Interventions in the House of Commons
 
 
 
RSS feed based on search criteria Export search results - CSV (plain text) Export search results - XML
Add search criteria
View Pierre Paul-Hus Profile
CPC (QC)
Madam Speaker, I rise this morning to speak to Bill  C-59, an omnibus bill that is over 260 pages long and has nine major parts. I listened to the minister's speech, which addressed the Senate amendments, but I would first like to focus on Bill  C-59 itself.
As I have been saying from the outset, the problem is that most parts of Bill  C-59 are administrative in nature. They make changes to the various intelligence and communications agencies. That is fine, but the main goal of Bill  C-59 was to respond to Bill C-51, which was implemented by the Conservatives following the attacks that took place here in Ottawa. Bill C-51 was specifically designed to counter terrorism and ensure that anyone seeking to commit terrorist acts in Canada was stopped to avert disaster.
Overall, the omnibus bill has some parts that are fine. They contain the sort of changes that need to be made from time to time. However, other parts are very administratively heavy and will be very costly for the public purse. Essentially, this is a bill on national security. The public expects the government to protect people properly and ensure that the offenders and would-be terrorists of this world are stopped.
Despite what the minister says, we believe that Bill  C-59 limits CSIS's ability to reduce terrorist threats. It also limits the departments' ability to share information in order to protect national security. It removes the offence of advocating or promoting the commission of terrorism offences in general and raises the threshold for obtaining terrorism peace bonds and recognizance with conditions.
At the end of the day, Bill C-59 is going to make life difficult for CSIS agents and telecommunications services people. The bill makes it harder to exchange information. It will once again clog up a system that is already burdensome. People working on the ground every day to ensure Canada's security and safety will be under even more restrictions, which will prevent them from doing their jobs.
Here is a snapshot of the nine parts. Part 1 establishes the national security and intelligence review agency.
Part 2 enacts the intelligence commissioner act. It deals with everything pertaining to the commissioner and the various tasks he or she will have, but abolishes the position of the Commissioner of the Communications Security Establishment and provides for that commissioner to become the intelligence commissioner. It transfers the employees of the former commissioner to the office of the new commissioner and makes related and consequential amendments to other acts. In other words, it shuffles things around.
Part 3 enacts the Communications Security Establishment act. CSE's new mandate includes the ability to conduct preventive attacks against threats in addition to its role in signals intelligence and cyber defence. We really do not have a problem with that, provided it remains effective. That is an important point.
Part 4 amends the Canadian Security Intelligence Service Act. It changes the threat reduction powers by limiting them to seven types of measures, one of which gives rise to the issue of whether non-invasive actions require a warrant. The measure in question is described as interfering with the movement of any person. This could mean that a CSIS officer requires a warrant to give misleading information to someone on the way to meeting with co-conspirators.
During operations, officers will sometimes provide individuals with false information to be passed on to those organizing terrorist or other plots. That is one of the work methods used in the field. Henceforth, warrants will have to be obtained, making the work more complicated. The officers will have to spend more time in the office doing paperwork and submitting applications instead of participating in operations.
Part 5 amends the Security of Canada Information Sharing Act, which was enacted by the Conservative government's Bill  C-51. Individuals and privacy groups were unhappy that government institutions could, on their own initiative or at the request of another institution, share information on activities that undermine the security of Canada. BillC-51 was criticized for permitting the sharing of citizens' personal information.
Although Bill C-59 maintains part of the departments' ability to share information, it is much more restrictive. This means that the departments operate in silos, which was harshly criticized by the national security experts who testified.
Part 6 is the most positive part, and we fully support it. This part deals with the Secure Air Travel Act and the problems with the no-fly list. When travellers have the same name as a terrorist, they encounter major problems, especially when it happens to children and they are not allowed to travel. This part will help fix this problem, and we fully support it.
Part 7 amends the Criminal Code by changing the offence of advocating or promoting terrorism offences in general to one of counselling the commission of a terrorism offence, which carries a maximum sentence of five years.
I will read the next part, which does not pose any problems:
Part 8 amends the Youth Criminal Justice Act to, among other things, ensure that the protections that are afforded to young persons apply in respect of proceedings in relation to recognizance orders, including those related to terrorism, and give employees of a department or agency of the Government of Canada access to youth records, for the purpose of administering the Canadian Passport Order.
Finally, here is the last part:
Part 9 requires that a comprehensive review of the provisions and operation of this enactment take place during the sixth year after section 168 of this enactment comes into force.
These are additional administrative measures.
In short, of the nine parts of Bill  C-59, we fully support part 6 on the no-fly list. The other parts contain a lot administrative provisions that will make the system more cumbersome. Part 7 is the most problematic.
We believe that the Prime Minister and the minister are weakening Canada's national security agencies and their ability to keep Canadians safe. This legislative measure will make it more difficult for law enforcement and security agencies to prevent attacks on Canadian soil because it takes away their authority to counter threats. The information silos this bill will create within our federal agencies are dangerous and foolish. Rather than countering radicalization, the Liberals are creating loopholes that could be exploited by those who want to radicalize our young people.
The Conservatives take the safety of Canadians very seriously. That is why the previous government brought Canada's national security laws into the 21st century and aligned them with those of our allies. While all of the Five Eyes allies are taking measures to strengthen national security, this government is bringing in legislation that will eliminate our intelligence service's ability to reduce terrorist threats. The Liberals' irresponsible approach will put Canadians' safety at risk.
I was pleased with the four amendments proposed by the senators, who also took the time to work on Bill C-59 and hear witnesses. We know that the independent Liberals have a majority in the the Senate, so we would not normally expect to see amendments that reflect the Conservatives' views. This time, however, we think all four amendments are excellent and deserve our support. We waited for the government's response.
Two of the amendments had been proposed by me and my Conservative colleagues on the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security, but the Liberals had rejected them. One of them sought to clarify the definition of the phrase “counselling commission of terrorism offence”. This short phrase really embodies the problem we have with Bill C-59. For the benefit of our viewers, I would like to quote the specific wording.
The bill would amend the Criminal Code by changing the following existing definition:
Every person who knowingly instructs, directly or indirectly, any person to carry out a terrorist activity is guilty....
The bill would change it to the following:
Every person who counsels another person to commit a terrorism offence...is guilty....
What is the Liberals' real goal here, if not to just strike out the Conservative government's Bill C-51 so they can say they made a change?
Did they make this change with the intention of improving the legislation? No. Even the senators advised the government to preserve the essence of the definition set out in the Conservatives' Bill C-51.
The minister says that in 2015, when Bill C-51 was introduced by the Conservative government, no charges were ever laid. Is it not possible that no charges were laid because people got scared and decided not to run any risks, in light of the legislation and resources that were in place, as well as the enforcement capability?
Maybe that was why nothing happened. Does watering down and changing this—
An hon. member: Oh! Oh!
Madame la Présidente, je suis ici ce matin pour parler du projet de loi  C-59, un projet de loi omnibus de plus de 260 pages qui comprend neuf parties importantes. J’ai écouté le discours du ministre, qui commentait les amendements du Sénat, mais j’aimerais d'abord me concentrer sur le projet de loi  C-59.
Comme je le dis depuis le début, le problème, c'est que la plupart des parties du projet de loi  C-59 sont de nature administrative. On transforme les différentes agences de renseignement et de communications. C'est correct, mais le but premier du projet de loi  C-59 était de répondre au projet de loi C-51 mis en place par les conservateurs à la suite des attentats qui ont lieu ici, à Ottawa. Celui-ci visait spécifiquement à contrer le terrorisme et à veiller à ce que les citoyens qui avaient envie de commettre des actes terroristes au Canada soient interceptés afin que le pire soit évité.
Dans l'ensemble, le projet de loi omnibus contient des parties correctes. Ce sont des modifications qu’on doit faire de temps en temps. Cependant, certaines parties sont très lourdes sur le plan administratif et vont engendrer de grandes dépenses de fonds publics. À la base, c’est un projet de loi sur la sécurité nationale. Le public s’attend à ce que le gouvernement protège les citoyens de façon efficace et s’assure que les délinquants et les terroristes en devenir de ce monde sont interceptés.
À cet égard, malgré ce que dit le ministre, nous considérons que le projet de loi  C-59 limite la capacité du SCRS de réduire les menaces terroristes. Il limite également la capacité des ministères de partager les données afin de protéger la sécurité nationale. En outre, il supprime l’infraction consistant à préconiser ou fomenter la perpétration d'infractions terroristes en général et relève le seuil d’obtention d’un engagement de ne pas troubler l’ordre public en matière de terrorisme et d’un engagement assorti de conditions.
En fin de compte, le projet de loi  C-59 va compliquer la vie aux agents du SCRS et aux gens des services de télécommunications. On complique l’échange d’informations. On va engorger encore une fois un système qui est déjà lourd. Les gens qui travaillent tous les jours sur le terrain pour assurer la sécurité du Canada se verront imposer encore plus de restrictions, ce qui va les empêcher de travailler.
Voici un aperçu des neuf parties. Tout d'abord, la partie 1 constitue l’Office de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité nationale et de renseignement.
Ensuite, la partie 2 édicte la Loi sur le commissaire au renseignement. Elle touche tout ce qui concerne le commissaire et les différentes tâches qu’il va avoir, mais surtout, elle abolit la fonction de commissaire du Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications et prévoit que ce dernier devienne le commissaire au renseignement. Elle transfère les employés de l’ancien bureau au bureau du nouveau commissaire et apporte des modifications connexes et corrélatives à d’autres lois. En d'autres mots, c'est du brassage.
Puis, la partie 3 édicte la Loi sur le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications. Le nouveau mandat du CST comprend la capacité de mener des attaques préventives contre les menaces, en plus de son rôle en matière de renseignement électromagnétique et de cyberdéfense. Cela ne nous pose pas trop de problèmes, tant et aussi longtemps que cela demeure efficace. C’est une nuance importante.
Par ailleurs, la partie 4 modifie la Loi sur le Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité. Elle change les pouvoirs de réduction des menaces en les limitant à sept types d’actes, dont un soulève la question de savoir si les actes non invasifs nécessitent un mandat. Cet acte est décrit comme le fait d’entraver les déplacements de toute personne. Cela pourrait signifier qu’un agent du SCRS ait besoin d’un mandat pour donner de mauvaises informations à quelqu’un qui va rencontrer des conspirateurs.
Lors d'opérations, les agents vont parfois se servir de personnes en leur donnant de fausses informations afin que celles-ci se rendent à des gens qui organisent des complots terroristes ou autres. Cela fait partie des façons de travailler sur le terrain. Dorénavant, cela va prendre des mandats et ce sera plus compliqué. Les agents devront passer plus de temps dans un bureau pour remplir de la paperasse et faire des demandes, plutôt que de participer à des opérations.
La partie 5 modifie la Loi sur la communication d'information ayant trait à la sécurité du Canada, qui a été édictée par le projet de loi C-51 du gouvernement conservateur. Des particuliers et des groupes de protection de la vie privée étaient mécontents que des institutions gouvernementales puissent, de leur propre initiative ou à la demande d'une autre institution, partager de l'information sur les activités qui portent atteinte à la sécurité du Canada. On reprochait au projet de loi C-51 de permettre que les renseignements personnels des citoyens circulent.
Bien que le projet de loi  C-59 maintienne une part de la capacité des ministères de partager l'information, il le fait d'une manière beaucoup plus restrictive. Cela fait en sorte qu'ils travaillent en vase clos, ce qui a été vivement critiqué par les témoins experts en matière de sécurité nationale.
La partie 6 est la partie la plus positive, et nous l'appuyons pleinement. Elle concerne la Loi sur la sûreté des déplacements aériens et les problèmes liés à la liste d'interdiction de vol. Lorsque le nom d'une personne correspond au nom d'un terroriste, cela crée de sérieux problèmes, surtout lorsqu'il s'agit d'un enfant et qu'on l'empêche de voyager. Cette partie va aider à régler ce problème, et nous l'appuyons pleinement.
La partie 7 modifie le Code criminel en supprimant l’infraction de préconiser ou fomenter la commission d’une infraction de terrorisme en général et la remplace par l’infraction de conseiller la commission d'infractions de terrorisme, qui s'accompagne d'une peine maximale exécutoire de cinq ans. De plus, elle relève le seuil relatif aux ordonnances et aux engagements de ne pas troubler l'ordre public.
Voici la prochaine partie, qui ne pose aucun problème:
La partie 8 modifie la Loi sur le système de justice pénale pour les adolescents afin, notamment, que les protections accordées aux adolescents s’appliquent à l’égard des procédures relatives aux engagements, y compris celles en matière de terrorisme, et que les employés d’un ministère ou organisme fédéral puissent avoir accès aux dossiers des adolescents pour l’application du Décret sur les passeports canadiens.
Finalement, voici la dernière partie:
La partie 9 exige qu’un examen approfondi des dispositions et de l’application du présent texte soit fait au cours de la sixième année qui suit l’entrée en vigueur de l’article 168 [...]
Ce sont d'autres mesures administratives.
Bref, parmi les neuf parties du projet de loi  C-59, nous appuyons pleinement la partie 6 sur la liste d'interdiction de vol. En ce qui concerne les autres parties, il y a beaucoup de dispositions administratives qui alourdissent le système. La partie 7 est la partie la plus problématique.
Nous considérons que le premier ministre et le ministre affaiblissent les agences de sécurité nationale du Canada et leur capacité à assurer la sécurité des Canadiens. Avec cette mesure législative, il sera plus difficile pour les forces de l'ordre et les agences de sécurité de prévenir les attaques en sol canadien, parce qu'elles perdront leur pouvoir de déjouer les menaces. Les silos d'information que ce projet de loi créera au sein de nos agences fédérales sont dangereux et insensés. Au lieu de lutter contre la radicalisation, les libéraux créent des lacunes qui pourront être exploitées par ceux qui veulent radicaliser nos jeunes.
Les conservateurs prennent la sécurité des Canadiens au sérieux. C'est pourquoi le gouvernement précédent a fait entrer les lois canadiennes sur la sécurité nationale dans le XXIe siècle et les a alignées sur celles de nos alliés. Alors que tous les alliés du Groupe des cinq prennent des mesures pour renforcer la sécurité nationale, cette mesure législative élimine la capacité de notre service de renseignement à réduire les menaces terroristes. L'approche irresponsable des libéraux mettra la sécurité des Canadiens en péril.
J'étais heureux de voir les quatre amendements proposés par les sénateurs, qui ont aussi pris le temps de travailler sur le projet de loi  C-59 et d'écouter les témoins. Nous savons que le Sénat a une majorité de libéraux indépendants, alors normalement, on ne s'attend pas à voir des amendements qui correspondent à ce que les conservateurs pensent. Cependant, cette fois-ci, il y a quatre amendements que nous trouvons tous excellents et que nous appuyons. Nous avons attendu la réponse du gouvernement à ce sujet.
Deux de ces amendements avaient été proposés mes collègues conservateurs et moi au Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale, mais ils avaient été refusés par les libéraux. L'un deux visait à clarifier la définition des termes « conseiller la commission d'infractions de terrorisme ». Ces quelques mots sont l'essence même du problème que nous relevons dans le projet de loi  C-59. Pour le bien des téléspectateurs, j'aimerais citer les mots précis.
Le projet de loi cherche à modifier le Code criminel en changeant la définition suivante, celle qui existe:
Est coupable [...] quiconque [...] sciemment, charge directement ou indirectement une personne de commettre une infraction [terroriste]
Le changement proposé est le suivant:
Est coupable [...] quiconque conseille à une autre personne de commettre une infraction de terrorisme [...]
Quel est vraiment le but, si ce n'est de simplement biffer le projet de loi C-51 du gouvernement conservateur et de pouvoir dire qu'ils ont apporté un changement?
Ont-ils apporté ce changement dans un but d'amélioration? Non. Même les sénateurs ont proposé au gouvernement de garder l'essence de la définition apparaissant dans le projet de loi C-51 des conservateurs.
Le ministre dit que, en 2015, quand le projet de loi C-51 du gouvernement conservateur est arrivé, il aucune accusation n'a été portée. S'il n'y a eu aucune accusation, ne serait-ce pas parce que des gens ont justement eu peur et qu'ils se sont dit qu'ils ne courraient pas de risque, étant donné la loi et les ressources en place, de même que la capacité d'intervenir?
C'est peut-être pour cette raison qu'il ne s'est rien passé. Est-ce que le fait d'affaiblir et de changer cela...
Une voix: Oh! Oh!
View Matthew Dubé Profile
NDP (QC)
View Matthew Dubé Profile
2019-06-07 12:27 [p.28803]
Madam Speaker, I am very pleased to rise in the House today.
I ask for the indulgence of the House and I hope no one will get up on a point of order on this, but because I am making a speech on a specific day, I did want to shout out to two of my biggest supporters.
The first is to my wife Chantale, whose birthday is today. I want to wish her a happy birthday. Even bigger news is that we are expecting a baby at the end of July. I want to shout out the fact that she has been working very hard at her own job, which is obviously a very exhausting thing, and so the patience she has for my uncomparable fatigue certainly is something that I really do thank her for and love her very much for.
I do not want to create any jealousy in the household, so I certainly want to give a shout-out to her daughter and our daughter Lydia, who is also a big supporter of mine. We are a threesome, and as I said at my wedding last year, I had the luck of falling in love twice. I wanted to take this opportunity, not knowing whether I will have another one before the election, to shout out to them and tell them how much I love them.
I thank my colleagues for their warm thoughts that they have shared with me.
On a more serious note, I would like to talk about the Senate amendments to Bill  C-59. More specifically, I would like to talk about the process per se and then come back to certain aspects of Bill  C-59, particularly those about which I raised questions with the minister—questions that have yet to be answered properly, if at all.
I want to begin by touching on a more timely issue related to a bill that is currently before the House, Bill C-98. This bill will give more authority to the Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the RCMP so that it also covers the Canada Border Services Agency. That is important because we have been talking for a long time about how the CBSA, the only agency that has a role to play in our national security, still does not have a body whose sole function is to review its operations.
Of course, there is the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians, which was created by Bill C-22, and there will soon be a committee created by Bill  C-59 that will affect the CBSA, but only with regard to its national security related activities.
I am talking about a committee whose sole responsibility would be to review the activities of the Canada Border Services Agency and to handle internal complaints, such as the allegations of harassment that have been reported in the media in recent years, or complaints that Muslim citizens may make about profiling.
It is very important that there be some oversight or further review. I will say that, as soon as an article is published, either about a problem at the border, about the union complaining about the mistreatment of workers or about problems connected to the agency, the minister comes out with great fanfare to remind everyone that he made a deep and sincere promise to create a system that would properly handle these complaints and that there would be some oversight or review of the agency.
What has happened in four whole years? Nothing at all.
For years now, every time there is a report in the news or an article comes out detailing various allegations of problems, I have just been copying and pasting the last tweet I posted. The situation keeps repeating, but the government is not doing anything.
This situation is problematic because the minister introduced a bill at the last minute, as the clock is winding down on this Parliament, and the bill has not even been referred yet to the House of Commons Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security.
I have a hard time believing that we will pass this bill in the House and an even harder time seeing how it is going to get through the Senate.
That is important because, in his speech, the minister himself alluded to the fact that in fall 2016, when the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security, of which I am a member, travelled across the country to study the issue and make recommendations ahead of introducing Bill C-59, the recommendation to create a committee tasked with studying the specific activities of the CBSA was one of the most important recommendations. As we see in BillC-98, the government did not take this opportunity to do any such thing.
It is certainly troubling, because Bill C-59 is an omnibus piece of legislation. I pleaded with the House, the minister and indeed even the Senate, when it reached the Senate, through different procedural mechanisms, to consider parts of the bill separately, because, as the minister correctly pointed out, this is a huge overhaul of our national security apparatus. The concern with that is not only the consideration that is required, but also the fact that some of these elements, which I will come back to in a moment, were not even part of the national security consultations that both his department and the committee, through the study it did, actually took the time to examine.
More specifically, coming back to and concluding the point on BillC-98, the minister does not seem to have acted in a prompt way, considering his commitments when it comes to oversight and/or a review of the CBSA. He said in his answer to my earlier question on his speech that it was not within the scope of this bill. That is interesting, not only because this is omnibus legislation, but also because the government specifically referred the legislation to committee prior to second reading with the goal of allowing amendments that were beyond the scope of the bill on the understanding that it did want this to be a large overhaul.
I have a hard time understanding why, with all the indicators being there that it wanted this to be a large, broad-reaching thing and wanted to have things beyond the scope, it would not have allowed for this type of mechanism. Instead, we find we have a bill, BillC-98, arriving at the 11th hour, without a proper opportunity to make its way through Parliament before the next election.
I talked about how this is an omnibus bill, which makes it problematic in several ways. I wrote a letter to some senators about children whose names are on the no-fly list and the No Fly List Kids group, which the minister talked about. I know the group very well. I would like to congratulate the parents for their tireless efforts on their children's behalf.
Some of the children are on the list simply because the list is racist. Basically, the fact that the names appear multiple times is actually a kind of profiling. We could certainly have a debate about how effective the list is. This list is totally outdated and flawed because so many people share similar names. It is absurd that there was nothing around this list that made it possible for airlines and the agents who managed the list and enforced the rules before the bill was passed to distinguish between a terrorist threat and a very young child.
Again, I thank the parents for their tireless efforts and for the work they did in a non-partisan spirit. They may not be partisan, but I certainly am. I will therefore take this opportunity to say that I am appalled at the way the government has taken these families and children hostage for the sake of passing an omnibus bill.
The minister said that the changes to the no-fly list would have repercussions on a recourse mechanism that would stop these children from being harassed every time they go to the airport. This part of the bill alone accounted for several hundred pages.
I asked the government why it did not split this part from the rest of the bill so it would pass sooner, if it really believed it would deliver justice to these families and their kids. We object to certain components or aspects of the list. We are even prepared to challenge the usefulness of the list and the flaws it may have. If there are any worthy objectives, we are willing to consider them. However, again, our hands were tied by the use of omnibus legislation. During the election campaign, the Liberals promised to make omnibus bills a thing of the past.
I know parents will not say that, and I do not expect them to do so. I commend them again for their non-partisan approach. However, it is appalling and unacceptable that they have been taken hostage.
Moreover, there is also BillC-21.
I will digress here for a moment. BillC-21, which we opposed, was a very troubling piece of legislation that dealt with the sharing of border information with the Americans, among others. This involved information on citizens travelling between Canada and the United States. Bill C-59 stalled in the Senate, much like Bill C-21.
As the Minister of Public Safety's press secretary was responding to the concerns of parents who have children on the no-fly list, he suddenly started talking about BillC-21 as a solution for implementing the redress system for people who want to file a complaint or do not want to be delayed at the airport for a name on the list, when it is not the individual identified. I think it is absolutely awful that these families are being used as bargaining chips to push through a bill that contains many points that have nothing to do with them and warrant further study. In my view, those aspects have not been examined thoroughly enough to move the bill forward.
I thank the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness for recognizing the work I did in committee, even though it took two attempts when he responded to my questions earlier today. In committee, I presented almost 200 amendments. Very few of them were accepted, which was not a surprise.
I would like to focus specifically on one of the Senate's amendments that the government agreed to. This amendment is important and quite simple, I would say even unremarkable. It proposes to add a provision enabling us to review the bill after three years, rather than five, and make amendments if required. That is important because we are proposing significant and far-reaching changes to our national security system. What I find intriguing is that I proposed the same amendment in committee, which I substantiated with the help of expert testimony, and the Liberals rejected my amendment. Now, all of a sudden, the Senate is proposing the same amendment and the government is agreeing to it in the motion we are debating today.
I asked the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness why the Liberals were not willing to put partisanship aside in a parliamentary committee and accept an opposition amendment that proposed a very simple measure but are agreeing to it today. He answered that they had taken the time to reflect and changed their minds when the bill was in the Senate. I am not going to spend too much of my precious time on that, but I find it somewhat difficult to accept because nothing has changed. Experts appeared before the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security, and it was very clear, simple and reasonable. Having said that, I thank the minister for finally recognizing this morning that I contributed to this process.
I also want to talk about some of what concerns us about the bill. There are two pieces specifically with regard to what was BillC-51 under the previous government, and a few aspects new to this bill that have been brought forward that cause us some concern and consternation.
There are two pieces in BillC-51 that raised the biggest concerns at the time of debate in the previous Parliament and raised the biggest concerns on the part of Canadians as well, leading to protests outside our committee hearings when we travelled the country to five major cities in five days in October 2016. The first has to do with threat disruption, and the second is the information-sharing regime that was brought in by Bill C-51. Both of those things are concerning, for different reasons.
The threat disruption powers offered to CSIS are of concern because at the end of the day, the reason CSIS was created in the first place was that there was an understanding and consensus in Canada that there had to be a separation between the RCMP's role in law enforcement, which is making arrests and the work that revolves around that, and intelligence gathering, which is the work our intelligence service has to do, so they were separated.
However, bringing us back closer to the point where we start to lose that distinction with regard to the threat disruption powers means that a concern about constitutionality will remain. In fact, the experts at committee did say that Bill C-59, while less unconstitutional than what the Conservatives brought forward in the previous Parliament, had yet to be tested, and there was still some uncertainty about it.
We still believe it is not necessary for CSIS to have these powers. That distinction remains important if we want to be in keeping with the events that led to the separation in the first place, namely the barn burnings, the Macdonald Commission and all those things that folks who have followed this debate know full well, but which we do not have time to get into today.
The other point is the sharing of information, which we are all familiar with. We opened the door to more liberal sharing of information, no pun intended, between the various government departments. That is worrisome. In Canada, one of the most highly publicized cases of human rights violations was the situation of Maher Arar while he was abroad, which led to the Arar commission. In such cases, we know that the sharing of information with other administrations is one of the factors that can lead to the violation of human rights or torture. There are places in the world where human rights are almost or completely non-existent. We find that the sharing of information between Canadian departments can exacerbate such situations, particularly when information is shared between the police or the Canadian Security Intelligence Service and the Department of Foreign Affairs.
There is an individual who was tortured abroad who is currently suing the government. His name escapes me at the moment. I hope he will forgive me. Global Affairs Canada tried to get him a passport to bring him back to Canada, regardless of whether the accusations against him were true, because he was still a Canadian citizen. However, overwhelming evidence suggests that CSIS and the RCMP worked together with foreign authorities to keep him abroad.
More information sharing can exacerbate that type of problem because, in the government, the left hand does not always know what the right hand is doing. Some information can fall into the wrong hands. If the Department of Foreign Affairs is trying to get a passport for someone and is obligated by law to share that information with CSIS, whose interests are completely different than those of our diplomats, this could put us on a slippery slope.
The much-criticized information sharing system will remain in place with Bill C-59. I do not have the time to list all the experts and civil society groups that criticized this system, but I will mention Amnesty International, which is a well-known organization that does excellent work. This organization is among those critical of allowing the information sharing to continue, in light of the human rights impact it can have, especially in other countries.
Since the bill was sent back to committee before second reading, we had the advantage of being able to propose amendments that went beyond the scope of the bill. We realized that this was a missed opportunity. It was a two-step process, and I urge those watching and those interested in the debates to go take a look at how it went down. There were several votes and we called for a recorded division. Votes can sometimes be faster in committee, but this time we took the time to do a recorded division.
There were two proposals. The Liberals were proposing an amendment to the legislation. We were pleased to support the amendment, since it was high time we had an act stating that we do not support torture in another country as a result of the actions of our national security agencies or police forces. Nevertheless, since this amendment still relies on a ministerial directive, the bill is far from being perfect.
I also proposed amendments to make it illegal to share any information that would lead to the torture of an individual in another country. The amendments were rejected.
I urge my colleagues to read about them, because I am running out of time. As you can see, 20 minutes is not enough, but I would be happy to take questions and comments.
Madame la Présidente, je suis très heureux de prendre la parole à la Chambre aujourd'hui.
Je demande à la Chambre d'être indulgente et j'espère que personne n'invoquera le Règlement, car je voudrais profiter de l'occasion qui m'est donnée de prononcer ce discours un jour particulier pour saluer deux de mes plus ferventes partisanes.
La première est mon épouse Chantale, dont c'est l'anniversaire aujourd'hui. Je veux lui souhaiter un joyeux anniversaire. Fait encore plus important, nous attendons un bébé à la fin de juillet. Je tiens à rendre hommage à mon épouse, car elle ne ménage aucun effort dans son travail à elle, qui est manifestement épuisant. Je tiens à la remercier de la grande patience dont elle fait preuve à mon égard quand je suis fatigué, même si ma fatigue n'est assurément pas comparable à la sienne. Je tiens à lui dire que je l'aime beaucoup.
Comme je ne voudrais pas susciter la jalousie dans notre foyer, je salue également notre fille, Lydia, qui est aussi une de mes grandes partisanes. Nous formons un trio et, comme je l'ai dit lors de notre mariage l'an dernier, j'ai eu la chance de tomber amoureux à deux reprises. Comme j'ignore si l'occasion se représentera avant les élections, je voulais en profiter pour les saluer et leur dire combien je les aime.
Je remercie les députés des bonnes pensées dont ils m'ont fait part.
Sur une note plus sérieuse, j'aimerais parler des amendements du Sénat au projet de loi  C-59. J'aimerais plus précisément parler du processus en tant que tel et revenir ensuite sur certains aspects du projet de loi  C-59, notamment en ce qui concerne des questions que j'ai soulevées auprès du ministre, des questions qui demeurent sans réponse ou, à tout le moins, sans réponse adéquate.
J'aimerais commencer par aborder une question plus actuelle concernant un projet de loi devant la Chambre au moment où on se parle. Il s'agit du projet de loi C-98, un projet de loi qui va donner plus de pouvoirs à la Commission civile d'examen et de traitement des plaintes relatives à la GRC pour qu'elle couvre également l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada. C'est important parce qu'on parle depuis longtemps du fait que l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada, seule agence ayant un rôle à jouer dans notre sécurité nationale, demeure sans comité qui aurait pour unique fonction l'examen de ses activités.
Bien sûr, il y a le Comité des parlementaires sur la sécurité nationale et le renseignement, qui a été créé par le projet de loi C-22, et il y aura bientôt un comité créé par le projet de loi  C-59, qui va toucher à l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada, mais seulement pour les activités concernant la sécurité nationale.
Or, j'aborde ici la question d'un comité qui serait consacré strictement à l'examen des activités de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada, mais également au traitement des plaintes à l'interne, par exemple les différentes allégations sur le harcèlement, qu'on a vues dans les médias au cours des dernières années, ou les plaintes que pourraient formuler des citoyens d'origine musulmane relativement au profilage.
Le fait qu'il existe une surveillance ou un examen plus approfondi est très important. Je peux dire que, chaque fois qu'un article est publié, que ce soit sur une situation problématique à la frontière, sur le syndicat qui se plaint du mauvais traitement de ses travailleurs ou des situations problématiques liées à l'Agence, le ministre sort en grande pompe pour rappeler que c'était une promesse profonde et un engagement important de sa part d'avoir un appareil qui ferait en sorte de traiter ces plaintes de façon adéquate et qu'il y aurait donc une surveillance ou un examen de l'Agence.
Or que s'est-il passé en quatre ans? Il ne s'est rien passé.
Chaque fois qu'il y a un reportage dans les médias, ou un article traitant des différentes allégations problématiques, j'en suis rendu à faire un copier-coller du dernier gazouillis que j'ai publié, et ce, depuis plusieurs années. En effet, la situation se répète, sans aucun geste de la part de ce gouvernement.
Si cette situation est problématique, c'est que le ministre dépose un projet de loi à minuit moins dix, qu'il reste peu de temps au Parlement actuel et que le projet de loi n'est même pas encore à l'étude au Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale de la Chambre des communes.
J'ai du mal à croire que nous pourrons adopter le projet de loi à la Chambre, et je doute encore plus qu'il chemine au Sénat.
Cela est important, parce que le ministre lui-même a fait allusion, dans son discours, au fait que, à l'automne 2016, lorsque le Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale, auquel je siège, a voyagé d'un bout à l'autre du pays pour étudier la question et formuler des recommandations en vue du dépôt du projet de loi  C-59, la recommandation de créer un comité qui soit attitré à l'examen précis des activités de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada était l'une des plus importantes. Or, comme on le voit dans le projet de loi C-98, on n'a pas profité de cette occasion pour poser des gestes en ce sens.
Il y a de quoi s'inquiéter, car le projet de loi  C-59 est une mesure législative omnibus. J'ai plaidé auprès de la Chambre, du ministre et même du Sénat, quand le projet de loi est arrivé au Sénat, en me servant de divers mécanismes de procédure, pour qu'on étudie certaines parties du projet de loi séparément parce que, comme l'a indiqué à juste titre le ministre, il est question d'un énorme remaniement de l'appareil de sécurité nationale. Ce n'est pas seulement qu'il faille prendre le temps de bien étudier la question, mais aussi que certains éléments, sur lesquels je reviendrai dans un instant, ne faisaient même pas partie des sujets examinés dans le cadre des consultations sur la sécurité nationale menées par le ministère ainsi que lors de l'étude faite par le comité.
Plus particulièrement, pour conclure au sujet du projet de loi C-98, le ministre ne semble pas avoir agi rapidement compte tenu des engagements qu'il avait pris quant à la surveillance ou l'examen des activités de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada. En réponse à la question que je lui ai posée après son discours, il a dit que cela dépassait la portée du projet de loi. Voilà qui est intéressant parce qu'il s'agit d'une mesure législative omnibus et parce que le gouvernement l'a renvoyée au comité avant l'étape de la deuxième lecture expressément dans le but de permettre des amendements dépassant la portée du projet de loi puisqu'on visait un important remaniement.
J'ai du mal à comprendre pourquoi il n'était pas possible d'intégrer ce genre de mécanisme au projet de loi actuel, puisque tout indiquait qu'on voulait un vaste projet de loi et qu'on envisageait même d'en élargir la portée. Nous nous retrouvons plutôt avec le projet de loi C-98, qui a été présenté à la dernière minute et qui ne pourra pas être adopté par le Parlement avant les prochaines élections.
J'ai parlé de la nature omnibus du projet de loi. Plusieurs aspects sont inquiétants à cet égard. J'ai écrit une lettre à des sénateurs au sujet des enfants dont le nom est sur la liste d'interdiction de vol et du groupe EnfantsInterditDeVol, dont le ministre a parlé. Je connais très bien ce groupe. J'aimerais féliciter les parents pour leurs efforts acharnés en ce qui concerne le dossier de leurs enfants.
Dans certains cas, ces enfants sont sur la liste simplement parce que cette liste est raciste. À la base, le fait que des noms se répètent est, en quelque sorte, une forme de profilage. Bien entendu, on pourrait tenir un débat sur l'efficacité de cette liste. Or elle est tout à fait désuète et défectueuse à cause de la similarité des noms qui se répètent. C'est effronté de prétendre qu'aucun élément de cette liste ne permettait, à une compagnie aérienne et aux agents qui géraient la liste et appliquaient les règles avant que ce projet de loi ne soit adopté, de faire la distinction entre une menace terroriste et un très jeune enfant.
Encore une fois, je félicite les parents pour leurs efforts acharnés et le travail qu'ils ont fait dans un esprit non partisan. Ils ne sont pas partisans, mais, moi, par contre, je le suis. Je profite donc de ma tribune pour dire que je trouve inadmissible la façon dont on a pris en otage ces familles et ces enfants pour faire adopter un projet de loi omnibus.
En effet, le ministre a dit que les changements apportés à la liste d'interdiction de vol allaient avoir des répercussions sur un système de redressement, qui permettrait à ces enfants de voyager sans se faire harceler à l'aéroport. Cette partie du projet de loi à elle seule comportait plusieurs centaines de pages.
J'ai demandé au gouvernement, s'il croyait réellement que cette partie du projet de loi rendrait justice à ces familles et à ces enfants, pourquoi il ne scindait pas le projet de loi et il ne l'adoptait pas plus rapidement. Nous nous opposons à plusieurs volets, à plusieurs aspects de la liste. Nous sommes même disposés à débattre de l'utilité de la liste et des défaillances qui peuvent exister. S'il y a des objectifs louables, nous sommes prêts à les considérer. Cependant, encore une fois, nous avons eu les mains liées par le mécanisme d'un projet de loi omnibus. Les libéraux nous avaient promis en campagne électorale que ce serait chose du passé.
Je sais que les parents ne diront pas cela, et je ne m'attends pas à ce qu'ils le fassent. Je les salue encore une fois pour leur esprit non partisan. Cependant, je trouve honteux et inadmissible qu'on les ait tenus en otage.
Par ailleurs, il y a aussi le projet de loi C-21.
J'ouvre ici une parenthèse. Le projet de loiC-21, auquel nous nous sommes opposés, était un projet de loi extrêmement inquiétant qui portait sur le partage d'informations à la frontière avec les Américains, entre autres. Il était donc question d'informations sur les citoyens qui se déplacent entre le Canada et les États-Unis. Le projet de loi  C-59 a été retardé au Sénat, tout comme le projet de loi C-21.
Au fur et à mesure que l'attaché de presse du ministre de la Sécurité publique répondait aux doléances des parents ayant des enfants sur la liste d'interdiction de vol, il parlait soudainement du projet de loi C-21 comme d'une solution de mise en œuvre du système de recours pour les personnes voulant déposer une plainte ou ne voulant pas être retardées à l'aéroport pour un nom sur la liste, alors qu'il ne s'agit pas de l'individu identifié. Je trouve absolument effrayant qu'on utilise ces familles comme monnaie d'échange pour faire cheminer un projet de loi qui touche beaucoup d'éléments qui ne les regardent pas et qui méritent une étude plus approfondie. Selon moi, ces éléments n'ont pas encore été suffisamment examinés pour faire avancer le projet de loi.
Je remercie le ministre de la Sécurité publique d'avoir reconnu le travail que j'ai fait au comité, même s'il lui a fallu deux tentatives lorsqu'il répondait à mes questions plus tôt aujourd'hui. En comité, j'ai présenté près de 200 amendements, dont très peu ont été acceptés, ce qui ne fut pas une surprise.
J'aimerais aborder plus particulièrement un des amendements du Sénat qui a été accepté par le gouvernement. Cet amendement est important et bien simple, pour ne pas dire banal. Il propose d'ajouter une disposition à la loi afin que nous puissions réexaminer le projet de loi après trois ans, plutôt que cinq, et lui apporter des modifications si cela est nécessaire. C'est important puisque nous proposons des changements importants et profonds à notre système de sécurité nationale. Ce que je trouve fascinant, c'est que j'ai proposé le même amendement en comité, que j'ai justifié à l'aide des témoignages des experts, et les libéraux ont rejeté mon amendement. Or, tout à coup, le Sénat propose le même amendement et le gouvernement l'accepte dans la motion que nous débattons aujourd'hui.
J'ai demandé au ministre de la Sécurité publique pourquoi les libéraux n'étaient pas prêts à mettre la partisanerie de côté dans un comité parlementaire et à accepter un amendement de l'opposition qui proposait une mesure bien simple, alors qu'ils l'acceptent aujourd'hui. Il m'a répondu qu'ils avaient pris le temps de réfléchir et qu'ils avaient changé d'avis lorsque le projet de loi était au Sénat. Je ne m'attarderai pas trop là-dessus puisque mon temps est précieux, mais j'ai un peu de mal à accepter cela puisque rien n'a changé. Les experts sont venus témoigner au Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale et c'était très clair, simple et raisonnable. Cela dit, je remercie le ministre d'avoir enfin reconnu, ce matin, que j'ai participé à ce processus.
J'aimerais également parler de certaines de nos préoccupations concernant le projet de loi. Deux dispositions du projet de loi actuel ayant trait au projet de loi C-51 du précédent gouvernement nous préoccupent, voire nous consternent, ainsi que quelques dispositions propres au projet de loi actuel.
Deux dispositions du projet de loi C-51 ont suscité plus de préoccupations que les autres lors du débat qui a eu lieu à la dernière législature. Ce sont elles qui préoccupaient le plus la population canadienne également, et c'est pourquoi des manifestations ont eu lieu à l'extérieur de la salle d'audience du comité dans les cinq grandes villes canadiennes qu'il a visitées en cinq jours, au cours du mois d'octobre 2016. La première disposition avait trait à la perturbation des menaces et la deuxième concernait le régime de communication d'information qui a été créé par le projet de loi C-51. Ces deux dispositions sont préoccupantes pour des raisons différentes.
Les pouvoirs de perturbation des menaces accordés au SCRS sont préoccupants, car le SCRS a initialement été créé parce qu'un consensus avait émergé au Canada autour de la nécessité de séparer le rôle d'application de la loi de la GRC, c'est-à-dire procéder à des arrestations et effectuer le travail qui s'y rapporte, de son rôle de collecte de renseignements, qui incombe désormais au SCRS. Les deux rôles ont donc été séparés.
Toutefois, en revenant à des dispositions où la distinction entre les pouvoirs n'est plus aussi nette en ce qui a trait à la perturbation de la menace, la question de la constitutionnalité se pose. D'ailleurs, les experts qui ont comparu devant le comité ont indiqué que, bien que le projet de loi  C-59 soit moins inconstitutionnel que celui qui a été présenté par les conservateurs à la législature précédente, il fallait encore le soumettre à l'épreuve des tribunaux et il restait encore une certaine incertitude à son sujet.
Nous croyons toujours qu'il n'est pas nécessaire que le SCRS ait ces pouvoirs. Il demeure important de distinguer les deux rôles compte tenu des événements qui ont mené à leur séparation, c'est-à-dire les granges incendiées, la Commission Macdonald et tous les autres événements dont les gens qui ont suivi ce débat sont bien au courant, mais dont nous n'avons pas le temps de discuter aujourd'hui.
L’autre élément, c’est le partage d’information, que nous connaissons très bien. Nous avons ouvert la porte à un partage d’information libéral, pour ne pas faire un mauvais jeu de mots, entre les différents ministères du gouvernement. C'est inquiétant. Au Canada, parmi les cas les plus médiatisés de violation des droits de la personne, il y a la situation que Maher Arar a vécue à l'étranger et qui a mené à la mise sur pied de la Commission Arar. Dans de tels cas, on sait que le partage d'information avec d'autres administrations est l'un des facteurs qui ont mené à la violation des droits de la personne ou à la torture. Il s'agit d'endroits dans le monde où les droits de la personne sont presque ou complètement inexistants. On constate que le partage d’information entre les ministères du Canada peut exacerber de telles situations, notamment lorsque cet échange a lieu entre la police ou le Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité et le ministère des Afffaires étrangères.
Il y a un citoyen qui a été torturé à l'étranger et qui poursuit actuellement le gouvernement. Son nom m'échappe, j'espère qu'il me pardonnera. Affaires mondiales Canada a tenté de lui procurer un passeport afin de le rapatrier, peu importe la véracité des accusations qui pesaient contre lui, car il demeurait un citoyen canadien. Cependant, des preuves accablantes nous portent à croire que le SCRS et la GRC auraient travaillé ensemble et avec les autorités étrangères pour le maintenir à l’étranger.
Un plus grand partage d’information peut exacerber ce genre de problème, car au gouvernement, la main gauche ne sait pas toujours ce que fait la main droite. Certaines informations peuvent tomber entre les mauvaises mains. Si le ministère des Affaires étrangères tente de procurer un passeport à un individu et qu'il est obligé par la loi de partager l’information avec le SCRS, qui a un intérêt tout autre que celui de nos diplomates, cela peut nous amener sur une pente glissante.
Avec le projet de loi  C-59, le régime de partage d’information qui a été dénoncé par plusieurs demeure donc en place. Je n’ai pas le temps de faire la liste exhaustive des experts et des groupes de la société civile qui ont critiqué cette réalité, mais je mentionnerai Amnistie internationale, qu'on connaît bien de réputation, qui fait un excellent travail. Ce groupe figure parmi ceux qui dénoncent le maintien de ce partage d’information, avec toutes les conséquences qu'il peut avoir pour les droits de la personne, surtout à l’étranger.
Comme le projet de loi a été renvoyé au comité avant la deuxième lecture, cela nous a conféré l’avantage de pouvoir proposer des amendements qui vont au-delà de sa portée. Nous avons constaté qu'une occasion a été ratée. Cette situation s'est déroulée en deux temps. J’invite les gens qui nous écoutent et ceux qui s’intéressent aux débats à aller voir comment cela s'est passé. Il y avait plusieurs votes et nous avons demandé un vote par appel nominal. En comité, les votes sont parfois plus rapides, mais cette fois-ci, nous avons pris le temps de faire un vote par appel nominal.
Il y avait deux propositions. D'une part, les libéraux proposaient un changement à la loi. Nous étions heureux de l'appuyer, car il était plus que temps que la loi contienne un énoncé disant que nous ne cautionnons pas la torture à l’étranger causée par les gestes de nos agences de sécurité nationale ou de nos forces policières ici. Néanmoins, comme ce changement à la loi repose toujours sur les directives ministérielles, la loi est bien loin d’être parfaite.
D'autre part, j’ai proposé des amendements visant à rendre illégal tout partage d’information qui mènerait à la torture à l’étranger. Ils ont été rejetés.
J'invite mes collègues à en prendre connaissance, car je suis à court de temps. Comme on peut le voir, 20 minutes, ce n'est pas suffisant, mais je serai heureux de répondre à des questions et des commentaires.
View Ralph Goodale Profile
Lib. (SK)
View Ralph Goodale Profile
2018-06-18 16:43 [p.21205]
moved:
That Bill C-59, An Act respecting national security matters, be read the third time and passed.
He said: Mr. Speaker, as I open this final third reading debate on Bill C-59, Canada's new framework governing our national security policies and practices, I want to thank everyone who has helped to get us to this point today.
Historically, there were many previous studies and reports that laid the intellectual groundwork for Bill C-59. Justices Frank Iacobucci, John Major, and Dennis O'Connor led prominent and very important inquiries. There were also significant contributions over the years from both current and previous members of Parliament and senators. The academic community was vigorously engaged. Professors Forcese, Roach, Carvin, and Wark have been among the most constant and prolific of watchdogs, commentators, critics, and advisers. A broad collection of organizations that advocate for civil, human, and privacy rights have also been active participants in the process, including the Privacy Commissioner. We have heard from those who now lead or have led in the past our key national security agencies, such as the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, the RCMP, the Communications Security Establishment, the Canada Border Services Agency, Global Affairs Canada, the Privy Council Office, and many others. While not consulted directly, through their judgments and reports we have also had the benefit of guidance from the Federal Court of Canada, other members of the judiciary, and independent review bodies like the Security Intelligence Review Committee, and the commissioner for the Communications Security Establishment.
National security issues and concerns gained particular prominence in the fall of 2014, with the attacks in Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu and here in Ottawa, which spawned the previous government's BillC-51, and a very intense public debate.
During the election campaign that followed, we undertook to give Canadians the full opportunity to be consulted on national security, actually for the first time in Canadian history. We also promised to correct a specific enumerated list of errors in the old BillC-51. Both of those undertakings have been fulfilled through the new bill, Bill C-59, and through the process that got us to where we are today.
Through five public town hall meetings across the country, a digital town hall, two national Twitter chats, 17 engagement events organized locally by members of Parliament in different places across the country, 14 in-person consultations with a broad variety of specific subject matter experts, a large national round table with civil society groups, hearings by the House of Commons Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security, and extensive online engagement, tens of thousands of Canadians had their say about national security like never before, and all of their contributions were compiled and made public for everyone else to see.
Based upon this largest and most extensive public consultation ever, Bill C-59 was introduced in Parliament in June of last year. It remained in the public domain throughout the summer for all Canadians to consider and digest.
Last fall, to ensure wide-ranging committee flexibility, we referred the legislation to the standing committee before second reading. Under the rules of the House, that provides the members on that committee with a broader scope of debate and possible amendment. The committee members did extensive work. They heard from three dozen witnesses, received 95 briefs, debated at length, and in the end made 40 different amendments.
The committee took what all the leading experts had said was a very good bill to start with, and made it better. I want to thank all members of the committee for their conscientious attention to the subject matter and their extensive hard work.
The legislation has three primary goals.
First, we sought to provide Canada with a modern, up-to-date framework for its essential national security activity, bearing in mind that the CSIS Act, for example, dates back to 1984, before hardly anyone had even heard of the information highway or of what would become the World Wide Web. Technology has moved on dramatically since 1984; so have world affairs and so has the nature of the threats that we are facing in terms of national security. Therefore, it was important to modify the law, to bring it up to date, and to put it into a modern context.
Second, we needed to correct the defects in the old BillC-51, again, which we specifically enumerated in our 2015 election platform. Indeed, as members go through this legislation, they will see that each one of those defects has in fact been addressed, with one exception and that is the establishment of the committee of parliamentarians, which is not included in Bill C-59. It was included, and enacted by Parliament already, in BillC-22.
Third, we have launched the whole new era of transparency and accountability for national security through review and oversight measures that are unprecedented, all intended to provide Canadians with the assurance that their police, security, and intelligence agencies are indeed doing the proper things to keep them safe while at the same time safeguarding their rights and their freedoms, not one at the expense of the other, but both of those important things together.
What is here in Bill C-59 today, after all of that extensive consultation, that elaborate work in Parliament and in the committees of Parliament, and the final process to get us to third reading stage? Let me take the legislation part by part. I noticed that in a ruling earlier today, the Chair indicated the manner in which the different parts would be voted upon and I would like to take this opportunity to show how all of them come together.
Part 1 would create the new national security and intelligence review agency. Some have dubbed this new agency a “super SIRC”. Indeed it is a great innovation in Canada's security architecture. Instead of having a limited number of siloed review bodies, where each focused exclusively on one agency alone to the exclusion of all others, the new national security and intelligence review agency would have a government-wide mandate. It would be able to follow the issues and the evidence, wherever that may lead, into any and every federal department or agency that has a national security or intelligence function. The mandate is very broad. We are moving from a vertical model where they have to stay within their silo to a horizontal model where the new agency would be able to examine every department of government, whatever its function may be, with respect to national security. This is a major, positive innovation and it is coupled, of course, with that other innovation that I mentioned a moment ago: the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians created under BillC-22. With the two of them together, the experts who would be working on the national security and intelligence review agency, and the parliamentarians who are already working on the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians, Canadians can have great confidence that the work of the security, intelligence, and police agencies is being properly scrutinized and in a manner that befits the complexity of the 21st century.
This scrutiny would be for two key purposes: to safeguard rights and freedoms, yes absolutely, but also to ensure our agencies are functioning successfully in keeping Canadians safe and their country secure. As I said before, it is not one at the expense of the other, it is both of those things together, effectiveness coupled with the safeguarding of rights.
Then there is a new part in the legislation. After part 1, the committee inserted part 1.1 in Bill C-59, by adding the concept of a new piece of legislation. In effect, this addition by the committee would elevate to the level of legislation the practice of ministers issuing directives to their agencies, instructing them to function in such a manner as to avoid Canadian complicity in torture or mistreatment by other countries. In future, these instructions would be mandatory, not optional, would exist in the form of full cabinet orders in council, and would be made public. That is an important element of transparency and accountability that the committee built into the new legislation, and it is an important and desirable change. The ministerial directives have existed in the past. In fact, we have made them more vigorous and public than ever before, but part 1.1 would elevate this to a higher level. It would make it part of legislation itself, and that is the right way to go.
Part 2 of the new law would create the new role and function of the intelligence commissioner. For the first time ever, this would be an element of real time oversight, not just a review function after the fact. The national security and intelligence review agency would review events after they have happened. The intelligence commissioner would actually have a function to perform before activities are undertaken. For certain specified activities listed in the legislation, both the Canadian security intelligence agency and the Communications Security Establishment would be required to get the approval of the intelligence commissioner in advance. This would be brand new innovation in the law and an important element of accountability.
Part 3 of Bill C-59 would create stand-alone legislative authority for the Communications Security Establishment. The CSE has existed for a very long time, and its legislation has been attached to other legislation this Parliament has previously passed. For the first time now, the CSE would have its own stand-alone legal authorization in new legislation. As Canada's foreign signals intelligence agency, CSE is also our centre for cybersecurity expertise. The new legislation lays out the procedures and the protection around both defensive and active cyber-operations to safeguard Canadians. That is another reason it is important the CSE should have its own legal authorization and legislative form in a stand-alone act.
Part 4 would revamp the CSIS Act. As I mentioned earlier, CSIS was enacted in 1984, and that is a long time ago. In fact, this is the largest overall renovation of the CSIS legislation since 1984. For example, it would ensure that any threat reduction activities would be consistent with the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. It would create a modern regime for dealing with datasets, the collection of those datasets, the proper use of those datasets, and how they are disposed of after the fact. It would clarify the legal authorities of CSIS employees under the Criminal Code and other federal legislation. It would bring clarity, precision, and a modern mandate to CSIS for the first time since the legislation was enacted in 1984.
Part 5 of the bill would change the Security of Canada Information Sharing Act to the security of Canada information disclosure act. The reason for the wording change is to make it clear that this law would not create any new collection powers. It deals only with the sharing of existing information among government agencies and it lays out the procedure and the rules by which that sharing is to be done.
The new act will clarify thresholds and definitions. It will raise the standards. It will sharpen the procedures around information sharing within the government. It will bolster record keeping, both on the part of those who give the information and those who receive the information. It will clearly exempt, and this is important, advocacy and dissent and protest from the definition of activities that undermine national security. Canadians have wanted to be sure that their democratic right to protest is protected and this legislation would do so.
Part 6 would amend the Secure Air Travel Act. This act is the legislation by which Canada establishes a no-fly list. We all know the controversy in the last couple of years about false positives coming up on the no-fly list and some people, particularly young children, being prevented from taking flights because their name was being confused with the name of someone else. No child is on the Canadian no-fly list. Unfortunately, there are other people with very similar names who do present security issues, whose names are on the list, and there is confusion between the two names. We have undertaken to try to fix that problem. This legislation would establish the legal authority for the Government of Canada to collect the information that would allow us to fix the problem.
The other element that is required is a substantial amount of funding. It is an expensive process to establish a whole new database. That funding, I am happy to say, was provided by the Minister of Finance in the last budget. We are on our way toward fixing the no-fly list.
Part 7 would amend the Criminal Code in a variety of ways, including withdrawing certain provisions which have never been used in the pursuit of national security in Canada, while at the same time creating a new offence in language that would more likely be utilized and therefore more useful to police authorities in pursuing criminals and laying charges.
Part 8 would amend the Youth Justice Act for the simple purpose of trying to ensure that offences with respect to terrorism where young people are involved would be handled under the terms of the Youth Justice Act.
Part 9 of the bill would establish a statutory review. That is another of the commitments we made during the election campaign, that while we were going to have this elaborate consultation, we were going to bring forward new legislation, we were going to do our very best to fix the defects in BillC-51, and move Canada forward with a new architecture in national security appropriate to the 21st century.
We would also build into the law the opportunity for parliamentarians to take another look at this a few years down the road, assess how it has worked, where the issues or the problems might be, and address any of those issues in a timely way. In other words, it keeps the whole issue green and alive so future members of Parliament will have the chance to reconsider or to move in a different direction if they think that is appropriate. The statutory review is built into Part 9.
That is a summary of the legislation. It has taken a great deal of work and effort on the part of a lot of people to get us to this point today.
I want to finish my remarks with where I began a few moments ago, and that is to thank everyone who has participated so generously with their hard work and their advice to try to get this framework right for the circumstances that Canada has to confront in the 21st century, ensuring we are doing those two things and doing them well, keeping Canadians safe and safeguarding their rights and freedoms.
propose;
Que le projet de loi  C-59, Loi concernant des questions de sécurité nationale, soit lu pour la troisième fois et adopté.
— Monsieur le Président, au moment d'entreprendre l'étape de la troisième lecture du projet de loi  C-59, le nouveau cadre fédéral régissant les politiques et les pratiques en matière de sécurité nationale, je tiens à remercier tous ceux qui ont contribué à ce que nous en arrivions là aujourd'hui.
Par le passé, de nombreuses études et de nombreux rapports ont jeté les bases intellectuelles du projet de loi  C-59. Les juges Frank Iacobucci, John Major et Dennis O’Connor ont dirigé des enquêtes très importantes. Au fil des ans, les députés et les sénateurs actuels et ceux qui les ont précédés ont également apporté des contributions importantes. Le milieu universitaire s’est beaucoup engagé. Les professeurs Forcese, Roach, Carvin et Wark figurent parmi les chiens de garde, les commentateurs, les critiques et les conseillers les plus constants et les plus prolifiques. Une vaste gamme d’organisations qui se portent à la défense des droits civils, des droits de la personne et du droit à la vie privée ont aussi participé activement au processus, y compris le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée. Nous avons pris connaissance du point de vue de ceux qui dirigent maintenant ou ont dirigé par le passé nos principaux organismes de sécurité nationale, comme le Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité, la GRC, le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications, l’Agence des services frontaliers du Canada, Affaires mondiales Canada, le Bureau du Conseil privé, et bien d’autres. Même s’ils n’ont pas été consultés directement, des représentants de la Cour fédérale du Canada et d’autres représentants de la magistrature et d’organismes d’examen indépendants, comme le Comité de surveillance des activités de renseignement de sécurité, ainsi que le commissaire du Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications, nous ont aussi fait profiter de leurs conseils grâce à leurs jugements et à leurs rapports.
Les questions et les préoccupations en matière de sécurité nationale ont pris une importance particulière à l’automne 2014, avec les attaques commises à Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu et ici, à Ottawa, qui ont entraîné la création du projet de loi C-51 du gouvernement précédent et qui ont suscité un débat public très intense.
Pendant la campagne électorale qui a suivi, nous nous sommes engagés à donner aux Canadiens la possibilité d’être consultés au sujet de la sécurité nationale, ce qui constituait une première dans l’histoire du Canada. Nous avons également promis de corriger une liste d’erreurs dans l’ancien projet de loi C-51. Ces deux engagements ont été respectés grâce au nouveau projet de loi  C-59 et au processus qui nous a menés là où nous sommes aujourd’hui.
Dans le cadre de cinq assemblées publiques locales tenues un peu partout au pays, d’une assemblée publique numérique, de deux séances de clavardage nationales sur Twitter, de 17 activités organisées localement par des députés dans différentes régions du pays, de 14 consultations sur place auprès d’une gamme d’experts spécialisés, d’une grande table ronde nationale avec des groupes de la société civile, d’audiences du Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale de la Chambre des communes, ainsi que d’une vaste consultation en ligne, des dizaines de milliers de Canadiens ont eu leur mot à dire sur la sécurité nationale, comme jamais cela ne s’était produit auparavant, et toutes leurs contributions ont été compilées et rendues publiques au bénéfice de tous.
Le projet de loi  C-59 a été présenté au Parlement, en juin dernier, par suite de la consultation publique la plus vaste et la plus exhaustive jamais tenue. Il est resté dans le domaine public tout au long de l’été pour que tous les Canadiens puissent l’examiner et l’assimiler.
L’automne dernier, afin de donner une plus grande marge de manoeuvre au comité, nous lui avons renvoyé le projet de loi avant l'étape de la deuxième lecture. Cette façon de faire, autorisée par le Règlement de la Chambre, permet d'élargir, pendant l'étude en comité, la portée des débats et des amendements. Les membres du comité ont accompli beaucoup de travail. Ils ont entendu près d'une quarantaine de témoins, reçu 95 mémoires, débattu en profondeur et, finalement, adopté 40 amendements.
Le comité s'est employé à améliorer un projet de loi dont tous les grands spécialistes avaient dit qu'il s'agissait d'un très bon début. Je tiens à remercier tous les membres du comité de leur excellent travail et d'avoir étudié consciencieusement la question.
Le projet de loi a trois objectifs.
Premièrement, nous voulions moderniser le cadre du Canada en ce qui concerne les activités essentielles en matière de sécurité nationale, sachant, par exemple, que la Loi sur le Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité remonte à 1984, soit à une époque où pratiquement personne n'avait entendu parler de l'autoroute de l'information ou de ce qui allait devenir le Web. La technologie a énormément évolué depuis 1984, tout comme les affaires mondiales et la nature des menaces à la sécurité nationale auxquelles nous sommes confrontés. Il était donc important de modifier la loi, de la moderniser pour l'adapter à la réalité actuelle.
Deuxièmement, nous devions corriger les lacunes de l'ancien projet de loi C-51, ce qui, encore une fois, faisait expressément partie des engagements énumérés dans notre programme électoral de 2015. Ainsi, les députés constateront que, dans ce projet de loi, nous avons corrigé toutes les lacunes, à l'exception d'une seule, celle ayant trait au comité de parlementaires. Le projet de loi  C-59 n'aborde pas ce point puisque le Parlement y a déjà remédié en adoptant le projet de loi C-22.
Troisièmement, nous avons lancé la nouvelle ère de transparence et de reddition de comptes dans le domaine de la sécurité nationale à l'aide de mesures d'examen et de surveillance sans précédent. Ces mesures visent à donner aux Canadiens l'assurance que leurs forces policières et leurs organismes de sécurité et de renseignement prennent bel et bien les bonnes mesures pour garantir leur sécurité et protéger leurs droits et leurs libertés et qu'ils s'efforcent d'atteindre ces deux objectifs simultanément au lieu d'en favoriser l'un aux dépens de l'autre.
Après avoir mené de vastes consultations, effectué des travaux complexes au Parlement ainsi qu'aux comités parlementaires et suivi le processus final menant à l'étape de la troisième lecture, quelles sont les dispositions incluses dans le projet de loi  C-59 aujourd'hui? Je vais décortiquer le projet de loi partie par partie. Dans une décision qu'il a rendue plus tôt aujourd'hui, la présidence a indiqué la façon dont la Chambre sera appelée à voter sur les différentes parties. J'aimerais profiter de cette occasion pour expliquer les liens entre toutes les parties.
La partie 1 créerait le nouvel Office de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité nationale et de renseignement. Certains ont qualifié cette nouvelle agence de « super CSARS ». En fait, l’Office constitue une grande innovation dans l’architecture de sécurité du Canada. Au lieu d’avoir un nombre limité d’organismes d’examen cloisonnés, où chacun se concentre exclusivement sur une seule organisation à l’exclusion de toutes les autres, le nouvel organisme de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité nationale et de renseignement aurait un mandat pangouvernemental. Il serait en mesure d’assurer le suivi des problèmes et des données probantes, peu importe où cela peut mener, dans tous les ministères ou organismes fédéraux qui ont une fonction de sécurité nationale ou de renseignement. Le mandat est très large. Nous passons d’un modèle vertical où chaque organisme doit fonctionner en vase clos, à un modèle horizontal où la nouvelle agence serait en mesure d’examiner chaque ministère, quelle que soit sa fonction, sous l’angle de la sécurité nationale. Il s’agit d’une innovation importante et positive qui s’ajoute, bien sûr, à l’autre innovation dont je parlais il y a un instant, soit le Comité des parlementaires sur la sécurité nationale et le renseignement créé en vertu du projet de loi C-22. Avec ces deux groupes réunis, les experts qui travailleraient à l’Office de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité nationale et de renseignement, et les parlementaires qui travaillent déjà au Comité des parlementaires sur la sécurité nationale et le renseignement, les Canadiens pourront avoir l’assurance que le travail des organismes de sécurité, de renseignement et de police sera scruté à la loupe et d’une manière qui correspond à la complexité du XXIe siècle.
Cet examen viserait deux objectifs clés, soit protéger les droits et libertés, effectivement, mais aussi veiller à ce que nos organismes réussissent à assurer la sécurité des Canadiens et de leur pays. Comme je l’ai déjà dit, un objectif ne sera pas atteint au détriment de l’autre. Ces deux objectifs, l’efficacité et la protection des droits, iront de pair.
Ensuite, il y a une nouvelle partie dans la loi. Après la partie 1, le comité a inséré la partie 1.1 dans le projet de loi C-59, en ajoutant le concept d’une nouvelle loi. En fait, cet ajout du comité porterait au niveau législatif la pratique des ministres qui donnent des directives à leurs organismes, leur ordonnant de fonctionner de manière à éviter la complicité du Canada dans la torture ou les mauvais traitements infligés par d’autres pays. À l’avenir, ces instructions seraient obligatoires, et non facultatives, elles existeraient sous forme de décrets du Cabinet et elle seraient rendues publiques. C’est un élément important de la transparence et de la reddition de comptes que le comité a intégré à la nouvelle loi, et c’est un changement important et souhaitable. Les directives ministérielles ont déjà existé. En fait, nous les avons rendues plus vigoureuses et publiques que jamais auparavant, mais la partie 1.1 rehausserait ce niveau. Elle ferait partie de la loi en soi, et c’est la bonne façon de procéder.
La partie 2 du projet de loi créerait le rôle et la fonction de commissaire au renseignement. Pour la toute première fois, il s'agirait d'exercer une surveillance en temps réel et non plus de réaliser un examen après coup. L’Office de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité nationale et de renseignement examinerait les événements après le fait. Le commissaire au renseignement aurait une fonction à remplir avant que ces activités n’aient lieu. Pour certaines activités désignées dans le projet de loi, l’Agence canadienne du renseignement de sécurité et le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications seraient tenus d’obtenir l’approbation préalable du commissaire au renseignement. Ce serait là une véritable innovation législative et un élément primordial en matière de reddition de comptes.
La partie 3 du projet de loi  C-59 créerait un pouvoir législatif indépendant pour le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications. Ce centre existe depuis très longtemps, et la loi qui le régit est rattachée à d’autres mesures législatives déjà adoptées par le Parlement. Pour la première fois, le Centre aurait son propre régime d’autorisation indépendant en vertu de la nouvelle loi. En tant qu’organisme canadien du renseignement électromagnétique étranger, le Centre est aussi notre centre d’expertise en matière de cybersécurité. Le projet de loi énonce les procédures et les mesures de protection entourant les cyberopérations aussi bien défensives qu'actives visant à protéger les Canadiens. Voilà une raison de plus qui justifie la nécessité pour le Centre d'avoir son propre régime d’autorisation et sa propre forme législative aux termes d’une loi indépendante.
La partie 4 moderniserait la Loi sur le Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité. Comme je l’ai dit précédemment, cette loi a été adoptée en 1984, c'est-à-dire il y a bien longtemps. En fait, il s’agit de la refonte la plus exhaustive de la Loi depuis son adoption. Par exemple, le projet de loi ferait en sorte que toute activité de réduction de la menace soit conforme à la Charte canadienne des droits et libertés. Il créerait un régime moderne pour traiter les ensembles de données, leur collecte, leur utilisation judicieuse et leur élimination ultérieure. Il préciserait les pouvoirs juridiques des employés du Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité en vertu du Code criminel et d’autres lois fédérales. Pour la première fois depuis l’adoption de la Loi, en 1984, le Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité aurait un mandat clair, précis et moderne.
La partie 5 du projet de loi modifierait le libellé anglais de la Loi sur la communication d’information ayant trait à la sécurité du Canada en remplaçant le mot « sharing » par le mot « disclosure ». Le nouveau libellé préciserait clairement que cette loi ne crée aucun nouveau pouvoir de collecte d'information. Elle ne concerne que la mise en commun de données existantes entre des organismes gouvernementaux et elle énonce la procédure et les règles à suivre pour communiquer de l’information.
La nouvelle loi clarifiera les seuils et les définitions. Elle rehaussera les normes. Elle précisera les procédures relatives à la communication de renseignements au sein de l'appareil gouvernemental. Ces mesures amélioreront la tenue de dossiers, tant par ceux qui fournissent l’information que par ceux qui la reçoivent. Il est important de souligner que les activités de défense d'une cause, de manifestation d'un désaccord ou de protestation seront expressément exclues de la définition des activités portant atteinte à la sécurité nationale. Les Canadiens veulent que leur droit démocratique de manifester soit protégé, et ce projet de loi leur en donne l’assurance.
La partie 6 modifierait la Loi sur la sûreté des déplacements aériens. Cette loi est celle par laquelle le Canada établit une liste d’interdiction de vol. Nous avons tous entendu parler de la controverse des deux ou trois dernières années au sujet des faux positifs sur la liste d’interdiction de vol et du fait que certaines personnes, surtout des jeunes enfants, n’ont pu prendre l’avion parce que leur nom a été confondu avec celui de quelqu’un d’autre. Aucun enfant ne figure sur la liste canadienne d’interdiction de vol. Malheureusement, il y a d’autres personnes qui ont des noms très semblables et qui sont associées à des problèmes de sécurité dont le nom figure sur la liste, et il y a confusion entre les deux noms. Nous nous sommes engagés à essayer de régler ce problème. Cette mesure législative donnerait au gouvernement du Canada le pouvoir juridique de recueillir des renseignements qui nous permettraient de régler le problème.
L’autre élément qui est nécessaire, c’est un financement substantiel. Établir une toute nouvelle base de données coûte cher. Je suis heureux de dire que ce financement a été octroyé par le ministre des Finances dans le dernier budget. Nous sommes en voie de corriger la liste d’interdiction de vol.
La partie 7 modifierait le Code criminel de diverses façons, notamment en retirant certaines dispositions qui n’ont jamais été utilisées pour assurer la sécurité nationale au Canada, tout en créant une nouvelle infraction dans un libellé qui serait plus probablement utilisé et donc plus utile aux autorités policières pour poursuivre les criminels et porter des accusations.
La partie 8 modifierait la Loi sur le système de justice pénale pour les adolescents dans le seul but de faire en sorte que les infractions liées au terrorisme commises par des jeunes soient traitées en vertu de la Loi sur le système de justice pénale pour les adolescents.
La partie 9 du projet de loi prévoit un examen législatif. C’est un autre des engagements que nous avons pris pendant la campagne électorale, à savoir que, même si nous allions tenir cette vaste consultation, nous allions présenter un nouveau projet de loi et faire de notre mieux pour corriger les lacunes du projet de loi C-51 et faire progresser le Canada au moyen d’une nouvelle architecture de sécurité nationale adaptée au XXIe siècle.
Nous inclurons également dans la loi la possibilité pour les parlementaires d’examiner de nouveau cette question quelques années plus tard, d’évaluer comment cela a fonctionné, où les problèmes pourraient se trouver et régler ces problèmes en temps opportun. Autrement dit, cela permet de garder toute la question à l’avant-plan afin que les futurs députés aient la possibilité de revoir la loi ou d’aller dans une autre direction s’ils le jugent approprié. L’examen prévu par la loi est intégré à la partie 9.
Voilà qui résume le projet de loi. Il a fallu beaucoup de travail et d’efforts de la part de beaucoup de gens pour en arriver là aujourd’hui.
Je veux terminer mon intervention en reprenant là où j’ai commencé il y a quelques instants, c’est-à-dire en remerciant tous ceux qui ont participé si généreusement et qui ont donné des conseils pour essayer de mettre en place un cadre adéquat pour la situation à laquelle le Canada doit faire face au XXIe siècle, pour veiller à ce que nous réalisions bien nos deux grands objectifs, soit assurer la sécurité des Canadiens et protéger leurs droits et libertés.
View Pierre Paul-Hus Profile
CPC (QC)
Mr. Speaker, I thank the minister for his speech.
On June 20, 2017, almost a year ago to the day, the minister introduced Bill C-59 in the House. Shortly after that, he said that, instead of bringing it back for second reading, it would be sent straight to the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security so the committee could strengthen and improve it. Opposition members thought that was fantastic. We thought there would be no need for political games for once. Since this bill is about national security, we thought we could work together to ensure that Bill C-59 works for Canadians. When it comes to security, there is no room for partisanship.
Unfortunately, the opposition soon realized that it was indeed a political game. The work we were asked to do was essentially pointless. I will have more to say about that later.
The government introduced BillC-71, the firearms bill, in much the same way. It said it would sever the gun-crime connection, but this bill does not even go there. The government is targeting hunters and sport shooters, but that is another story.
Getting back to Bill C-59, we were invited to propose amendments. We worked very hard. We got a lot of work done in just under nine months. We really took the time to go through this 250-page omnibus bill. We Conservatives proposed 45 specific amendments that we thought were important to improve Bill C-59, as the minister had asked us to do. In the end, none of our amendments were accepted by the committee or the government. Once again, we were asked to do a certain job, but then our work was dismissed, even though everything we proposed made a lot of sense.
The problem with Bill C-59, as far as we are concerned, is that it limits the Canadian Security Intelligence Service's ability to reduce terrorist threats. It also limits the ability of government departments to share data among themselves to protect national security. It removes the offence of advocating and promoting terrorist offences in general. Finally, it raises the threshold for obtaining a terrorism peace bond and recognizance with conditions. One thing has been clear to us from the beginning. Changing just two words in a 250-page document can sometimes make all the difference. What we found is that it will be harder for everyone to step in and address a threat.
The minister does indeed have a lot of experience. I think he has good intentions and truly wants this to work, but there is a prime minister above him who has a completely different vision and approach. Here we are, caught in a bind, with changes to our National Security Act that ultimately do nothing to enhance our security.
Our allies around the world, especially those in Europe, have suffered attacks. Bill C-51 was introduced in 2014, in response to the attacks carried out here, in Canada. Right now, we do not see any measures that would prevent someone from returning to the Islamic State. This is a problem. Our act is still in force, and we are having a hard time dealing with Abu Huzaifa, in Toronto. The government is looking for ways to arrest him—if that is what it truly wants to do—and now it is going to pass a law that will make things even harder for our security services. We are having a hard time with this.
Then there is the whole issue of radicalization. Instead of cracking down on it, the government is trying to put up barriers to preventing it. The funny thing is that at the time, when they were in the opposition, the current Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness and Prime Minister both voted with the government in favour of BillC-51. There was a lot of political manoeuvring, and during the campaign, the Liberals said that they would address Bill C-51, a bill they had supported. At the time, it was good, effective counter-terrorism legislation. However, the Liberals listened to lobby groups and said during the campaign that they would amend it.
I understand the world of politics, being a part of it. However, there are certain issues on which we should set politics aside in the interest of national security. Our allies, the Five Eyes countries are working to enhance their security and to be more effective.
The message we want to get across is that adding more red tape to our structures makes them less operationally effective. I have a really hard time with that.
Let me share some examples of amendments we proposed to Bill C-59. We proposed an amendment requiring the minister to table in Parliament a clear description of the way the various organizations would work together, namely, the NSIC, CSE, CSIS, the new committee of parliamentarians, as well as the powers and duties of the minister.
In our meetings with experts, we noticed that people had a hard time understanding who does what and who speaks to whom. We therefore drafted an amendment that called on the minister to provide a breakdown of the duties that would be clear to everyone. The answer was no. The 45 amendments we are talking about were not all ideological in nature, but rather down to earth. The amendments were rejected.
It was the Conservative government that introduced Bill C-51 when it was in office. Before the bill was passed, the mandate of CSIS prevented it from engaging in any disruption activities. For example, CSIS could not approach the parents of a radicalized youth and encourage them to dissuade their child from travelling to a war zone or conducting attacks here in Canada. After Bill C-51 was passed, CSIS was able to engage in some threat disruption activities without a warrant and in others with a warrant. Threat disruption refers to efforts to stop terrorist attacks while they are still in the planning stages.
Threat disruption activities not requiring a warrant are understood to be any activities that are not contrary to Canadian laws. Threat disruption activities requiring a warrant currently include any activity that would infringe on an individual's privacy or other rights and any activity that contravenes Canada's laws. Any threat disruption activities that would cause bodily harm, violate sexual integrity, or obstruct justice are specifically prohibited.
Under BillC-51, warrants were not required for activities that were not against Canadian law. BillC-51 was balanced. No one could ask to intervene if it was against the law to do so. When there was justification, that worked, but if a warrant was required, one was applied for.
At present, Bill C-59 limits the threat reduction activities of CSIS to the specific measures listed in the bill. CSIS cannot employ these measures without a warrant. At present CSIS requires a warrant for these actions, which I will describe. First, a warrant is required to amend, remove, replace, destroy, disrupt, or degrade a communication or means of communication. Second, a warrant is also required to modify, remove, replace, destroy, degrade, or provide or interfere with the use or delivery of all or part of something, including files, documents, goods, components, and equipment.
The work was therefore complicated by the privacy objectives of Canadians. BillC-51 created a privacy problem. Through careful analysis and comparison, it eventually became clear that the work CSIS was requesting was not in fact a privacy intrusion, as was believed. Even the privacy commissioners and witnesses did not analyze the situation the same way we are seeing now.
BillC-51 made it easier to secure peace bonds in terrorism cases. Before BillC-51, the legal threshold for police to secure a peace bond was that a person had to fear that another person will commit a terrorism offence.
Under BillC-51, a peace bond could be issued if there were reasonable grounds to fear that a person might commit a terrorism offence. It is important to note that Bill C-59 maintains the lower of the two thresholds by using “may”. However, Bill C-59 raises the threshold from “is likely” to “is necessary”.
Earlier when I mentioned the two words that changed out of the 250 pages, I was referring to changing “is likely” to “is necessary”. These two words make all the difference for preventing a terrorist activity, in order to secure a peace bond.
It would be very difficult to prove that a peace bond, with certain conditions, is what is needed to prevent an act of terrorism. This would be almost as complex as laying charges under the Criminal Code. What we want, however, is to get information to be able to act quickly to prevent terrorist acts.
We therefore proposed an amendment to the bill calling for a recognizance order to be issued if a peace officer believes that such an order is likely to prevent terrorist activities. The Liberals are proposing replacing the word “likely” with the words “is necessary”. We proposed an amendment to eliminate that part of the bill, but it was refused. That is the main component of Bill  C-59 with respect to managing national security.
Bill  C-59 has nine parts. My NDP colleague wanted to split the bill, and I thought that was a very good idea, since things often get mixed up in the end. We are debating Bill  C-59 here, but some parts are more administrative in nature, while others have to do with young people. Certain aspects need not be considered together. We believe that the administrative parts could have been included in other bills, while the more sensitive parts that really concern national security could have been dealt with publicly and separately.
Finally, the public and the media are listening to us, and Bill C-59 is an omnibus bill with so many elements that we cannot oppose it without also opposing some aspects that we support. For example, we are not against reorganizing the Communications Security Establishment. Some things could be changed, but we are not opposed to that.
We supported many of the bill's elements. On balance, however, it contains some legislation that is too sensitive and that we cannot support because it touches on fundamental issues. In our view, by tinkering with this, security operations will become very bureaucratic and communications will become difficult, despite the fact the the main goal was to simplify things and streamline operations.
The Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security heard from 36 witnesses, and several of them raised this concern. The people who work in the field every day said that it complicated their lives and that this bill would not simplify things. A huge structure that looks good on paper was put in place, but from an operational point of view, things have not been simplified.
Ultimately, national security is what matters to the government and to the opposition. I would have liked the amendments that we considered important to be accepted. Even some administrative amendments were rejected. We believe that there is a lack of good faith on the part of the government on this file. One year ago, we were asked to work hard and that is what we did. The government did not listen to us and that is very disappointing.
Monsieur le Président, je remercie le ministre de son discours.
Le 20 juin 2017, il y a un an presque jour pour jour, le ministre a déposé le projet de loi  C-59 à la Chambre. Peu de temps après, il a dit qu'au lieu d'en faire la deuxième lecture, on l'enverrait immédiatement au Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale, afin de le renforcer et de l'améliorer. Nous, dans l'opposition, avions dit que c'était fantastique, et que pour une fois, nous n'aurions pas à faire de jeux politiques. En outre, comme cela concernait la sécurité nationale, nous pourrions travailler ensemble pour nous assurer de l'efficacité du projet de loi  C-59 pour les Canadiens. Lorsque nous parlons de sécurité, il n'y a pas d'enjeu partisan avec cela.
Malheureusement, l'opposition a rapidement constaté qu'il s'agissait encore d'un jeu politique. Le travail qu'on nous a demandé n'a pas réellement servi. J'en parlerai un peu plus longuement.
On présente le projet de loi C-71, concernant les armes à feu, un peu de la même façon, en disant qu'on va enlever l'aspect criminel entourant les armes à feu, alors qu'il n'y a absolument rien sur cela dans le projet de loi. On s'attaque aux chasseurs et aux tireurs sportifs, mais c'est une autre histoire.
Concernant le projet de loi  C-59, on nous a invités à proposer des amendements. Nous avons travaillé très fort. Nous avons fait beaucoup de travail pendant presque neuf mois. Nous avons vraiment pris le temps de passer à travers ce projet de loi omnibus de 250 pages. Nous, les conservateurs, avons proposé 45 amendements qui étaient précis, et que nous considérions importants pour améliorer le projet de loi  C-59, comme le ministre nous avait demandé de le faire. Au bout du compte, aucun de nos amendements n'a été retenu par le comité et par le gouvernement. Encore une fois, on nous a demandé de faire un travail, et on n'a pas considéré ce que nous avons fait, alors que tout ce que nous avions proposé avait beaucoup de sens.
En ce qui nous concerne, le problème avec le projet de loi  C-59, c'est qu'il limite la capacité du Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité à réduire les menaces terroristes, ainsi que la capacité des ministères à partager des données pour protéger la sécurité nationale, en plus d'éliminer l'infraction de préconiser et de promouvoir les infractions de terrorisme en général, et d'augmenter le seuil pour l'obtention d'un engagement de paix et d'un engagement de terrorisme avec des conditions. Pour nous, depuis le début, c'est clair: sur 250 pages, il suffit parfois de changer deux mots et cela fait toute la différence. Ce que nous avons constaté, c'est que ce sera plus difficile pour tout le monde d'intervenir pour contrer la menace.
Le ministre est en effet un homme d'expérience. Je pense que son intention est louable et qu'il a vraiment l'objectif que cela fonctionne, mais au-dessus de lui, il y a un premier ministre qui a une vision et une façon de voir les choses totalement différentes. On se retrouve donc dans un étau, avec des changements à notre Loi sur la sécurité nationale qui, au bout du compte, ne font rien pour améliorer notre sécurité.
Des attentats se sont produits chez nos alliés partout dans le monde, notamment dans différents pays d'Europe. Chez nous, le projet de loi C-51 a été déposé en 2014, à la suite des attentats perpétrés ici, au Canada. Or nous ne voyons actuellement pas de mesures qui empêcheraient, par exemple, les gens de retourner auprès du groupe État islamique. C'est un problème. Notre loi est encore en vigueur et nous avons de la difficulté à intervenir auprès du fameux Abu Huzaifa qui est à Toronto. Le gouvernement cherche des moyens de l'arrêter — s'il veut bien l'arrêter —, et on va maintenant adopter une loi qui va compliquer encore plus les choses pour le service de sécurité. Nous avons beaucoup de difficulté avec cela.
En outre, il y a tout ce qui concerne la radicalisation. Au lieu de la réprimer, on cherche à mettre des barrières pour en empêcher le contrôle. Ce qui est plus drôle encore, c'est qu'à l'époque, l'actuel ministre de la Sécurité publique et de la Protection civile et le premier ministre, qui étaient dans l'opposition, avaient voté avec le gouvernement en faveur du projet de loi C-51. Il y a eu différentes tractations politiques, et en campagne électorale, les libéraux ont dit qu'ils s'attaqueraient au projet de loi C-51, alors qu'ils avaient voté en faveur de ce projet de loi. À l'époque, c'était une loi bonne et efficace pour contrer le terrorisme. Toutefois, pour écouter les groupes de pression, les libéraux ont dit en campagne électorale qu'ils changeraient cela.
La politique est une réalité que je comprends, car j'en fais partie. Toutefois, il y a des choses pour lesquelles on devrait laisser la politique de côté et travailler dans l'intérêt de la sécurité nationale. Nos alliés, les pays des « Five Eyes », travaillent à renforcer leur sécurité et à être plus efficaces.
Quant à nous, on passe le message que, finalement, on crée des structures, mais en les rendant plus administratives, on réduit l'efficacité opérationnelle. C'est un côté qui me fatigue énormément.
Voici des exemples d'amendements que nous avons proposés pour le projet de loi  C-59. Par exemple, nous avons proposé un amendement qui exigeait que le ministre dépose au Parlement une description claire de la façon dont toutes les organisations travailleraient ensemble, en occurrence, le CSNR, le CST, le SCRS, le nouveau comité des parlementaires, ainsi que les pouvoirs et les fonctions du ministre.
Au cours de nos rencontres avec les experts, nous avons constaté que les gens avaient de la difficulté à comprendre qui fait quoi et qui parle à qui. Nous avons donc rédigé un amendement qui demandait au ministre de donner une description de tâches claire à tout le monde. La réponse a été non. Pourtant, les 45 amendements dont nous parlons n'étaient pas tous liés à des choses idéologiques, mais plutôt terre à terre. Les amendements ont été rejetés.
C'est le gouvernement conservateur qui avait proposé le projet de loi C-51, à l'époque. Avant que ce projet de loi ne soit adopté, le mandat du SCRS l'empêchait de participer à des activités de perturbation. À titre d'exemple, le SCRS ne pouvait pas approcher les parents d'un jeune radicalisé et les encourager à dissuader leur enfant de se rendre dans une zone de guerre ou de mener des attaques, ici, au Canada. Avec l'adoption du projet de loi C-51, le SCRS a obtenu le pouvoir de participer à certaines activités de perturbation des menaces sans mandat, et certaines activités de perturbation des menaces exigeant un mandat. La perturbation de la menace fait référence aux efforts visant à arrêter les attaques terroristes, alors qu'elles sont encore en cours de planification.
La perturbation de la menace qui ne nécessite pas de mandat doit être comprise comme une activité qui n'est pas contraire à la loi canadienne. Les activités de perturbation des menaces qui nécessitent un mandat comprennent actuellement toute activité qui porterait atteinte à la vie privée ou à d'autres droits d'une personne ou à toute autre activité contraire à la loi canadienne. En outre, la perturbation de la menace interdisait spécifiquement toute atteinte corporelle, toute atteinte à l'intégrité sexuelle ou toute entrave à la justice.
En vertu du projet de loi C-51, des mandats n'étaient pas requis pour les activités qui n'étaient pas contraire à la loi canadienne. Le projet de loi C-51 était équilibré. On ne pouvait pas demander d'intervenir si c'était contraire à la loi de le faire. Quand c'était logique, cela fonctionnait, mais quand il y avait le besoin de demander un mandat, on en demandait un.
Actuellement, le projet de loi  C-59 limite les activités de perturbation des menaces du SCRS à des mesures précises énumérées dans le projet de loi. Présentement, le SCRS ne peut prendre ces mesures qu'avec un mandat. Je vais mentionner les points où le SCRS a effectivement besoin d'un mandat. Premièrement, il en a besoin pour modifier, supprimer, remplacer, détruire, perturber ou dégrader une communication ou des moyens de communication. Deuxièmement, il en a aussi besoin pour modifier, enlever, remplacer, détruire, dégrader ou fournir ou interférer avec l'utilisation ou la livraison de tout ou partie d'une chose, y compris des dossiers, des documents, des biens, des composantes et de l'équipement.
Par conséquent, le travail était compliqué par les objectifs de la population canadienne par rapport à la vie privée. Le projet de loi C-51 créait un problème concernant la vie privée. En analysant et en comparant tout cela, on se rend finalement compte que le travail demandé par le SCRS ne s'ingérait pas dans la vie privée de la population, comme on le croyait. Même les commissaires à la vie privée et les gens qui sont venus témoigner ne faisaient pas la même analyse de la situation que celle que nous voyons actuellement.
À l'époque, le projet de loi C-51 avait facilité l'obtention de l'engagement de ne pas troubler l'ordre public en cas de terrorisme. Avant le projet de loi C-51, la loi indiquait qu'il fallait craindre qu'un individu commette une infraction terroriste, avant que la police puisse obtenir un engagement de ne pas troubler l'ordre public.
En vertu du projet de loi C-51, l'engagement de ne pas troubler l'ordre public pourrait être émis s'il y avait des motifs raisonnables de craindre qu'une personne puisse commettre une infraction terroriste. Il est important de noter que le projet de loi  C-59 maintient le seuil inférieur de ces deux critères de « s'engager » à « peut s'engager ». Cependant, le projet de loi  C-59 augmente le seuil de « est susceptible » à « est nécessaire ».
Comme je le disais tantôt, sur 250 pages, cela fait partie des deux mots qui changent: « est susceptible » à « est nécessaire ». Cela vient tout changer pour empêcher une activité terroriste, afin d'obtenir un engagement de paix.
Il est très difficile de prouver qu'un engagement de ne pas troubler la paix, assorti de certaines conditions, est nécessaire pour empêcher un acte de terrorisme. Ce serait presque aussi complexe que de déposer des accusations en vertu du Code criminel. Pourtant, ce qu'on veut, c'est obtenir de l'information pour intervenir rapidement afin d'empêcher des actes terroristes.
Nous avons donc proposé un amendement à ce projet de loi visant à ce qu'une ordonnance d'engagement puisse être délivrée si un agent de la paix estime qu'une telle ordonnance est susceptible d'empêcher des activités terroristes. Les libéraux proposent de remplacer les mots « est susceptible » par « est nécessaire ». Nous, nous avons proposé un amendement qui éliminerait cette partie du projet de loi, mais cela a été refusé. C'est l'élément principal du projet de loi  C-59 en ce qui concerne la gestion de la sécurité nationale.
Le projet de loi  C-59 comporte neuf parties. Mon collègue du NPD voulait les séparer, et je trouvais que c'était une très bonne idée, car on finit par mélanger les choses. Ici, nous débattons du projet de loi  C-59, mais il y a des parties plutôt administratives et d'autres qui concernent les jeunes. Certains éléments n'ont pas à être évalués ensemble. Selon nous, les parties administratives auraient pu faire partie d'autres projets de loi, tandis que les parties plus délicates qui concernent vraiment la sécurité nationale auraient pu être traitées publiquement et séparément.
En fin de compte, les gens et les médias nous écoutent, et le projet de loi  C-59 est un projet de loi omnibus qui contient tellement d'éléments que nous ne pouvons nous y opposer sans nous opposer également à certaines idées que nous appuyons. Par exemple, nous ne sommes pas contre celle de refaire la structure du Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications. Certaines choses pourraient être changées, mais nous ne sommes pas fondamentalement contre cela.
Nous étions en faveur de plusieurs éléments du projet de loi, mais dans son ensemble, il contient des éléments trop délicats que nous ne pouvons appuyer parce qu'ils touchent des questions fondamentales. Selon nous, en jouant avec cela, on va faire de la sécurité un monde où il y aura beaucoup de bureaucratie et où la communication sera complexe, alors que le but premier était de simplifier les choses et de faciliter les opérations.
Au Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale, nous avons rencontré 36 témoins, et plusieurs d'entre eux ont soulevé cette préoccupation. Les gens qui travaillent sur le terrain tous les jours ont dit que cela leur compliquait la vie et que ce projet de loi n'allait pas simplifier les choses. On a mis en place une immense structure qui paraît bien sur papier, mais d'un point de vue opérationnel, on n'a pas simplifié les choses.
Finalement, c'est la sécurité nationale qui est importante, tant pour le gouvernement que pour les gens de l'opposition. J'aurais aimé que les amendements que nous considérions importants soient acceptés. Il y a même des amendements de nature administrative qui ont été refusés. Nous croyons que la bonne foi du gouvernement dans ce dossier fait défaut. Il y a un an, on nous a demandé de travailler fort, et c'est ce que nous avons fait. On ne nous a pas écoutés, et c'est très décevant.
View Matthew Dubé Profile
NDP (QC)
View Matthew Dubé Profile
2018-06-18 17:36 [p.21212]
Mr. Speaker, I thank my colleagues for their speeches. Here we are again, debating Bill C-59 at third reading, and I would like to start by talking about the process of debate surrounding a bill, which started not with this government, but rather during the last Parliament with the former Bill C-51.
Contrary to what we have been hearing from the other side today and at other times as well, the NDP and the Green Party were the only ones that opposed Bill C-51 in the previous Parliament. I have heard many people talk about how they were aware that Canadians had concerns about their security, about how a balanced approach was vital, and about how they understood the bill was flawed. They took it for granted that they would come to power and then fix the many, many, many flaws in the bill. Some of those flaws are so dangerous that they threaten the rights, freedoms, and privacy of Canadians. Of course, I am talking about the Liberal Party, which supported Bill C-51 even as it criticized it. I remember that when it was before committee, the member for Malpeque, who is still an MP, spend his time criticizing it and talking about its flaws. Then the Liberal Party supported it anyway.
That is problematic because now the government is trying to use the bill to position itself as the champion of nuanced perspectives. The government keeps trying to say that there are two objectives, namely to protect Canadians and to protect Canadians' rights. I myself remember a rather different situation, which developed in the wake of the 2014 attack on Parliament. The Conservative government tried to leverage people's fear following that terrible event to make unnecessary legislative changes. I will comment further on what was really necessary to protect Canadians.
A legislative change was therefore proposed to increase the powers given to national security agencies, but nothing was done to enhance the oversight system, which already falls short of where it needs to be to ensure that their work is done in full compliance with our laws and in line with Canadians' expectations regarding their rights and freedoms. Surveys showed that Canadians obviously welcomed those measures because, after all, we were in a situation where ISIS was on the rise, and we had the attack in Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, which is not far from my region. We also had the attack right here in Parliament. They took advantage of people's fear, so there was some support for the measures presented in the bill.
To the NDP, our reflection in caucus made it very clear that we needed to stand up. We are elected to this place not only to represent our constituents, but also to be leaders on extremely difficult issues and to make the right decision, the decision that will ensure that we protect the rights of Canadians, even when that does not appear to be a popular decision.
Despite the fact that it seemed to be an unpopular decision, and despite the fact that the Liberals, seeing the polls, came out saying “We are just going to go with the wind and try and denounce the measures in the bill so that we can simultaneously protect ourselves from Conservative attacks and also try and outflank the NDP on the progressive principled stand of protecting Canadians' rights and freedoms,” what happened? The polls changed. As the official opposition, we fought that fight here in Parliament. Unlike the Liberals, we stood up to Stephen Harper's draconian BillC-51. We saw Canadians overwhelmingly oppose the measures that were in Bill C-51.
What happened after the election? We saw the Liberals try to square the circle they had created for themselves by denouncing and supporting legislation all at the same time. They said not to worry, because they were going to do what they do best, which is to consult. They consulted on election promises and things that were already debated in the previous Parliament.
The minister brought forward his green paper. The green paper was criticized, correctly and rightfully so, for going too far in one direction, for posing the question of how we could give more flexibility to law enforcement, how we could give them more tools to do their jobs, which is a complete misunderstanding of the concerns that Canadians had with Bill C-51 to begin with. It goes back to the earlier point I made. Instead of actually giving law enforcement the resources to create their tools, having a robust anti-radicalization strategy, and making sure that we do not see vulnerable young people falling through the cracks and being recruited by terrorist organizations like ISIS or the alt right that we see in these white supremacist groups, what happened?
We embarked on this consultation that was already going in one direction, and nearly two years after the Liberals coming into power, we finally see legislation tabled. The minister, in his speech earlier today, defended tabling that legislation in the dying days of a spring sitting of Parliament before the House rises for the summer by saying that we would have time to consider and contemplate the legislation over the summer. He neglected to mention that the very same powers that stood on shaky constitutional ground that were accorded to agencies like CSIS by the Conservatives' BillC-51 remain on the books, and as Michel Coulombe, the then director of CSIS, now retired, said repeatedly in committee, they are powers that were being used at that time.
It is all well and good to consult. Certainly, no one is opposed to the principles behind consultation, but when the consultation is about promises that were made to the Canadian people to fix legislation that undermined their rights while the very powers that undermined their rights are still on the books and being used, then one has to recognize the urgency to act.
The story continues because after this consultation the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security conducted a consultation. We made recommendations and the NDP prepared an excellent supplementary report, which supports the committee's unanimous recommendations, but also includes our own, in support of the bill introduced by my colleague from Esquimalt—Saanich—Sooke, which is on the Order Paper. He was the public safety critic before me and he led the charge, along with the member for Outremont, who was then the leader of the official opposition, against BillC-51. The bill introduced by my colleague from Esquimalt—Saanich—Sooke entirely repeals all of the legislation in Bill C-51.
Interestingly, the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness defended the fact that he did not repeal it all by stating that several MPs, including the member for Spadina—Fort York, said that the reason not to do so was that it would be a highly complex legislative endeavour. My colleague introduced a bill that is on the Order Paper and that does exactly that. With due respect to my colleague, it cannot be all that complex if we were able to draft a bill that achieved those exact objectives.
Bill C-59 was sent to the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security before second reading, on the pretext that this would make it possible to adopt a wider range of amendments, give the opposition more opportunities to be heard, and allow for a robust study. What was the end result? A total of 55 amendments were adopted, and we are proud of that. However, of those 55 amendments, two come from the NDP, and one of those relates to the preamble to one part of the bill. While I have no desire to impugn the Liberals' motives, the second amendment was adopted only once the wording met their approval. None of the Conservatives' amendments were adopted. Ultimately, it is not the end of the world, because we disagree on several points, but I hear all this talk about collaboration, yet none of the Green Party's amendments were adopted. This goes to show that the process was rigged and that the government had already decided on its approach.
The government is going to brag about the new part 1.1 of the legislation that has been adopted. Contrary to what the minister said when answering my question earlier today in debate, that would not create any new legal obligation in terms of how the system currently works. The ministerial directives that are adopted to prohibit—despite loopholes, it is important to note—the use of information obtained under torture will remain just that, ministerial directives. The legal obligation that the minister or the Governor in Council “may” recommend the issuing of directives to deputy heads of departments is just not good enough. If it were, the Liberals would have had no problem voting for amendments that I read into record at committee. Time does not permit me to reread the amendments into the record, but I read them into the record in my question for the minister. The amendments would have explicitly and categorically prohibited acquiring, using, or, in way, shape, or form, interacting with information, from a public safety perspective, that may have been obtained under the use of torture. That is in keeping with our obligations under international law conventions that Canada has signed on to.
On a recorded vote, on every single one of those amendments, every member of the committee, Liberal and Conservative alike, voted against them. I invite Canadians to look at that record, and I invite Canadians to listen to what the minister said in response to me. When public safety may be at risk, there is no bigger admission that they are open to using information obtained under the use of torture than saying that they want to keep the flexibility when Canadians are at risk. Let Canadians be assured that it has been proven time and again that information obtained under the use of torture is of the most unreliable sort. It not only does nothing to protect Canadians and ensure public safety, but most of the time it does the opposite, by leading law enforcement on wild goose chases with erroneous information that could put their lives at risk, and Canadian lives at risk, not to mention the abhorrent and flagrant breach of human rights here and elsewhere through having those types of provisions. Therefore, I will let the Liberals explain why they voted against those amendments to explicitly prohibit torture, and why they feel that standing on ministerial directives and words like “may”, that are anything but binding, is good enough.
The Minister of Public Safety loves to boast that he has the support of various experts, and I have the utmost respect for those experts. I took the process in committee very seriously. I tried to unpack the extremely complex elements of the bill.
My Conservative colleague mentioned the Chair's decision to apply Standing Order 69.1. In my opinion, separating the votes on the different elements of the bill amounts to an acknowledgement that it is indeed an omnibus bill. A former director of CSIS, who served as a national security advisor to Prime Minister Harper and the current Prime Minister, said that the bill was beginning to rival the Income Tax Act in terms of complexity. Furthermore, several witnesses were forced to limit their testimony to just one part of the bill. In addition, elements were added concerning the Communications Security Establishment, or CSE, and those elements fall within the scope of national defence, yet they were never mentioned during the consultations held by the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security or by the Minister of Public Safety.
Before anyone jumps on me, I want to say that we realize the CSE's statutory mandate needs to be updated. We recognize that cybersecurity threats exist. However, when a government rams something through, as the government is doing with Bill C-59, we end up with flawed definitions, in particular with respect to the information available to the public, and with vague allocation of powers. Furthermore, the government is already announcing the position of a director of a new centre that is being created, under which everything will be consolidated, even though the act that is set out in the budget and, according to the minister, should be introduced this fall, has not yet been introduced.
This bill has many parts. The committee heard from some impressive experts, including professors Carvin, Forcese, and Wark, authors of some very important and interesting briefs, all of which are well thought out and attempt to break down all of the complicated aspects of the bill, including the ones I just mentioned. In their columns in The Globe and Mail, they say that some parts of the bill are positive and others require a more in-depth study. One of these parts has to do with information sharing.
Information sharing was one of the most problematic aspects of BillC-51.
Information sharing is recognized by the experts whom the minister touts as those supporting his legislation, by civil liberties associations and others, as one of the most egregious elements of what was BillC-51, and that is changed only in a cosmetic way in this legislation.
We changed “sharing” to “disclosure”, and what does that mean? When there are consequential amendments to changing “disclosure” everywhere else in all of these acts, it does not change anything. All experts recognize that. The problematic information-sharing regime that was brought in, which is a threat to Canadians' rights and freedoms, still exists.
If we want to talk about what happened to Maher Arar, the Liberals voted down one of my amendments to include Global Affairs as one of the governmental departments that Canadians could make a complaint about to the new review agency. Yet, when it comes to consular services, when it comes to human rights breaches happening to Canadians abroad, Global Affairs and consular services have a role to play, especially when we see stories in the news of CSIS undermining efforts of consular affairs to get Canadians out of countries with horrible human rights records and back here.
This has all fallen on deaf ears. The information-sharing regime remains in place. The new powers given to CSE, in clause 24, talk about how CSE has the ability to collect. Notwithstanding the prohibition on it being able to collect information on Canadians, it can, for the sake of research and other things, and all kinds of ill-defined terms, collect information on the information infrastructure related to Canadians.
Incidentally, as a matter of fact, it voted down my amendments to have a catch-and-release provision in place for information acquired incidentally on Canadians. What does that do? When we read clause 24 of part 3 of the bill related to CSE, it says that it is for the purposes of “disclosing”. Not only are they now exempt from the explicit prohibition that they normally have in their mandate, they can also disclose.
What have the Liberals done to the information-sharing regime brought in by the Conservatives under BillC-51? It is called “disclosure” now. Members can do the math. We are perpetuating this regime that exists.
I know my time is very limited, so I want to address the issue of threat disruption by CSIS. As I said in my questions to my Conservative colleague, the very reason CSIS exists is that disruption is a police duty. As a result, leaving the power to disrupt threats granted in former Bill C-51 in the hands of CSIS still goes against the mandate of CSIS and its very purpose, even if the current government is making small improvements to the constitutionality of those powers. That is unacceptable.
I am not alone in saying this. As I said in my questions to my Conservative colleagues, I am talking about the excellent interview with former RCMP commissioner Paulson. He was interviewed by Professors Carvin and Forcese on their podcast. That interview raised concerns about that power.
In closing, I would like to talk about solutions. After all, I did begin my remarks by saying that we do not want to increase the legislative powers, which we believe are already sufficient. I am talking here about Bill C-51, which was introduced in the previous Parliament. We need to look at resources for police officers, which were cut by the previous government. The Conservatives eliminated the police recruitment fund, which allowed municipalities and provinces to recruit police officers and improve police services in their jurisdictions. I am thinking in particular of the Montreal police, or SPVM, and the Eclipse squad, which dealt with street gangs. It was a good thing the Government of Quebec was there to fill the gap left by the elimination of the funding that made it possible for the squad to exist. The current government is making some efforts in the fight against radicalization, but it needs to do more. The Conservatives are dumping on and ridiculing those efforts. The radicalization that we are seeing on social media and elsewhere targets vulnerable young people. Ridiculing and minimizing the government's efforts undermines the public safety objectives that we need to achieve.
We cannot support a bill that so deeply undermines the protection of Canadians' rights and privacy. Despite what they claim across the way, this bill does nothing to protect the safety of Canadians, which, let us be clear, is an objective all parliamentarians want to achieve. However, achieving that objective must not be done to the detriment of rights and freedoms, as was the case under the previous government and as is currently still the case with this bill.
Monsieur le Président, je remercie mes collègues de leurs discours. Nous voilà encore à étudier le projet de loi  C-59 en troisième lecture et j'aimerais tout d'abord parler du processus du débat entourant un projet de loi, qui a débuté non pas à l'arrivée de ce gouvernement, mais plutôt à la dernière législature avec l'ancien projet de loi C-51.
Contrairement aux propos entendus de l'autre côté plus tôt aujourd'hui et à d'autres moment aussi, le NPD et le Parti vert étaient les seuls à s'opposer au projet de loi C-51 à la dernière législature. Maintenant, j'entends beaucoup d'histoires pour nous dire qu'on était conscient que les Canadiens avaient des préoccupations concernant leur sécurité, qu'il fallait trouver un approche équilibrée, et qu'on comprenait que le projet de loi avait des failles. Donc, on a pris pour acquis qu'on allait accéder au pouvoir et réparer par la suite les nombreuses — je dis bien les nombreuses — failles de ce projet de loi, voire même des failles dangereuses qui représentaient des menaces pour les droits et libertés et la protection de la vie privée des Canadiens. Je parle bien sûr du Parti libéral qui a offert son appui au projet de loi C-51, tout en le dénonçant. Je me souviens à l'époque de l'étude en comité, il y avait le député de Malpeque qui est toujours député à la Chambre qui a passé son temps à dénoncer le projet de loi, à parler de toutes ses lacunes et pourtant le Parti libéral lui a donné son appui.
Cela est problématique parce qu'ultimement on essaie de présenter cette position vis-à-vis du projet de loi comme le porte-étendard des perspectives nuancées. On essaie de nous dire qu'il fallait accomplir les deux objectifs: protéger les Canadiens et protéger leurs droits. Personnellement, je me souviens d'une situation pas mal différente à l'époque, une situation découlant de l'attentat que nous avons tous vécu ici, dans l'enceinte du Parlement en 2014. Le gouvernement conservateur a tenté de profiter de la peur qui existait au sein de la population à la suite cet horrible événement pour apporter un changement législatif qui n'était pas nécessaire. Je vais revenir à ce qui était réellement nécessaire pour protéger les Canadiens.
Donc, on a proposé un changement législatif. On a voulu accroître les pouvoirs accordés aux agences de sécurité nationale sans rien faire pour un système de surveillance qui n'était déjà pas à la hauteur de ce dont elles avaient besoin pour s'assurer que leur travail était fait en tout respect et en conformité de nos lois, mais aussi des attentes que les Canadiens ont par rapport à leurs droits et libertés. On a constaté dans les sondages que les Canadiens étaient, évidemment, favorables à ces mesures parce qu'après tout on était dans une situation où il y avait la montée du groupe État islamique, l'attentat à Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu — pas loin de chez nous — et l'attentat ici même au Parlement. On a profité de cette peur et on a vu un appui pour les mesures présentes dans le projet de loi.
Au NDP, notre réflexion en caucus nous amené à nous dire que nous devions nous tenir debout. On nous envoie ici non seulement pour représenter nos concitoyens, mais pour être des leaders sur des questions extrêmement difficiles et pour prendre la bonne décision, la décision qui va vous permettre de protéger les droits des Canadiens, et ce, même si cela semble être une décision qui n'est pas populaire.
Malgré que cela semblait être une décision impopulaire, et malgré le fait que les libéraux, en voyant les sondages, se sont dit « Suivons simplement le courant et dénonçons les mesures du projet de loi, de sorte que nous puissions simultanément nous protéger des attaques des conservateurs et faire mieux que le NPD sur la position de principe progressiste de la protection des droits et libertés des Canadiens », que s’est-il passé? L’opinion publique a changé. À titre d’opposition officielle, nous avons fait ce combat ici, au Parlement. À la différence des libéraux, nous avons tenu tête à Stephen Harper sur le projet de loi radical qu'était le C-51. Nous avons vu les Canadiens s’opposer farouchement aux mesures se trouvant dans le projet de loi C-51.
Qu’est-il arrivé après les élections? Nous avons vu les libéraux tenter de résoudre le problème qu’ils s’étaient créé en dénonçant et en appuyant tout à la fois le projet de loi. Ils ont dit de ne pas s’inquiéter parce qu’ils allaient faire ce qu’ils font le mieux, c’est-à-dire consulter. Ils ont consulté sur des promesses électorales et des choses dont on avait déjà débattu au cours de la précédente législature.
Le ministre a déposé son livre vert. Le livre vert a été critiqué, à bon droit, parce qu’il allait trop loin dans une direction, parce qu'il demandait comment nous pourrions accorder plus de souplesse aux organismes d’application de la loi, leur donner plus d’outils pour faire leur travail, ce qui dénote une incompréhension totale des craintes que les Canadiens avaient au départ à l’égard du projet de loi C-51. On revient à l’argument que j’ai exposé tout à l’heure. Plutôt que de donner aux organismes d’application de la loi les ressources qui leur permettraient de créer leurs propres outils, de mettre au point une solide stratégie de prévention de la radicalisation et de veiller à ce que des jeunes gens vulnérables ne tombent pas entre les mailles du filet pour être recrutés par des organisations terroristes — telles que Daech ou la droite alternative militant pour la suprématie blanche — qu'a-t-on fait?
Nous avons participé à ces consultations qui étaient déjà orientées, et presque deux ans après l’arrivée au pouvoir des libéraux, nous voyons enfin le dépôt du projet de loi. Le ministre, dans son allocution de tout à l’heure, a défendu le dépôt du projet de loi dans les derniers jours d’une session du printemps du Parlement, juste avant que la Chambre des communes n’ajourne, en disant que nous aurions le temps au cours de l’été d’examiner la loi et d’y réfléchir. Il a oublié de mentionner que les pouvoirs accordés par le projet de loi C-51, sur des bases constitutionnelles fragiles, à des agences telles que le SCRS, restent en vigueur et que, comme l’a dit de manière répétée devant le comité M. Michel Coulombe, le directeur de l’époque du SCRS qui est maintenant à la retraite, ce sont des pouvoirs dont on se servait déjà à ce moment.
C’est très bien de consulter. Sans nul doute, personne ne s’objecte aux principes qu’incarnent les consultations, mais, lorsque ces consultations portent sur des promesses faites au peuple canadien de corriger une loi qui mine leurs droits, alors que les pouvoirs mêmes minant ces droits demeurent en vigueur et qu’on les utilise, il faut être conscient de l’urgence d’agir.
L'histoire se poursuit, car après cette consultation, le Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale a mené une consultation. Nous avons fait des recommandations et le NPD a produit un excellent rapport supplémentaire, qui appuie les recommandations unanimes du Comité mais qui ajoute les nôtres aussi, en appui au projet de loi de mon collègue de Esquimalt—Saanich—Sooke, qui est au Feuilleton. Il était porte-parole en matière de sécurité publique avant moi et il a mené la charge, avec le député d'Outremont, qui était à ce moment chef de l'opposition officielle, contre le projet de loi C-51. Le projet de loi de mon collègue de Esquimalt—Saanich—Sooke abroge complètement tous les éléments qui étaient contenus dans le projet de loi C-51.
C'est intéressant, parce que le ministre de la Sécurité publique et de la Protection civile s'est défendu de ne pas complètement abroger ces éléments en disant que plusieurs députés de la Chambre, dont le député de Spadina—Fort York, ont dit que la raison pour laquelle on n'abrogeait pas tous ces éléments, c'était parce que ce serait un exercice législatif trop compliqué. Mon collègue a déposé un projet de loi, qui est au Feuilleton, et qui fait exactement cela. En tout respect envers mon collègue, cela ne peut pas être si compliqué que cela si on a été capable de rédiger un projet de loi qui atteint exactement ces objectifs.
On a renvoyé le projet de loi  C-59 au Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale avant la deuxième lecture en disant que cela permettrait d'adopter un plus grand éventail d'amendements, que cela permettrait à l'opposition d'être entendue et que cela permettrait de faire une étude robuste. Qu'est-ce que cela a donné? Ce sont 55 amendements qui ont été adoptés, et on est bien fier. Or, sur ces 55 amendements, deux proviennent du NPD, dont un qui concerne le préambule d'une partie du projet de loi. Sans vouloir nier la bonne foi des libéraux, le deuxième amendement a été adopté avec une formulation qui faisait leur affaire. Aucun amendement des conservateurs n'a été adopté. Ultimement, ce n'est pas la fin du monde, parce que nous sommes en désaccord sur plusieurs points, mais néanmoins, on parle de collaboration et on n'a adopté aucun amendement du Parti vert. Cela reflète le fait que les jeux étaient faits et que le gouvernement avait déjà déterminé son approche.
Le gouvernement va se vanter de la nouvelle partie 1.1 de la loi qui a été adoptée. Contrairement à ce que le ministre a dit en répondant à ma question pendant le débat d’aujourd’hui, cela ne créerait aucune obligation juridique en ce qui a trait au fonctionnement actuel du système. Les directives ministérielles adoptées afin d’interdire — malgré les échappatoires, il importe de le souligner — l’utilisation de renseignements obtenus par la torture ne seront toujours que cela: des directives ministérielles. L’obligation juridique selon laquelle le ministre ou le gouverneur en conseil « peut » donner des instructions aux administrateurs généraux des ministères n’est pas suffisante. Si elle l’était, les libéraux n’auraient eu aucune réticence à voter pour les amendements que j’ai proposés au comité. Le temps qui me reste ne me permet pas de relire ces amendements, mais je l'ai fait dans ma question au ministre. Les amendements auraient explicitement et catégoriquement interdit l’acquisition ou l’utilisation, d’une façon ou d’une autre, d’information qui, du point de vue de la sécurité publique, pourrait avoir été obtenue par la torture. C’est conforme à nos obligations aux termes des conventions en droit international que le Canada a signées.
Lors d'un vote par appel nominal, tous les membres du comité, libéraux et conservateurs, on voté contre chacun de ces amendements sans exception. J’invite les Canadiens à consulter ce compte rendu et j’invite les Canadiens à écouter la réponse que le ministre m’a faite. Lorsque la sécurité publique est en danger, il n’existe pas d’admission plus flagrante qu’ils sont prêts à utiliser de l’information obtenue par la torture que de dire qu’ils veulent conserver de la latitude si les Canadiens sont en péril. Je veux assurer aux Canadiens qu’il a été prouvé maintes et maintes fois que l’information obtenue par la torture est la moins fiable. Non seulement elle n’a aucune utilité pour protéger les Canadiens et assurer la sécurité publique, mais elle a la plupart du temps l’effet contraire en lançant les organismes d’application de la loi sur de fausses pistes à partir de renseignements erronés, ce qui peut mettre en danger les membres de ces organismes ainsi que la vie des Canadiens, sans parler de la violation abjecte et flagrante des droits de la personne, ici et ailleurs, permise par ce genre de dispositions. Je laisserai par conséquent les libéraux expliquer pourquoi ils ont voté contre ces amendements visant explicitement à interdire la torture, et pourquoi ils croient que se fier à des directives ministérielles et à des mots tel que « peut », qui n’ont rien de contraignant, est suffisant.
Le ministre de la Sécurité publique aime bien se vanter de l'appui qu'il a eu de plusieurs experts, et je respecte beaucoup ceux-ci. J'ai pris le processus en comité très au sérieux. J'ai tenté de décortiquer les éléments extrêmement complexes du projet de loi.
Par ailleurs, mon collègue conservateur a mentionné la décision de la présidence d'appliquer l'article 69.1 du Règlement. Selon moi, en séparant les votes sur divers éléments du projet de loi, on reconnaît par le fait même la nature omnibus de celui-ci. L'ancien directeur du SCRS, qui a été le conseiller en matière de sécurité nationale du premier ministre Harper et du premier ministre actuel, a dit que le projet de loi était quasiment plus compliqué que les lois sur l'impôt. Plusieurs témoins ont quant à eux dû se limiter à une partie du projet de loi. De plus, on a ajouté des éléments concernant le CST, le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications, qui sont du ressort de la défense nationale et qui n'ont jamais été mentionnés lors des consultations menées par le Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale ou par le ministre de la Sécurité publique.
Avant qu'on me critique là-dessus, j'aimerais dire que nous reconnaissons la nécessité de mettre à jour le mandat législatif du CST. Nous reconnaissons qu'il y a des menaces à la cybersécurité. Cependant, en précipitant l'exercice comme on l'a fait avec le projet de loi  C-59, on se retrouve avec des définitions défaillantes, notamment en ce qui concerne l'information disponible au public, et avec l'attribution de pouvoirs nébuleux. De plus, on annonce déjà le poste de directeur d'un nouveau centre qu'on est en train de créer et où on va tout consolider sous un toit, alors que la loi qui est prévue par le budget et qui, selon le ministre, devait être déposée cet automne n'a pas encore été déposée.
Bref, ce projet de loi contient de nombreux éléments. Des experts impressionnants, comme les professeurs Carvin, Forcese et Wark, ont témoigné devant le comité et ont écrit des textes extrêmement importants et intéressants. Ils les ont conçus avec beaucoup d'intérêt et ont tenté de décortiquer tous les éléments complexes, dont ceux que je viens de mentionner. Dans leurs chroniques du Globe and Mail, ils disent que certains éléments du projet de loi sont positifs et que d'autres méritent une étude plus approfondie. Un de ces éléments est le partage d'information.
L'échange d'information était l'un des éléments les plus problématiques du projet de loi C-51
La communication d’information est reconnue par les experts dont le ministre se targue d'avoir le soutien pour son projet de loi ainsi que par les associations de défense des libertés civiles et autres comme l’un des éléments les plus notables de ce qui était le projet de loi C-51, et cela n’est changé que de manière cosmétique dans le présent projet de loi.
On a remplacé la « communication » par la « divulgation », et qu’est-ce que cela signifie? Lorsqu’il y a des modifications corrélatives au changement de « divulgation » partout ailleurs dans toutes ces lois, cela ne change rien. Tous les experts le reconnaissent. Le régime problématique de communication d’information qui a été amené, qui menace les droits et les libertés des Canadiens, existe encore.
Si nous voulons parler de ce qui est arrivé à Maher Arar, les libéraux ont rejeté l’un de mes amendements visant à inclure Affaires mondiales Canada parmi les ministères auxquels les Canadiens pourraient présenter une plainte concernant le nouvel Office de surveillance. Pourtant, lorsqu’il s’agit des services consulaires, lorsqu’il s’agit de violations des droits de la personne subies par les Canadiens à l’étranger, Affaires mondiales Canada et les services consulaires ont un rôle à jouer, particulièrement quand nous voyons des reportages aux nouvelles à propos du SCRS, qui mine les efforts des affaires consulaires pour sortir les Canadiens des pays dont les bilans en matière de droits de la personne sont horribles et pour les ramener ici.
Tout cela est tombé dans l’oreille d’un sourd. Le régime de communication d’information demeure en place. Les nouveaux pouvoirs conférés au CST, à l'article 24, expliquent comment le CST peut recueillir des renseignements. Malgré l’interdiction de recueillir des renseignements sur les Canadiens qui lui est imposée, il peut, à des fins de recherche et autres, et au regard d’une panoplie de termes mal définis, recueillir des renseignements sur l’infrastructure de l’information en lien avec les Canadiens.
Soit dit en passant, il a rejeté mes amendements visant à mettre en place un principe de saisie et de rejet des renseignements sur les Canadiens obtenus de manière incidente. Qu’est-ce que cela fait? Quand on lit l'article 24 de la partie 3 du projet de loi liée au CST, on voit que c’est aux fins de « divulguer ». Non seulement sont-ils exemptés maintenant de l’interdiction explicite qui figure normalement dans leur mandat, mais ils peuvent aussi divulguer de l’information.
Qu’est-ce que les libéraux ont fait du régime de communication d’information mis en place par les conservateurs en vertu du projet de loi C-51? On l’appelle maintenant « divulgation ». Les députés peuvent tirer les conclusions qui s’imposent. Nous perpétuons le régime existant.
Je sais que mon temps de parole est très limité, alors je vais aborder la question des perturbations faites par le SCRS. Comme je l'ai dit dans mes questions à mon collègue conservateur, l'existence même du SCRS repose sur le fait que le pouvoir de perturbation est un devoir policier. Par conséquent, le fait de maintenir le pouvoir de perturbation, qui a été accordé par l'ancien projet de loi C-51, dans les mains du SCRS, même si on améliore légèrement la possible constitutionnalité de ces pouvoirs, va tout de même à l'encontre du mandat du SCRS et de sa raison d'être. Selon nous, c'est inacceptable.
Je ne suis pas le seul à le dire. Comme je l'ai dit dans mes questions à mes collègues conservateurs, je parle de l'excellente entrevue avec l'ancien commissaire de la GRC, le commissaire Paulson, qui a été interviewé par les professeurs Carvin et Forcese, sur leur balado. Cette entrevue soulève des inquiétudes par rapport à ce pouvoir.
En terminant, je vais parler des solutions. Après tout, j'ai dit d'entrée de jeu que nous ne voulons pas augmenter les pouvoirs législatifs, qui sont déjà suffisants, à notre avis. Je parle ici du projet de loi C-51 déposé lors de la dernière législature. Il faut examiner les ressources pour les policiers, qui ont été réduites par le gouvernement précédent. On a éliminé le fonds de recrutement de la police, qui permettait aux municipalités et aux provinces de recruter des policiers et de bonifier les services policiers sur leur territoire. On pense notamment au SPVM et à l'Escouade Éclipse, qui s'attaquait aux gangs de rue. Une chance que le gouvernement du Québec était là pour combler la brèche créée par l'élimination de ce fonds qui permettait l'existence de cette escouade. Dans la lutte contre la radicalisation, le gouvernement actuel déploie des efforts, mais ils devraient être bonifiés. Les conservateurs crachent sur ces efforts et essaient de les ridiculiser. La radicalisation que nous voyons sur les réseaux sociaux et ailleurs concerne des jeunes qui sont vulnérables. Ridiculiser ces efforts et les minimiser va à l'encontre des objectifs de sécurité publique que nous devons atteindre.
Nous ne pouvons pas appuyer un projet de loi qui crée autant de brèches dans la protection des droits des Canadiens, dans la protection de leur vie privée. Malgré ce qu'on plaide de l'autre côté, il ne fait rien pour réellement protéger la sécurité des Canadiens qui — disons-le franchement, ne mélangeons pas les choses — est un objectif partagé par tous les parlementaires. Toutefois, l'atteinte de cet objectif ne doit pas se faire au détriment des droits et libertés, comme ce fut le cas sous le gouvernement précédent et comme ce l'est toujours actuellement avec cette mesure législative.
View Elizabeth May Profile
GP (BC)
View Elizabeth May Profile
2018-06-18 19:20 [p.21226]
Mr. Speaker, I appreciate that the hon. member for Bellechasse—Les Etchemins—Lévis has perhaps a more nostalgic and certainly more favourable view of what took place in the 41st Parliament, but I put it to him that my experience in studying BillC-51 convinced me that it made us much less safe. I will give an example and hope my hon. colleague can comment on it.
Far from creating silos, Bill C-59 would help us by creating the security and intelligence review agency because, in the words of former chief justice John Major who chaired the Air India inquiry, we have had no pinnacle review, no oversight over all the actions of all the agencies. This is a real-life example. When Jeffrey Delisle was stealing secrets from the Canadian navy, CSIS knew about it. CSIS knew all about it, but it decided not to tell the RCMP. The RCMP acted when it got a tip from the FBI. We know that in the Air India disaster, various agencies of the Government of Canada—CSIS knew things as did the RCMP—did not talk to each other. The information sharing sections to which the member refers have nothing to do with government agencies sharing the information they have about a threat. They have to do it by sharing personal information of Canadians, such as what occurred to Maher Arar.
To the member's last comment that nothing has gone wrong since BillC-51, my comment is: how would we know? Everything is secret. Rights could have been infringed. No special advocate was in the room. We have no idea what happened to infringe rights during Bill C-51's reign.
Monsieur le Président, je comprends que le député de Bellechasse—Les Etchemins—Lévis a peut-être un point de vue plus nostalgique et certainement plus favorable sur ce qui s’est passé au cours de la 41e législature, mais je lui dirai que l’étude du projet de loi C-51 m’a convaincue qu’il contribuait en fait à réduire la sécurité. Je vais donner un exemple et j’espère que le député pourra nous faire part de ses commentaires.
Loin de créer des cloisonnements, le projet de loi  C-59 nous aiderait en créant l’Office de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité nationale et de renseignement, parce que, pour citer l’ex-juge en chef John Major, qui a présidé l’enquête sur la tragédie d'Air India, nous n’avons eu ni examen ni surveillance au sommet de l’ensemble des actions de l’ensemble des organismes. Voici un exemple concret: quand Jeffrey Delisle dérobait des secrets à la Marine canadienne, le SCRS le savait. Le SCRS savait tout, mais a décidé de ne rien dire à la GRC. La GRC a agi lorsqu’elle a eu un tuyau du FBI. Nous savons qu’en ce qui concerne l’attentat d’Air India, divers organismes du gouvernement du Canada — le SCRS savait des choses, tout comme la GRC — ne se sont pas parlé. Les articles sur la mise en commun de l’information que le député mentionne n’ont rien à voir avec la mise en commun par les organismes gouvernementaux de l’information dont ils disposent à propos des menaces. Elles concernent la mise en commun des renseignements personnels des Canadiens, comme dans le cas de Maher Arar.
Pour ce qui est de ce que le député a dit en dernier, à savoir qu'il n'y a eu aucun problème depuis l'adoption du projet de loi C-51, je réponds: comment peut-il le savoir? Tout est secret. Des droits pourraient avoir été violés. Il n'y avait pas d'avocat spécial dans la pièce. Nous ne savons pas quelles sortes d'atteintes aux droits ont pu survenir sous le projet de loi C-51.
View Garnett Genuis Profile
CPC (AB)
Mr. Speaker, before I get into the substantive remarks, I want to respond to an interesting comment made by my friend from Hull—Aylmer, who was asking in a question about actions taken by the previous government. There were many provisions in BillC-51 that were aimed at making Canadians safer. However, one thing I do not think has come up yet in the debate was a specific proposal that the Conservative Party put forward in the last election to make it illegal to travel to specific regions. There were certain exceptions built into the legislation, travel for humanitarian purposes, and for journalistic purposes perhaps. That was a good proposal, because when people are planning to travel to Daesh-controlled areas in Syria and Iraq, outside of certain very clearly defined objectives, it is fairly obvious what the person is going there to do. This was another proposal that we had put forward, one that the government has not chosen to take us up on, that I think eminently made sense. It would have given prosecutors and law enforcement another tool. Hopefully, that satisfies my friend from Hull—Aylmer, and maybe he will have further comments on that.
Substantively on Bill C-59, it is a bill that deals with the framework for ensuring Canadians' security, and it would make changes to a previous piece of legislation from the previous Parliament, BillC-51. There are a number of different measures in it. I would not call it an omnibus bill. I know Liberals are allergic to that word, so I will not say it is an omnibus bill. I will instead say that it makes a number of disparate changes to different parts of the act. I am going to go through some of those changes as time allows, and talk about some of the questions that are raised by each one. Certainly some of those changes are ones that we in the Conservative Party do not support. We are concerned about those changes making us less safe.
Before I go on to the particular provisions of the bill, I want to set the stage for the kinds of discussions we are having in this Parliament around safety and security. We take the position, quite firmly, that the first role of government is to keep people safe. Everything else is contingent on that. If people are not safe, all of the other things that a government does fall secondary to that. They are ultimately less important to people who feel that their basic security is not preserved. Certainly it is good for us to see consensus, as much as possible in this House, on provisions that would genuinely improve people's safety. Canadians want us to do it, and they want us to work together to realistically, in a thoughtful and hard-headed way, confront the threats that are in front of us.
We should not be naive about the threats we face, simply because any one of us individually has not interacted with a terrorist threat, although many people who were part of the previous Parliament obviously have interacted directly with a terrorist threat, given the attack that occurred on Parliament Hill. In any event, just because there are many threats that we do not see or directly experience ourselves, it does not mean they are not there. Certainly we know our law enforcement agencies are actively engaged in monitoring and countering threats, and doing everything they can to protect us. We need to be aware that those threats are out there. They are under the surface, but they are having an impact. There is a greater potential impact on our lives that is prevented if we give our security agencies and our law enforcement the tools that they need.
Many of these threats are things that people are aware of. There is the issue of radicalization and terrorism that is the result of a world in which the flow of information is much more across borders than it used to be. Governments can, to some extent, control the entry of people into their space, but they cannot nearly as effectively control the ideas of radicalization that come easily across borders and that influence people's perceptions. People can be radicalized even if they have never had any physical face-to-face interactions with people who hold those radical views. These things can happen over the Internet much more easily today than they did in the past. They do not require the face-to-face contact that was probably necessary in the past for the dissemination of extreme ideas. People living in a free western society can develop romanticized notions about extremism. This is a challenge that can affect many different people, those who are new to Canada, as well as people whose families have been here for generations.
This growing risk of radicalization has a genuine impact, and it is something that we need to be sensitive to. Of course, there are different forms of radicalization. There is radicalization advanced by groups like Daesh. We also need to aware of threats that are posed from extreme racist groups that may advocate targeting minorities, for instance, the shooting we saw at the mosque in Quebec City, or the attack that just happened at a mosque in Edson. These come out of extreme ideas that should be viewed as terrorism as well. Therefore, there are different kinds of threats that we see from different directions as the result of a radicalization that no longer requires a face-to-face interaction. These are real, growing, emergent threats.
There is also the need for us to be vigilant about threats from foreign governments. More and more, we are seeing a world in which foreign authoritarian governments are trying to project power beyond their borders. They are trying to influence our democratic system by putting messages out there that may create confusion, disinformation, and there may be active interference within our democratic system. There is the threat from radical non-state actors, but there are also threats from state actors, who certainly have malicious intent and want to influence the direction of our society, or may attack us directly, and want to do these sorts of things to their advantage. In the interest of protecting Canadians, we need to be aware and vigilant about these threats. We need to be serious about how we respond to them.
As much as we seek consensus in our discussion of these issues, we sometimes hear from other parties, when we raise these real and legitimate concerns, the accusation that this is spreading fear. We should not talk in these sorts of stark terms about threats that we face, as that is creating fear. The accusation is that it also creates division, because the suggestion that there might be people out there with radical ideas divides us. However, I think there is a difference between fear and prudence. We need to know that difference as legislators, and we need to be prudent without being fearful.
Fear, I think, implies an irrational, particularly an emotional response to threats that would have us freeze up, worry incessantly, stop going about our normal activities, or maybe even lead to the demonization of other people who someone might see as a threat. These are all things that could well be manifestations of fear, which is not good, obviously. However, prudence is something quite different. Prudence is to be aware of threats in a clear-headed, factual, realistic way. It is to say that thoughtfully, intellectually, reasonably, we need to do everything we can to protect ourselves, recognizing that if we fail to be prudent, if we do not take these rational, clear-headed steps to give our law enforcement agencies the tools they need to protect us from real risks that exist, then we are more liable to violence and terrorism. Also, obviously from that flows a greater risk of people being seized with that kind of emotional fearful response.
It is our job as legislators to encourage prudence, and to be prudent in policy-making. Therefore, when we raise concerns about security threats that we face, illegal border crossings, radicalization, and Daesh fighters returning to Canada, it is not because we are advocating for a fearful response, but rather we are advocating for a prudent response. Sometimes that distinction is lost on the government, because it is often typical of a Liberal world view to, perhaps with the best of intentions, imagine the world to be a safer place than it is.
Conservatives desire a better world, but we also look at the present world realistically. Sometimes one of the problems with Liberals is that they imagine the world to already be the way they would like it to be. The only way we get to a better, safer world, on many fronts, is by looking clearly at the challenges we face, and then, through that, seeking to overcome them.
It was variously attributed to Disraeli, Thatcher, or Churchill, but the line “the facts of life are conservative” is one that sticks out to me when we talk about having a prudent, clear-sighted approach to the threats we face. My colleague, the member for Thornhill, may correct me on who originally said that. Disraeli lived first, so we will say it was probably him.
Now, having set the framework through which we view, and I think we ought to view this bill, I want to speak specifically to a number of the changes that have been put forward. One of points we often hear from the government is about changes it has made with respect to the issue of torture. An amendment was proposed at committee. I understand that this was not part of the original bill, but came through in an amendment. It restates Canada's position that torture is obviously not acceptable. There is no disagreement in this House about the issue of torture. Obviously, we all agree that torture is unacceptable. Some of the aspects of this amendment, which effectively puts into law something that was already in a ministerial directive, is obviously not a substantial change in terms of changing the place or the mechanism by which something is recognized that was already in place.
Of course, when it comes to torture, it is a great opportunity for people in philosophy classrooms to debate, theoretically, what happens if there is information that could save lives that could be gained that way. However, the reality is the evidence demonstrates that torture not only is immoral, but is not effective at gathering information. A commitment to effectiveness, to giving our law enforcement agencies all the tools that are necessary and effective, while also opposing torture, are actually quite consistent with each other. I do not think there is anything substantively new with respect to those provisions that we are seeing from the government.
It is important to be clear about that. There are areas on which we agree; there are areas on which we disagree. However, there are areas on which we agree, and we can identify that clearly.
There are some other areas. In the beginning, the bill introduces a new national security and intelligence review agency. There is a new administrative cost with this new administrative agency. One of the questions we have is where that money is going to come from. The government is not proposing corresponding increases to the overall investment in our security agencies.
If a new administrative apparatus is added, with administrative costs associated with it, obviously that money has to come from somewhere. Likely it is a matter of internal reallocation, which effectively means a fairly substantial cut to the operational front-line activities of our security agencies. If that is not the case, I would love to hear the government explain how it is not, and where the money is coming from. It seems fairly evident that when something is introduced, the cost of which is about $97 million over five years, and that is an administrative cost, again that money has to come from somewhere. With the emergence and proliferation of threats, I know Canadians would not like to see what may effectively amount to a cut to front-line delivery in terms of services. That is clearly a concern that Canadians have.
Part 2 deals with the intelligence commissioner, and the Liberals rejected expedited timing requirements on the commissioner's office. This effectively means that security operations may be delayed because the commissioner is working through the information. There are some technical aspects to the bill, certainly that we have raised concerns about, and we will continue to raise concerns about them. We want to try to make sure that our security agencies, as my colleagues have talked about, have all the tools they need to do their job very effectively.
Now, this is something that stuck out to me. There are restrictions in part 3 to security and intelligence agencies being able to access already publicly available data.
Effectively, this bill has put in place restrictions on accessing that data, which is already publicly available. If security agencies have to go through additional hoops to access information that is already on Facebook or Twitter, it is not clear to me why we would put those additional burdens in place and what positive purpose those additional restrictions would achieve. That is yet another issue with respect to the practical working out of the bill.
Given the political context of some of these changes, one wonders why the government is doing this. It is because the Liberals put themselves in a political pickle. They supported, and voted for, BillC-51. The current Prime Minister, as a member of the then third party, voted in favour of that legislation. However, the Liberals then wanted to position themselves differently on it, and so they said they were going to change aspects of it when they got into government. Some of those changes serve no discernible purpose, and yet they raise additional questions regarding the restrictions they would put on our law enforcement agencies' ability to operate effectively and efficiently.
Part 4 of the proposed legislation puts additional restrictions on interdepartmental information-sharing. Members have spoken about this extensively in the debate, but there are important points to underline here.
The biggest act of terrorism in our country's history, the Air India bombing, was determined to have been preventable by the Air India inquiry. The issue was that one agency was keeping information from another agency that could have prevented the bombing. Certainly, if information is already in the hands of government, it makes sense to give our agencies the tools to share that information. It seems fairly obvious that people should be able to share that information. It is clearly in the national interest. If it can save lives to transfer information effectively from one department to another with regard to files about individuals who may present a security threat, and if CSIS already has that information and is going to share it with the RCMP, I think all Canadians would say that makes sense. However, Bill C-59 would impose additional restrictions on that sharing of information.
Through taking a hard-headed look at the threats we face and the need to combat them, parliamentarians should be concerned about those particular provisions in this bill.
Another issue raised in this bill is that of threat disruption. Should security agencies be able to undertake actions that disrupt a security threat? Previously, under BillC-51, actions could be taken to disrupt threats without a warrant if those actions were within the law. If there was a need to do something that would normally be outside of the law, then a warrant would be required, but if it was something ordinarily within the remit of the law, then agencies could proceed with it. It could be something like talking to the parents of a potential terrorist traveller, and alerting them to what was going on in the life of their child, or being present in an online chatroom to try to counter a radicalizing message. These things are presently legal under Bill C-51.
However, under Bill C-59, there would be a much higher standard with respect to the activities that would require a warrant, which include disseminating any information, record, or document. It seems to me that something as simple as putting a security agent in an online chatroom to move the conversation in a particular direction through the dissemination of information would require a warrant, which can create challenges if one wants to engage in an organic conversation so as to counter messages in real time.
All of us in the House believe in the need for parameters and rules around this, but BillC-51 established parameters that allowed for intervention by law enforcement agencies where necessary. It did keep us safe, and unfortunately Bill C-59 would make this more difficult and muddies the waters. That is why we oppose it.
Monsieur le Président, avant d'entrer dans le vif du sujet, je souhaite répondre à une observation intéressante formulée par le député de Hull—Aylmer alors qu'il posait une question à propos des gestes posés par l'ancien gouvernement. De nombreuses dispositions du projet de loi C-51 avaient pour but d'améliorer la sécurité des Canadiens. Je crois que personne n'a encore mentionné, pendant le débat, une proposition faite par le Parti conservateur pendant la dernière campagne électorale: il proposait qu'il soit illégal de se rendre dans certaines régions. La mesure législative prévoyait des exceptions, notamment si le voyage avait un but humanitaire ou s'il s'agissait d'un travail journalistique. C'était une proposition judicieuse car, lorsqu'une personne a l'intention de se rendre dans une région de Syrie ou d'Irak sous le contrôle de Daech, on peut deviner assez facilement ce qu'elle compte y faire, sauf si elle a une raison précise de s'y rendre. C'était l'une de nos propositions. Le gouvernement a choisi de ne pas y donner suite, mais elle avait beaucoup de sens, je crois. Elle aurait fourni aux procureurs et aux forces de l'ordre un outil de plus. J'espère que cette réponse satisfera le député de Hull—Aylmer, qui aura peut-être d'autres observations à ce sujet.
Je reviens donc au projet de loi  C-59, qui porte sur le cadre conçu pour assurer la sécurité des Canadiens. Il vise à modifier une mesure adoptée pendant la législature précédente, soir le projet de loi C-51. Le projet de loi à l'étude contient plusieurs mesures. Je ne le qualifierai pas de projet de loi omnibus, puisque les libéraux sont allergiques à ce terme. Disons plutôt qu'il apporte une variété de modifications à différentes parties de la loi. Je m'attarderai sur quelques-uns de ces changements, en fonction du temps dont je dispose, et je parlerai des questions qu'ils soulèvent. Certains de ces changements n'ont pas l'appui des conservateurs, de toute évidence, car nous craignons qu'ils nuisent à la sécurité des Canadiens.
Avant de passer aux dispositions particulières du projet de loi, j'aimerais préparer le terrain pour le genre de discussions que nous avons dans le cadre de la présente législature au sujet de la sécurité et de la sûreté. Nous sommes fermement convaincus que le premier rôle du gouvernement est d'assurer la sécurité des gens. Tout le reste dépend de cela. Si les gens ne sont pas en sécurité, toutes les autres choses qu'un gouvernement fait qui sont secondaires à ce rôle sont en fin de compte moins importantes pour les gens qui estiment que leur sécurité de base n'est pas assurée. Il est certainement bon pour nous de voir un consensus, autant que possible à la Chambre, sur des dispositions qui amélioreraient réellement la sécurité des personnes. Les Canadiens veulent que nous le fassions, et ils veulent que nous travaillions ensemble pour faire face, de façon réaliste, réfléchie et déterminée, aux menaces qui pèsent sur nous.
Nous ne devrions pas être naïfs au sujet des menaces qui pèsent sur nous simplement parce que l'un d'entre nous n'a pas été victime d'une menace terroriste, même si de nombreuses personnes qui faisaient partie de la législature précédente ont manifestement été en contact direct avec une menace terroriste, étant donné l'attaque qui s'est produite sur la Colline du Parlement. Quoi qu'il en soit, ce n'est pas parce qu'il y a beaucoup de menaces que nous ne voyons pas ou que nous ne ressentons pas directement que cela signifie qu'elles n'existent pas. Nous savons certainement que nos organismes d'application de la loi sont activement engagés dans la surveillance et la lutte contre les menaces et qu'ils font tout ce qu'ils peuvent pour nous protéger. Nous devons être conscients que ces menaces existent. Elles sont sous la surface, mais elles ont un impact. Pour éviter un impact potentiel plus important sur nos vies, nous devons donner à nos organismes de sécurité et à nos forces de l'ordre les outils dont ils ont besoin.
Beaucoup de ces menaces sont des choses dont les gens sont conscients. Il y a la question de la radicalisation et du terrorisme qui est le résultat d'un monde dans lequel la circulation de l'information est beaucoup plus transfrontalière qu'elle ne l'était auparavant. Les gouvernements peuvent, dans une certaine mesure, contrôler l'entrée des personnes dans leur espace, mais ils ne peuvent pas contrôler aussi efficacement les idées de radicalisation qui traversent facilement les frontières et qui influent sur les perceptions des gens. Les gens peuvent être radicalisés même s'ils n'ont jamais été physiquement face à face avec des gens qui ont des opinions radicales. Ces choses peuvent se produire sur Internet beaucoup plus facilement aujourd'hui que par le passé. Ils n'ont pas besoin de la présence physique qui était probablement nécessaire dans le passé pour la diffusion d'idées extrêmes. Les gens qui vivent dans une société occidentale libre peuvent ainsi développer des idées romancées sur l'extrémisme. Il s'agit d'une réalité qui peut toucher de nombreuses personnes différentes, tant celles qui sont nouvelles au Canada que les personnes dont les familles sont ici depuis des générations.
Ce risque croissant de radicalisation a un impact réel, et c'est quelque chose auquel nous devons être sensibles. Bien sûr, il existe différentes formes de radicalisation. Il y a la radicalisation avancée par des groupes comme Daesh. Nous devons également être conscients des menaces que représentent les groupes racistes extrêmes qui peuvent préconiser le ciblage des minorités, par exemple, la fusillade à la mosquée de Québec ou l'attaque qui vient de se produire dans une mosquée à Edson. Il s'agit d'idées extrêmes qui devraient également être considérées comme du terrorisme. Par conséquent, il y a différents types de menaces que nous voyons comme le résultat d'une radicalisation qui ne nécessite plus d'interaction face à face. Il s'agit de menaces réelles, croissantes et émergentes.
Il est également nécessaire que nous soyons vigilants face aux menaces des gouvernements étrangers. De plus en plus, nous voyons un monde dans lequel des gouvernements autoritaires étrangers tentent d'exercer du pouvoir au-delà de leurs frontières. Ils essaient d'influer sur notre système démocratique en diffusant des messages qui peuvent créer de la confusion, de la désinformation et de l'ingérence active au sein de notre système démocratique. Il y a la menace des acteurs non étatiques radicaux, mais il y a aussi les menaces des acteurs étatiques, qui ont certainement des intentions malveillantes et qui veulent avoir un impact sur l'orientation de notre société, ou qui peuvent nous attaquer directement, et qui veulent faire ce genre de choses à leur avantage. Dans l'intérêt de la protection des Canadiens, nous devons être conscients et vigilants face à ces menaces. Nous devons être sérieux quant à la façon dont nous y réagissons.
Même si nous cherchons le consensus dans nos discussions sur ces questions, nous entendons parfois les autres partis, lorsque nous soulevons ces préoccupations réelles et légitimes, nous accuser de répandre la peur. Il semble que nous ne devrions pas parler en des termes si durs des menaces auxquelles nous sommes confrontés, car cela crée de la peur. L'accusation est que cela crée aussi la division, parce que la suggestion qu'il pourrait y avoir des gens qui ont des idées radicales nous divise. Cependant, je pense qu'il y a une différence entre la peur et la prudence. Nous devons connaître cette différence en tant que législateurs, et nous devons être prudents sans avoir peur.
La peur, je pense, implique une réponse irrationnelle, particulièrement une réponse émotionnelle aux menaces qui nous paralyseraient, nous feraient nous inquiéter sans cesse, nous feraient arrêter nos activités normales, ou peut-être même conduire à la diabolisation d'autres personnes que quelqu'un pourrait voir comme une menace. Ce sont toutes des choses qui pourraient bien être des manifestations de peur, ce qui n'est pas bon, évidemment. Cependant, la prudence est toute autre chose. La prudence consiste à être conscient des menaces d'une manière claire, factuelle et réaliste. C'est dire qu'intellectuellement, raisonnablement, nous devons faire tout ce que nous pouvons pour nous protéger, en reconnaissant que si nous ne faisons pas preuve de prudence, si nous ne prenons pas ces mesures rationnelles et lucides pour donner à nos organismes d'application de la loi les outils dont ils ont besoin pour nous protéger des risques qui existent réellement, alors nous sommes plus susceptibles d'être victimes de violence et de terrorisme. Dans une telle situation, il est évident qu'il y a un plus grand risque que les gens soient victimes de ce genre de réaction de peur émotionnelle.
C’est notre tâche à titre de législateurs d’inviter à la prudence, et d’être prudents dans l’élaboration des politiques. Par conséquent, lorsque nous soulevons des craintes à propos des menaces pour la sécurité auxquelles nous faisons face, les traversées illégales à la frontière, la radicalisation et le retour au Canada des combattants de Daech, ce n’est pas parce que nous préconisons une réaction craintive, mais plutôt parce que nous préconisons une réaction prudente. Le gouvernement ne fait parfois pas cette distinction parce qu’il est souvent typique de la vision libérale du monde, peut-être avec les meilleures intentions, d’imaginer que le monde est plus sûr qu’il ne l’est en réalité.
Les conservateurs veulent un monde meilleur, mais nous jetons aussi un regard réaliste sur le monde actuel. Un des problèmes des libéraux est qu’ils imaginent parfois que le monde est déjà tel qu’ils aimeraient qu’il soit. La seule manière d’avoir un monde meilleur, plus sûr, sous plusieurs angles, est de regarder avec lucidité les défis auxquels nous faisons face puis, par cela, de chercher à les surmonter.
On l’a attribué à différents moments à Disraeli, à Thatcher et à Churchill, mais l’adage « les faits sont conservateurs » revient constamment lorsqu’on parle d’une approche prudente et lucide des menaces qui nous guettent. Mon collègue de Thornhill pourra me corriger sur l’auteur initial de la citation. Comme Disraeli est le plus ancien de la liste, c’était probablement de lui.
Maintenant que j’ai précisé par quelle lentille nous regardons, et par quelle lentille nous devrions examiner ce projet de loi, je désire aborder un certain nombre de changements précis qui sont proposés. Un des éléments dont parle souvent le gouvernement, ce sont les changements qu’il a apportés sur la question de la torture. Un amendement a été proposé en comité. Selon ce que je comprends, cela ne faisait pas partie du projet de loi initial, mais a été proposé dans le cadre d’un amendement. Il réitère la position du Canada à l’effet que la torture est évidemment inacceptable. Il n’y aucun désaccord au sein de la Chambre sur la question de la torture. Manifestement, nous sommes tous d’accord sur le caractère inacceptable de la torture. Certains éléments de cet amendement, qui édicte ce qui était déjà une directive ministérielle, ne constituent de toute évidence pas un changement de fond quant à la manière ou la place dont on exprimait cela.
Bien sûr, lorsqu’on parle de torture, c’est une excellent occasion pour se demander en théorie, dans les cours de philosophie, ce qui se passerait si une information obtenue de cette façon pouvait sauver des vies. Dans la réalité cependant, les faits indique que la torture est non seulement immorale, mais qu’elle n’est pas efficace pour réunir du renseignement. Un engagement à l’égard de l’efficacité, de la fourniture aux organismes d’application de la loi tous les outils nécessaires et efficaces, est en fait très cohérent avec l’interdiction de la torture. Je ne crois pas qu’il y a quoi que ce soit de fondamentalement nouveau dans les dispositions proposées par le gouvernement.
Il est important d’être limpide à ce sujet. S'il y a des éléments sur lesquels nous sommes d’accord, il y en a cependant d’autres sur lesquels nous sommes en désaccord; nous pouvons clairement les cerner.
Il y a d’autres éléments. Dès l’abord, le projet de loi instaure l’Office de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité nationale et de renseignement. Ce nouvel organisme administratif s’accompagne de nouveaux coûts administratifs. Une des questions que nous posons est d’où viendra l’argent. Le gouvernement ne propose pas d’augmentation correspondante de notre investissement global dans nos organismes de sécurité.
Si l'on ajoute un nouveau rouage à l'appareil administratif de l'État, avec des coûts administratifs qui lui sont associés, il est évident qu'il faut trouver de l'argent quelque part pour financer une telle mesure. L'argent viendra probablement d'une réaffectation interne de l'enveloppe budgétaire, ce qui engendrera dans les faits une réduction assez substantielle des sommes que les organismes de sécurité du pays consacrent à leurs activités de première ligne, sur le terrain. Si ce n'est pas le cas, je serais très heureux d'entendre le gouvernement nous expliquer comment ce sera possible et d'où viendra l'argent. Il paraît assez évident que, lorsqu'un travail administratif doit être effectué au coût d'environ 97 millions de dollars sur cinq ans, l'argent doit venir de quelque part. Vu le rythme auquel les risques pour la sécurité apparaissent et prolifèrent, je sais que les Canadiens n'aimeraient pas voir des compressions dans les services de première ligne. C'est nettement un objet de préoccupation pour les Canadiens.
La partie 2 porte sur le commissaire au renseignement, et les libéraux ont rejeté l'idée de fixer des délais dans lesquels le personnel du commissaire devrait faire son travail. Les opérations de sécurité pourraient donc être retardées parce que le personnel du commissaire est en train d'analyser l'information. Le projet de loi pose certains problèmes d'ordre technique, que nous avons bien sûr soulignés, et nous continuerons de le faire. Nous voulons nous assurer, comme mes collègues l'ont dit, que les organismes canadiens chargés de la sécurité ont les outils nécessaires pour faire leur travail très efficacement.
C'est quelque chose qui a retenu mon attention. La partie 3 prévoit des restrictions quant à la capacité des organismes de sécurité et de renseignement d'accéder à des données accessibles au public.
Effectivement, le projet de loi prévoit des restrictions pour ce qui est d'accéder à des données auxquelles le public a déjà accès. Je ne vois pas pourquoi les organismes de sécurité devraient surmonter de nouveaux obstacles pour obtenir de l'information qui figure déjà sur Facebook ou sur Twitter, et je ne vois pas de quelle façon ces restrictions supplémentaires pourraient donner des résultats favorables. C'est un autre point à régler en ce qui concerne le fonctionnement du projet de loi.
Compte tenu du contexte politique de certains des changements, on peut se demander pourquoi le gouvernement prend une telle mesure. C'est parce que les libéraux se sont mis dans le pétrin sur le plan politique. Ils ont appuyé le projet de loi C-51 et ils ont voté pour son adoption. Le premier ministre actuel, qui était alors membre du troisième parti, a voté pour cette mesure législative. Cependant, les libéraux ont voulu par la suite modifier leur position à cet égard, et c'est pourquoi ils ont affirmé qu'ils apporteraient certains changements lorsqu'ils arriveraient au pouvoir. Certains de ces changements ne sont d'aucune utilité évidente. Malgré cela, ils soulèvent d'autres questions quant aux restrictions qu'ils imposeraient aux organismes d'application de la loi et qui auraient une incidence sur la capacité de ces organismes de mener leurs activités avec efficacité et efficience.
La partie 4 du projet de loi prévoit d'autres restrictions en ce qui concerne la communication de renseignements entre ministères. Les députés en ont parlé longuement dans le cadre du débat, mais il y a des éléments importants à prendre en compte.
Le plus grand acte de terrorisme dans l'histoire du pays, l'attentat d'Air India, aurait pu être évité, selon l'enquête menée à la suite de la tragédie. Le problème est qu'un organisme ne communiquait pas les renseignements à un autre organisme, ce qui aurait pu empêcher l'attentat. Si les renseignements sont déjà entre les mains du gouvernement, il est certainement logique de donner aux organismes les outils pour échanger ces renseignements. Il semble assez clair que les gens devraient être en mesure d'échanger ces renseignements. C'est manifestement dans l'intérêt national. Si le transfert efficace de renseignements d'un ministère à l'autre concernant les dossiers d'individus pouvant présenter une menace pour la sécurité peut sauver des vies, et que le Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité dispose déjà de ces renseignements et qu'il les communiquera à la GRC, je pense que tous les Canadiens diraient que c'est logique. Cependant, le projet de loi  C-59 imposera d'autres restrictions à cet échange de renseignements.
En examinant froidement les menaces qui nous guettent et la nécessité de les combattre, les parlementaires devraient être préoccupés par ces dispositions du projet de loi.
On a soulevé un autre enjeu relativement à ce projet de loi, à savoir le fait de contrer les menaces. Les organismes de sécurité devraient-ils pouvoir prendre des mesures en vue de contrer une menace à la sécurité? Auparavant, au titre du projet de loi C-51, on pouvait prendre des mesures sans demander de mandat afin de contrer des menaces si ces mesures étaient légales. S'il fallait faire quelque chose qui est normalement illégal, un mandat était nécessaire, mais si les mesures étaient d'ordinaire légales, les organismes pouvaient intervenir. Il peut s'agir par exemple de parler aux parents d'un voyageur terroriste potentiel pour les aviser de ce qui se passe dans la vie de leur enfant ou encore d'assurer une présence dans un salon de clavardage en ligne pour tenter de contrer un message de radicalisation. Ces mesures sont actuellement légales au titre du projet de loi C-51.
Toutefois, au titre du projet de loi  C-59, les normes seront beaucoup plus élevées quant aux activités qui nécessiteront un mandat, notamment pour la communication d'information, de dossiers ou de documents. Il me semble que le fait d'exiger un mandat pour quelque chose d'aussi simple que de faire intervenir un agent de sécurité dans un salon de clavardage en vue d'orienter une conversation dans une direction précise en disséminant de l'information peut créer des difficultés si on souhaite entretenir une conversation naturelle afin de contrer les messages en temps réel.
Tous les députés croient qu'il est nécessaire que des paramètres et des règles encadrent ces mesures, mais le projet de loi C-51 a déjà établi des paramètres permettant aux organismes d'application de la loi d'intervenir lorsque c'est nécessaire. Cette mesure législative a permis d'assurer notre sécurité, mais, malheureusement, le projet de loi  C-59 compliquera cette tâche et sèmera la confusion. Voilà pourquoi nous nous y opposons.
View Randall Garrison Profile
NDP (BC)
Madam Speaker, I rise tonight to speak against Bill C-59 at third reading. Unfortunately, it is yet another example of the Liberals breaking an election promise, only this time it is disguised as promise keeping.
In the climate of fear after the attacks on Parliament Hill and in St. Jean in 2014, the Conservative government brought forward BillC-51. I heard a speech a little earlier from the member for Bellechasse—Les Etchemins—Lévis, and he remembers things slightly different than I. The difference is that I was in the public safety committee and he, as the minister, was not there. He said that there was a great clamour for new laws to meet this challenge of terrorism. I certainly did not hear that in committee. What I heard repeatedly from law enforcement and security officials coming before us was that they had not been given enough resources to do the basic enforcement work they needed to do to keep Canadians safe from terrorism.
However, when the Conservatives finally managed to pass their Anti-terrorism Act, they somehow managed to infringe our civil liberties without making us any safer.
At that time, the New Democrats remained firm in our conviction that it would be a mistake to sacrifice our freedoms in the name of defending them. BillC-51 was supported by the Liberals, who hedged their bets with a promise to fix what they called “its problematic elements” later if they were elected. Once they were elected in 2015, that determination to fix Bill C-51 seemed to wane. That is why in September of 2016, I introduced BillC-303, a private member's bill to repeal Bill C-51 in its entirety.
Some in the House at that time questioned why I introduced a private member's bill since I knew it would not come forward for a vote. In fact, this was an attempt to get the debate started, as the Liberals had already kept the public waiting for a year at that point. The New Democrats were saying, “You promised a bill. Well, here's our bill. It's very simple. Repeal all of C-51.”
Now, after more than two years and extensive consultations, we have this version of Bill C-59 before us, which does not repeal BillC-51 and fails to fix most of the major problems of Bill C-51, it actually introduces new threats to our privacy and rights.
Let me start with the things that were described, even by the Liberals, as problematic, and remain unfixed in Bill C-59 as it stands before us.
First, there is the definition of “national security” in the Anti-terrorism Act that remains all too broad, despite some improvements in Bill C-59. Bill C-59 does narrow the definition of criminal terrorism speech, which BillC-51 defined as “knowingly advocates or promotes the commission of terrorism offences in general”. That is a problematic definition. Bill C-59 changes the Criminal Code wording to “counsels another person to commit a terrorism offence”. Certainly, that better captures the problem we are trying to get at in the Criminal Code. There is plenty of existing case law around what qualifies as counselling someone to commit an offence. Therefore, that is much better than it was.
Then the government went on to add a clause that purports to protect advocacy and protest from being captured in the Anti-terrorism Act. However, that statement is qualified with an addition that says it will be protected unless the dissent and advocacy are carried out in conjunction with activities that undermine the security of Canada. It completes the circle. It takes us right back to that general definition.
The only broad definition of national security specifically in BillC-51 included threats to critical infrastructure. Therefore, this still raises the spectre of the current government or any other government using national security powers against protesters against things like the pipeline formerly known as Kinder Morgan.
The second problem Bill C-59 fails to fix is that of the broad data collection information sharing authorized by BillC-51, and in fact maintained in Bill C-59. This continues to threaten Canadians' basic privacy rights. Information and privacy commissioners continue to point out that the basis of our privacy law is that information can only be used for the purposes for which it is collected. Bill C-51 and Bill C-59 drive a big wedge in that important protection of our privacy rights.
Bill C-51 allowed sharing information between agencies and with foreign governments about national security under this new broad definition which I just talked about. Therefore, it is not just about terrorism and violence, but a much broader range of things the government could collect and share information on. Most critics would say Bill C-59, while it has tweaked these provisions, has not actually fixed them, and changing the terminology from “information sharing” to “information disclosure” is more akin to a sleight of hand than an actual reform of its provisions.
The third problem that remains are those powers that BillC-51 granted to CSIS to act in secret to counter threats. This new proactive power granted to CSIS by Bill C-51 is especially troubling precisely because CSIS activities are secret and sometimes include the right to break the law. Once again, what we have done is returned to the very origins of CSIS. In other words, when the RCMP was both the investigatory and the enforcement agency, we ran into problems in the area of national security, so CSIS was created. Therefore, what we have done is return right back to that problematic situation of the 1970s, only this time it is CSIS that will be doing the investigating and then actively or proactively countering those threats. We have recreated a problem that CSIS was supposed to solve.
Bill C-59 also maintains the overly narrow list of prohibitions that are placed on those CSIS activities. CSIS can do pretty much anything short of committing bodily harm, murder, or the perversion of the course of democracy or justice. However, it is still problematic that neither justice nor democracy are actually defined in the act. Therefore, this would give CSIS powers that I would argue are fundamentally incompatible with a free and democratic society.
The Liberal change would require that those activities must be consistent with the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. That sounds good on its face, except that these activities are exempt from scrutiny because they are secret. Who decides whether they might potentially violate the charter of rights? It is not a judge, because this is not oversight. There is no oversight here. This is the government deciding whether it should go to the judge and request oversight. Therefore, if the government does not think it is a violation of the charter of rights, it goes ahead and authorizes the CSIS activities. Again, this is a fundamental problem in a democracy.
The fourth problem is that Bill C-59 still fails to include an absolute prohibition on the use of information derived from torture. The member for Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan made some eloquent statements on this with which I agree. What we have is the government saying that now it has included a cabinet directive on torture in Bill C-59, which gives the cabinet directive to force of law. The cabinet directive already has the force of law, so it absolutely changes nothing about this.
However, even worse, there is no absolute prohibition in that cabinet directive on the use of torture-implicated information. Instead, the prohibition says that information from torture can be used in some circumstances, and then it sets a very low threshold for when we can actually use information derived from fundamental rights violations. Not only is this morally repugnant, most likely unconstitutional, but it also gives us information that is notoriously unreliable. People who are being tortured will say precisely what they think the torturer wants them to say to stop the torture.
Finally, Bill C-59 would not do one of the things it could have done, and that is create a review agency for the CBSA. The CBSA remains without an independent review and complaints mechanism. It is one of our only law enforcement or security agencies that has no direct review agency. Yes, the new national security intelligence review agency will have some responsibility over the CBSA, but only in terms of national security questions, not in terms of its basic day-to-day operations.
We have seen quite often that the activities carried out by border agencies have a major impact on fundamental rights of people. We can look at the United States right now and see what its border agency is doing in the separation of parents and children. Therefore, it is a concern that there is no place in Canada, if we have a complaint about what CBSA has done, to file that complaint except in a court of law, which requires information, resources, and all kinds of other things that are unlikely to be available to those people who need to make those complaints.
The Liberals will tell us that there are some areas where they have already acted outside of Bill C-59, and we have just heard the member for Winnipeg North talk about BillC-22, which established the national security review committee of parliamentarians.
The New Democrats feel that this is a worthwhile first step toward fixing some of the long-standing weaknesses in our national security arrangements, but it is still only a review agency, still only an agency making recommendations. It is not an oversight agency that makes decisions in real time about what can be done and make binding orders about what changes have to be made.
The government rejected New Democrat amendments on the bill, amendments which would have allowed the committee to be more independent from the government. It would have allowed it to be more transparent in its public reporting and would have given it better integration with existing review bodies.
The other area the Liberals claim they have already acted on is the no-fly list. It was interesting that the minister today in his speech, opening the third reading debate, claimed that the government was on its way to fixing the no-fly list, not that it had actually fixed the no-fly list. Canada still lacks an effective redress system for travellers unintentionally flagged on the no-fly list. I have quite often heard members on the government side say that no one is denied boarding as a result of this. I could give them the names of people who have been denied boarding. It has disrupted their business activities. It has disrupted things like family reunions. All too often we end up with kids on the no-fly list. Their names happen to be Muslim-sounding or Arabic-sounding or whatever presumptions people make and they names happen to be somewhat like someone else already on the list.
The group of no-fly list kids' parents have been demanding that we get some effective measures in place right away to stop the constant harassment they face for no reason at all. The fact that we still have not fixed this problem raises real questions about charter right guarantees of equality, which are supposed to be protected by law in our country.
Not only does Bill C-59 fail to correct the problems in BillC-51, it goes on to create two new threats to fundamental rights and freedoms of Canadians, once again, without any evidence that these measures will make it safer.
Bill C-59 proposes to immediately expand the Communications Security Establishment Canada's mandate beyond just information gathering, and it creates an opportunity for CSE to collect information on Canadians which would normally be prohibited.
Just like we are giving CSIS the ability to not just collect information but to respond to threats, now we are saying that the Communications Security Establishment Canada should not just collect information, but it should be able to conduct what the government calls defensive cyber operations and active cyber operations.
Bill C-59 provides an overly broad list of purposes and targets for these active cyber operations. It says that activities could be carried out to “degrade, disrupt, influence, respond to or interfere with the capabilities, intentions or activities of a foreign individual, state, organization or terrorist group as they relate to international affairs, defence or security.” Imagine anything that is not covered there. That is about as broad as the provision could be written.
CSE would also be allowed to do “anything that is reasonably necessary to maintain the covert nature of the activity.” Let us think about that when it comes to oversight and review of its activities. In my mind that is an invitation for it to obscure or withhold information from review agencies.
These new CSE powers are being expanded without adequate oversight. Once again, there is no independent oversight, only “after the fact” review. To proceed in this case, it does not require a warrant from a court, but only permission from the Minister of National Defence, if the activities are to be domestic based, or from the Minister of Foreign Affairs, if the activities are to be conducted abroad.
These new, active, proactive measures to combat a whole list and series of threats is one problem. The other is while Bill C-59 says that there is a still a prohibition on the Canadian Security Establishment collecting information on Canadians, we should allow for what it calls “incidental” acquisition of information relating to Canadians or persons in Canada. This means that in situations where the information was not deliberately sought, a person's private data could still be captured by CSE and retained and used. The problem remains that this incidental collecting, which is called research by the government and mass surveillance by its critics, remains very much a part of Bill C-59.
Both of these new powers are a bit disturbing, when the Liberal promise was to fix the problematic provisions in BillC-51, not add to them. The changes introduced for Bill C-51 in itself are minor. The member for Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan talked about the changes not being particularly effective. I have to agree with him. I do not think they were designed to be effective. They are unlikely to head off the constitutional challenges to Bill C-51 already in place by organizations such as the Canadian Civil Liberties Association. Those constitutional challenges will proceed, and I believe that they will succeed.
What works best in terrorism cases? Again, when I was the New Democrats' public safety critic sitting on the public safety committee when BillC-51 had its hearings, we heard literally dozens and dozens of witnesses who almost all said the same thing: it is old-fashioned police work on the front line that solves or prevents terrorism. For that, we need resources, and we need to focus the resources on enforcement activities at the front end.
What did we see from the Conservatives when they were in power? There were actual cutbacks in the budgets of the RCMP, the CBSA, and CSIS. The whole time they were in power and they were worried about terrorism, they were denying the basic resources that were needed.
What have the Liberals done since they came back to power? They have actually added some resources to all of those agencies, but not for the terrorism investigation and enforcement activities. They have added them for all kinds of other things they are interested in but not the areas that would actually make a difference.
We have heard quite often in this House, and we have heard some of it again in this debate, that what we are talking about is the need to balance or trade off rights against security. New Democrats have argued very consistently, in the previous Parliament and in this Parliament, that there is no need to trade our rights for security. The need to balance is a false need. Why would we give up our rights and argue that in doing so, we are actually protecting them? This is not logical. In fact, it is the responsibility of our government to provide both protection of our fundamental rights and protection against threats.
The Liberals again will tell us that the promise is kept. What I am here to tell members is that I do not see it in this bill. I see a lot of attempts to confuse and hide what they are really doing, which is to hide the fundamental support they still have for what was the essence of BillC-51. That was to restrict the rights and freedoms of Canadians in the name of national security. The New Democrats reject that false game. Therefore, we will be voting against this bill at third reading.
Madame la Présidente, je prends la parole ce soir contre le projet de loi  C-59 à l'étape de la troisième lecture. Malheureusement, nous avons là un autre exemple de promesse électorale des libéraux qui n'est pas tenue, sauf que, cette fois-ci, il font passer cela pour une promesse tenue.
Dans le climat de peur qui a suivi les attentats sur la Colline du Parlement et à Saint-Jean, en 2014, le gouvernement conservateur a présenté le projet de loi C-51. J'ai entendu une allocution un peu plus tôt du député de Bellechasse—Les Etchemins—Lévis, et il me semble que ses souvenirs sont légèrement différents des miens. La différence vient du fait que je siégeais au comité de la sécurité publique et lui, qui était ministre, n'y siégeait pas. Il a dit qu'on réclamait à grands cris de nouvelles mesures législatives pour faire face au terrorisme. Je n'ai certainement pas entendu cela au comité. Ce que j'ai entendu à maintes reprises des policiers et des responsables de la sécurité qui ont comparu devant nous, c'est qu'on ne leur avait pas donné suffisamment de ressources pour s'acquitter du travail de base qu'ils devaient faire pour garder les Canadiens à l'abri du terrorisme.
Toutefois, lorsque les conservateurs ont réussi à faire adopter leur loi antiterrorisme, ils ont réussi, d'une certaine façon, à empiéter sur nos libertés civiles sans accroître notre sécurité pour autant.
À l'époque, les néo-démocrates ont toujours maintenu que ce serait une erreur de sacrifier nos libertés au nom de la défense de celles-ci. Les libéraux ont appuyé le projet de loi C-51, et ils se sont couverts avec la promesse de corriger plus tard — une fois qu'ils seraient élus — ce qu'ils ont appelé « ses éléments problématiques ». Une fois élus, en 2015, leur détermination à corriger le projet de loi C-51 est vraisemblablement disparue. C'est pourquoi, en septembre 2016, j'ai présenté le projet de loi C-303, un projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire visant à abroger entièrement le projet de loi C-51.
À l'époque, certains députés ont remis en question mon idée de présenter un projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire, puisque je savais qu'il ne serait jamais soumis à un vote. En réalité, c'était une tentative de faire entamer le débat, puisque cela faisait déjà une année que les libéraux faisaient attendre le public à ce sujet. C'était une façon, pour les néo-démocrates, de dire: « Vous avez promis un projet de loi. Eh bien, voici le nôtre. C'est très simple: il faut abroger le projet de loi C-51. »
Maintenant, après deux ans et de longues consultations, nous voici, saisis de cette version du projet de loi  C-59, qui n'abroge pas le projet de loi C-51 et qui ne corrige pas la majorité des problèmes que présente ce dernier. En fait, il introduit de nouvelles menaces à notre vie privée et à nos droits.
Je commencerai par les aspects que même les libéraux ont décrits comme étant problématiques, et qui demeurent non corrigés dans le projet de loi  C-59 actuel.
Premièrement, la définition de « sécurité nationale » qui figure dans la Loi antiterroriste reste trop vague, malgré quelques améliorations apportées dans le projet de loi  C-59, qui resserre la définition de discours lié au terrorisme. Le projet de loi C-51 la définissait comme toute personne qui « préconise ou fomente la perpétration d’infraction de terrorisme en général ». Cette définition pose problème. Le projet de loi  C-59 modifie le libellé du Code criminel en ces termes: « conseille à une autre personne de commettre une infraction de terrorisme ». Ce libellé cerne mieux le problème à régler en vertu du Code criminel. La jurisprudence entourant ce qui constitue « conseiller quelqu’un à commettre une infraction » est abondante. En conséquence, la nouvelle définition est bien meilleure que l’ancienne.
Le gouvernement ajoute ensuite un article censé exclure de la Loi antiterroriste les activités de défense d’une cause et de manifestation d’un désaccord. Toutefois, cet article est assorti d'une déclaration d’une réserve selon laquelle les activités de défense d’une cause ou de manifestation d’un désaccord ne doivent avoir aucun lien avec une activité portant atteinte à la sécurité du Canada. La boucle est bouclée et cela nous ramène directement à la définition générale.
La seule définition globale de sécurité nationale qui figure dans le projet de loi C-51 comprend les menaces aux infrastructures essentielles. Cela soulève le spectre que le gouvernement actuel ou un gouvernement à venir se serve de ses pouvoirs relatifs à la sécurité nationale contre des gens qui manifestent par exemple contre le pipeline anciennement appelé Kinder Morgan.
Le deuxième problème que le projet de loi  C-59 ne corrige pas est la vaste autorisation à communiquer les données recueillies qui se trouvait dans le projet de loi C-51 et qui est maintenue dans le projet de loi  C-59. Cela perpétue la menace au droit fondamental des Canadiens à la vie privée. Les commissaires à l'information et à la protection de la vie privée continuent de signaler que le principe de base de notre Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels est que l'information peut uniquement être utilisée aux fins pour lesquelles elle est recueillie. Or, les projets de loi C-51 et C-59 créent une grosse brèche dans cette importante protection de notre droit à la vie privée.
Le projet de loi C-51 autorisait la communication, entre les organismes ainsi qu'à des gouvernements étrangers, de renseignements concernant la sécurité nationale, au sens large de la nouvelle définition dont je viens de parler. Par conséquent, ces renseignements ne portent pas seulement sur le terrorisme et la violence, mais sur un éventail beaucoup plus large de sujets à propos desquels le gouvernement pourrait recueillir de l'information et la communiquer. La plupart des détracteurs du projet de loi  C-59 diraient que, bien que ce dernier modifie les dispositions à ce sujet, il ne les corrige pas, et changer la terminologie anglaise d'« information sharing » à « information disclosure » tient davantage d'un tour de passe-passe que d'une véritable réforme des dispositions de la loi.
Le troisième problème qui reste non résolu est celui des pouvoirs que le projet de loi C-51 a accordé au SCRS et qui lui permettent d'agir en secret pour contrer les menaces. Le nouveau pouvoir proactif accordé au SCRS par le projet de loi C-51 est particulièrement inquiétant précisément parce que les activités du SCRS sont secrètes et qu'il a parfois le droit d'enfreindre la loi. Encore une fois, nous en sommes revenus aux origines du SCRS. Autrement dit, quand la GRC était l'organisme d'enquête et d'application, cela posait des problèmes de sécurité nationale. C'est pourquoi le SCRS a été créé. Ainsi, nous nous retrouvons face à la même situation problématique que dans les années 1970, seulement cette fois-ci, c'est le SCRS qui va faire enquête, pour ensuite contrer les menaces de façon active ou proactive. Nous avons recréé un problème que le SCRS devait régler.
Le projet de loi  C-59 conserve également la liste bien trop étroite d'interdictions qui sont imposées sur les activités du SCRS. Le SCRS peut pratiquement tout faire sauf causer des blessures, commettre un meurtre ou nuire à la démocratie ou à la justice. Toutefois, il est toujours problématique que ni la justice ni la démocratie ne soient définies dans la loi. Ainsi, le projet de loi accorderait au SCRS des pouvoirs qui, selon moi, sont fondamentalement incompatibles avec une société libre et démocratique.
Les activités du SCRS devront encore être conformes à la Charte des droits et libertés. À première vue, cela semble bien, sauf que ces activités étant secrètes, il sera impossible de les passer au crible. Qui déterminera si elles violent la Charte? Pas un juge, puisqu'il ne s'agit pas ici de contrôle. Ce sera donc le gouvernement qui décidera s'il saisira ou non un juge de la question. Autrement dit, si le gouvernement déclare que la Charte n'a pas été enfreinte, il pourra autoriser sans crainte les activités du SCRS. Là encore, il s'agit d'une situation inacceptable en démocratie.
Le quatrième problème du projet de loi  C-59, c'est qu'il n'interdit pas complètement le recours aux renseignements obtenus sous la torture. Le député de Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan l'a démontré de manière éloquente, et je suis d'accord avec lui. Le gouvernement nous dit que nous n'avons rien à craindre puisqu'il a inclus la directive du Cabinet dans le texte du projet de loi, ce qui veut dire qu'elle aura force de loi. Elle a déjà force de loi, alors cette entourloupette ne change absolument rien à l'affaire.
Il y a toutefois pire, puisqu'absolument rien dans cette même directive n'interdit le recours aux renseignements obtenus sous la torture. On y dit que cette information, qui va à l'encontre des droits de la personne les plus fondamentaux, peut être utilisée seulement dans certaines circonstances, sauf que le seuil établi est extrêmement bas. D'abord, c'est moralement répugnant, voire carrément inconstitutionnel, mais en plus, l'information ainsi obtenue est d'une fiabilité à peu près nulle. Sous la torture, les gens vont dire exactement ce que leur bourreau veut entendre pour que cessent leurs supplices.
Enfin, le projet de loi  C-59 ne ferait pas ce qu'on aurait pu faire, c'est-à-dire créer un comité de surveillance pour l'ASFC. Il n'y a toujours pas de mécanisme indépendant d'examen et de traitement des plaintes pour l'ASFC. C'est l'un des rares organismes de sécurité ou d'application de la loi à ne pas faire l'objet d'une surveillance directe. Il est vrai que le nouveau Comité de surveillance des activités de renseignement de sécurité se penchera en partie sur les activités de l'ASFC, mais seulement lorsqu'il est question de sécurité nationale et non de ses activités quotidiennes.
Nous avons très souvent constaté que les activités menées par les organismes responsables des services frontaliers ont d'énormes conséquences sur le plan du respect des droits fondamentaux de la personne. Nous n'avons qu'à observer la situation actuelle aux États-Unis, où l'organisme chargé des services frontaliers sépare des parents de leurs enfants. Il est donc préoccupant qu'il n'y ait aucun recours au Canada, qu'on ne puisse pas porter plainte au sujet d'un incident impliquant l'ASFC, à part en s'adressant à une cour de justice, ce qui nécessite des renseignements, des ressources et toutes sortes d'autres choses qui ne sont probablement pas accessibles à ceux qui pourraient avoir à porter plainte.
Les libéraux nous diront qu'ils ont déjà pris certaines mesures qui ne sont pas couvertes par le projet de loi  C-59. Par exemple, le député de Winnipeg-Nord vient de dire que le projet de loi C-22 a permis d'établir le Comité des parlementaires sur la sécurité nationale et le renseignement.
Les néo-démocrates pensent que c’est une première étape utile pour corriger certaines lacunes de longue date des arrangements en matière de sécurité nationale, mais cette instance ne reste qu’un organisme d’examen, un organisme qui fait des recommandations. Il ne s'agit pas d'un organisme de contrôle qui prend des décisions en temps réel sur ce qui peut être fait et qui rend des ordonnances contraignantes sur les changements à apporter.
Le gouvernement a rejeté les amendements des néo-démocrates qui auraient permis au comité d’être plus indépendant. Ils lui auraient permis d’être plus transparent dans ses rapports au public et de mieux s’intégrer aux organes de surveillance existants.
L’autre sujet auquel les libéraux prétendent avoir donné suite concerne la liste d’interdiction de vol. Fait intéressant, dans son discours prononcé aujourd’hui, à l’ouverture du débat à l'étape de la troisième lecture, le ministre a affirmé que le gouvernement s’apprêtait à régler le problème de la liste d’interdiction de vol et non pas qu’il l’avait réglé. Le Canada n’a toujours pas de mécanisme efficace de recours que peuvent utiliser les voyageurs dont le nom figure par erreur sur cette liste. J’ai entendu très souvent des députés ministériels déclarer que, de toute façon, on ne refuse à personne l’accès à bord. Je peux leur donner le nom de gens qui se sont vu refuser l’accès à bord, ce qui a perturbé leurs activités commerciales ou d'autres choses, comme des réunions de famille. Bien trop souvent, des enfants se retrouvent sur les listes d’interdiction de vol. Leur nom a une consonance musulmane, arabe ou autre qui le fait ressembler au nom de gens qui figurent déjà sur ces listes.
Le groupe de parents dont les enfants figurent sur ces listes a exigé que des mesures efficaces soient immédiatement mises en oeuvre pour faire cesser le harcèlement constant dont ils sont victimes sans aucune raison. Le fait que nous n’ayons pas encore réglé ce problème suscite des questions sérieuses sur les garanties à l’égalité que confère la Charte et qui sont censées être protégées par la loi dans notre pays.
Non seulement le projet de loi  C-59 ne corrige pas les lacunes du projet de loi C-51, mais il crée deux nouvelles menaces aux droits et aux libertés des Canadiens, là encore, sans preuve que ces mesures accroîtront la sécurité.
Le projet de loi  C-59 propose d'élargir immédiatement le mandat du Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications au-delà de la simple collecte de renseignements pour lui donner la possibilité de recueillir sur les Canadiens des renseignements qu'il lui serait normalement interdit de recueillir.
Tout comme nous permettons au SCRS non seulement de recueillir des renseignements, mais aussi de réagir aux menaces, nous disons maintenant que le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications ne devrait pas uniquement recueillir de l'information, mais qu'il devrait aussi pouvoir mener ce que le gouvernement appelle des cyberopérations défensives et des cyberopérations actives.
Le projet de loi  C-59 fournit une liste trop générale de buts et de cibles pour les cyberopérations actives. Il dit que des activités pourraient être menées afin « de réduire, d’interrompre, d’influencer ou de contrecarrer, selon le cas, les capacités, les intentions ou les activités de tout étranger ou État, organisme ou groupe terroriste étrangers, dans la mesure où ces capacités, ces intentions ou ces activités se rapportent aux affaires internationales, à la défense ou à la sécurité, ou afin d’intervenir dans le déroulement de telles intentions ou activités. » Pensons à tout ce qui n'est pas couvert. La disposition ne pourrait être plus générale.
Le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications serait en outre autorisé à prendre « toute mesure qui est raisonnablement nécessaire pour assurer la nature secrète de l'activité ». Pensons à ce que cela suppose pour la surveillance et l'examen de ses activités. Je vois là une invitation à dissimuler de l'information aux organismes de surveillance.
On élargit les pouvoirs du Centre sans prévoir de surveillance adéquate. Encore une fois, il n'y a pas de surveillance indépendante, seulement un examen « après coup ». Ici, pour mener ses activités, il n'a pas à obtenir de mandat d'un tribunal, l'autorisation d'un ministre suffit, celle du ministre de la Défense nationale s'il s'agit d'activités à l'échelle nationale et celle du ministre des Affaires étrangères dans le cas d'activités menées à l'étranger.
Ces nouvelles mesures actives et proactives pour lutter contre toute une série de menaces constituent un des problèmes. Voici l'autre: bien que, aux termes du projet de loi  C-59, il soit toujours interdit au Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications de recueillir des renseignements sur les Canadiens, nous sommes censés lui permettre d'acquérir « incidemment » de l'information qui se rapporte à un Canadien ou à une personne se trouvant au Canada. Ainsi, même si ce n'était pas le but visé, le Centre pourrait tout de même recueillir, conserver et utiliser des renseignements personnels sur une personne. Ce qui ne va pas ici, c'est que la possibilité d'acquérir de l'information incidemment — ce qui est considéré comme de la recherche par le gouvernement et de la surveillance de masse par les détracteurs de cette façon de faire — demeure clairement un élément du projet de loi  C-59.
Ces deux nouveaux pouvoirs sont un peu troublants, quand on pense que la promesse des libéraux était de corriger les dispositions problématiques du projet de loi C-51, et non d'en ajouter d'autres. En soi, les modifications apportées au projet de loi C-51 sont mineures. Le député de Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan a mentionné que les changements n'étaient pas particulièrement efficaces. Je dois avouer que je suis d'accord avec lui. À mon avis, ils n'ont pas été conçus pour être efficaces. Il est peu probablement qu'ils empêchent les contestations constitutionnelles à l'égard du projet de loi C-51 qui ont déjà été déposées par des organismes comme l'Association canadienne des libertés civiles. Ces contestations constitutionnelles iront de l'avant et, selon moi, elles seront couronnées de succès.
Quelle est la meilleure solution dans les cas de terrorisme? Je le répète, lorsque j'étais le porte-parole du NPD en matière de sécurité publique et que je siégeais au comité de la sécurité publique lors des témoignages entourant le projet de loi C-51, nous avons entendu littéralement des dizaines et des dizaines de témoins qui ont presque tous dit la même chose: ce sont les bonnes vieilles méthodes policières en première ligne qui permettent de régler le problème du terrorisme ou d'empêcher des actes terroristes. Pour ce faire, il faut des ressources et il faut concentrer les ressources sur les mécanismes d'application de la loi en amont.
Qu'ont fait les conservateurs lorsqu'ils étaient au pouvoir? Ils ont réduit les budgets de la GRC, de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada et du Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité. Pendant tout le temps qu'ils ont été au pouvoir et qu'ils s'inquiétaient du terrorisme, ils ont refusé d'accorder les ressources élémentaires dont on avait besoin.
Qu'ont fait les libéraux depuis leur retour au pouvoir? Ils ont affecté de nouvelles ressources à tous ces organismes, mais pas pour les activités d'enquête et d'application de la loi en matière de terrorisme. Ces ressources serviront à toutes sortes de choses qui les intéressent, mais pas à celles qui permettraient vraiment d'améliorer les choses.
On a entendu souvent à la Chambre, notamment au cours du présent débat, qu'il faut faire des compromis entre les droits et la sécurité. Au cours de la dernière législature et durant la présente législature, les néo-démocrates ont soutenu régulièrement qu'il n'est pas nécessaire de faire des compromis entre les droits et la sécurité. Il est faux de prétendre qu'un juste équilibre doit être atteint. Comment pourrions-nous abandonner nos droits et, ce faisant, prétendre que nous les protégeons? Ce n'est pas logique. En fait, il incombe au gouvernement de protéger les droits fondamentaux des Canadiens et de les protéger contre les menaces.
Les libéraux nous diront encore qu'ils ont rempli leur promesse. Or, ce n'est pas ce que je vois dans ce projet de loi. Ce que je vois, ce sont de multiples tentatives de semer la confusion et de cacher ce qu'ils sont vraiment en train de faire, soit qu'ils continuent d'appuyer l'essence même du projet de loi C-51, c'est-à-dire restreindre les droits et libertés des Canadiens au nom de la sécurité nationale. Les néo-démocrates rejettent ce petit jeu. Ils vont donc voter contre ce projet de loi à l'étape de la troisième lecture.
View Pierre Paul-Hus Profile
CPC (QC)
At the time, the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness decided not to give Bill  C-59 second reading and sent it directly to the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security. He said that committee meetings were needed to get additional information in order to improve the bill, so that is what we did.
During the committee's study of Bill  C-59, 235 amendments were proposed. The Conservative Party proposed 29 and the Green Party 45. The Liberals rejected all of them. Four NDP amendments and 40 Liberal amendments were adopted. Twenty-two of the Liberal amendments had more to do with the wording and with administrative issues. The Liberals also proposed one very important amendment that I will talk about later on.
The committee's mandate was to improve the bill. We, the Conservatives, undertook that work in good faith. We proposed important amendments to try to round out and improve the bill presented at second reading. The Liberal members on the committee rejected all of our amendments, even though they made a lot of sense. The Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security held 16 meetings on the subject and heard from a number of witnesses, including people from all walks of life and key stakeholders in the security field. In the end, the government chose to reject all of our amendments.
There were two key points worth noting. The first was that under Bill  C-59, our security agencies will have fewer tools to combat the ongoing terrorist threat around the world. The second was that our agencies will have a harder time sharing information.
One important proposal made in committee was the amendment introduced by the Liberal member for Montarville regarding the perpetration of torture. Every party in the House agrees that the use of torture by our intelligence or security agencies is totally forbidden. There is no problem on that score. However, there is a problem with the part about torture, in that our friends across the aisle are playing political games because they are still not prepared to tell China and Iran to change their ways on human rights. One paragraph in the part about torture says that if we believe, even if we do not know for sure, that intelligence passed on by a foreign entity was obtained through torture, Canada will not make use of that intelligence. For example, if another country alerts us that the CN Tower in Toronto is going to be blown up tomorrow, but we suspect the information was extracted through some form of torture, we will not act on that intelligence if the law remains as it is. That makes no sense. We believe we should protect Canadians first and sort it out later with the country that provided the intelligence.
It is little things like that that make it impossible for us to support the bill. That element was proposed at the end of the study. Again, it was dumped on us with no notice and we had to vote on it.
There are two key issues. The national security and intelligence review agency in part 1 does not come with a budget. The Liberals added an entity, but not a budget to go with it. How can we vote on an element of the bill that has no number attached to it?
Part 2 deals with the intelligence commissioner. The Liberals rejected changes to allow current judges, who would retire if appointed, and retirees from being considered, despite testimony from the intelligence commissioner who will assume these new duties. Currently, only retired judges are accepted. We said that there are active judges who could do the work, but that idea was rejected. It is not complicated. It makes perfect sense. We could have the best people in the prime of their lives who may have more energy than those who are about to retire and may be less interested in working 40 hours a week.
In part 3 on the Communications Security Establishment, known as CSE, there are problems concerning the restriction of information. In fact, some clauses in Bill C-59 will make capturing data more complicated. Our intelligence agencies are facing additional barriers. It will be more difficult to obtain information that allows our agencies to take action, for example against terrorists.
Part 4 concerns the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, or CSIS. The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and the privacy issue often come up in connection with CSIS. A common criticism of BillC-51 is that this bill would allow agencies to breach people's privacy. Witnesses representing interest groups advocating for Canadians' privacy and people whose daily work is to ensure the safety of Canadians appeared before the committee. For example, Richard Fadden said that the agencies are currently working in silos. CSIS, the CSE, and the RCMP work in silos, and the situation is too complex. There is no way to share information, and that is not working.
Dr. Leuprecht, Ph.D., from the Royal Military College, Lieutenant-General Michael Day from the special forces, and Ray Boisvert, a former security adviser, all made similar comments. Conservative amendment No. 12 was rejected. That amendment called for a better way of sharing information. In that regard, I would like to remind members of the Air India bombing in 1985. We were given the example of that bombing, which killed more than 200 people on a flight from Toronto to Bombay. It was determined that this attack could have been prevented had it been easier to share information at the time.
The most important thing to note about part 7, which deals with the Criminal Code, is that it uses big words to increase the burden for obtaining arrest warrants to prevent terrorist acts. Amendments were made regarding the promotion of terrorism. Section 83.221 of the Criminal Code pertains to advocating or promoting the commission of terrorism offences. The Liberals changed the wording of that section with regard to unidentified terrorist offences, for example, ISIS videos on YouTube. They therefore created section 83.221.
That changes the recognizance orders for terrorism and makes it more difficult to control threats. Now, rather than saying “likely”, it says “is necessary”. Those are just two little words, but they make all the difference. Before, if it was likely that something would happen, our security agencies could intervene, whereas now, intervention must be necessary. It is a technicality, but we cannot support Bill C-59 because of that change in wording. This bill makes it harder for security agencies and police to do their work, when it should be making it easier for them.
We are not opposed to revising our national security legislation. All governments must be prepared to do that to adapt. BillC-51, which was introduced at the time by the Conservatives, was an essential tool in the fight against terrorist attacks in Canada and the world. We needed tools to help our agents. The Liberals alluded to BillC-51 during the election campaign and claimed that it violated Canadians' freedoms and that it did not make sense. They promised to introduce a new bill and here it is before us today, Bill C-59.
I would say that Bill C-59, a massive omnibus bill, is ultimately not much different from Bill C-51. There are a number of parts I did not mention, because we have nothing to say and we agree with their content. We are not against everything. What we want, no matter the party, is to be effective and to keep Canadians safe. We agree on that.
Nevertheless, some parts are problematic. As I said earlier, the government does not want to accept information from certain countries on potential attacks, because this information could have been obtained through torture. This would be inadmissible. Furthermore, the government is changing two words, which makes it harder to access the information needed to take action. We cannot agree with this.
Now the opposite is being done, and most of the witnesses who came to see us in committee, people in the business of privacy, did not really raise any issues. They did not show up and slam their fists on the desk saying that it was senseless and had to be changed. Everyone had their views to express, but ultimately, there were not that many problems. Some of the witnesses said that Bill C-59 made no sense, but upon questioning them further, we often reached a compromise and everyone agreed that security is important.
Regardless, the Liberals rejected all of the Conservatives' proposed amendments. I find that hard to understand because the minister asked us to do something, he asked us to improve Bill C-59 before bringing it back here for second reading—it is then going to go to third reading. We did the work. We did what we were supposed to do, as did the NDP, as did the Green Party. The Green Party leader had 45 amendments and is to be commended for that. I did not agree with all her amendments, but we all worked to improve Bill C-59, and in turn, to enhance security in Canadians' best interest, as promised. Unfortunately, that never happened. We will have to vote against this bill.
Since I have some time left, I will give you some quotes from witnesses who appeared before the committee. For example, everyone knows Richard Fadden, the Prime Minister's former national security adviser. Mr. Fadden said that Bill  C-59 was “beginning to rival the Income Tax Act for complexity. There are sub-sub-subsections that are excluded, that are exempted. If there is anything the committee can do to make it a bit more straightforward”, it would help. Mr. Fadden said that to the committee. If anyone knows security, it is Canada's former national security adviser. He said that he could not understand Bill  C-59 at all and that it was worse than the Income Tax Act. That is what he told the committee. We agreed and tried to help, but to no avail. It seems like the Liberals were not at the same meeting I was at.
We then saw the example of a young man who goes by the name Abu Huzaifa. Everyone knows that two or three weeks ago, in Toronto, this young man boasted to the New York Times and then to CBC that he had fought as a terrorist for Daesh in Iraq and Syria. He admitted that he had travelled there for the purposes of terrorism and had committed atrocities that are not fit to be spoken of here. However, our intelligence officers only found out that this individual is currently roaming free in Toronto from a New York Times podcast. Here, we can see the limitations of Bill  C-59 in the specific case of a Canadian citizen who decided to fight against us, to go participate in terrorism, to kill people the Islamic State way—everyone here knows what I mean—and then to come back here, free as a bird. Now the Liberals claim that the law does not allow such and such a thing. When we tabled Bill C-51, we were told that it was too restrictive, but now Bill  C-59 is making it even harder to get information.
What do Canadians think of that? Canadians are sitting at home, watching the news, and they are thinking that something must be done. They are wondering what exactly we MPs in Ottawa are being paid for. We often see people on Facebook or Twitter asking us to do something, since that is what we are paid for. We in the Conservative Party agree, and we are trying; the government, not so much. Liberal members are hanging their heads and waiting for it to pass. That is not how it works. They need to take security a little more seriously.
This is precisely why Canadians have been losing confidence in their public institutions and their politicians. This is also why some people eventually decide to take their safety into their own hands, but that should never happen. I agree that this must not happen. That would be very dangerous for a society. When people lose confidence in their politicians and take their safety into their own hands, we have the wild west. We do not want that. We therefore need to give our security officers, our intelligence officers, the powerful tools they need to do their jobs properly, not handcuff them. Handcuffs belong on terrorists, not on our officers on the ground.
Christian Leuprecht from Queen's University Royal Military College said that he respected the suggestion that CSIS should stick to its knitting, or in other words, not intervene. In his view, the RCMP should take care of some things, such as disruption. However, he also indicated that the RCMP is struggling on so many fronts already that we need to figure out where the relative advantage of different organizations lies and allow them to quickly implement this.
The questions that were asked following the testimony focused on the fact that the bill takes away our intelligence officers' ability to take action and asks the RCMP to take on that responsibility in CSIS's place, even though the RCMP is already overstretched. We only have to look at what is happening at the border. We have to send RCMP officers to strengthen border security because the government told people to come here. The RCMP is overstretched and now the government is asking it to do things that it is telling CSIS not to do. Meanwhile, western Canada is struggling with a crime wave. My colleagues from Alberta spoke about major crimes being committed in rural communities.
Finland and other European countries have said that terrorism is too important an issue and so they are going to allow their security agencies to take action. We cannot expect the RCMP to deal with everything. That is impossible. At some point, the government needs to take this more seriously.
After hearing from witnesses, we proposed amendments to improve Bill  C-59, so that we would no longer have any reason to oppose it at second reading. The government could have listened to reason and accepted our amendments, and then we would have voted in favour of the bill. However, that is not what happened, and in my opinion it was because of pure partisanship. When we are asked to look at a bill before second or third reading and then the government rejects all of our proposals, it is either for ideological reasons or out of partisanship. In any case, I think it is shameful, because this is a matter of public safety and security.
When I first joined the Canadian Armed Forces, in the late 1980s, we were told that the military did not deal with terrorism, that this was the Americans' purview. That was the first thing we were told. At the time, we were learning how to deal with the Warsaw Pact. The wars were highly mechanized and we were not at all involved in fighting terrorism.
However, times have changed. Clearly, everything changed on September 11, 2001. Canada now has special forces, which did not exist back then. JTF2, a special forces unit, was created. Canada has had to adapt to the new world order because it could also be a target for terrorist attacks. We have to take off our blinders and stop thinking that Canada is on another planet, isolated from any form of wickedness and cruelty. Canada is on planet Earth and terrorism knows no borders.
The G7 summit, which will soon be under way, could already be the target of a planned attack. We do not know. If we do not have tools to prevent and intercept threats, what will happen? That is what is important. At present, at the G7, there are Americans and helicopters everywhere. As we can see on the news, U.S. security is omnipresent. Why are there so many of them there? It is because confidence is running low. If Americans are not confident about Canadians' rules, military, and ability to intervene, they will bring everything they need to protect themselves.
That is why we need to take a position of strength. Yes, of course we have to show that we are an open and compassionate country, but we still need to be realistic. We have to be on the lookout and ready to take action.
À cette époque, le ministre de la Sécurité publique a décidé de ne pas faire la deuxième lecture et d'envoyer directement le projet de loi  C-59 au Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale. Selon lui, il fallait tenir des rencontres pour avoir encore plus d'informations afin d'améliorer le projet de loi, et c'est ce qu'on a fait.
Pendant l'étude du projet de loi  C-59 en comité, 235 modifications ont été proposées: le Parti conservateur en a soumis 29 et le Parti vert, 45. Toutes ont été défaites par les libéraux. Quatre modifications proposées par le NPD et 40 modifications présentées par les libéraux ont été adoptées. Celles des libéraux concernaient plus des questions de libellé, soit 22 modifications, et des questions d'administration. Les libéraux ont aussi proposé une modification très importante dont je vais parler plus tard.
Le mandat du Comité était d'améliorer le projet de loi. Nous, les conservateurs, avons entrepris ce travail de bonne foi. Nous avons proposé des amendements importants pour que le projet de loi présenté à l'étape de la deuxième lecture soit plus complet et meilleur. Les membres libéraux du comité ont refusé d'adopter tous nos amendements, qui avaient beaucoup de bon sens. Le Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale a tenu 16 réunions sur ce sujet lors desquelles nous avons reçu plusieurs témoins: des gens de tous les horizons et des personnalités importantes de la sécurité. Finalement, le gouvernement a préféré dire non à nos amendements.
Nous retenons deux choses importantes. Premièrement, avec le projet de loi  C-59, il y aura moins d'outils pour nos agences de la sécurité, alors que la menace terroriste demeure présente dans notre monde. Deuxièmement, les agences auront encore plus de difficultés à s'échanger de l'information.
Une des choses importantes qui ont été proposées lors des réunions du comité, c'est l'amendement déposé par le député libéral de Montarville qui concerne la perpétration de la torture. Tous les partis à la Chambre s'entendent pour dire que l'utilisation de la torture par nos différentes agences de renseignement ou de sécurité est absolument interdite. Là-dessus, il n'y a aucun problème. Par contre, dans la partie sur la torture, il y a actuellement un problème et un jeu politique alors que nos amis d'en face ne sont pas encore prêts à dire à la Chine et à l'Iran de changer leurs façons de faire en ce qui concerne les droits de la personne. Dans un paragraphe de la partie sur la torture, il est écrit que si on pense — sans vraiment le savoir — qu'un renseignement qui provient de l'étranger a été obtenu par la torture, le Canada n'utilisera pas l'information. Par exemple, si un pays nous avertit qu'un attentat se prépare pour faire sauter demain la Tour CN, à Toronto, et qu'on pense que l'information a été soutirée par une forme de torture, on ne fera rien avec l'information si la loi reste comme cela. Cela n'a aucun sens. Nous pensons qu'il faut protéger les Canadiens d'abord et régler le problème avec le pays concerné après.
Ce sont des petits éléments comme celui-là qui font que nous ne pouvons pas appuyer le projet de loi. Cet élément a été proposé à la fin de l'étude. Encore une fois, il a été garroché sans avis, et nous avons dû voter.
Il y a des enjeux clés. Dans la partie 1 qui porte sur l'Office de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité nationale et de renseignement, il n'y a aucun budget prévu. Les libéraux ont donc augmenté la structure, mais n'y ont pas associé de budget. Comment pouvons-nous voter sur un élément du projet de loi alors qu'aucun chiffre n'y est rattaché?
Dans la partie 2, il est question du commissaire au renseignement. Les libéraux ont rejeté les modifications visant à permettre aux juges actuels, qui prendront leur retraite à leur nomination, et aux retraités d'être considérés, et ce, malgré le témoignage du commissaire au renseignement qui assumera ces nouvelles fonctions. Actuellement, on prend seulement des juges retraités. Nous avons dit qu'il y a des juges en fonction qui pourraient faire le travail, mais cela a été refusé. Pourtant, ce n'est rien de compliqué, c'est plein de bon sens. On pourrait avoir les meilleures personnes, dans la force de l'âge, qui ont une énergie peut-être plus grande que celle des personnes qui prennent leur retraite et qui sont moins intéressées à travailler 40 heures par semaine.
Dans la partie 3 sur le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications ou CST, il y a des problèmes relatifs à la restriction de l'information. En effet, dans le projet de loi  C-59, des clauses font en sorte que la capture de l'information sera plus compliquée. Nos agences de renseignement font face à des barrières supplémentaires. Il sera donc plus difficile d'obtenir l'information qui permet à nos agences d'engager des actions, entre autres contre des terroristes.
La partie 4 porte sur le Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité ou SCRS. En ce qui concerne le SCRS, on a souvent fait référence à la Charte canadienne des droits et libertés, ainsi qu'à la vie privée. On a souvent reproché cela au projet de loi C-51; on disait qu'en vertu de ce projet de loi, on pouvait interférer dans la vie privée des gens. Des témoins, qui représentaient les groupes d'intérêts pour les droits à la vie privée des gens, et des personnes qui travaillent quotidiennement pour assurer la sécurité des Canadiens, ont comparu. Par exemple, Richard Fadden a dit qu'on travaillait actuellement en silo. Le SCRS, le CST et la GRC travaillent en silo, et c'est trop compliqué. Il n'y a pas moyen de faire un partage d'information, cela ne fonctionne pas.
Ces commentaires ont été faits également par M. Leuprecht, Ph.D., du Collège militaire, par le lieutenant-général Michael Day, des forces spéciales, et par Ray Boisvert, ancien conseiller à la sécurité. L'amendement 12 des conservateurs a été rejeté. Cet amendement demandait une meilleure façon de faire pour le transfert d'information. À ce sujet, je rappelle l'attentat d'Air India en 1985. On nous a donné l'exemple de cet attentat qui a tué plus de 200 personnes dans un vol en partance de de Toronto pour Bombay. Il a été déterminé que si le transfert d'information avait été plus facile à l'époque, on aurait pu éviter cet attentat.
Le point le plus important dans la partie 7 qui traite du Code criminel est le fait d'augmenter le fardeau pour l'obtention de mandats d'arrestation afin d'empêcher des actes terroristes, en se servant de mots importants, Des mesures ont été prises pour modifier la promotion du terrorisme. À l'article 83.221 concernant l'incitation au terrorisme, libéraux ont changé une partie du libellé pour les activités terroristes non identifiées, comme par exemple les vidéos du groupe État islamique sur Youtube. Ils ont donc créé l'article 83.221.
Avec cela, on modifie les ordonnances d'engagement pour terrorisme, afin qu'il soit plus difficile de contrôler les menaces. Maintenant, au lieu de dire « probable », on dit « est nécessaire ». Ce sont tout simplement deux mots, mais ils font toute la différence. Avant, si c'était probable que quelque chose arrive, on pouvait intervenir, alors que maintenant, il faut que ce soit nécessaire. C'est un aspect technique, mais ces deux mots font en sorte que l'ensemble du projet de loi  C-59 ne peut être acceptable pour nous. En effet, on augmente la difficulté, alors qu'on devrait aider les agences et nos policiers à faire leur travail.
Nous ne sommes pas contre l'idée de remanier notre projet de loi sur la sécurité nationale. Tout gouvernement a besoin de le faire pour s'adapter à la situation. Le projet de loi C-51, déposé à l'époque par les conservateurs, était un outil essentiel dans les cas d'attentat terroriste au Canada et partout dans le monde. Nous avions besoin d'outils pour aider nos agents. En campagne électorale, les libéraux se sont servis du projet de loi C-51, disant qu'il allait à l'encontre de la liberté des Canadiens, que c'était un outil qui n'avait pas de bon sens. Ils ont d'ailleurs promis de déposer un nouveau projet de loi et nous l'avons devant nous aujourd'hui, le projet de loi  C-59.
Au bout du compte, je dirais que le projet de loi  C-59, un projet de loi omnibus et majeur, n'est pas nécessairement trop différent du projet de loi C-51. Il y a plusieurs parties dont je n'ai pas parlé, parce que nous n'avons rien à dire et que nous sommes d'accord avec ce qu'elles contiennent. Nous sommes pas contre tout dans la vie. Ce que nous voulons, c'est d'être efficaces et d'assurer la sécurité des Canadiens, peu importe le parti. On s'entend là-dessus.
Par contre, certains éléments sont problématiques. Comme je l'ai dit tantôt, on ne voudra pas accepter de l'information sur des attentats possibles provenant de certains pays, parce qu'elle a peut-être été obtenue sous la torture. Cela ne peut pas être admissible. De plus, on change deux mots, ce qui complique l'accès à l'information afin d'intervenir. On ne peut pas être d'accord avec cela.
Actuellement, on fait le contraire et la plupart des témoins qui sont venus nous voir au Comité, des gens qui s'occupent de la vie privée, n'avaient pas vraiment de problèmes à signaler. Ils ne sont pas arrivés en tapant sur le bureau, en disant que cela n'avait pas de bon sens, qu'il fallait changer cela. Tout le monde y allait de ses propositions, mais enfin de compte il n'y avait pas tant de problèmes. Oui, certains sont arrivés en disant que C-51 était insensé, mais quand on posait nos questions en contre-argument, on arrivait souvent à un compromis et tout le monde disait que la sécurité était importante.
Il demeure que les amendements proposés par les conservateurs ont tous été défaits par les libéraux. Je ne peux pas le comprendre alors que le ministre nous a demandé de faire un travail, d'aider à améliorer C-59 avant de l'amener ici en deuxième lecture — par la suite il va être en troisième lecture. Nous avons fait le travail. Nous avons fait ce que nous avions à faire, comme le NPD, comme le Parti vert. La chef du Parti vert, que je félicite, avait 45 amendements; je n'étais pas d'accord sur tous ses amendements, mais il y a un travail qui a été fait justement pour améliorer C-59 afin d'améliorer la sécurité, dans l'intérêt des Canadiens, tel que promis. Malheureusement, cela n'a pas été fait. Nous allons devoir voter contre le projet de loi.
Puisque j'ai du temps, je vais vous donner des exemples de citations des témoins qui sont venus au Comité. Par exemple, Richard Fadden, tout le monde connaît l'ancien conseiller à la sécurité nationale du premier ministre, a dit que le projet de loi  C-59 commençait « à rivaliser de complexité avec la Loi de l'impôt sur le revenu. Certains sous-alinéas sont exclus. S'il y a quelque chose que le Comité peut faire, c'est le simplifier un peu. » M. Fadden se présente au Comité, il nous dit cela. S'il y a quelqu'un qui connaît la sécurité, c'est bien l'ancien conseiller à la sécurité nationale du Canada. Il nous a dit qu'il ne comprenait rien à C-59, que c'était pire que l'impôt. C'est ce qu'il nous a dit en comité. Nous avons acquiescé et essayer d'aider, en vain. Il semble que les libéraux n'étaient pas à la même réunion que moi.
Ensuite, on a eu l'exemple d'une personne connue sous le nom Abu Huzaifa, un gentil petit monsieur. Tout le monde sait qu'il y a deux ou trois semaines à Toronto, le gentil petit monsieur s'est vanté au New York Times puis à CBC d'avoir été avec Daech, en Irak et en Syrie, d'avoir travaillé avec cette organisation comme terroriste. Il a avoué avoir voyagé pour faire du terrorisme et avoir commis des crimes odieux — je pense que cela ne peut même pas se dire ici —, puis nos agents de renseignement apprennent en écoutant les balados du New York Times que cet individu, qui est à Toronto actuellement, se promène en toute liberté. On voit les limites de C-59 avec le cas précis d'un Canadien qui a décidé de se battre contre nous, d'aller faire du terrorisme, de tuer des gens à la façon de l'État islamique — tout le monde sait ce que c'est — puis de revenir ici, et maintenant il se promène en liberté. Là, on nous dit que le loi ne permet pas ceci ou cela. Avec C-51, nous nous faisions dire que nous étions trop restrictifs, mais là on augmente les problèmes pour avoir de l'information avec C-59.
Que pensent les Canadiens de cela? Les Canadiens sont chez eux, ils regardent les nouvelles en se disant que quelque chose doit être fait et se demandent pourquoi les députés sont payés, à Ottawa. On voit cela souvent sur Facebook ou Twitter: les gens demandent que nous fassions quelque chose, car on nous paie pour cela. Nous, les conservateurs nous sommes d'accord et nous poussons. Le gouvernement est de l'autre bord; il penche la tête et il attend que cela passe. Cela ne fonctionne pas de cette manière. Il faut être un peu plus sérieux au chapitre de la sécurité.
C'est ce genre de chose qui fait que les Canadiens perdent confiance envers leurs institutions, envers leurs politiciens. C'est pour cela que les gens en viennent à un moment donné à vouloir prendre en charge leur sécurité eux-mêmes, mais il ne faut pas que cela arrive. Je suis d'accord qu'il ne faut pas que cela arrive. C'est ce qui est dangereux pour une société. Quand les gens perdent confiance envers leurs politiciens, décident de prendre en main leur sécurité, c'est le far west. Nous ne voulons pas cela. Nous avons donc besoin d'outils forts, qui permettent à nos agents de sécurité, nos agents de renseignement, de bien faire leur travail et non pas de les menotter. Les menottes vont aux terroristes, elles ne vont pas à nos agents sur le terrain.
Christian Leuprecht, du Collège militaire royal de l'Université Queen's, a dit qu'il respectait les suggestions selon lesquelles le SCRS devrait s'en tenir au tricotage, c'est-à-dire ne pas intervenir. Selon lui, la GRC devrait faire certaines choses comme des perturbations, mais il estime qu'elle a déjà des difficultés sur bien des fronts et qu'on devrait déterminer l'avantage relatif des différentes organisations et leur permettre de le mettre à profit rapidement.
Les questions que nous avons reçues à la suite des témoignages portaient donc sur le fait qu'on enlève à nos agents de renseignement du SCRS la possibilité d'intervenir et qu'on demande à la GRC de le faire, alors que celle-ci est débordée. Regardons ce qui se passe à la frontière. On doit envoyer des agents de la GRC pour la renforcer parce qu'on fait signe aux gens de venir ici. La GRC est donc débordée et on lui demande de faire des choses qu'on dit au SCRS de ne pas faire, et pendant ce temps, il y a des crimes dans l'Ouest. Mes collègues de l'Alberta parlaient des crimes majeurs qui ont lieu dans des communautés rurales.
La Finlande et d'autres pays d'Europe ont dit que le terrorisme était une question trop importante et qu'ils allaient permettre à leurs agents d'intervenir. On ne peut pas toujours dire que la GRC va tout régler, c'est impossible. À un moment donné, il faut être plus sérieux.
À la suite de ces témoignages, nous avions proposé des amendements pour améliorer le projet de loi  C-59 de telle sorte que nous n'ayons plus de raison de nous y opposer à l'étape de la deuxième lecture. Le gouvernement aurait pu entendre raison et accepter nos amendements, puis nous aurions eu un beau vote, mais cela n'a pas été le cas. Selon moi, c'est de la pure partisanerie. Quand on nous demande de faire un travail préalable à la deuxième lecture ou à la troisième lecture et qu'on rejette ensuite tout ce que nous proposons, c'est soit parce qu'on impose son idéologie, soit parce qu'on fait preuve de partisanerie. Quoi qu'il en soit, lorsqu'il est question de sécurité publique, cela me répugne.
À mes débuts dans les Forces armées canadiennes, à la fin des années 1980, on nous disait qu'au Canada, les militaires ne touchaient pas au terrorisme et que c'était un sujet qui concernait les Américains. C'était les premières choses qu'on nous disait. À l'époque, nous apprenions à nous battre contre le pacte de Varsovie. Il s'agissait des grandes guerres mécanisées; nous ne touchions pas du tout au terrorisme.
Toutefois, les temps ont changé. Évidemment, le 11 septembre 2001 a tout changé. Maintenant, le Canada a des forces spéciales, ce qu'il n'avait pas à l'époque. La FOI 2, une unité de forces spéciales, a été créée. Le Canada a dû s'adapter à la réalité mondiale, puisqu'il peut aussi être la cible d'attentats terroristes. Il faut cesser de se mettre des oeillères et de penser que le Canada est sur une autre planète, isolé de toute forme de méchanceté ou de cruauté. Le Canada est sur la planète Terre et le terrorisme n'a pas de frontières.
Le G7 approche, et n'importe qui pourrait avoir planifié un attentat là-bas. On ne le sait pas. Si on n'a pas d'outils pour prévenir et intercepter les menaces, que va-t-il arriver? C'est cela qui est important. Présentement, au G7, il y a des Américains et des hélicoptères partout. Des reportages télévisés nous montrent l'omniprésence de la sécurité américaine. Pourquoi y a-t-il autant de monde? C'est parce qu'il y a une perte de confiance. Si les Américains ne font pas confiance aux Canadiens en ce qui concerne nos règles, nos forces et notre capacité d'intervention, ils vont apporter tout ce dont ils ont besoin pour se défendre eux-mêmes.
Il faut donc prendre une position forte. Oui, il faut démontrer que nous sommes un pays ouvert et compatissant, bien sûr. Cependant, il ne faut pas se mettre des oeillères; il faut être à l'affût et prêt à agir.
View Kevin Lamoureux Profile
Lib. (MB)
Mr. Speaker, it is a pleasure to rise and speak to such an important piece of legislation. I do not say that lightly. While we were in opposition, Stephen Harper and the government of the day brought in BillC-51. Many Canadians will remember Bill C-51, which had very serious issues. I appreciate the comments coming from the New Democrats with respect to Bill C-51. Like many of them, I too was here, and I listened very closely to what was being debated.
The biggest difference between us and the New Democrats is that we understand very clearly that we have to ensure Canadians are safe while at the same time protecting our rights and freedoms. As such, when we assessed BillC-51, we made a commitment to Canadians to address the major flaws in the bill. At a standing committee on security, which was made up of parliamentarians, I can recall our proposing ways to address the whole issue and concerns about the potential invasion of rights and freedoms. It went into committee, and it was a really long debate. We spent many hours, both in the chamber and at committee, discussing the pros and cons of BillC-51.
What came out of it for us as the Liberal Party back in 2015 was that we made a commitment to Canadians. We said we would support BillC-51, but that if we were to form government we would make substantial changes to it.
That is why it is such a pleasure for me to stand in the House today. Looking at Bill C-59, I would like to tell the constituents I represent that the Prime Minister has kept yet another very important promise made to Canadians in the last election.
We talk a lot about Canada's middle class, those striving to be a part of it, and how this government is so focused on improving conditions for our middle class. One could ultimately argue that the issue of safety and rights is very important to the middle class, but for me, this particular issue is all about righting a wrong from the past government and advancing the whole issue of safety, security, freedoms, and rights.
I believe it is the first time we have been able to deal with that. Through a parliamentary committee, we had legislation that ultimately put in place a national security body, if I can put it that way, to ensure a high sense of transparency and accountability from within that committee and our security agencies. In fact, prior to this government bringing it in, we were the only country that did not have an oversight parliamentary group to look at all the different aspects of security, rights, and freedoms. We were the only one of the Five Eyes that did not have such a group. New Zealand, Australia, the U.S., and the U.K. all had them.
Today, Canada has that in place. That was a commitment we made and a commitment that was fulfilled. I look at Bill C-59 today, and again it is fulfilling a commitment. The government is, in fact, committed to keeping Canadians safe while safeguarding rights and freedoms.
We listen to some of my colleagues across the way, and we understand the important changes taking place even in our own society, with radicalization through the promotion of social media and the types of things that can easily be downloaded or observed. Many Canadians share our concern and realize that at times there is a need for a government to take action. Bill C-59 does just that.
We have legislation before us that was amended. A number of very positive amendments were brought forward, even some from non-government members, that were ultimately adopted. I see that again as a positive thing.
The previous speaker raised some concerns in terms of communications between departments. I remember talking in opposition about how important it is that our security and public safety agencies and departments have those links that enable the sharing of information, but let us look at the essence of what the Conservatives did. They said these agencies shall share, but there was no real clear definition or outline in terms of how they would share information. That was a concern Canadians had. If we look at Bill C-59, we find more detail and clarity in terms of how that will take place.
Again, this is something that will alleviate a great deal of concern Canadians had in regard to our security agencies. It is a positive step forward. Information disclosure between departments is something that is important. Information should be shared, but there also needs to be a proper establishment of a system that allows a sense of confidence and public trust that rights and freedoms are being respected at the same time.
My colleague across the way talked about how we need to buckle down on the promoting and advocating of terrorism. He seemed to take offence to the fact that we have used the word “counselling” for terrorism versus using words like “promoting” and “advocating”. There is no doubt the Conservatives are very good when it comes to spin. They say if it is promoting or advocating terrorism, that is bad, and of course Canadians would agree, but it is those types of words. Now they are offended because we replaced that with “counselling”. I believe that "counselling" will be just as effective, if not more effective, in terms of the long game in trying to prevent these types of actions from taking place. It will be more useful in terms of going into the courts.
There is no doubt that the Conservatives know the types of spin words to use, but I do not believe for a moment that it is more effective than what was put in this legislation. When it comes to rights and freedoms, Canadians are very much aware that it was Pierre Elliott Trudeau who brought in the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. We are a party of the charter. We understand how important that is.
At the same time, we also understand the need to ensure that there is national safety, and to support our security agencies. It was not this government but the Stephen Harper government that literally cut tens, if not hundreds of millions of dollars out of things such as border controls and supports for our RCMP. This government has recognized that if we are not only going to talk the line, we also have to walk the line and provide the proper resources. We have seen those additional resources in not only our first budget, but also our second budget.
We have ministers such as public safety, immigration and citizenship, and others who are working together on some very important files. When I think of Bill C-59 and the fine work we have done in regard to the establishment of this parliamentary oversight committee, I feel good for the simple reason that we made a commitment to Canadians and the bill is about keeping that commitment. It deals with ensuring and re-establishing public confidence that we are protecting freedoms and rights. At the same time, it ensures that Canada is a safe country and that the terrorist threat is marginalized as much as possible through good, sound legislation. That is what this is.
Monsieur le Président, je suis heureux de pouvoir prendre la parole au sujet d'un projet de loi d'une grande importance. Je ne le dis pas à la légère. Lorsque nous étions dans l'opposition, Stephen Harper et le gouvernement de l'époque ont fait adopter le projet de loi  C-51. Beaucoup de Canadiens se rappellent le projet de loi C-51, qui comportait des problèmes très sérieux. J'apprécie les observations des néo-démocrates sur ce projet de loi. À l'instar de nombre d'entre eux, j'étais présent et j'écoutais très attentivement le débat.
La principale différence entre nous et les néo-démocrates est la compréhension claire que nous avons de notre obligation de garantir la sécurité des Canadiens tout en protégeant leurs droits et libertés. Ainsi, lorsque nous avons évalué le projet de loi C-51, nous avons pris l'engagement envers les Canadiens d'en corriger les principaux défauts. Je me souviens que, lors des travaux du comité permanent de la sécurité, qui est composé de parlementaires, nous avons proposé des solutions pour résoudre les problèmes et dissiper les inquiétudes relativement au risque de violation des droits et libertés. Le projet de loi C-51 a été étudié par le comité, et il a suscité un très long débat, auquel nous avons consacré de nombreuses heures où nous avons discuté du pour et du contre, dans cette enceinte et lors des réunions du comité.
Ces discussions nous ont poussés, les libéraux, à faire une promesse aux Canadiens en 2015. Nous avions alors annoncé notre intention d'appuyer le projet de loi C-51, mais nous avions promis que, si nous étions portés au pouvoir, nous y apporterions des changements considérables.
C'est pourquoi je suis très content de prendre la parole aujourd'hui. Je tiens à dire aux gens de ma circonscription que le projet de loi C-59 est le résultat d'une autre grande promesse que le premier ministre a faite aux Canadiens lors de la dernière campagne électorale.
On parle beaucoup des gens de la classe moyenne et de ceux qui s'efforcent d'y accéder. On dit souvent que le gouvernement a à coeur d'améliorer les conditions des Canadiens de la classe moyenne. On pourrait même dire que la sécurité et les droits sont des enjeux très importants pour la classe moyenne, mais pour moi, il s'agit d'abord et avant tout de corriger une erreur de l'ancien gouvernement et de faire progresser l'ensemble du dossier de la sécurité ainsi que les libertés et les droits des Canadiens.
Si je ne m'abuse, c'est la première fois qu'une telle occasion s'offre à nous. Nous avons présenté une mesure législative afin de créer un comité de parlementaires — une sorte d'organisme national de sécurité, si je puis dire — ayant pour mandat d'assurer la transparence des services de sécurité du pays et de leur demander des comptes. En fait, avant que le gouvernement libéral ne passe à l'action, le Canada était le seul pays du Groupe des cinq à ne pas avoir de groupe parlementaire chargé de voir à l'ensemble des aspects liés à la sécurité, aux droits et aux libertés. La Nouvelle-Zélande, l'Australie, les États-Unis et le Royaume-Uni avaient tous déjà le leur.
Aujourd'hui, le Canada a son comité bien à lui. Nous en avions fait la promesse, et nous avons tenu parole. Le projet de loi  C-59 aussi nous permet de remplir une de nos promesses, celle d'assurer la sécurité des Canadiens tout en protégeant leurs droits et libertés.
Nous avons bien compris les grands changements dont parlent les députés d'en face et qui marquent la société d'aujourd'hui, comme la radicalisation et le fait qu'on peut trouver et télécharger à peu près tout sur les médias sociaux. Nombreux sont les Canadiens à penser comme nous que, venu un certain moment, le gouvernement doit agir. C'est ce que nous faisons avec le projet de loi  C-59.
Nous sommes saisis d'un projet de loi qui a été modifié. Des amendements très positifs ont été proposés, dont certains par des députés non ministériels, et ont fini par être adoptés. Je vois aussi cela comme une chose positive.
Le précédent intervenant a soulevé des réserves en ce qui a trait aux communications entre les ministères. Je me souviens d'avoir souligné alors que j'étais dans l'opposition l'importance que nos organismes et nos ministères chargés de la sécurité et de la protection publique aient de tels rapports pour être en mesure d'échanger de l'information, mais j'aimerais examiner en gros ce que les conservateurs ont fait. Ils ont affirmé que ces organismes devaient échanger de l'information, mais il n'y avait aucune définition vraiment précise de la manière dont cette communication se ferait. Cela préoccupait les Canadiens. Si nous prenons le projet de loi  C-59, nous pouvons voir qu'il précise la façon dont cela se fera.
Je répète que cela permettra d'atténuer grandement les préoccupations des Canadiens par rapport aux organismes de sécurité. C'est un pas dans la bonne direction. La communication d'information entre les ministères est quelque chose d'important. Nous devons communiquer l'information, mais nous devons aussi mettre en place un système adéquat qui permet au public d'avoir confiance que les droits et libertés sont aussi respectés.
Mon collègue d'en face a dit que nous devions sévir contre ceux qui préconisent ou fomentent le terrorisme. Il a semblé s'offusquer du fait que nous ayons utilisé le mot « conseiller », plutôt que des termes comme « fomenter » et « préconiser ». Il ne fait aucun doute que les conservateurs sont passés maîtres dans l'art de jeter de la poudre aux yeux. Ils prétendent que si on parle de préconiser ou de fomenter la perpétration d'actes terroristes, cela évoque le caractère répréhensible de la chose et que, bien entendu, les Canadiens seraient d'accord là-dessus, mais qu'il faut s'en tenir à ce genre de termes. Or, ils sont maintenant offusqués parce que nous avons remplacé ces termes par le verbe « conseiller ». Je crois que ce mot sera tout aussi efficace, voire plus efficace, dans le cadre des efforts déployés à long terme pour essayer d'empêcher la perpétration de ce genre d'actes. Ce sera plus utile du point de vue des poursuites judiciaires.
À n'en point douter, les conservateurs savent quel genre de termes évocateurs utiliser, mais je ne crois pas un seul instant que leur proposition soit plus efficace que ce qui est prévu dans le projet de loi. Lorsqu'il est question de droits et de libertés, les Canadiens savent très bien que c'est Pierre Elliott Trudeau qui a fait adopter la Charte des droits et libertés. Nous sommes le parti de la Charte. Nous en comprenons l'importance.
En même temps, nous comprenons également la nécessité d'assurer la sécurité nationale et d'appuyer nos agences de sécurité. Ce n'est pas le gouvernement actuel mais celui de Stephen Harper qui a littéralement purgé de dizaine de millions de dollars, si ce n'est de centaines de millions de dollars, les budgets de choses comme les contrôles frontaliers et les appuis à la GRC. Le gouvernement actuel a reconnu que les engagements devaient s'accompagner de gestes concrets et de ressources appropriées. Or, nous avons pu constater que ces ressources étaient au rendez-vous, non seulement dans notre premier budget, mais aussi dans notre deuxième budget.
Nous avons des ministres — comme ceux de la Sécurité publique et de la Citoyenneté et de l'Immigration, pour ne nommer que ceux-là — qui travaillent ensemble sur certains dossiers très importants. Lorsque je pense au projet de loi  C-59 et à l'excellent travail que nous avons fait en ce qui concerne la mise sur pied du comité de surveillance parlementaire, je suis content. La raison en est simple: nous avons fait une promesse aux Canadiens, et ce projet de loi est notre façon d'honorer cette promesse. Le projet de loi vise à restaurer et à consolider la confiance du public quant à la façon dont nous protégeons nos droits et libertés. En même temps, le projet de loi veille à faire en sorte que le Canada soit un pays sécuritaire et que la menace terroriste soit réduite au minimum. C'est ce que l'application de mesures législatives efficaces et bien fondées permettra de concrétiser.
View Ed Fast Profile
CPC (BC)
View Ed Fast Profile
2018-06-07 12:16
Mr. Speaker, I appreciate the opportunity to speak to Bill C-59. Listening to our Liberal friends across the way, one would assume that this is all about public safety, that Bill C-59 would improve public safety and the ability of our security agencies to intervene if a terrorist threat presented itself. Nothing could be further from the truth.
Let us go back and understand what this Prime Minister did in the last election. Whether it was his youth, or ignorance, he went out there and said that he was going to undo every single bit of the Stephen Harper legacy, a legacy I am very proud of, by the way. That was his goal.
One of the things he was going to undo was what BillC-51 did. Bill C-51 was a bill our previous Conservative government brought forward to reform and modernize how we approach terrorist threats in Canada. We wanted to provide our government security agencies with the ability to effectively, and in a timely way, intervene when necessary to protect Canadians against terrorist threats. Bill C-51 was actually very well received across the country. Our security agencies welcomed it as providing them with additional tools.
I just heard my Liberal colleagues chuckle and heckle. Did members know that the Liberals, in the previous Parliament, actually supported BillC-51? Here they stand saying that somehow that legislation did not do what it was intended to do. In fact, it did. It made Canadians much safer and allowed our security agencies to intervene in a timely way to protect Canadians. This bill that has come forward would do nothing of the sort.
The committee overseeing this bill had 16 meetings, and at the end of the whole process, there were 235 amendments brought forward. That is how bad this legislation was. Forty-three of those amendments came from Liberals themselves. They rushed forward this legislation, doing what Liberals do best: posture publicly, rush through legislation, and then realize, “What have we done? My goodness.” They had 43 amendments of their own, all of which passed, of course. There were 20-some Conservative amendments, and none of them passed, even though they were intelligently laid-out improvements to this legislation. That is the kind of government we are dealing with here. It was all about optics so that the government would be able to say, “We are taking that old BillC-51 that was not worth anything, although we voted in favour of it, and we are going to replace it with our own legislation.” The reality is that Bill C-51 was a significant step forward in protecting Canadians.
This legislation is quite different. What it would do is take one agency and replace it with another. That is what Liberals do. They take something that is working and replace it with something else that costs a ton of money. In fact, the estimate to implement this bill is $100 million. That is $100 million taxpayers do not have to spend, because the bill would not do one iota to improve the protection of Canadians against terrorist threats. There would be no improved oversight or improved intelligence capabilities.
The bill would do one thing we applaud, which is reaffirm that Canada will not torture. Most Canadians would say that this is something Canada should never do.
The Liberals went further. They ignored warnings from some of our intelligence agencies that the administrative costs were going to get very expensive. In fact, I have a quote here from our former national security adviser, Richard Fadden. Here is what he said about Bill C-59: “It is beginning to rival the Income Tax Act for complexity.” Canadians know how complex that act has become.
He said, “There are sub-sub-subsections that are excluded, that are exempted. If there is anything the committee can do to make it a bit more straightforward, [it would be appreciated].” Did the committee, in fact, do that? No, it did not make it more straightforward.
There is the appointment of a new intelligence commissioner, which is, of course, the old one, but again, with additional costs. The bill would establish how a new commissioner would be appointed. What the Liberals would not do is allow current or past judges to fill that role. As members know, retired and current judges are highly skilled in being able to assess evidence in the courtroom. It is a skill that is critical to being a good commissioner who addresses issues of intelligence.
Another shortcoming of Bill C-59 is that there is excessive emphasis on privacy, which would be a significant deterrent to critical interdepartmental information sharing. In other words, this legislation would highlight privacy concerns to the point that our security agencies and all the departments of government would now become hamstrung. Their hands would become tied when it came to sharing information with other departments and our security agencies, which could be critical information in assessing and deterring terrorist threats.
Why would the government do this? The Liberals say that they want to protect Canadians, but the legislation would actually take a step backwards. It would make it even more difficult and would trip up our security agencies as they tried to do the job we have asked them to do, which is protect us. Why are we erring on the side of the terrorists?
We heard testimony, again from Mr. Fadden, that this proposed legislation would establish more silos. They were his nightmare when he was the national security director. We now have evidence from the Air India bombing. The inquiry determined that the tragedy could have been prevented had one agency in government not withheld critical information from our police and security authorities. Instead, 329 people died at the hands of terrorists.
Again, why are we erring on the side of terrorists? This proposed legislation is a step backward. It is not something Canadians expected from a government that had talked about protecting Canadians better.
There are also challenges with the Criminal Code amendments in Bill C-59. The government chose to move away from criminalizing “advocating or promoting terrorism” and would move towards “counselling” terrorism. The wording has been parsed very carefully by security experts, and they have said that this proposed change in the legislation would mean, for example, that ISIS propaganda being spread on YouTube would not be captured and would not be criminalized. Was the intention of the government when it was elected, when it made its promises to protect Canadians, to now step backward, to revise the Criminal Code in a way that would make it less tough on terrorists, those who are promoting terrorism, those who are advocating terrorism, and those who are counselling terrorism? This would be a step backward on that.
In closing, I have already stated that the Liberals are prepared to err on the side of terrorists rather than on the side of Canadian law enforcement and international security teams. The bill would create more bureaucracy, more costs, and less money and security for Canadians.
When I was in cabinet, we took security very seriously. We trusted our national security experts. The proposed legislation is essentially a vote of non-confidence in those experts we have in government to protect us.
Finally, the message we are sending is that red tape is more important than sharing information and stopping terrorism. That is a sad story. We can do better as Canadians.
Monsieur le Président, je suis ravi d'avoir l'occasion d'intervenir sur le projet de loi  C-59. Les députés libéraux prétendent que le projet de loi permettra d'améliorer la sécurité publique et de renforcer la capacité de nos agences de sécurité d'intervenir en cas de menace terroriste. Or, rien n'est plus faux.
Faisons un retour dans le passé pour tenter de comprendre ce qu'a fait le premier ministre au cours de la dernière campagne électorale. Peut-être était-ce à cause de sa jeunesse ou de son ignorance, mais toujours est-il qu'il a manifesté le désir de démanteler totalement l'héritage de Stephen Harper, héritage dont je suis fier, soit dit en passant. C'était l'objectif du premier ministre.
Il s'est engagé notamment à annuler les mesures prévues dans le projet de loi C-51. Il s'agit du projet de loi que le gouvernement conservateur précédent avait présenté pour réformer et moderniser les mécanismes de lutte contre le terrorisme au Canada. Nous souhaitions habiliter les agences de sécurité de l'État à intervenir de manière efficace et opportune pour protéger les Canadiens contre la menace terroriste, le cas échéant. Le projet de loi C-51 avait suscité des commentaires très positifs partout au pays. Nos agences de sécurité l'ont accueilli favorablement, car il leur permettait d'obtenir des outils supplémentaires.
Je viens d'entendre mes collègues libéraux glousser et chahuter. Les députés savent-ils qu'au cours de la dernière législature, les libéraux étaient, en fait, favorables au projet de loi C-51? Et les voilà qui disent que cette mesure législative n'a, en quelque sorte, pas eu l'effet escompté. En fait, c'est le contraire. Elle a beaucoup rehaussé la sécurité des Canadiens et a permis à nos organismes chargés de la sécurité d'intervenir rapidement pour protéger la population. Le projet de loi à l'étude ne ferait rien de tel.
Le comité responsable de ce projet de loi a tenu 16 réunions et, à la fin du processus, ses membres ont proposé 235 amendements. La mesure législative était à ce point médiocre. De ce nombre, 43 ont été proposés par les libéraux mêmes. Ils ont précipité le dépôt de ce projet de loi et fait ce qu'ils font de mieux: ils ont pris des grands airs en public et déposé le projet de loi à la hâte pour ensuite se demander « Qu'avons-nous fait? Mon Dieu ». Ils ont eux-mêmes proposé 43 amendements, qui ont tous été adoptés, bien sûr. En revanche, la vingtaine d'amendements conservateurs ont été rejetés, même s'il s'agissait d'améliorations judicieuses de ce projet de loi. Voilà le type de gouvernement auquel nous avons ici affaire. Tout était une question d'apparences pour que le gouvernement puisse dire « Nous reprenons l'ancien projet de loi C-51 dont il n'y avait rien à tirer, bien que nous ayons voté en sa faveur, et nous allons le remplacer par notre propre mesure législative ». En réalité, le projet de loi C-51 représentait une importante avancée pour protéger les Canadiens.
Cette mesure est très différente. Elle ne fait que prendre une agence et la remplacer par une autre. C’est ce que les libéraux font. Ils prennent quelque chose qui fonctionne et le remplacent par quelque chose d’autre qui coûte une montagne d’argent. De fait, on estime que mettre en œuvre ce projet de loi coûtera 100 millions de dollars. Ce sont 100 millions de dollars que les contribuables n’ont pas à dépenser, parce que ce projet de loi n’améliore en rien la protection des Canadiens contre les menaces terroristes. Il n’améliore en rien la surveillance, pas plus que les capacités de renseignement.
Ce projet de loi fait une seule chose que nous applaudissons; il réaffirme le fait que le Canada ne pratiquera pas la torture. La plupart des Canadiens seraient d’avis que c’est une chose que le Canada ne devrait jamais faire.
Les libéraux ont été plus loin. Ils ont ignoré les avertissements que leur ont donnés certaines de nos agences du renseignement, qui leur ont dit que les coûts administratifs seraient très élevés. De fait, j’ai une citation ici de notre ancien conseiller à la sécurité nationale, Richard Fadden. Il a dit, en parlant du projet de loi  C-59 « [qu’]il commence à rivaliser de complexité avec la Loi de l’impôt sur le revenu. » Les Canadiens savent à quel point cette loi est devenue complexe.
Il a dit: « Certains sous-alinéas sont exclus. S’il y a quelque chose que le comité peut faire, c’est le simplifier un peu. » Le comité l’a-t-il fait? Non, il ne l’a pas simplifié.
Il prévoit la nomination d’un nouveau commissaire au renseignement, celui-ci étant, bien sûr, le même que l’ancien, mais là encore, avec plus de coûts. Le projet de loi établit la façon dont un nouveau commissaire est nommé. Les libéraux ne permettraient pas que celui-ci soit choisi parmi les anciens juges ou les juges actuels. Comme les députés le savent, les juges actuels ou à la retraite sont experts dans l’évaluation des preuves au tribunal. C’est une compétence qu’un bon commissaire doit absolument avoir pour pouvoir traiter des questions de renseignement.
Une autre lacune du projet de loi  C-59 consiste en son insistance excessive sur la confidentialité, ce qui découragerait considérablement le partage de renseignements cruciaux entre les ministères. En d’autres termes, ce projet de loi insiste tellement sur les questions de confidentialité que nos agences de sécurité et tous les ministères s’en trouveraient paralysés. Ils auraient les mains liées quand il s’agit de partager des renseignements avec d’autres ministères et nos agences de sécurité, des renseignements qui pourraient être cruciaux dans l’évaluation et la dissuasion des menaces terroristes.
Pourquoi le gouvernement fait-il cela? Les libéraux disent qu’ils veulent protéger les Canadiens, mais le projet de loi nous fait faire un pas en arrière. Il rend la tâche encore plus difficile et mettrait des bâtons dans les roues de nos agences de sécurité, les empêchant de faire le travail que nous leur avons demandé de faire, soit nous protéger. Pourquoi penchons-nous du côté des terroristes?
M. Fadden a dit, dans son témoignage, que ce projet de loi créerait encore plus de cloisonnement. Ce cloisonnement était un cauchemar pour lui quand il était directeur de la sécurité nationale. Nous avons maintenant des preuves dans le cas de l’attentat à la bombe contre Air India. L’enquête a déterminé que la tragédie aurait pu être évitée si une agence du gouvernement ne s’était pas abstenue de communiquer des enseignements cruciaux à nos forces policières et organismes de sécurité. Résultat: 329 personnes ont péri aux mains de terroristes.
Une fois de plus, pourquoi penchons-nous du côté des terroristes? Ce projet de loi est un pas en arrière. Ce n’est pas ce à quoi les Canadiens s’attendraient d’un gouvernement qui parlait de mieux les protéger.
Il y a aussi des problèmes en ce qui concerne les modifications au Code criminel proposées dans le projet de loi  C-59. Le gouvernement a choisi de remplacer l'Infraction de « préconiser ou fomenter la commission d’une infraction de terrorisme » par l'infraction de « conseiller » la commission d’infractions de terrorisme. Des experts en matière de sécurité ont analysé très soigneusement la formulation et sont arrivés à la conclusion que ce changement dans le projet de loi signifierait, par exemple, qu’une propagande du groupe État islamique sur YouTube ne serait pas saisie et ne serait pas criminalisée. Le gouvernement avait-il l’intention, quand il a été élu, quand il a promis de protéger les Canadiens, de faire un pas en arrière, de réviser le Code criminel d’une façon qui le rendrait moins sévère pour les terroristes, ceux qui préconisent le terrorisme et ceux qui conseillent la commission d’infractions de terrorisme? Ce serait un pas en arrière.
Pour terminer, j’ai déjà dit que les libéraux sont prêts à pencher du côté des terroristes plutôt que du côté des organismes d’application de la loi canadiens et des équipes de sécurité internationale. Le projet de loi créerait plus de lourdeurs administratives et plus de coûts, mais il permet moins d'investissement et de sécurité pour les Canadiens.
Quand j’étais au Cabinet, nous prenions la sécurité très au sérieux. Nous faisions confiance à nos experts en sécurité nationale. Le projet de loi représente, en fait, un vote de non-confiance à l’égard de ces experts qui sont au gouvernement pour nous protéger.
Enfin, nous envoyons ainsi le message que la paperasserie est plus importante que la communication des renseignements et l’élimination du terrorisme. C’est bien triste. En tant que Canadiens, nous pouvons faire mieux.
View Gérard Deltell Profile
CPC (QC)
Mr. Speaker, I am very pleased to rise to speak to Bill C-59, which relates to issues of national security and how we deal with people suspected of terrorist acts.
This issue is quite different from those usually addressed. Usually, I have to talk about public finance. It is quite easy to say that the Liberals are wrong because they have a deficit and that we are right because we oppose deficits, which is very clear. In that case, this is very touchy. We are talking about so many great issues, and this issue should be addressed without partisanship. For sure, it is not easy.
That is why this really should be a non-partisan issue. This will not be easy, because obviously people are sharply divided on how this information should be dealt with in order to stop terrorism and how terrorists should be dealt with.
Bill C-59 is the current government's response to BillC-51, which our government had passed. I remind the House that the Liberals, who formed the second opposition party at the time, supported Bill C-51, but said that they would change it right away once in power. It was supposedly so urgent, and yet they have been in power for two and a half years now, and it has taken the Liberals this long to bring forward their response to the Conservative Bill C-51 in the House of Commons.
As I was saying earlier, some questions are easier to answer, because they are based not on partisanship, but on your point of view. For example, when it comes to public finances, you can be for or against the deficit. However, no one is arguing against the need to crack down on terrorism. The distinctions are in the nuances.
That is why the opposition parties proposed dozens of amendments to the bill; sadly, however, with the exception of four technical amendments proposed by the NDP, the Liberals systematically rejected all amendments proposed by the Conservative Party and the Green Party, and Lord knows that there is an entire world between the Conservative Party and the Green Party.
This bill is meant to help us tackle the terrorist threat, whether real or potential. In the old days, in World War II, the enemy was easily identified. Speaking of which, yesterday was the 74th anniversary of the Normandy landing, a major turning point in the liberation of the world from Nazi oppression. It was easy to identify the enemy back then. Their flag, leader, uniform and weapons were clearly identifiable. We knew where they were.
The problem with terrorism is that the enemy is everywhere and nowhere. They have no flag. They have a leader, but they may have another one by tomorrow morning. The enemy can be right here or on the other side of the world. Terrorism is an entirely new way of waging war, which calls for an entirely new way of defending ourselves. That is why, in our opinion, we need to share information. All police forces and all intelligence agencies working in this country and around the world must be able to share information in order to prevent tragedies like the one we witnessed on September 11, 2001.
In our opinion, the bill does not go far enough in terms of information sharing, which is necessary if we are to win the fight against terrorism. We believe that the Communications Security Establishment, the RCMP, CSIS and all of the other agencies that fight terrorism every day should join forces. They should share an information pipeline rather than work in silos.
In our opinion, if the bill is passed as it is now, the relevant information that could be used to flush out potential terrorists will not be shared as it should be. We are therefore asking the government to be more flexible in this respect. Unfortunately, the amendments proposed by our shadow cabinet minister, the hon. member for Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles, were rejected.
We are very concerned about another point as well: the charges against suspected terrorists. We believe that the language of the bill will make it more difficult to charge and flush out terrorists. This is a delicate subject, and every word is important.
We believe that the most significant and most contentious change the bill makes to the Criminal Code amends the offence set out in section 83.221, “Advocating or promoting commission of terrorism offences”. This is of special interest to us because this offence was created by Bill C-51, which we introduced. Bill C-59 requires a much more stringent test by changing the wording to, “Every person who counsels another person to commit a terrorism offence”. The same applies to the definition of terrorist propaganda in subsection 83.222(8), which, in our opinion, will greatly restrict law enforcement agencies' ability to use the tool for dismantling terrorist propaganda with judicial authorization as set out in BillC-51. Why? Because as it is written, when you talk about counselling another person to commit a terrorism offence, it leaves room for interpretation.
What is the difference between a person and a group of people; between a person and a gathering; between a person and an entity; or between a person and an illicit and illegal group? In our opinion, this is a loophole in the bill. It would have been better to leave it as written in the Conservative Bill C-51. The government decided not to. In our opinion, it made a mistake.
Generally speaking, should we be surprised at the government’s attitude toward the fight against terrorism? The following example is unfortunate, but true. We know that 60 Canadians left Canada to join ISIS. Then, they realized that the war was lost because the free and democratic nations of the world decided to join forces and fight back. Now, with ISIS beginning to crumble, these 60 Canadians, cowards at heart, realize that they are going to lose and decide to return to Canada. In our opinion, these people are criminals. They left our country to fight Canadian soldiers defending freedom and democracy and return to Canada as if nothing had happened. No.
Worse still, the Liberal government’s attitude toward these Canadian criminals is to offer them poetry lessons. That is a pretty mediocre approach to criminals who left Canada with the mandate to kill Canadian soldiers. We believe that we should throw the book at these people. They need to be dealt with accordingly, and certainly not welcomed home with poetry lessons, as the government proposes.
Time is running out, but I would like to take this opportunity, since we are discussing security, to extend the warmest thanks to all the employees at the RCMP, CSIS, the CSE and other law enforcement agencies such as the Sûreté du Québec in Quebec and municipal police forces. Let us pay tribute to all these people who get up every morning to keep Canadians safe. I would like to take this opportunity to thank the 4,000 or more police officers from across Canada who are working hard in the Charlevoix and Quebec City regions to ensure the safety of the G7 summit, these people who place their life on the line so that we can live in a free and democratic society where we feel safe. I would like to thank these women and men from coast to coast to coast that make it possible for us to be free and, most importantly, to feel safe.
Monsieur le Président, je suis très heureux de prendre la parole au sujet du le projet de loi  C-59, qui concerne les enjeux de sécurité nationale et du traitement que l'on peut faire des personnes que l'on soupçonne d'actes terroristes.
Cet enjeu est très différent de ceux auxquels nous nous attaquons habituellement. D'habitude, je dois parler des finances publiques. Il est assez facile pour les autres de dire que les libéraux ont tort parce qu'ils affichent un déficit et qu’eux ont raison parce qu’ils s’opposent aux déficits, ce qui est très clair. Dans le cas présent, c'est un sujet très délicat. Nous nous penchons sur tant de grands enjeux, mais celui ci devrait être abordé en toute impartialité, ce qui n’est évidemment pas facile.
C'est pourquoi cette question doit être traitée de façon non partisane. Ce ne sera pas évident, parce qu'il y a évidemment des points de vue qui nous séparent brutalement en ce qui concerne le traitement des informations que l'on doit faire pour contrer le terrorisme et ce qu'on doit faire des terroristes.
Le projet de loi  C-59 est une réponse du gouvernement actuel au projet de loi C-51 que notre gouvernement avait fait adopter. Je rappelle qu'à l'époque, le Parti libéral, qui formait le deuxième parti de l'opposition, avait donné son appui au projet de loi C-51, mais en rappelant qu'il allait le modifier très rapidement une fois qu'il serait au pouvoir. C'était donc supposément urgent, mais cela fait maintenant deux ans et demi qu'il est au pouvoir, et la réplique des libéraux au projet de loi conservateur C-51 vient finalement d'aboutir à la Chambre des communes.
Comme je le disais tout à l'heure, il y a des questions plus faciles à relever, parce qu'elles peuvent être basées non pas sur la partisanerie, mais sur la vision que l'on a de deux choses. Par exemple, en ce qui concerne les finances publiques, on peut être pour ou contre le déficit. Toutefois, personne n'est contre le fait qu'il faut être sévère à l'égard du terrorisme. C'est dans les nuances que l'on peut voir les distinctions.
C'est pourquoi les partis de l'opposition avaient proposé des dizaines d'amendements au projet de loi, et malheureusement, mis à part quatre amendements de nature technique que le NPD avait soumis, les libéraux ont refusé systématiquement les amendements proposés par le Parti conservateur et ceux proposés par le Parti vert, et Dieu sait qu'une planète entière sépare le Parti conservateur du Parti vert.
Ce projet de loi vise à répondre aux attaques terroristes potentielles et aux menaces terroristes réelles. Il faut savoir qu'en d'autres temps, l'ennemi était facilement identifiable, comme lors de la Seconde Guerre mondiale. D'ailleurs, nous avons commémoré hier le 74e anniversaire du débarquement en Normandie, l'un des facteurs majeurs qui ont mené à la libération de la planète entière du joug nazi. À l'époque, l'ennemi était facilement identifiable. Il avait un drapeau, un chef, un uniforme et un armement clairement identifiable. On savait où était l'ennemi.
Le problème avec le terrorisme, c'est que l'ennemi est partout et nulle part. Il n'a pas de drapeau. Il a un chef, mais celui-ci peut changer demain matin. L'ennemi peut être à côté comme il peut être à l'autre bout du monde. Le terrorisme est une toute nouvelle façon de faire la guerre, ce qui conduit à une toute nouvelle façon de se défendre. C'est pourquoi, de notre point de vue, il faut échanger énormément les informations. Tous les corps policiers et tous les corps de renseignement qui travaillent dans ce pays, voire ailleurs dans le monde, doivent pouvoir s'échanger des informations afin de prévenir des tragédies comme celle que nous avons connue le 11 septembre 2001.
De notre point de vue, le projet de loi ne va pas assez loin en ce qui concerne l'échange d'informations, qui est nécessaire pour faire face au terrorisme. Nous estimons que le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications, la GRC, le SCRS et tous les autres organismes qui travaillent tous les jours pour contrer les actes terroristes devraient le faire main dans la main. Ils devraient partager un pipeline d'informations plutôt que de travailler en vase clos.
De notre point de vue, le projet de loi tel qu'il est rédigé fait en sorte que les informations pertinentes pouvant être utilisées pour débusquer les terroristes potentiels ne sont pas communiquées comme il se doit. Nous sollicitions donc le gouvernement afin qu'il y ait plus de flexibilité à cet égard. Malheureusement, les amendements que nous avons proposés par l'entremise du ministre de notre cabinet fantôme le député de Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles n'ont pas été retenus.
Un autre point nous préoccupe beaucoup. Il s'agit des motifs d'accusation envers les présumés terroristes. Comme c'est formulé dans le projet de loi, nous estimons que ce sera plus difficile de porter des accusation et de débusquer des terroristes. Le sujet est délicat et chaque mot a son importance.
On estime que la modification la plus notable et la plus contestable qu'apporte le projet de loi au Code criminel, c'est la modification de l'infraction prévue dans l'article 83.221, soit de « préconiser ou fomenter la perpétration d'infractions de terrorisme ». Là, cela devient intéressant, car cette infraction a été créée par le projet de loi C-51, et c'est nous qui avions fait cela. Le projet de loi  C-59 lui substitue un degré de preuve beaucoup plus élevé, soit celui de conseiller à une autre personne de commettre une infraction terroriste. Il en va de même aussi pour la définition de propagande terroriste, telle qu'inscrite au paragraphe 83.222(8), qui réduira considérablement à notre point de vue la capacité des forces de l'ordre d'utiliser l'outil de démantèlement de la propagande terroriste autorisé par un juge, que prévoit le projet de loi C-51. Pourquoi? Parce que tel que c'est rédigé, lorsqu'on parle de conseiller à une autre personne de commettre une infraction terroriste, cela prête à examen.
En fait, qu'est-ce qu'une personne par rapport à un groupe de personnes? Qu'est-ce qu'une personne par rapport à un rassemblement? Qu'est-ce qu'une personne par rapport à une entité? Qu'est-ce qu'une personne par rapport à un groupe qui s'est constitué de façon illicite et illégale? C'est à notre point de vue une faille de ce projet de loi. Il aurait été préférable de le laisser comme cela avait été rédigé dans le projet de loi conservateur C-51. Le gouvernement a décidé d'agir autrement. Pour nous, ce n'est pas la bonne chose.
De façon plus globale et générale, doit-on se surprendre de l'attitude de ce gouvernement quand il est question de s'attaquer au terrorisme? L'exemple est malheureux, mais réel. Nous savons que 60 Canadiens ont quitté notre pays pour aller rejoindre le groupe État islamique. Ces gens finissent par se rendre compte que la guerre est perdue, parce que les nations libres et démocratiques ont décidé de s'unir et de mener un combat incessant contre le groupe État islamique. On voit que le groupe État islamique commence à s'émietter. Voilà que ces 60 Canadiens, poltrons dans l'âme, constatant qu'ils vont perdre, décident de revenir au Canada. À notre point de vue, ces gens sont des criminels. Ils ont quitté notre pays pour aller combattre nos soldats canadiens qui, eux, allaient défendre la liberté et la démocratie et ils reviennent au pays comme si de rien n'était. Non.
Pire encore, l'attitude du gouvernement libérale face à ces criminels canadiens est de leur offrir des cours de poésie. On a cette approche médiocre face à ces criminels qui sont allés à l'étranger avec le mandat de tuer des soldats canadiens. Nous estimons que ces gens doivent être traités de façon rigoureuse et tout à fait pertinente, mais surtout pas en les accueillant avec des cours de poésie, tel que le soumet le gouvernement.
Le temps est compté, mais je profite de l'occasion, puisque nous parlons de sécurité, pour remercier chaleureusement tous les employés de la GRC, du SCRS, du CST ou de groupes policiers, comme la Sûreté du Québec, au Québec, ou les corps municipaux. Rendons hommage à tous ces gens qui se lèvent le matin ayant à l'esprit la sécurité des citoyens. Je profite de l'occasion pour remercier ces 4 000 policiers, ou peut-être même plus qui, de partout au pays, travaillent aujourd'hui à pied d'oeuvre dans les régions de Charlevoix et de Québec pour accueillir comme il se doit le monde entier à l'occasion du G7. Ces gens qui, il faut bien le dire, mettent en certaines circonstances leur vie en péril, font en sorte que nous pouvons vivre dans une société libre, démocratique où nous nous sentons en sécurité. Merci à ces femmes et à ces hommes canadiens qui, d'un océan à l'autre, font en sorte que nous vivons dans une société libre et, surtout, dans laquelle nous nous sentons en sécurité.
View François Choquette Profile
NDP (QC)
Mr. Speaker, it is important to rise to speak to this fundamental bill. As I mentioned earlier, at 138 pages, Bill C-59, an act respecting national security matters, is a real omnibus bill. Unfortunately, there are still problems with this bill. That is why we are going to have to oppose it. It does not meet all our expectations.
We opposed BillC-51. We were the only ones to support compliance with the Charter of Rights and Freedoms in order to safeguard Canadians' rights and freedoms in 2015. The Liberals and the Conservatives voted for that bill, which was condemned by all Canadians. That is the reason why the Liberals later stated in their campaign that the bill made no sense and that they would rescind it if they were elected. They have finally woken up three years later. Unfortunately, the bill does not deliver on those promises.
There are elements missing. For example, the Liberals promised to fully repeal BillC-51, and they are not doing that. Another extremely important thing that I want to spend some time talking about is the fact that they should have replaced the existing ministerial directive on torture in order to ensure that Canada stands for an absolute prohibition on torture. A lawful society, a society that respects the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and the UN Charter of Rights, should obviously not allow torture. However, once again, Canada is somewhat indirectly complicit in torture that is happening around the world. We have long been calling on the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness to repeal and replace the 2010 directive on torture to ensure that Canada stands for an absolute prohibition on torture. More specifically, we want to ensure that, under no circumstances, will Canada use information from foreign countries that could have been obtained using torture or share information that is likely to result in torture. We have bad memories of the horrors endured by some Canadians such as Maher Arar, Abdullah Almaki, Amhad Abou El Maati, and Muayyed Nureddin. Canadians have suffered torture, so we are in some way complicit. It is very important that we resolve this problem, but unfortunately, the new directive, issued in October 2017, does not forbid the RCMP, CSIS, or the CBSA from using information that may have been obtained through torture in another country.
The new instructions feature not a single semantic change, since they authorize the use of information obtained by torture in certain cases. That is completely unacceptable. Canada should take a leading role in preventing torture and should never agree to use or share information that is likely to result in torture in other countries around the world. We should be a leader on this issue.
There is another extremely important file that I want to talk about that this bill does not address and that is the infamous no-fly list. This list and the unacceptable delays in funding redress mechanisms are regrettable. There is currently no effective redress mechanism to help people who suffer the consequences from being added to this list. Some Canadian families are very concerned. They want to protect their rights because children are at risk of being detained by airport security after mistakenly being added to the list, a list that prevents them from being able to fly.
We are very worried about that. We are working with No Fly List Kids. We hope that the Liberal government will wake up. It should have fixed this situation in this bill, especially considering that this is an omnibus bill.
Speaking of security, I want to mention two security-related events that occurred in Drummond that had a significant impact. The first was on May 29 and was reported by journalist Ghyslain Bergeron, who is very well known in Drummondville. A dozen or so firefighters from Saint-Félix-de-Kingsey were called to rescue a couple stranded on the Saint-François river. Led by the town's fire chief, Pierre Blanchette, they headed to the area and courageously rescued the couple. It is extremely important to acknowledge acts of bravery when we talk about the safety our our constituents.
I also want to talk about Rosalie Sauvageau, a 19-year-old woman who received a certificate of honour from the City of Drummondville after an unfortunate event at a party in Saint-Thérèse park. A bouncy castle was blown away by the wind, and she immediately rushed the children out of the bouncy castle, bringing them to safety. Not long after, a gust of wind blew one of the bouncy castles into Rivière Saint-François. Fortunately, Rosalie Sauvageau had the presence of mind, the quickness, and the courage to keep these children safe. I mentioned these events because the safety and bravery of our fellow citizens is important.
To come back to the bill, I must admit that there are some good things in it, but there are also some parts that worry us, in particular the new definition of an activity that undermines the security of Canada. This definition was amended to include any activity that threatens the lives or the security of individuals, or an individual who has a connection to Canada and who is outside Canada. This definition is pernicious and dangerous, because it will now include activities that involve significant or widespread interference with critical infrastructure.
The Liberal government just recently purchased the Kinder Morgan pipeline, a 65-year-old pipeline that the company originally bought for $500,000. The government bought it for the staggering price of $4.5 billion, with money from the taxes paid by Canadians and the people of greater Drummond, and claimed that it was essential to Canada.
Does that mean that the Liberal government could tell the thousands of people protesting against this pipeline that they are substantially obstructing essential infrastructure?
We are rather concerned about that. This clause of the bill creates potential problems for people who peacefully protest projects such as the Kinder Morgan pipeline. That is why we are voting against this bill. The Liberals have to go back to the drawing board. We must improve this bill and ensure that the Charter of Rights and Freedoms is upheld.
Monsieur le Président, c'est important de prendre la parole sur ce projet de loi fondamental. Comme je le mentionnais tout à l'heure, le projet de loi  C-59, Loi concernant des questions de sécurité nationale est un véritable projet de loi omnibus de 138 pages. Malheureusement, il y a encore des problèmes qui n'ont pas été résolus dans ce projet de loi. C'est pour cela que nous allons devoir nous opposer au projet de loi. C'est un projet de loi qui ne répond pas à toutes nos attentes.
Nous nous sommes opposés au projet de loi C-51. Nous étions parmi les seuls à nous tenir debout pour respecter la Charte des droits et libertés veiller à garantir les droits des Canadiens et Canadiennes en 2015. Les libéraux et les conservateurs avaient voté en faveur de ce projet de loi qui avait été décrié par tous les Canadiens et les Canadiennes. C'est pour cela que, par la suite, les libéraux ont dit en campagne électorale que ce projet de loi n'avait pas de sens qu'ils le renverseraient lorsqu'ils seraient au pouvoir. Trois ans plus tard, enfin ils se réveillent. Malheureusement, le projet de loi n'accomplit pas les promesses.
Il manque des aspects. Par exemple, ils avaient promis d'abroger complètement la loi C-51, et ils ne font pas. Ce qui est extrêmement important aussi et sur quoi je vais m'attarder, c'est qu'ils auraient dû remplacer la directive ministérielle actuelle au sujet de la torture afin de s'assurer que le Canada adopte une position qui interdit la torture de manière absolue. Une société de droit, une société qui respecte la Charte canadienne des droits, mais aussi les droits des Nations unies ne doit pas accepter la torture, cela va de soi. Malheureusement, d'une manière un peu détournée, encore une fois, le Canada est complice de la torture qui se passe partout dans le monde. Nous avons demandé depuis longtemps au ministre de la Sécurité publique et de la Protection civile d'abroger et de remplacer la directive de 2010 sur la torture pour veiller à ce que le Canada défende l'interdiction absolue de la torture, plus particulièrement qu'on n'utilise en aucun cas des renseignements que d'autres pays auraient pu obtenir sous la torture ni qu'on communique des renseignements susceptibles de donner lieu à de la torture. Nous avons des souvenirs désagréables concernant les horreurs qu'ont subies certains Canadiens comme Maher Arar, Abdullah Almaki, Amhad Abou El Maati et Muayyed Nureddin. Des Canadiens qui ont souffert de torture dont nous sommes, en quelques sortes, un peu complice. C'est très important qu'on puisse régler ce problème, mais malheureusement la nouvelle directive, introduite en octobre 2017, n'interdit pas à la GRC, aux espions ni aux agences frontalières d'utiliser les renseignements qui ont possiblement été obtenus à l'étranger au moyen de la torture.
Les nouvelles instructions ne contiennent aucun changement sémantique puisqu'elles autorisent l'utilisation de renseignements obtenus par la torture dans certains cas. C'est totalement inacceptable. Le Canada devrait être un chef de file pour lutter contre la torture et ne devrait jamais accepter d'utiliser ou de donner des renseignements susceptibles d'entraîner de la torture partout dans le monde. Nous devrions être un chef de file dans ce dossier.
Il y a aussi un dossier extrêmement important duquel je veux parler et qui n'est pas réglé dans ce projet de loi, c'est le fameux problème de la liste d'interdiction de vol. On ne peut que déplorer cette liste et les retards inacceptables en matière de financement de mécanismes de recours. Il n'y a pas de mécanisme de recours efficace présentement pour venir en aide aux gens qui souffrent de cette inscription. Il y a des familles canadiennes qui sont très préoccupées. Elles veulent protéger leurs droits, parce qu'il y a des enfants qui pourraient être retenus par des agents de sécurité à l'aéroport parce qu'ils sont inscrits par erreur sur la liste. Une liste qui les place en interdiction de vol.
Nous sommes très inquiets par rapport à cela. Nous travaillons d'ailleurs avec le groupe No Fly List Kids. Nous espérons que le gouvernement libéral va se réveiller. Il aurait dû remédier à cette situation dans ce projet de loi. Comme c'est un projet de loi omnibus, il pouvait le faire.
En parlant de sécurité, je voudrais mentionner deux événements relatifs à la sécurité qui ont eu lieu dans Drummond et qui ont eu un impact important. Le premier est survenu le 29 mai dernier et a été rapporté par le journaliste Ghyslain Bergeron, qui est très connu dans Drummondville. Une dizaine de pompiers de Saint-Félix-de-Kingsey ont été appelés à sauver un couple qui était pris sur la rivière Saint-François. Avec le directeur du service d'incendie de la municipalité, Pierre Blanchette, ils se sont dirigés là-bas pour courageusement venir en aide à ce couple. Il est extrêmement important de souligner ces actes courageux lorsqu'on parle de la sécurité de nos concitoyens.
Ensuite, je veux parler d'une jeune dame de 19 ans, Rosalie Sauvageau, qui a reçu un certificat honorifique de la part de la Ville de Drummondville après un événement malheureux survenu dans le cadre d'une fête au parc Saint-Thérèse. Un jeu gonflable s'est envolé à la suite d'une rafale et elle est tout de suite intervenue auprès des jeunes pour leur dire de sortir des jeux rapidement, les mettant ainsi en sécurité. Peu après, une rafale a emporté un des jeux gonflables dans la rivière Saint-François. Heureusement, Rosalie Sauvageau a eu l'esprit, la vivacité et le courage de s'occuper de la sécurité des jeunes. Je tenais à souligner ces événements, parce que la sécurité et la bravoure de nos concitoyens sont importantes.
Pour revenir au projet de loi, je dois dire qu'il contient de bonnes choses, mais il y a tout de même des éléments qui nous préoccupent, notamment la nouvelle définition des activités portant atteinte à la sécurité du Canada. Celle-ci a été modifié afin d'inclure les activités qui menacent la vie ou la sécurité de la population au Canada ou des personnes qui ont un lien avec le Canada et qui se trouvent à l'étranger. Cette définition est pernicieuse et dangereuse, parce qu'elle comprendra dorénavant les activités ayant pour effet d'entraver de manière considérable ou à grande échelle le fonctionnement d'infrastructures essentielles.
On sait que le gouvernement libéral vient d'acheter l'oléoduc de Kinder Morgan, un vieux pipeline de 65 ans que cette compagnie avait payé 500 000 $. Il l'a acheté au prix faramineux de 4,5 milliards de dollars, et ce, avec les taxes et les impôts des Canadiens des Canadiennes et des gens du Grand Drummond, en disant qu'il était essentiel pour le Canada.
Est-ce que cela signifie que le gouvernement libéral pourra dire aux manifestants qui s'opposeraient à ce pipeline — et il y en a des milliers — qu'ils entravent de manière considérable une infrastructure essentielle?
Cela nous préoccupe beaucoup. Cet article du projet de loi crée des possibilités dangereuses pour les manifestants pacifiques qui s'opposent à des projets comme celui de Kinder Morgan. C'est pourquoi nous allons voter contre ce projet de loi. Les libéraux doivent refaire leur travail. Il faut améliorer ce projet de loi et s'assurer que la Charte des droits et libertés est respectée.
View Elizabeth May Profile
GP (BC)
Mr. Speaker, I find myself surprised to have a speaking spot tonight. For that I want to thank the New Democratic Party. We do not agree about this bill, but it was a generous gesture to allow me to speak to it.
I have been very engaged in the issue of anti-terrorism legislation for many years. I followed it when, under Prime Minister Chrétien, the anti-terrorism legislation went through this place immediately after 9/11. Although I was executive director of the Sierra Club, I recall well my conversations with former MP Bill Blaikie, who sat on the committee, and we worried as legislation went forward that appeared to do too much to limit our rights as Canadians in its response to the terrorist threat.
That was nothing compared to what happened when we had a shooting, a tragic event in October 2014, when Corporal Nathan Cirillo was murdered at the National War Memorial. I do not regard that event, by the way, as an act of terrorism, but rather of one individual with significant addiction and mental health issues, something that could have been dealt with if he had been allowed to have the help he sought in British Columbia before he came to Ottawa and committed the horrors of October 22, 2014.
It was the excuse and the opening that the former government needed to bring in truly dangerous legislation. I will never forget being here in my seat in Parliament on January 30. It was a Friday morning. One does not really expect ground-shaking legislation to hit without warning on a Friday morning in this place. There was no press release, no briefing, no telling us what was in store for us. I picked up BillC-51, an omnibus bill in five parts, and read it on the airplane flying home, studied it all weekend, and came back here. By Monday morning, February 2, I had a speaking spot during question period and called it the “secret police act”.
I did not wait, holding my finger to the wind, to see which way the political winds were blowing. The NDP did that for two weeks before they decided to oppose it. The Liberals decided they could not win an election if they opposed it, so they would vote for it but promised to fix it later.
I am afraid some of that is still whirling around in this place. I will say I am supporting this effort. I am voting for it. I still see many failures in it. I know the Minister of Justice and the Minister of Public Safety have listened. That is clear; the work they did in the consultation process was real.
Let me go back and review why BillC-51 was so very dangerous.
I said it was a bill in five parts. I hear the Conservatives complaining tonight that the government side is pushing Bill C-59 through too fast. Well, on January 30, 2015, BillC-51, an omnibus bill in five parts, was tabled for first reading. It went all the way through the House by May 6 and all the way through the Senate by June 9, less than six months.
This bill, Bill C-59, was tabled just about a year ago. Before it was tabled, we had consultations. I had time to hold town hall meetings in my riding specifically on public security, espionage, our spy agencies, and what we should do to protect and balance anti-terrorism measures with civil liberties. We worked hard on this issue before the bill ever came for first reading, and we have worked hard on it since.
I will come back to BillC-51, which was forced through so quickly. It was a bill in five parts. What I came to learn through working on that bill was that it made Canadians less safe. That was the advice from many experts in anti-terrorism efforts, from the leading experts in the trenches and from academia, from people like Professor Kent Roach and Professor Craig Forcese, who worked so hard on the Air India inquiry; the chair of the Air India inquiry, former judge John Major; and people in the trenches I mentioned earlier in debate tonight, such as Joseph Fogarty, an MI5 agent from the U.K. who served as anti-terrorism liaison with Canada.
What I learned from all of these people was BillC-51 was dangerous because it would put in concrete silos that would discourage communication between spy agencies. That bill had five parts.
Part 1 was information sharing. It was not about information sharing between spy agencies; it was about information sharing about Canadians to foreign governments. In other words, it was dangerous to the rights of Canadians overseas, and it ignored the advice of the Maher Arar inquiry.
Part 2 was about the no-fly list. Fortunately, this bill fixes that. The previous government never even bothered to consult with the airlines, by the way. That was interesting testimony we got back in the 41st Parliament.
Part 3 I called the “thought chill” section. We heard tonight that the government is not paying attention to the need remove terrorist recruitment from websites. That is nonsense. However, part 3 of BillC-51 created a whole new term with no definition, this idea of terrorism in general, and the idea of promoting terrorism in general. As it was defined, we could imagine someone would be guilty of violating that law if they had a Facebook page that put up an image of a clenched fist. That could be seen as promotion of terrorism in general. Thank goodness we got that improved.
In terms of thought chill, it was so broadly worded that it could have caused, for instance, someone in a community who could see someone was being radicalized a reasonable fear that they could be arrested if they went to talk to that person to talk them out of it. It was very badly drafted.
Part 4 is the part that has not been adequately fixed in this bill. This is the part that, for the first time ever, gave CSIS what are called kinetic powers.
CSIS was created because the RCMP, in response to the FLQ crisis, was cooking up plots that involved, famously, burning down a barn. As a result, we said intelligence gathering would have to be separate from the guys who go out and break up plots, because we cannot have the RCMP burning down barns, so the Canadian Security Intelligence Service was created. It was to be exclusively about collecting information, and then the RCMP could act on that information.
I think it is a huge mistake that in Bill C-59we have left CSIS kinetic powers to disrupt plots. However, we have changed the law quite a bit to deal with CSIS's ability to go to a single judge to get permission to violate our laws and break the charter. I wish the repair in Bill C-59 was stronger, but it is certainly a big improvement on BillC-51.
Part 5 of Bill C-51 is not repaired in Bill C-59. I think that is because it was so strangely worded that most people did not ever figure out what it was about. I know professors Roach and Forcese left part 5 alone because it was about changes to the immigration and refugee act. It really was hard to see what it was about. However, Professor Donald Galloway at the University of Victoria law school said part 5 is about being able to give a judge information in secret hearings about a suspect and not tell the judge that the evidence was obtained by torture, so I really hope the Minister of Public Safety will go back and look at those changes to the refugee and immigration act, and if that is what they are about, it needs fixing.
Let us look at why the bill is enough of an improvement that I am going to vote for it. By the way, in committee I did bring forward 46 amendments to the bill on my own. They went in the direction of ensuring that we would have special advocates in the room so that there would be someone there on behalf of the public interest when a judge was giving a warrant to allow a CSIS agent to break the law or violate the charter. The language around what judges can do and how often they can do it and what respect to the charter they must exercise when they grant such a warrant is much better in this bill, but it is still there, and it does worry me that there will be no special advocate in the room.
I cannot say I am wildly enthusiastic about Bill C-59, but it is a huge improvement over what we saw in the 41st Parliament in BillC-51.
The creation of the security intelligence review agency is something I want to talk about in my remaining minutes.
This point is fundamental. This was what Mr. Justice John Major, who chaired the Air India inquiry, told the committee when it was studying the bill back in 2015: He told us it is just human nature that the RCMP and CSIS will not share information and that we need to have pinnacle oversight.
There is review that happens, and the term “review” is post facto, so SIRC, the Security Intelligence Review Committee, would look at what CSIS had done over the course of the year, but up until this bill we have never had a single security agency that watched what all the guys and girls were doing. We have CSIS, the RCMP, the Canada Border Services Agency, the Communications Security Establishment—five different agencies all looking at collecting intelligence, but not sharing. That is why having the security intelligence review agency created by this bill is a big improvement.
Monsieur le Président, je suis étonnée de pouvoir prendre la parole ce soir. Je dois d'ailleurs remercier le Nouveau Parti démocratique. Nous ne sommes pas d'accord sur la valeur de ce projet de loi, mais il a été assez généreux pour me permettre d'en parler.
Les lois antiterroristes me passionnent depuis de nombreuses années. Déjà à l'époque du premier ministre Jean Chrétien, j'ai suivi le débat sur la loi antiterroriste qui a été présentée tout de suite après les attentats du 11 septembre. J'étais alors directrice générale du Sierra Club, mais je me souviens encore parfaitement de mes conversations avec l'ex-député Bill Blaikie, qui faisait alors partie du comité. Nous trouvions que la loi allait trop loin et restreignait trop les droits des Canadiens par rapport à la menace terroriste.
Ce n'est rien par rapport à ce qui est arrivé après la fusillade d'octobre 2014, lorsque le caporal Nathan Cirillo a été tué près du Monument commémoratif de guerre. Je ne considère pas cet acte comme un geste terroriste, soit dit en passant, mais comme les agissements d'une personne souffrant de toxicomanie et de graves problèmes de santé mentale. D'ailleurs, toute cette tragédie aurait pu être évitée si le tireur avait obtenu les soins qu'il avait réclamés en Colombie-Britannique avant de venir à Ottawa, le 22 octobre 2014, pour commettre les horreurs que l'on sait.
C'était le prétexte et l'occasion rêvée dont le gouvernement avait besoin pour présenter un projet de loi vraiment dangereux. Je n'oublierai jamais le vendredi matin 30 janvier, alors que j'étais assise sur ma banquette, au Parlement. On ne s'attend pas à ce qu'un projet de loi aussi incendiaire soit déposé un vendredi matin dans cette enceinte. Il n'était accompagné d'aucun communiqué ni d'aucune séance d'information. Personne ne nous avait prévenus. J'ai pris le projet de loi C-51, un projet de loi omnibus en cinq parties, et je l'ai lu à bord de l'avion, alors que je rentrais chez moi. Je l'ai étudié toute la fin de semaine, puis je suis rentrée à Ottawa. Lundi matin, le 2 février, j'ai pris la parole pendant la période des questions et j'ai dit que le projet de loi entraînerait la création d'une police secrète.
Je n'ai pas attendu de voir dans quelle direction le vent allait souffler sur le paysage politique, contrairement au NPD, qui a tergiversé pendant deux semaines avant de s'opposer au projet de loi. Les libéraux, eux, ont décidé qu'ils ne pourraient pas remporter les prochaines élections s'ils s'opposaient au projet de loi, alors ils allaient voter pour tout en promettant d'apporter des correctifs plus tard.
J'ai bien peur que cette attitude ne perdure aux Communes. Je précise que je suis favorable à cet effort. Je voterai pour ce projet de loi, même si j'y vois de nombreuses lacunes. Je sais que la ministre de la Justice et le ministre de la Sécurité publique ont écouté les gens. C'est clair. Ils ont fait un travail de consultation bien réel.
Revenons sur les raisons pour lesquelles le projet de loi C-51 était si dangereux.
J'ai dit que c'était un projet de loi divisé en cinq parties. J'entends les conservateurs se plaindre ce soir que les députés ministériels essayent de faire adopter le projet de loi  C-59 trop rapidement. Eh bien, le 30 janvier 2015, le projet de loi C-51, un projet de loi omnibus divisé en cinq parties, a été déposé en première lecture. Le 6 mai, il avait été adopté à la Chambre, et le 9 juin, il avait été adopté au Sénat, soit six mois plus tard.
Le projet de loi  C-59 a été déposé il y a tout près d'un an. Il y a eu des consultations avant qu'il ait été déposé. J'ai eu l'occasion d'organiser des assemblées publiques dans ma circonscription sur la sécurité publique, l'espionnage et les organismes d'espionnage, et sur ce que nous devrions faire pour assurer la sécurité et veiller à ce qu'il y ait un équilibre entre les mesures antiterroristes et les libertés civiles. Nous avons travaillé fort sur cette question avant même que le projet de loi soit présenté pour la première lecture et nous travaillons vaillamment dessus depuis.
Je poursuis ce que je disais au sujet du projet de loi C-51, qui a été adopté à toute vapeur. C'était un projet de loi divisé en cinq parties. En travaillant sur ce projet de loi, j'ai appris qu'il nuisait à la sécurité des Canadiens. C'est ce que nous ont dit de nombreux experts de la lutte contre le terrorisme, de grands spécialistes sur le terrain et des universitaires. Je parle de gens comme les professeurs Kent Roach et Craig Forcese, qui ont travaillé si fort sur l'enquête sur la tragédie d'Air India; le président de l'enquête sur l'affaire d'Air India, l'ancien juge John Major; et les personnes sur le terrain, dont j'ai parlé plus tôt ce soir, comme Joseph Fogarty, un agent du MI5 au Royaume-Uni qui a été l'agent de liaison du Royaume-Uni avec le Canada dans la lutte contre le terrorisme.
Tous ces gens m'ont appris que le projet de loi C-51 était dangereux parce qu'il allait construire des murs de béton qui ne feraient que décourager la communication entre les organismes d'espionnage. Ce projet de loi était composé de cinq parties.
La partie 1 portait sur la communication d'information. Il ne s'agissait pas de communication d'information entre les organismes d'espionnage, mais de communication d'information au sujet des Canadiens à des gouvernements étrangers. Autrement dit, c'était dangereux pour les droits des Canadiens à l'étranger et le projet de loi ne tenait pas compte des conseils de l'enquête sur l'affaire Maher Arar.
La partie 2 portait sur la liste d'interdiction de vol. Heureusement, le présent projet de loi corrige ce problème. En passant, le gouvernement précédent ne s'est même pas donné la peine de consulter les compagnies aériennes. Nous avons entendu des témoignages intéressants à ce sujet lors de la 41e législature.
La partie 3, à mon avis, limitait la liberté de pensée. Nous avons entendu dire ce soir que le gouvernement ne prête pas attention à la nécessité de retirer les messages de recrutement terroriste des sites Web. C'est une accusation ridicule. Par contre, la partie 3 du projet de loi C-51 créait un tout nouveau terme sans définition. On y présentait l'idée du terrorisme et de la fomentation du terrorisme en général. En raison de la façon dont ces concepts étaient définis, une personne aurait pu être reconnue coupable d'avoir violé cette loi si elle publiait sur sa page Facebook une image d'un poing serré. Un tel geste aurait pu être considéré comme une fomentation du terrorisme en général. C'est un élément que nous avons heureusement amélioré.
Le libellé de la partie 3 était si vague qu'un membre d'une communauté, par exemple, qui constatait qu'une personne était en train de se radicaliser aurait eu des motifs raisonnables de craindre qu'il pourrait se faire arrêter s'il tentait d'aller parler à la personne pour lui faire changer d'idée. Cette partie était vraiment mal rédigée.
La partie 4 est celle qui n'a pas été corrigée comme il se doit par ce projet de loi. C'est la partie qui, pour la toute première fois, a accordé au SCRS ce qu'on appelle des pouvoirs cinétiques.
Le SCRS a été créé dans la foulée de la crise du FLQ parce que la GRC mijotait des complots, dont l'un des plus célèbres l'ont amené à incendier une grange. C'est pour cela que nous avons déterminé qu'il fallait que la collecte de renseignements soit menée par une autre entité que celle qui s'occupe de déjouer les complots, car on ne peut pas laisser la GRC incendier des granges. On a donc mis sur pied le Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité. Il devait s'occuper exclusivement de la collecte de renseignements, dont la GRC pouvait ensuite se servir pour intervenir.
Dans le projet de loi  C-59, je crois qu'on commet une grave erreur en laissant au SCRS ses pouvoirs cinétiques pour déjouer des complots. Cependant, des modifications législatives importantes ont été proposées relativement à la capacité du SCRS de s'adresser à un seul juge pour obtenir la permission d'aller à l'encontre de nos lois et de la Charte. J'aurais aimé que les corrections proposées dans le projet de loi  C-59 soient plus importantes, mais c'est certainement une nette amélioration par rapport au projet de loi C-51.
Le projet de loi  C-59 ne fait rien pour corriger la partie 5 du projet de loi C-51. Je crois que c'est parce que ces dispositions étaient formulées de manière si étrange que personne n'arrivait à les comprendre. Je sais que les professeurs Roach et Forcese n'en ont pas tenu compte parce que les modifications visaient la Loi sur l’immigration et la protection des réfugiés. Cette partie était très difficile à interpréter. Cependant, selon le professeur Donald Galloway, de la faculté de droit de l'Université de Victoria, la partie 5 permet de tenir des audiences secrètes pour fournir à un juge des renseignements sur un suspect sans dire au juge qu'ils ont été obtenu par la torture. Par conséquent, j'espère vraiment que le ministre de la Sécurité publique se penchera de nouveau sur ces modifications à la Loi sur l’immigration et la protection des réfugiés. Si elles autorisent réellement cette pratique, alors il faut y remédier.
Regardons pourquoi ce projet de loi constitue une amélioration suffisante pour que je puisse voter en sa faveur. En passant, au comité, j'ai moi-même présenté 46 amendements au projet de loi. Ils visaient à garantir que des avocats spéciaux soient présents dans la pièce pour qu'une personne représentant l'intérêt public soit là lorsqu'un juge décernerait à un agent du SCRS un mandat lui permettant d'enfreindre la loi ou de violer la Charte. Le libellé entourant ce que les juges peuvent faire et la fréquence à laquelle ils peuvent le faire ainsi que le respect qu'ils doivent accorder à la Charte lorsqu'ils décernent un tel mandat est bien meilleur dans ce projet de loi, mais il est encore présent, et cela m'inquiète qu'on ne prévoit pas la présence d'avocats spéciaux dans la pièce.
Je ne peux pas dire que je raffole du projet de loi  C-59, mais il s'agit d'une énorme amélioration par rapport à ce que nous avons vu lors de la 41e législature avec le projet de loi C-51.
Pour les minutes qu'il me reste, j'aimerais parler de l'office de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité et de renseignement.
C'est un point fondamental. C'est ce que le juge John Major qui présidait l'enquête sur la tragédie d'Air India a dit au comité lorsque ce dernier étudiait le projet de loi, en 2015. Il nous a dit que le fait que la GRC et le SCRS n'échangent pas leurs renseignements était tout simplement un trait de la nature humaine, et qu'il nous fallait un mécanisme de surveillance de haut calibre.
Il y a une certaine surveillance qui se fait — et le terme « surveillance » a ici une dimension d'après-coup —, alors le CSARS, le Comité de surveillance des activités de renseignement de sécurité, garderait un oeil sur ce que le SCRS aurait fait pendant l'année, sauf que jusqu'à ce que ce projet de loi soit proposé, nous n'avons jamais eu d'organisme de sécurité pour surveiller ce que faisait tout ce beau monde. Il y a le SCRS, la GRC, l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada et le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications — cinq différents organismes qui s'appliquent à colliger des renseignements, mais toujours en vase clos. C'est pour cette raison que la création de l'office de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité et de renseignement prévue aux termes du projet de loi est une grosse amélioration.
View Ralph Goodale Profile
Lib. (SK)
View Ralph Goodale Profile
2017-11-20 12:05 [p.15289]
moved that:
Bill C-59, An Act respecting national security matters, be referred forthwith to the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security.
He said: Madam Speaker, the Government of Canada has no greater responsibility than keeping Canadians safe. We must fulfill that essential and solemn obligation while at the same time safeguarding Canadian rights and freedoms.
This double objective of protecting Canadians while defending their rights and freedoms was the basis of our commitments regarding national security during the last election, and it informed everything we have done in the area since we have been in government.
We have, for example, created a committee of parliamentarians with unprecedented access to classified information to scrutinize the activities of all national security and intelligence agencies. We have launched the Canada Centre for Community Engagement and Prevention of Violence to help Canada become a world leader in counter-radicalization.
We have issued new ministerial directions that more clearly prohibit conduct that would result in a substantial risk of torture. Our starting point was the most extensive and inclusive consultations about national security ever undertaken by the Government of Canada. Beginning in the spring of 2016, that effort involved individual stakeholders, round tables, town halls, various renowned experts, studies by parliamentary committees, and a broad solicitation of views online. More than 75,000 submissions were received.
All of this fresh input was supplemented by earlier judicial inquires by Iacobucci, O'Connor, and Major, as well as several parliamentary proposals, certain court judgments, and reports from existing national security review bodies. It all helped to shape the legislation before us today, Bill C-59, the national security act of 2017.
The measures in this bill cover three core themes, enhancing accountability and transparency, correcting problematic elements from the former BillC-51, and updating our national security laws to ensure that our agencies can keep pace with evolving threats.
One of the major advances in this legislation is the creation of the national security and intelligence review agency. This new body, which has been dubbed by some as a "super SIRC", will be mandated to review any activity carried out by any government department that relates to national security and intelligence, as well as any matters referred to it by the government. It will be able to investigate public complaints. It will specifically replace the existing review bodies for CSIS and the Communications Security Establishment, but it will also be authorized to examine security and intelligence activities throughout the government, including the Canada Border Services Agency.
In this day and age, security operations regularly involve multiple departments and agencies. Therefore, effective accountability must not be limited to the silo of one particular institution. Rather, it must follow the trail wherever it leads. It must provide for comprehensive analysis and integrated findings and recommendations. That is exactly what Canadians will get from this new review agency.
Bill C-59 also creates the brand new position of the intelligence commissioner, whose role will be to oversee and approve, or not approve, certain intelligence activities by CSIS and the CSE in advance. The intelligence commissioner will be a retired or supernumerary superior court judge whose decisions will be binding. In other words, if he or she says that a particular proposed operation is unreasonable or inappropriate, it will simply not proceed.
Taken together, the new comprehensive review agency, the intelligence commissioner, and the new committee of parliamentarians will give Canada accountability mechanisms of unprecedented scope and depth. This is something that Canadians have been calling for, and those calls intensified when the former BillC-51 was introduced. We heard them loud and clear during our consultations, and we are now putting these accountability measures into place.
Bill C-59 also brings clarity and rigour to internal government information sharing under the Security of Canada Information Sharing Act, or SCISA. This is the law that allows government institutions to share information with each other in respect of activities that undermine the security of Canada. Among other things, Bill C-59 would change the name of the law, in English, to the security of Canada information disclosure act, to be clear that we are talking only about the disclosure of existing information, not the collection of anything new. Government institutions will now be required to keep specific records of all disclosures made under the act, and to provide these records to the new review agency.
Importantly, Bill C-59 clarifies the definition of activities “that undermine the security of Canada”. For example, it is explicit in stating that advocacy, protest, dissent, and artistic expression are not included. The new legislation would also provide more precision in the definition of “terrorist propaganda”, in line with the well-known criminal offence of counselling.
The paramountcy of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms is an overriding principle in Bill C-59. That is perhaps most evident in the updates that we are proposing to the CSIS Act. This is the law that created CSIS back in 1984, and it has not been modernized in any meaningful way since then.
The former BillC-51 empowered CSIS to engage in measures to reduce threats to the security of Canada without clearly defining what those measures could and could not include. We are now creating a specific closed list of measures that CSIS will have the authority to take to deal with threats. If any such activity might limit a charter right, CSIS will have to go before a judge. The activity can only be allowed if the judge is satisfied that it is compliant with the charter.
Another concern we heard during the consultations and more generally has been about the no-fly list, especially the problem of false positives, which affects people whose names are similar to listed individuals. This is due to long-standing design flaws in the way that the no-fly list was first created many years ago. Those flaws require legislative, regulatory, and technological changes to fix them.
Bill C-59 includes the necessary legislative changes and paves the way for the others that will be necessary. In essence, Canada's no-fly list currently piggybacks onto the airlines' computer systems, which means that the government does not control the fields to be included nor the way that the whole system works. This bill would give us the authority we need to allow the government, instead of airlines, to screen passenger information against the no-fly list. The people who have been affected by this, especially those with children, feel frustrated and stigmatized by their no-fly problems. That is entirely understandable, and that is why we are working so hard to get this fixed. Passing Bill C-59 is a necessary step toward that end.
There is much more in Bill C-59 than I could possibly deal with in these 10 minutes, but in keeping with the open and inclusive approach that we have taken with this legislation since before it was even drafted, we are sending it to committee before second reading to ensure that the examination of the bill is as thorough as possible.
Professor Craig Forcese, a respected expert in national security law from the University of Ottawa, said Bill C-59 “appears to be more carefully crafted than anything we've seen in this area in a long time..”. I appreciate that, but there is still more work to be done.
I certainly hope to hear ideas and advice from colleagues in the House. We are open to constructive suggestions as we work together to ensure that Canada's national security framework is as strong and effective as it can possibly be.
propose:
Que le projet de loi  C-59, Loi concernant des questions de sécurité nationale, soit renvoyé sur-le-champ au Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale.
-- Madame la Présidente, la plus importante responsabilité du gouvernement du Canada est d'assurer la sécurité des Canadiens. Nous devons nous acquitter de cette obligation essentielle et solennelle tout en protégeant les droits et libertés des Canadiens.
Ce double objectif, protéger les Canadiens et défendre leurs droits et libertés, a sous-tendu nos engagements en matière de sécurité nationale pendant la dernière élection, et il a guidé tout ce que nous avons fait dans ce domaine depuis que nous sommes au gouvernement.
Par exemple, nous avons créé un comité de parlementaires ayant un accès sans précédent à des renseignements classifiés dans le but d'examiner les activités de toutes les agences de sécurité nationale et de tous les services nationaux de renseignement. Nous avons mis sur pied le Centre canadien d'engagement communautaire et de prévention de la violence pour aider le Canada à devenir un chef de file mondial de la lutte contre la radicalisation.
Nous avons publié de nouvelles directives ministérielles qui interdisent plus clairement toute activité susceptible d'entraîner un risque élevé de torture. Les consultations les plus exhaustives et inclusives sur la sécurité nationale jamais entreprises par le gouvernement du Canada constituaient notre point de départ. Cette mesure, qui a été prise au début du printemps de 2016, a nécessité la participation d'intervenants et d'experts reconnus, la tenue de tables rondes et d'assemblées publiques et la réalisation d'études par des comités parlementaires et de vastes sondages d'opinion en ligne. Plus de 75 000 mémoires ont été reçus.
À ces nouvelles idées s'ajoutent les enquêtes judiciaires réalisées précédemment par les juges Iacobucci, O'Connor et Major, ainsi que plusieurs propositions parlementaires, quelques décisions des tribunaux et des rapports produits par des organismes existants d'examen des activités de sécurité nationale. Tout cela a permis de façonner la mesure législative dont nous sommes saisis aujourd'hui, le projet de loi  C-59, la Loi de 2017 sur la sécurité nationale.
Les mesures présentées dans ce projet de loi portent sur trois thèmes principaux: accroître la responsabilité et la transparence, corriger les lacunes de l'ancien projet de loi C-51, et mettre à jour les lois nationales en matière de sécurité afin que les agences canadiennes soient en mesure de s'adapter à l'évolution des menaces.
Une des principales avancées que propose le projet de loi est la création de l’Office de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité nationale et de renseignement. Ce nouvel organisme, qualifié par certains de « super CSARS », aura pour mandat d’examiner l’exercice par les ministères de leurs activités liées à la sécurité nationale ou au renseignement et d'examiner toute question dont il est saisi par le gouvernement. Il pourra également faire enquête sur les plaintes qu'il recevra du public. Il remplacera les organismes de surveillance du SCRS et du Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications, mais son mandat s'étendra également aux activités liées à la sécurité et au renseignement dans l'ensemble du gouvernement, y compris à l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada.
De nos jours, il est fréquent que de nombreux ministères et organismes doivent collaborer dans les opérations de sécurité. C'est pourquoi la responsabilisation, pour être efficace, ne doit pas être compartimentée et cibler un organisme en particulier. Il faut qu'elle suive chacune des étapes, peu importe qui les effectue. Les examens doivent permettre une analyse complète et produire des résultats et des recommandations intégrés. C'est exactement ce que ce nouvel office de surveillance fera pour les Canadiens.
Le projet de loi  C-59 créé également un nouveau poste de commissaire au renseignement, dont le rôle sera de surveiller et de préapprouver ou non certaines activités de renseignement du SCRS et du Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications. Le poste de commissaire au renseignement sera occupé par un juge à la retraite ou un juge surnuméraire d’une cour supérieure, dont les décisions seront exécutoires. Autrement dit, si ce juge détermine qu'une opération donnée est déraisonnable ou inappropriée, elle ne sera simplement pas menée.
Ensemble, le nouvel office de surveillance complète, le commissaire au renseignement et le nouveau comité de parlementaires offriront au Canada des mécanismes de responsabilisation d'une étendue et d'une portée sans précédent. Les Canadiens réclament de telles mesures depuis longtemps, et ces demandes se sont accrues lorsque l'ancien projet de loi C-51 a été présenté. Nous avons bien compris ces demandes lors des consultations, et ce sont ces mesures de responsabilisation que nous mettons présentement en place.
Le projet de loi  C-59 apporte également des précisions et de la rigueur en ce qui concerne la communication d'information entre les organismes gouvernementaux aux termes de la Loi sur la communication d’information ayant trait à la sécurité du Canada. Cette loi permet aux organismes gouvernementaux de partager de l'information concernant les activités susceptibles de nuire à la sécurité du Canada. Le projet de loi  C-59 modifie notamment le nom de la loi en anglais, qui devient « Security of Canada Information Disclosure Act », afin qu'il soit clair que la divulgation porte uniquement sur de l'information existante, non sur la collecte de nouveaux renseignements. Les institutions gouvernementales seront tenues de conserver des documents concernant les communications effectuées aux termes de la loi et de les présenter au nouvel office de surveillance.
Il importe de noter que le projet de loi  C-59 précise la définition d'activités « portant atteinte à la sécurité du Canada ». Par exemple, il dispose explicitement que les activités de défense d’une cause, de protestation, de manifestation d’un désaccord ou d’expression artistique ne sont pas visées. La nouvelle mesure législative précise également la définition de « propagande terroriste » afin qu'elle corresponde à une infraction déjà connue, c'est-à-dire conseiller la commission d’une infraction.
La primauté de la Charte des droits et libertés constitue un principe fondamental du projet de loi  C-59. C'est particulièrement évident dans les mises à jour que le gouvernement propose à la Loi sur le SCRS. Cette loi a donné lieu à la création du SCRS en 1984, mais elle n'a pas été modernisée de façon substantielle depuis.
L'ancien projet de loi C-51 donnait au SCRS le pouvoir de prendre des mesures en vue de réduire les menaces à la sécurité du Canada, sans toutefois définir clairement ce que les mesures pouvaient comprendre ou pas. Nous créons actuellement une liste exhaustive de mesures que le SCRS sera autorisé à prendre pour gérer les menaces. Si une activité limite un droit garanti par la Charte, le SCRS devra se présenter devant un juge. L'activité ne sera autorisée que si le juge est convaincu qu'elle est conforme à la Charte.
Une autre préoccupation que nous avons entendue pendant les consultations, notamment, a trait à la liste d'interdiction de vol, tout particulièrement les faux positifs, qui ont une incidence sur les personnes dont le nom est semblable à celui de personnes figurant sur la liste. Cette situation est attribuable à des défauts de conception de longue date, c'est-à-dire depuis la création il y a de nombreuses années de la liste d'interdiction de vol. Des modifications devront être apportées sur les plans législatif, réglementaire et technologique pour y remédier.
Le projet de loi  C-59 prévoit les modifications législatives nécessaires et ouvre la voie aux autres modifications qui devront être apportées. En gros, la liste actuelle d'interdiction de vol du Canada se greffe aux systèmes informatiques des compagnies aériennes, ce qui signifie que le gouvernement n'a aucun contrôle sur les champs à inclure ou sur la façon dont l'ensemble du système fonctionne. Le projet de loi donnera au gouvernement, plutôt qu'aux compagnies aériennes, le pouvoir de vérifier les renseignements concernant les passagers en fonction de la liste d'interdiction de vol. Les gens touchés par cette situation, tout particulièrement ceux qui ont des enfants, se sentent frustrés et stigmatisés en raison des problèmes liés à la liste d'interdiction de vol. C'est tout à fait compréhensible, et c'est pourquoi nous ne ménageons aucun effort pour remédier à la situation. L'adoption du projet de loi  C-59 est une étape essentielle pour atteindre cet objectif.
Il reste encore beaucoup à dire au sujet du projet de loi  C-59, mais je ne dispose que de 10 minutes. Cependant, conformément à l'approche transparente et inclusive que nous avons adoptée à l'égard de cette mesure législative, et ce, avant même qu'elle soit rédigée, nous la renvoyons au comité avant l'étape de la deuxième lecture pour qu'elle fasse l'objet d'un examen le plus exhaustif possible.
Le professeur Craig Forcese, un expert réputé du droit relatif à la sécurité nationale de l'Université d'Ottawa, a déclaré que le projet de loi  C-59 semble être plus soigneusement conçu que n'importe quelle autre mesure législative produite depuis fort longtemps dans ce domaine. Je m'en réjouis, mais il reste beaucoup de travail à faire.
J'espère que mes collègues à la Chambre nous feront part de leurs idées et de leurs conseils. Nous sommes ouverts aux suggestions constructives, et nous avons à coeur de travailler en collaboration afin que le cadre de sécurité nationale du Canada soit aussi rigoureux et efficace qu'il peut l'être.
Results: 1 - 15 of 15