Interventions in the House of Commons
 
 
 
RSS feed based on search criteria Export search results - CSV (plain text) Export search results - XML
Add search criteria
View Pierre Paul-Hus Profile
CPC (QC)
Mr. Speaker, I thank the minister for his speech.
On June 20, 2017, almost a year ago to the day, the minister introduced Bill C-59 in the House. Shortly after that, he said that, instead of bringing it back for second reading, it would be sent straight to the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security so the committee could strengthen and improve it. Opposition members thought that was fantastic. We thought there would be no need for political games for once. Since this bill is about national security, we thought we could work together to ensure that Bill C-59 works for Canadians. When it comes to security, there is no room for partisanship.
Unfortunately, the opposition soon realized that it was indeed a political game. The work we were asked to do was essentially pointless. I will have more to say about that later.
The government introduced BillC-71, the firearms bill, in much the same way. It said it would sever the gun-crime connection, but this bill does not even go there. The government is targeting hunters and sport shooters, but that is another story.
Getting back to Bill C-59, we were invited to propose amendments. We worked very hard. We got a lot of work done in just under nine months. We really took the time to go through this 250-page omnibus bill. We Conservatives proposed 45 specific amendments that we thought were important to improve Bill C-59, as the minister had asked us to do. In the end, none of our amendments were accepted by the committee or the government. Once again, we were asked to do a certain job, but then our work was dismissed, even though everything we proposed made a lot of sense.
The problem with Bill C-59, as far as we are concerned, is that it limits the Canadian Security Intelligence Service's ability to reduce terrorist threats. It also limits the ability of government departments to share data among themselves to protect national security. It removes the offence of advocating and promoting terrorist offences in general. Finally, it raises the threshold for obtaining a terrorism peace bond and recognizance with conditions. One thing has been clear to us from the beginning. Changing just two words in a 250-page document can sometimes make all the difference. What we found is that it will be harder for everyone to step in and address a threat.
The minister does indeed have a lot of experience. I think he has good intentions and truly wants this to work, but there is a prime minister above him who has a completely different vision and approach. Here we are, caught in a bind, with changes to our National Security Act that ultimately do nothing to enhance our security.
Our allies around the world, especially those in Europe, have suffered attacks. Bill C-51 was introduced in 2014, in response to the attacks carried out here, in Canada. Right now, we do not see any measures that would prevent someone from returning to the Islamic State. This is a problem. Our act is still in force, and we are having a hard time dealing with Abu Huzaifa, in Toronto. The government is looking for ways to arrest him—if that is what it truly wants to do—and now it is going to pass a law that will make things even harder for our security services. We are having a hard time with this.
Then there is the whole issue of radicalization. Instead of cracking down on it, the government is trying to put up barriers to preventing it. The funny thing is that at the time, when they were in the opposition, the current Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness and Prime Minister both voted with the government in favour of BillC-51. There was a lot of political manoeuvring, and during the campaign, the Liberals said that they would address Bill C-51, a bill they had supported. At the time, it was good, effective counter-terrorism legislation. However, the Liberals listened to lobby groups and said during the campaign that they would amend it.
I understand the world of politics, being a part of it. However, there are certain issues on which we should set politics aside in the interest of national security. Our allies, the Five Eyes countries are working to enhance their security and to be more effective.
The message we want to get across is that adding more red tape to our structures makes them less operationally effective. I have a really hard time with that.
Let me share some examples of amendments we proposed to Bill C-59. We proposed an amendment requiring the minister to table in Parliament a clear description of the way the various organizations would work together, namely, the NSIC, CSE, CSIS, the new committee of parliamentarians, as well as the powers and duties of the minister.
In our meetings with experts, we noticed that people had a hard time understanding who does what and who speaks to whom. We therefore drafted an amendment that called on the minister to provide a breakdown of the duties that would be clear to everyone. The answer was no. The 45 amendments we are talking about were not all ideological in nature, but rather down to earth. The amendments were rejected.
It was the Conservative government that introduced Bill C-51 when it was in office. Before the bill was passed, the mandate of CSIS prevented it from engaging in any disruption activities. For example, CSIS could not approach the parents of a radicalized youth and encourage them to dissuade their child from travelling to a war zone or conducting attacks here in Canada. After Bill C-51 was passed, CSIS was able to engage in some threat disruption activities without a warrant and in others with a warrant. Threat disruption refers to efforts to stop terrorist attacks while they are still in the planning stages.
Threat disruption activities not requiring a warrant are understood to be any activities that are not contrary to Canadian laws. Threat disruption activities requiring a warrant currently include any activity that would infringe on an individual's privacy or other rights and any activity that contravenes Canada's laws. Any threat disruption activities that would cause bodily harm, violate sexual integrity, or obstruct justice are specifically prohibited.
Under BillC-51, warrants were not required for activities that were not against Canadian law. BillC-51 was balanced. No one could ask to intervene if it was against the law to do so. When there was justification, that worked, but if a warrant was required, one was applied for.
At present, Bill C-59 limits the threat reduction activities of CSIS to the specific measures listed in the bill. CSIS cannot employ these measures without a warrant. At present CSIS requires a warrant for these actions, which I will describe. First, a warrant is required to amend, remove, replace, destroy, disrupt, or degrade a communication or means of communication. Second, a warrant is also required to modify, remove, replace, destroy, degrade, or provide or interfere with the use or delivery of all or part of something, including files, documents, goods, components, and equipment.
The work was therefore complicated by the privacy objectives of Canadians. BillC-51 created a privacy problem. Through careful analysis and comparison, it eventually became clear that the work CSIS was requesting was not in fact a privacy intrusion, as was believed. Even the privacy commissioners and witnesses did not analyze the situation the same way we are seeing now.
BillC-51 made it easier to secure peace bonds in terrorism cases. Before BillC-51, the legal threshold for police to secure a peace bond was that a person had to fear that another person will commit a terrorism offence.
Under BillC-51, a peace bond could be issued if there were reasonable grounds to fear that a person might commit a terrorism offence. It is important to note that Bill C-59 maintains the lower of the two thresholds by using “may”. However, Bill C-59 raises the threshold from “is likely” to “is necessary”.
Earlier when I mentioned the two words that changed out of the 250 pages, I was referring to changing “is likely” to “is necessary”. These two words make all the difference for preventing a terrorist activity, in order to secure a peace bond.
It would be very difficult to prove that a peace bond, with certain conditions, is what is needed to prevent an act of terrorism. This would be almost as complex as laying charges under the Criminal Code. What we want, however, is to get information to be able to act quickly to prevent terrorist acts.
We therefore proposed an amendment to the bill calling for a recognizance order to be issued if a peace officer believes that such an order is likely to prevent terrorist activities. The Liberals are proposing replacing the word “likely” with the words “is necessary”. We proposed an amendment to eliminate that part of the bill, but it was refused. That is the main component of Bill  C-59 with respect to managing national security.
Bill  C-59 has nine parts. My NDP colleague wanted to split the bill, and I thought that was a very good idea, since things often get mixed up in the end. We are debating Bill  C-59 here, but some parts are more administrative in nature, while others have to do with young people. Certain aspects need not be considered together. We believe that the administrative parts could have been included in other bills, while the more sensitive parts that really concern national security could have been dealt with publicly and separately.
Finally, the public and the media are listening to us, and Bill C-59 is an omnibus bill with so many elements that we cannot oppose it without also opposing some aspects that we support. For example, we are not against reorganizing the Communications Security Establishment. Some things could be changed, but we are not opposed to that.
We supported many of the bill's elements. On balance, however, it contains some legislation that is too sensitive and that we cannot support because it touches on fundamental issues. In our view, by tinkering with this, security operations will become very bureaucratic and communications will become difficult, despite the fact the the main goal was to simplify things and streamline operations.
The Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security heard from 36 witnesses, and several of them raised this concern. The people who work in the field every day said that it complicated their lives and that this bill would not simplify things. A huge structure that looks good on paper was put in place, but from an operational point of view, things have not been simplified.
Ultimately, national security is what matters to the government and to the opposition. I would have liked the amendments that we considered important to be accepted. Even some administrative amendments were rejected. We believe that there is a lack of good faith on the part of the government on this file. One year ago, we were asked to work hard and that is what we did. The government did not listen to us and that is very disappointing.
Monsieur le Président, je remercie le ministre de son discours.
Le 20 juin 2017, il y a un an presque jour pour jour, le ministre a déposé le projet de loi  C-59 à la Chambre. Peu de temps après, il a dit qu'au lieu d'en faire la deuxième lecture, on l'enverrait immédiatement au Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale, afin de le renforcer et de l'améliorer. Nous, dans l'opposition, avions dit que c'était fantastique, et que pour une fois, nous n'aurions pas à faire de jeux politiques. En outre, comme cela concernait la sécurité nationale, nous pourrions travailler ensemble pour nous assurer de l'efficacité du projet de loi  C-59 pour les Canadiens. Lorsque nous parlons de sécurité, il n'y a pas d'enjeu partisan avec cela.
Malheureusement, l'opposition a rapidement constaté qu'il s'agissait encore d'un jeu politique. Le travail qu'on nous a demandé n'a pas réellement servi. J'en parlerai un peu plus longuement.
On présente le projet de loi C-71, concernant les armes à feu, un peu de la même façon, en disant qu'on va enlever l'aspect criminel entourant les armes à feu, alors qu'il n'y a absolument rien sur cela dans le projet de loi. On s'attaque aux chasseurs et aux tireurs sportifs, mais c'est une autre histoire.
Concernant le projet de loi  C-59, on nous a invités à proposer des amendements. Nous avons travaillé très fort. Nous avons fait beaucoup de travail pendant presque neuf mois. Nous avons vraiment pris le temps de passer à travers ce projet de loi omnibus de 250 pages. Nous, les conservateurs, avons proposé 45 amendements qui étaient précis, et que nous considérions importants pour améliorer le projet de loi  C-59, comme le ministre nous avait demandé de le faire. Au bout du compte, aucun de nos amendements n'a été retenu par le comité et par le gouvernement. Encore une fois, on nous a demandé de faire un travail, et on n'a pas considéré ce que nous avons fait, alors que tout ce que nous avions proposé avait beaucoup de sens.
En ce qui nous concerne, le problème avec le projet de loi  C-59, c'est qu'il limite la capacité du Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité à réduire les menaces terroristes, ainsi que la capacité des ministères à partager des données pour protéger la sécurité nationale, en plus d'éliminer l'infraction de préconiser et de promouvoir les infractions de terrorisme en général, et d'augmenter le seuil pour l'obtention d'un engagement de paix et d'un engagement de terrorisme avec des conditions. Pour nous, depuis le début, c'est clair: sur 250 pages, il suffit parfois de changer deux mots et cela fait toute la différence. Ce que nous avons constaté, c'est que ce sera plus difficile pour tout le monde d'intervenir pour contrer la menace.
Le ministre est en effet un homme d'expérience. Je pense que son intention est louable et qu'il a vraiment l'objectif que cela fonctionne, mais au-dessus de lui, il y a un premier ministre qui a une vision et une façon de voir les choses totalement différentes. On se retrouve donc dans un étau, avec des changements à notre Loi sur la sécurité nationale qui, au bout du compte, ne font rien pour améliorer notre sécurité.
Des attentats se sont produits chez nos alliés partout dans le monde, notamment dans différents pays d'Europe. Chez nous, le projet de loi C-51 a été déposé en 2014, à la suite des attentats perpétrés ici, au Canada. Or nous ne voyons actuellement pas de mesures qui empêcheraient, par exemple, les gens de retourner auprès du groupe État islamique. C'est un problème. Notre loi est encore en vigueur et nous avons de la difficulté à intervenir auprès du fameux Abu Huzaifa qui est à Toronto. Le gouvernement cherche des moyens de l'arrêter — s'il veut bien l'arrêter —, et on va maintenant adopter une loi qui va compliquer encore plus les choses pour le service de sécurité. Nous avons beaucoup de difficulté avec cela.
En outre, il y a tout ce qui concerne la radicalisation. Au lieu de la réprimer, on cherche à mettre des barrières pour en empêcher le contrôle. Ce qui est plus drôle encore, c'est qu'à l'époque, l'actuel ministre de la Sécurité publique et de la Protection civile et le premier ministre, qui étaient dans l'opposition, avaient voté avec le gouvernement en faveur du projet de loi C-51. Il y a eu différentes tractations politiques, et en campagne électorale, les libéraux ont dit qu'ils s'attaqueraient au projet de loi C-51, alors qu'ils avaient voté en faveur de ce projet de loi. À l'époque, c'était une loi bonne et efficace pour contrer le terrorisme. Toutefois, pour écouter les groupes de pression, les libéraux ont dit en campagne électorale qu'ils changeraient cela.
La politique est une réalité que je comprends, car j'en fais partie. Toutefois, il y a des choses pour lesquelles on devrait laisser la politique de côté et travailler dans l'intérêt de la sécurité nationale. Nos alliés, les pays des « Five Eyes », travaillent à renforcer leur sécurité et à être plus efficaces.
Quant à nous, on passe le message que, finalement, on crée des structures, mais en les rendant plus administratives, on réduit l'efficacité opérationnelle. C'est un côté qui me fatigue énormément.
Voici des exemples d'amendements que nous avons proposés pour le projet de loi  C-59. Par exemple, nous avons proposé un amendement qui exigeait que le ministre dépose au Parlement une description claire de la façon dont toutes les organisations travailleraient ensemble, en occurrence, le CSNR, le CST, le SCRS, le nouveau comité des parlementaires, ainsi que les pouvoirs et les fonctions du ministre.
Au cours de nos rencontres avec les experts, nous avons constaté que les gens avaient de la difficulté à comprendre qui fait quoi et qui parle à qui. Nous avons donc rédigé un amendement qui demandait au ministre de donner une description de tâches claire à tout le monde. La réponse a été non. Pourtant, les 45 amendements dont nous parlons n'étaient pas tous liés à des choses idéologiques, mais plutôt terre à terre. Les amendements ont été rejetés.
C'est le gouvernement conservateur qui avait proposé le projet de loi C-51, à l'époque. Avant que ce projet de loi ne soit adopté, le mandat du SCRS l'empêchait de participer à des activités de perturbation. À titre d'exemple, le SCRS ne pouvait pas approcher les parents d'un jeune radicalisé et les encourager à dissuader leur enfant de se rendre dans une zone de guerre ou de mener des attaques, ici, au Canada. Avec l'adoption du projet de loi C-51, le SCRS a obtenu le pouvoir de participer à certaines activités de perturbation des menaces sans mandat, et certaines activités de perturbation des menaces exigeant un mandat. La perturbation de la menace fait référence aux efforts visant à arrêter les attaques terroristes, alors qu'elles sont encore en cours de planification.
La perturbation de la menace qui ne nécessite pas de mandat doit être comprise comme une activité qui n'est pas contraire à la loi canadienne. Les activités de perturbation des menaces qui nécessitent un mandat comprennent actuellement toute activité qui porterait atteinte à la vie privée ou à d'autres droits d'une personne ou à toute autre activité contraire à la loi canadienne. En outre, la perturbation de la menace interdisait spécifiquement toute atteinte corporelle, toute atteinte à l'intégrité sexuelle ou toute entrave à la justice.
En vertu du projet de loi C-51, des mandats n'étaient pas requis pour les activités qui n'étaient pas contraire à la loi canadienne. Le projet de loi C-51 était équilibré. On ne pouvait pas demander d'intervenir si c'était contraire à la loi de le faire. Quand c'était logique, cela fonctionnait, mais quand il y avait le besoin de demander un mandat, on en demandait un.
Actuellement, le projet de loi  C-59 limite les activités de perturbation des menaces du SCRS à des mesures précises énumérées dans le projet de loi. Présentement, le SCRS ne peut prendre ces mesures qu'avec un mandat. Je vais mentionner les points où le SCRS a effectivement besoin d'un mandat. Premièrement, il en a besoin pour modifier, supprimer, remplacer, détruire, perturber ou dégrader une communication ou des moyens de communication. Deuxièmement, il en a aussi besoin pour modifier, enlever, remplacer, détruire, dégrader ou fournir ou interférer avec l'utilisation ou la livraison de tout ou partie d'une chose, y compris des dossiers, des documents, des biens, des composantes et de l'équipement.
Par conséquent, le travail était compliqué par les objectifs de la population canadienne par rapport à la vie privée. Le projet de loi C-51 créait un problème concernant la vie privée. En analysant et en comparant tout cela, on se rend finalement compte que le travail demandé par le SCRS ne s'ingérait pas dans la vie privée de la population, comme on le croyait. Même les commissaires à la vie privée et les gens qui sont venus témoigner ne faisaient pas la même analyse de la situation que celle que nous voyons actuellement.
À l'époque, le projet de loi C-51 avait facilité l'obtention de l'engagement de ne pas troubler l'ordre public en cas de terrorisme. Avant le projet de loi C-51, la loi indiquait qu'il fallait craindre qu'un individu commette une infraction terroriste, avant que la police puisse obtenir un engagement de ne pas troubler l'ordre public.
En vertu du projet de loi C-51, l'engagement de ne pas troubler l'ordre public pourrait être émis s'il y avait des motifs raisonnables de craindre qu'une personne puisse commettre une infraction terroriste. Il est important de noter que le projet de loi  C-59 maintient le seuil inférieur de ces deux critères de « s'engager » à « peut s'engager ». Cependant, le projet de loi  C-59 augmente le seuil de « est susceptible » à « est nécessaire ».
Comme je le disais tantôt, sur 250 pages, cela fait partie des deux mots qui changent: « est susceptible » à « est nécessaire ». Cela vient tout changer pour empêcher une activité terroriste, afin d'obtenir un engagement de paix.
Il est très difficile de prouver qu'un engagement de ne pas troubler la paix, assorti de certaines conditions, est nécessaire pour empêcher un acte de terrorisme. Ce serait presque aussi complexe que de déposer des accusations en vertu du Code criminel. Pourtant, ce qu'on veut, c'est obtenir de l'information pour intervenir rapidement afin d'empêcher des actes terroristes.
Nous avons donc proposé un amendement à ce projet de loi visant à ce qu'une ordonnance d'engagement puisse être délivrée si un agent de la paix estime qu'une telle ordonnance est susceptible d'empêcher des activités terroristes. Les libéraux proposent de remplacer les mots « est susceptible » par « est nécessaire ». Nous, nous avons proposé un amendement qui éliminerait cette partie du projet de loi, mais cela a été refusé. C'est l'élément principal du projet de loi  C-59 en ce qui concerne la gestion de la sécurité nationale.
Le projet de loi  C-59 comporte neuf parties. Mon collègue du NPD voulait les séparer, et je trouvais que c'était une très bonne idée, car on finit par mélanger les choses. Ici, nous débattons du projet de loi  C-59, mais il y a des parties plutôt administratives et d'autres qui concernent les jeunes. Certains éléments n'ont pas à être évalués ensemble. Selon nous, les parties administratives auraient pu faire partie d'autres projets de loi, tandis que les parties plus délicates qui concernent vraiment la sécurité nationale auraient pu être traitées publiquement et séparément.
En fin de compte, les gens et les médias nous écoutent, et le projet de loi  C-59 est un projet de loi omnibus qui contient tellement d'éléments que nous ne pouvons nous y opposer sans nous opposer également à certaines idées que nous appuyons. Par exemple, nous ne sommes pas contre celle de refaire la structure du Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications. Certaines choses pourraient être changées, mais nous ne sommes pas fondamentalement contre cela.
Nous étions en faveur de plusieurs éléments du projet de loi, mais dans son ensemble, il contient des éléments trop délicats que nous ne pouvons appuyer parce qu'ils touchent des questions fondamentales. Selon nous, en jouant avec cela, on va faire de la sécurité un monde où il y aura beaucoup de bureaucratie et où la communication sera complexe, alors que le but premier était de simplifier les choses et de faciliter les opérations.
Au Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale, nous avons rencontré 36 témoins, et plusieurs d'entre eux ont soulevé cette préoccupation. Les gens qui travaillent sur le terrain tous les jours ont dit que cela leur compliquait la vie et que ce projet de loi n'allait pas simplifier les choses. On a mis en place une immense structure qui paraît bien sur papier, mais d'un point de vue opérationnel, on n'a pas simplifié les choses.
Finalement, c'est la sécurité nationale qui est importante, tant pour le gouvernement que pour les gens de l'opposition. J'aurais aimé que les amendements que nous considérions importants soient acceptés. Il y a même des amendements de nature administrative qui ont été refusés. Nous croyons que la bonne foi du gouvernement dans ce dossier fait défaut. Il y a un an, on nous a demandé de travailler fort, et c'est ce que nous avons fait. On ne nous a pas écoutés, et c'est très décevant.
Result: 1 - 1 of 1