lecture. Nous avons fait le travail. Nous avons fait ce que nous avions à faire, comme le NPD, comme le Parti vert. La chef du Parti vert, que je félicite, avait 45 amendements; je n'étais pas d'accord sur tous ses amendements, mais il y a un travail qui a été fait justement pour améliorer C-59 afin d'améliorer la sécurité, dans l'intérêt des Canadiens, tel que promis. Malheureusement, cela n'a pas été fait. Nous allons devoir voter contre le projet de loi.
Puisque j'ai du temps, je vais vous donner des exemples de citations des témoins qui sont venus au Comité. Par exemple, Richard Fadden, tout le monde connaît l'ancien conseiller à la sécurité nationale du premier ministre, a dit que le projet de loi  C-59 commençait « à rivaliser de complexité avec la Loi de l'impôt sur le revenu. Certains sous-alinéas sont exclus. S'il y a quelque chose que le Comité peut faire, c'est le simplifier un peu. » M. Fadden se présente au Comité, il nous dit cela. S'il y a quelqu'un qui connaît la sécurité, c'est bien l'ancien conseiller à la sécurité nationale du Canada. Il nous a dit qu'il ne comprenait rien à C-59, que c'était pire que l'impôt. C'est ce qu'il nous a dit en comité. Nous avons acquiescé et essayer d'aider, en vain. Il semble que les libéraux n'étaient pas à la même réunion que moi.
Ensuite, on a eu l'exemple d'une personne connue sous le nom Abu Huzaifa, un gentil petit monsieur. Tout le monde sait qu'il y a deux ou trois semaines à Toronto, le gentil petit monsieur s'est vanté au New York Times puis à CBC d'avoir été avec Daech, en Irak et en Syrie, d'avoir travaillé avec cette organisation comme terroriste. Il a avoué avoir voyagé pour faire du terrorisme et avoir commis des crimes odieux — je pense que cela ne peut même pas se dire ici —, puis nos agents de renseignement apprennent en écoutant les balados du New York Times que cet individu, qui est à Toronto actuellement, se promène en toute liberté. On voit les limites de C-59 avec le cas précis d'un Canadien qui a décidé de se battre contre nous, d'aller faire du terrorisme, de tuer des gens à la façon de l'État islamique — tout le monde sait ce que c'est — puis de revenir ici, et maintenant il se promène en liberté. Là, on nous dit que le loi ne permet pas ceci ou cela. Avec C-51, nous nous faisions dire que nous étions trop restrictifs, mais là on augmente les problèmes pour avoir de l'information avec C-59.
Que pensent les Canadiens de cela? Les Canadiens sont chez eux, ils regardent les nouvelles en se disant que quelque chose doit être fait et se demandent pourquoi les députés sont payés, à Ottawa. On voit cela souvent sur Facebook ou Twitter: les gens demandent que nous fassions quelque chose, car on nous paie pour cela. Nous, les conservateurs nous sommes d'accord et nous poussons. Le gouvernement est de l'autre bord; il penche la tête et il attend que cela passe. Cela ne fonctionne pas de cette manière. Il faut être un peu plus sérieux au chapitre de la sécurité.
C'est ce genre de chose qui fait que les Canadiens perdent confiance envers leurs institutions, envers leurs politiciens. C'est pour cela que les gens en viennent à un moment donné à vouloir prendre en charge leur sécurité eux-mêmes, mais il ne faut pas que cela arrive. Je suis d'accord qu'il ne faut pas que cela arrive. C'est ce qui est dangereux pour une société. Quand les gens perdent confiance envers leurs politiciens, décident de prendre en main leur sécurité, c'est le far west. Nous ne voulons pas cela. Nous avons donc besoin d'outils forts, qui permettent à nos agents de sécurité, nos agents de renseignement, de bien faire leur travail et non pas de les menotter. Les menottes vont aux terroristes, elles ne vont pas à nos agents sur le terrain.
Christian Leuprecht, du Collège militaire royal de l'Université Queen's, a dit qu'il respectait les suggestions selon lesquelles le SCRS devrait s'en tenir au tricotage, c'est-à-dire ne pas intervenir. Selon lui, la GRC devrait faire certaines choses comme des perturbations, mais il estime qu'elle a déjà des difficultés sur bien des fronts et qu'on devrait déterminer l'avantage relatif des différentes organisations et leur permettre de le mettre à profit rapidement.
Les questions que nous avons reçues à la suite des témoignages portaient donc sur le fait qu'on enlève à nos agents de renseignement du SCRS la possibilité d'intervenir et qu'on demande à la GRC de le faire, alors que celle-ci est débordée. Regardons ce qui se passe à la frontière. On doit envoyer des agents de la GRC pour la renforcer parce qu'on fait signe aux gens de venir ici. La GRC est donc débordée et on lui demande de faire des choses qu'on dit au SCRS de ne pas faire, et pendant ce temps, il y a des crimes dans l'Ouest. Mes collègues de l'Alberta parlaient des crimes majeurs qui ont lieu dans des communautés rurales.
La Finlande et d'autres pays d'Europe ont dit que le terrorisme était une question trop importante et qu'ils allaient permettre à leurs agents d'intervenir. On ne peut pas toujours dire que la GRC va tout régler, c'est impossible. À un moment donné, il faut être plus sérieux.
À la suite de ces témoignages, nous avions proposé des amendements pour améliorer le projet de loi  C-59 de telle sorte que nous n'ayons plus de raison de nous y opposer à l'étape de la deuxième lecture. Le gouvernement aurait pu entendre raison et accepter nos amendements, puis nous aurions eu un beau vote, mais cela n'a pas été le cas. Selon moi, c'est de la pure partisanerie. Quand on nous demande de faire un travail préalable à la deuxième lecture ou à la troisième lecture et qu'on rejette ensuite tout ce que nous proposons, c'est soit parce qu'on impose son idéologie, soit parce qu'on fait preuve de partisanerie. Quoi qu'il en soit, lorsqu'il est question de sécurité publique, cela me répugne.
À mes débuts dans les Forces armées canadiennes, à la fin des années 1980, on nous disait qu'au Canada, les militaires ne touchaient pas au terrorisme et que c'était un sujet qui concernait les Américains. C'était les premières choses qu'on nous disait. À l'époque, nous apprenions à nous battre contre le pacte de Varsovie. Il s'agissait des grandes guerres mécanisées; nous ne touchions pas du tout au terrorisme.
Toutefois, les temps ont changé. Évidemment, le 11 septembre 2001 a tout changé. Maintenant, le Canada a des forces spéciales, ce qu'il n'avait pas à l'époque. La FOI 2, une unité de forces spéciales, a été créée. Le Canada a dû s'adapter à la réalité mondiale, puisqu'il peut aussi être la cible d'attentats terroristes. Il faut cesser de se mettre des oeillères et de penser que le Canada est sur une autre planète, isolé de toute forme de méchanceté ou de cruauté. Le Canada est sur la planète Terre et le terrorisme n'a pas de frontières.
Le G7 approche, et n'importe qui pourrait avoir planifié un attentat là-bas. On ne le sait pas. Si on n'a pas d'outils pour prévenir et intercepter les menaces, que va-t-il arriver? C'est cela qui est important. Présentement, au G7, il y a des Américains et des hélicoptères partout. Des reportages télévisés nous montrent l'omniprésence de la sécurité américaine. Pourquoi y a-t-il autant de monde? C'est parce qu'il y a une perte de confiance. Si les Américains ne font pas confiance aux Canadiens en ce qui concerne nos règles, nos forces et notre capacité d'intervention, ils vont apporter tout ce dont ils ont besoin pour se défendre eux-mêmes.
Il faut donc prendre une position forte. Oui, il faut démontrer que nous sommes un pays ouvert et compatissant, bien sûr. Cependant, il ne faut pas se mettre des oeillères; il faut être à l'affût et prêt à agir.
Results: 1 - 2 of 2