Interventions in the House of Commons
 
 
 
RSS feed based on search criteria Export search results - CSV (plain text) Export search results - XML
Add search criteria
View Randall Garrison Profile
NDP (BC)
Madam Speaker, I rise tonight to speak against Bill C-59 at third reading. Unfortunately, it is yet another example of the Liberals breaking an election promise, only this time it is disguised as promise keeping.
In the climate of fear after the attacks on Parliament Hill and in St. Jean in 2014, the Conservative government brought forward BillC-51. I heard a speech a little earlier from the member for Bellechasse—Les Etchemins—Lévis, and he remembers things slightly different than I. The difference is that I was in the public safety committee and he, as the minister, was not there. He said that there was a great clamour for new laws to meet this challenge of terrorism. I certainly did not hear that in committee. What I heard repeatedly from law enforcement and security officials coming before us was that they had not been given enough resources to do the basic enforcement work they needed to do to keep Canadians safe from terrorism.
However, when the Conservatives finally managed to pass their Anti-terrorism Act, they somehow managed to infringe our civil liberties without making us any safer.
At that time, the New Democrats remained firm in our conviction that it would be a mistake to sacrifice our freedoms in the name of defending them. BillC-51 was supported by the Liberals, who hedged their bets with a promise to fix what they called “its problematic elements” later if they were elected. Once they were elected in 2015, that determination to fix Bill C-51 seemed to wane. That is why in September of 2016, I introduced BillC-303, a private member's bill to repeal Bill C-51 in its entirety.
Some in the House at that time questioned why I introduced a private member's bill since I knew it would not come forward for a vote. In fact, this was an attempt to get the debate started, as the Liberals had already kept the public waiting for a year at that point. The New Democrats were saying, “You promised a bill. Well, here's our bill. It's very simple. Repeal all of C-51.”
Now, after more than two years and extensive consultations, we have this version of Bill C-59 before us, which does not repeal BillC-51 and fails to fix most of the major problems of Bill C-51, it actually introduces new threats to our privacy and rights.
Let me start with the things that were described, even by the Liberals, as problematic, and remain unfixed in Bill C-59 as it stands before us.
First, there is the definition of “national security” in the Anti-terrorism Act that remains all too broad, despite some improvements in Bill C-59. Bill C-59 does narrow the definition of criminal terrorism speech, which BillC-51 defined as “knowingly advocates or promotes the commission of terrorism offences in general”. That is a problematic definition. Bill C-59 changes the Criminal Code wording to “counsels another person to commit a terrorism offence”. Certainly, that better captures the problem we are trying to get at in the Criminal Code. There is plenty of existing case law around what qualifies as counselling someone to commit an offence. Therefore, that is much better than it was.
Then the government went on to add a clause that purports to protect advocacy and protest from being captured in the Anti-terrorism Act. However, that statement is qualified with an addition that says it will be protected unless the dissent and advocacy are carried out in conjunction with activities that undermine the security of Canada. It completes the circle. It takes us right back to that general definition.
The only broad definition of national security specifically in BillC-51 included threats to critical infrastructure. Therefore, this still raises the spectre of the current government or any other government using national security powers against protesters against things like the pipeline formerly known as Kinder Morgan.
The second problem Bill C-59 fails to fix is that of the broad data collection information sharing authorized by BillC-51, and in fact maintained in Bill C-59. This continues to threaten Canadians' basic privacy rights. Information and privacy commissioners continue to point out that the basis of our privacy law is that information can only be used for the purposes for which it is collected. Bill C-51 and Bill C-59 drive a big wedge in that important protection of our privacy rights.
Bill C-51 allowed sharing information between agencies and with foreign governments about national security under this new broad definition which I just talked about. Therefore, it is not just about terrorism and violence, but a much broader range of things the government could collect and share information on. Most critics would say Bill C-59, while it has tweaked these provisions, has not actually fixed them, and changing the terminology from “information sharing” to “information disclosure” is more akin to a sleight of hand than an actual reform of its provisions.
The third problem that remains are those powers that BillC-51 granted to CSIS to act in secret to counter threats. This new proactive power granted to CSIS by Bill C-51 is especially troubling precisely because CSIS activities are secret and sometimes include the right to break the law. Once again, what we have done is returned to the very origins of CSIS. In other words, when the RCMP was both the investigatory and the enforcement agency, we ran into problems in the area of national security, so CSIS was created. Therefore, what we have done is return right back to that problematic situation of the 1970s, only this time it is CSIS that will be doing the investigating and then actively or proactively countering those threats. We have recreated a problem that CSIS was supposed to solve.
Bill C-59 also maintains the overly narrow list of prohibitions that are placed on those CSIS activities. CSIS can do pretty much anything short of committing bodily harm, murder, or the perversion of the course of democracy or justice. However, it is still problematic that neither justice nor democracy are actually defined in the act. Therefore, this would give CSIS powers that I would argue are fundamentally incompatible with a free and democratic society.
The Liberal change would require that those activities must be consistent with the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. That sounds good on its face, except that these activities are exempt from scrutiny because they are secret. Who decides whether they might potentially violate the charter of rights? It is not a judge, because this is not oversight. There is no oversight here. This is the government deciding whether it should go to the judge and request oversight. Therefore, if the government does not think it is a violation of the charter of rights, it goes ahead and authorizes the CSIS activities. Again, this is a fundamental problem in a democracy.
The fourth problem is that Bill C-59 still fails to include an absolute prohibition on the use of information derived from torture. The member for Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan made some eloquent statements on this with which I agree. What we have is the government saying that now it has included a cabinet directive on torture in Bill C-59, which gives the cabinet directive to force of law. The cabinet directive already has the force of law, so it absolutely changes nothing about this.
However, even worse, there is no absolute prohibition in that cabinet directive on the use of torture-implicated information. Instead, the prohibition says that information from torture can be used in some circumstances, and then it sets a very low threshold for when we can actually use information derived from fundamental rights violations. Not only is this morally repugnant, most likely unconstitutional, but it also gives us information that is notoriously unreliable. People who are being tortured will say precisely what they think the torturer wants them to say to stop the torture.
Finally, Bill C-59 would not do one of the things it could have done, and that is create a review agency for the CBSA. The CBSA remains without an independent review and complaints mechanism. It is one of our only law enforcement or security agencies that has no direct review agency. Yes, the new national security intelligence review agency will have some responsibility over the CBSA, but only in terms of national security questions, not in terms of its basic day-to-day operations.
We have seen quite often that the activities carried out by border agencies have a major impact on fundamental rights of people. We can look at the United States right now and see what its border agency is doing in the separation of parents and children. Therefore, it is a concern that there is no place in Canada, if we have a complaint about what CBSA has done, to file that complaint except in a court of law, which requires information, resources, and all kinds of other things that are unlikely to be available to those people who need to make those complaints.
The Liberals will tell us that there are some areas where they have already acted outside of Bill C-59, and we have just heard the member for Winnipeg North talk about BillC-22, which established the national security review committee of parliamentarians.
The New Democrats feel that this is a worthwhile first step toward fixing some of the long-standing weaknesses in our national security arrangements, but it is still only a review agency, still only an agency making recommendations. It is not an oversight agency that makes decisions in real time about what can be done and make binding orders about what changes have to be made.
The government rejected New Democrat amendments on the bill, amendments which would have allowed the committee to be more independent from the government. It would have allowed it to be more transparent in its public reporting and would have given it better integration with existing review bodies.
The other area the Liberals claim they have already acted on is the no-fly list. It was interesting that the minister today in his speech, opening the third reading debate, claimed that the government was on its way to fixing the no-fly list, not that it had actually fixed the no-fly list. Canada still lacks an effective redress system for travellers unintentionally flagged on the no-fly list. I have quite often heard members on the government side say that no one is denied boarding as a result of this. I could give them the names of people who have been denied boarding. It has disrupted their business activities. It has disrupted things like family reunions. All too often we end up with kids on the no-fly list. Their names happen to be Muslim-sounding or Arabic-sounding or whatever presumptions people make and they names happen to be somewhat like someone else already on the list.
The group of no-fly list kids' parents have been demanding that we get some effective measures in place right away to stop the constant harassment they face for no reason at all. The fact that we still have not fixed this problem raises real questions about charter right guarantees of equality, which are supposed to be protected by law in our country.
Not only does Bill C-59 fail to correct the problems in BillC-51, it goes on to create two new threats to fundamental rights and freedoms of Canadians, once again, without any evidence that these measures will make it safer.
Bill C-59 proposes to immediately expand the Communications Security Establishment Canada's mandate beyond just information gathering, and it creates an opportunity for CSE to collect information on Canadians which would normally be prohibited.
Just like we are giving CSIS the ability to not just collect information but to respond to threats, now we are saying that the Communications Security Establishment Canada should not just collect information, but it should be able to conduct what the government calls defensive cyber operations and active cyber operations.
Bill C-59 provides an overly broad list of purposes and targets for these active cyber operations. It says that activities could be carried out to “degrade, disrupt, influence, respond to or interfere with the capabilities, intentions or activities of a foreign individual, state, organization or terrorist group as they relate to international affairs, defence or security.” Imagine anything that is not covered there. That is about as broad as the provision could be written.
CSE would also be allowed to do “anything that is reasonably necessary to maintain the covert nature of the activity.” Let us think about that when it comes to oversight and review of its activities. In my mind that is an invitation for it to obscure or withhold information from review agencies.
These new CSE powers are being expanded without adequate oversight. Once again, there is no independent oversight, only “after the fact” review. To proceed in this case, it does not require a warrant from a court, but only permission from the Minister of National Defence, if the activities are to be domestic based, or from the Minister of Foreign Affairs, if the activities are to be conducted abroad.
These new, active, proactive measures to combat a whole list and series of threats is one problem. The other is while Bill C-59 says that there is a still a prohibition on the Canadian Security Establishment collecting information on Canadians, we should allow for what it calls “incidental” acquisition of information relating to Canadians or persons in Canada. This means that in situations where the information was not deliberately sought, a person's private data could still be captured by CSE and retained and used. The problem remains that this incidental collecting, which is called research by the government and mass surveillance by its critics, remains very much a part of Bill C-59.
Both of these new powers are a bit disturbing, when the Liberal promise was to fix the problematic provisions in BillC-51, not add to them. The changes introduced for Bill C-51 in itself are minor. The member for Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan talked about the changes not being particularly effective. I have to agree with him. I do not think they were designed to be effective. They are unlikely to head off the constitutional challenges to Bill C-51 already in place by organizations such as the Canadian Civil Liberties Association. Those constitutional challenges will proceed, and I believe that they will succeed.
What works best in terrorism cases? Again, when I was the New Democrats' public safety critic sitting on the public safety committee when BillC-51 had its hearings, we heard literally dozens and dozens of witnesses who almost all said the same thing: it is old-fashioned police work on the front line that solves or prevents terrorism. For that, we need resources, and we need to focus the resources on enforcement activities at the front end.
What did we see from the Conservatives when they were in power? There were actual cutbacks in the budgets of the RCMP, the CBSA, and CSIS. The whole time they were in power and they were worried about terrorism, they were denying the basic resources that were needed.
What have the Liberals done since they came back to power? They have actually added some resources to all of those agencies, but not for the terrorism investigation and enforcement activities. They have added them for all kinds of other things they are interested in but not the areas that would actually make a difference.
We have heard quite often in this House, and we have heard some of it again in this debate, that what we are talking about is the need to balance or trade off rights against security. New Democrats have argued very consistently, in the previous Parliament and in this Parliament, that there is no need to trade our rights for security. The need to balance is a false need. Why would we give up our rights and argue that in doing so, we are actually protecting them? This is not logical. In fact, it is the responsibility of our government to provide both protection of our fundamental rights and protection against threats.
The Liberals again will tell us that the promise is kept. What I am here to tell members is that I do not see it in this bill. I see a lot of attempts to confuse and hide what they are really doing, which is to hide the fundamental support they still have for what was the essence of BillC-51. That was to restrict the rights and freedoms of Canadians in the name of national security. The New Democrats reject that false game. Therefore, we will be voting against this bill at third reading.
Madame la Présidente, je prends la parole ce soir contre le projet de loi  C-59 à l'étape de la troisième lecture. Malheureusement, nous avons là un autre exemple de promesse électorale des libéraux qui n'est pas tenue, sauf que, cette fois-ci, il font passer cela pour une promesse tenue.
Dans le climat de peur qui a suivi les attentats sur la Colline du Parlement et à Saint-Jean, en 2014, le gouvernement conservateur a présenté le projet de loi C-51. J'ai entendu une allocution un peu plus tôt du député de Bellechasse—Les Etchemins—Lévis, et il me semble que ses souvenirs sont légèrement différents des miens. La différence vient du fait que je siégeais au comité de la sécurité publique et lui, qui était ministre, n'y siégeait pas. Il a dit qu'on réclamait à grands cris de nouvelles mesures législatives pour faire face au terrorisme. Je n'ai certainement pas entendu cela au comité. Ce que j'ai entendu à maintes reprises des policiers et des responsables de la sécurité qui ont comparu devant nous, c'est qu'on ne leur avait pas donné suffisamment de ressources pour s'acquitter du travail de base qu'ils devaient faire pour garder les Canadiens à l'abri du terrorisme.
Toutefois, lorsque les conservateurs ont réussi à faire adopter leur loi antiterrorisme, ils ont réussi, d'une certaine façon, à empiéter sur nos libertés civiles sans accroître notre sécurité pour autant.
À l'époque, les néo-démocrates ont toujours maintenu que ce serait une erreur de sacrifier nos libertés au nom de la défense de celles-ci. Les libéraux ont appuyé le projet de loi C-51, et ils se sont couverts avec la promesse de corriger plus tard — une fois qu'ils seraient élus — ce qu'ils ont appelé « ses éléments problématiques ». Une fois élus, en 2015, leur détermination à corriger le projet de loi C-51 est vraisemblablement disparue. C'est pourquoi, en septembre 2016, j'ai présenté le projet de loi C-303, un projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire visant à abroger entièrement le projet de loi C-51.
À l'époque, certains députés ont remis en question mon idée de présenter un projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire, puisque je savais qu'il ne serait jamais soumis à un vote. En réalité, c'était une tentative de faire entamer le débat, puisque cela faisait déjà une année que les libéraux faisaient attendre le public à ce sujet. C'était une façon, pour les néo-démocrates, de dire: « Vous avez promis un projet de loi. Eh bien, voici le nôtre. C'est très simple: il faut abroger le projet de loi C-51. »
Maintenant, après deux ans et de longues consultations, nous voici, saisis de cette version du projet de loi  C-59, qui n'abroge pas le projet de loi C-51 et qui ne corrige pas la majorité des problèmes que présente ce dernier. En fait, il introduit de nouvelles menaces à notre vie privée et à nos droits.
Je commencerai par les aspects que même les libéraux ont décrits comme étant problématiques, et qui demeurent non corrigés dans le projet de loi  C-59 actuel.
Premièrement, la définition de « sécurité nationale » qui figure dans la Loi antiterroriste reste trop vague, malgré quelques améliorations apportées dans le projet de loi  C-59, qui resserre la définition de discours lié au terrorisme. Le projet de loi C-51 la définissait comme toute personne qui « préconise ou fomente la perpétration d’infraction de terrorisme en général ». Cette définition pose problème. Le projet de loi  C-59 modifie le libellé du Code criminel en ces termes: « conseille à une autre personne de commettre une infraction de terrorisme ». Ce libellé cerne mieux le problème à régler en vertu du Code criminel. La jurisprudence entourant ce qui constitue « conseiller quelqu’un à commettre une infraction » est abondante. En conséquence, la nouvelle définition est bien meilleure que l’ancienne.
Le gouvernement ajoute ensuite un article censé exclure de la Loi antiterroriste les activités de défense d’une cause et de manifestation d’un désaccord. Toutefois, cet article est assorti d'une déclaration d’une réserve selon laquelle les activités de défense d’une cause ou de manifestation d’un désaccord ne doivent avoir aucun lien avec une activité portant atteinte à la sécurité du Canada. La boucle est bouclée et cela nous ramène directement à la définition générale.
La seule définition globale de sécurité nationale qui figure dans le projet de loi C-51 comprend les menaces aux infrastructures essentielles. Cela soulève le spectre que le gouvernement actuel ou un gouvernement à venir se serve de ses pouvoirs relatifs à la sécurité nationale contre des gens qui manifestent par exemple contre le pipeline anciennement appelé Kinder Morgan.
Le deuxième problème que le projet de loi  C-59 ne corrige pas est la vaste autorisation à communiquer les données recueillies qui se trouvait dans le projet de loi C-51 et qui est maintenue dans le projet de loi  C-59. Cela perpétue la menace au droit fondamental des Canadiens à la vie privée. Les commissaires à l'information et à la protection de la vie privée continuent de signaler que le principe de base de notre Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels est que l'information peut uniquement être utilisée aux fins pour lesquelles elle est recueillie. Or, les projets de loi C-51 et C-59 créent une grosse brèche dans cette importante protection de notre droit à la vie privée.
Le projet de loi C-51 autorisait la communication, entre les organismes ainsi qu'à des gouvernements étrangers, de renseignements concernant la sécurité nationale, au sens large de la nouvelle définition dont je viens de parler. Par conséquent, ces renseignements ne portent pas seulement sur le terrorisme et la violence, mais sur un éventail beaucoup plus large de sujets à propos desquels le gouvernement pourrait recueillir de l'information et la communiquer. La plupart des détracteurs du projet de loi  C-59 diraient que, bien que ce dernier modifie les dispositions à ce sujet, il ne les corrige pas, et changer la terminologie anglaise d'« information sharing » à « information disclosure » tient davantage d'un tour de passe-passe que d'une véritable réforme des dispositions de la loi.
Le troisième problème qui reste non résolu est celui des pouvoirs que le projet de loi C-51 a accordé au SCRS et qui lui permettent d'agir en secret pour contrer les menaces. Le nouveau pouvoir proactif accordé au SCRS par le projet de loi C-51 est particulièrement inquiétant précisément parce que les activités du SCRS sont secrètes et qu'il a parfois le droit d'enfreindre la loi. Encore une fois, nous en sommes revenus aux origines du SCRS. Autrement dit, quand la GRC était l'organisme d'enquête et d'application, cela posait des problèmes de sécurité nationale. C'est pourquoi le SCRS a été créé. Ainsi, nous nous retrouvons face à la même situation problématique que dans les années 1970, seulement cette fois-ci, c'est le SCRS qui va faire enquête, pour ensuite contrer les menaces de façon active ou proactive. Nous avons recréé un problème que le SCRS devait régler.
Le projet de loi  C-59 conserve également la liste bien trop étroite d'interdictions qui sont imposées sur les activités du SCRS. Le SCRS peut pratiquement tout faire sauf causer des blessures, commettre un meurtre ou nuire à la démocratie ou à la justice. Toutefois, il est toujours problématique que ni la justice ni la démocratie ne soient définies dans la loi. Ainsi, le projet de loi accorderait au SCRS des pouvoirs qui, selon moi, sont fondamentalement incompatibles avec une société libre et démocratique.
Les activités du SCRS devront encore être conformes à la Charte des droits et libertés. À première vue, cela semble bien, sauf que ces activités étant secrètes, il sera impossible de les passer au crible. Qui déterminera si elles violent la Charte? Pas un juge, puisqu'il ne s'agit pas ici de contrôle. Ce sera donc le gouvernement qui décidera s'il saisira ou non un juge de la question. Autrement dit, si le gouvernement déclare que la Charte n'a pas été enfreinte, il pourra autoriser sans crainte les activités du SCRS. Là encore, il s'agit d'une situation inacceptable en démocratie.
Le quatrième problème du projet de loi  C-59, c'est qu'il n'interdit pas complètement le recours aux renseignements obtenus sous la torture. Le député de Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan l'a démontré de manière éloquente, et je suis d'accord avec lui. Le gouvernement nous dit que nous n'avons rien à craindre puisqu'il a inclus la directive du Cabinet dans le texte du projet de loi, ce qui veut dire qu'elle aura force de loi. Elle a déjà force de loi, alors cette entourloupette ne change absolument rien à l'affaire.
Il y a toutefois pire, puisqu'absolument rien dans cette même directive n'interdit le recours aux renseignements obtenus sous la torture. On y dit que cette information, qui va à l'encontre des droits de la personne les plus fondamentaux, peut être utilisée seulement dans certaines circonstances, sauf que le seuil établi est extrêmement bas. D'abord, c'est moralement répugnant, voire carrément inconstitutionnel, mais en plus, l'information ainsi obtenue est d'une fiabilité à peu près nulle. Sous la torture, les gens vont dire exactement ce que leur bourreau veut entendre pour que cessent leurs supplices.
Enfin, le projet de loi  C-59 ne ferait pas ce qu'on aurait pu faire, c'est-à-dire créer un comité de surveillance pour l'ASFC. Il n'y a toujours pas de mécanisme indépendant d'examen et de traitement des plaintes pour l'ASFC. C'est l'un des rares organismes de sécurité ou d'application de la loi à ne pas faire l'objet d'une surveillance directe. Il est vrai que le nouveau Comité de surveillance des activités de renseignement de sécurité se penchera en partie sur les activités de l'ASFC, mais seulement lorsqu'il est question de sécurité nationale et non de ses activités quotidiennes.
Nous avons très souvent constaté que les activités menées par les organismes responsables des services frontaliers ont d'énormes conséquences sur le plan du respect des droits fondamentaux de la personne. Nous n'avons qu'à observer la situation actuelle aux États-Unis, où l'organisme chargé des services frontaliers sépare des parents de leurs enfants. Il est donc préoccupant qu'il n'y ait aucun recours au Canada, qu'on ne puisse pas porter plainte au sujet d'un incident impliquant l'ASFC, à part en s'adressant à une cour de justice, ce qui nécessite des renseignements, des ressources et toutes sortes d'autres choses qui ne sont probablement pas accessibles à ceux qui pourraient avoir à porter plainte.
Les libéraux nous diront qu'ils ont déjà pris certaines mesures qui ne sont pas couvertes par le projet de loi  C-59. Par exemple, le député de Winnipeg-Nord vient de dire que le projet de loi C-22 a permis d'établir le Comité des parlementaires sur la sécurité nationale et le renseignement.
Les néo-démocrates pensent que c’est une première étape utile pour corriger certaines lacunes de longue date des arrangements en matière de sécurité nationale, mais cette instance ne reste qu’un organisme d’examen, un organisme qui fait des recommandations. Il ne s'agit pas d'un organisme de contrôle qui prend des décisions en temps réel sur ce qui peut être fait et qui rend des ordonnances contraignantes sur les changements à apporter.
Le gouvernement a rejeté les amendements des néo-démocrates qui auraient permis au comité d’être plus indépendant. Ils lui auraient permis d’être plus transparent dans ses rapports au public et de mieux s’intégrer aux organes de surveillance existants.
L’autre sujet auquel les libéraux prétendent avoir donné suite concerne la liste d’interdiction de vol. Fait intéressant, dans son discours prononcé aujourd’hui, à l’ouverture du débat à l'étape de la troisième lecture, le ministre a affirmé que le gouvernement s’apprêtait à régler le problème de la liste d’interdiction de vol et non pas qu’il l’avait réglé. Le Canada n’a toujours pas de mécanisme efficace de recours que peuvent utiliser les voyageurs dont le nom figure par erreur sur cette liste. J’ai entendu très souvent des députés ministériels déclarer que, de toute façon, on ne refuse à personne l’accès à bord. Je peux leur donner le nom de gens qui se sont vu refuser l’accès à bord, ce qui a perturbé leurs activités commerciales ou d'autres choses, comme des réunions de famille. Bien trop souvent, des enfants se retrouvent sur les listes d’interdiction de vol. Leur nom a une consonance musulmane, arabe ou autre qui le fait ressembler au nom de gens qui figurent déjà sur ces listes.
Le groupe de parents dont les enfants figurent sur ces listes a exigé que des mesures efficaces soient immédiatement mises en oeuvre pour faire cesser le harcèlement constant dont ils sont victimes sans aucune raison. Le fait que nous n’ayons pas encore réglé ce problème suscite des questions sérieuses sur les garanties à l’égalité que confère la Charte et qui sont censées être protégées par la loi dans notre pays.
Non seulement le projet de loi  C-59 ne corrige pas les lacunes du projet de loi C-51, mais il crée deux nouvelles menaces aux droits et aux libertés des Canadiens, là encore, sans preuve que ces mesures accroîtront la sécurité.
Le projet de loi  C-59 propose d'élargir immédiatement le mandat du Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications au-delà de la simple collecte de renseignements pour lui donner la possibilité de recueillir sur les Canadiens des renseignements qu'il lui serait normalement interdit de recueillir.
Tout comme nous permettons au SCRS non seulement de recueillir des renseignements, mais aussi de réagir aux menaces, nous disons maintenant que le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications ne devrait pas uniquement recueillir de l'information, mais qu'il devrait aussi pouvoir mener ce que le gouvernement appelle des cyberopérations défensives et des cyberopérations actives.
Le projet de loi  C-59 fournit une liste trop générale de buts et de cibles pour les cyberopérations actives. Il dit que des activités pourraient être menées afin « de réduire, d’interrompre, d’influencer ou de contrecarrer, selon le cas, les capacités, les intentions ou les activités de tout étranger ou État, organisme ou groupe terroriste étrangers, dans la mesure où ces capacités, ces intentions ou ces activités se rapportent aux affaires internationales, à la défense ou à la sécurité, ou afin d’intervenir dans le déroulement de telles intentions ou activités. » Pensons à tout ce qui n'est pas couvert. La disposition ne pourrait être plus générale.
Le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications serait en outre autorisé à prendre « toute mesure qui est raisonnablement nécessaire pour assurer la nature secrète de l'activité ». Pensons à ce que cela suppose pour la surveillance et l'examen de ses activités. Je vois là une invitation à dissimuler de l'information aux organismes de surveillance.
On élargit les pouvoirs du Centre sans prévoir de surveillance adéquate. Encore une fois, il n'y a pas de surveillance indépendante, seulement un examen « après coup ». Ici, pour mener ses activités, il n'a pas à obtenir de mandat d'un tribunal, l'autorisation d'un ministre suffit, celle du ministre de la Défense nationale s'il s'agit d'activités à l'échelle nationale et celle du ministre des Affaires étrangères dans le cas d'activités menées à l'étranger.
Ces nouvelles mesures actives et proactives pour lutter contre toute une série de menaces constituent un des problèmes. Voici l'autre: bien que, aux termes du projet de loi  C-59, il soit toujours interdit au Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications de recueillir des renseignements sur les Canadiens, nous sommes censés lui permettre d'acquérir « incidemment » de l'information qui se rapporte à un Canadien ou à une personne se trouvant au Canada. Ainsi, même si ce n'était pas le but visé, le Centre pourrait tout de même recueillir, conserver et utiliser des renseignements personnels sur une personne. Ce qui ne va pas ici, c'est que la possibilité d'acquérir de l'information incidemment — ce qui est considéré comme de la recherche par le gouvernement et de la surveillance de masse par les détracteurs de cette façon de faire — demeure clairement un élément du projet de loi  C-59.
Ces deux nouveaux pouvoirs sont un peu troublants, quand on pense que la promesse des libéraux était de corriger les dispositions problématiques du projet de loi C-51, et non d'en ajouter d'autres. En soi, les modifications apportées au projet de loi C-51 sont mineures. Le député de Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan a mentionné que les changements n'étaient pas particulièrement efficaces. Je dois avouer que je suis d'accord avec lui. À mon avis, ils n'ont pas été conçus pour être efficaces. Il est peu probablement qu'ils empêchent les contestations constitutionnelles à l'égard du projet de loi C-51 qui ont déjà été déposées par des organismes comme l'Association canadienne des libertés civiles. Ces contestations constitutionnelles iront de l'avant et, selon moi, elles seront couronnées de succès.
Quelle est la meilleure solution dans les cas de terrorisme? Je le répète, lorsque j'étais le porte-parole du NPD en matière de sécurité publique et que je siégeais au comité de la sécurité publique lors des témoignages entourant le projet de loi C-51, nous avons entendu littéralement des dizaines et des dizaines de témoins qui ont presque tous dit la même chose: ce sont les bonnes vieilles méthodes policières en première ligne qui permettent de régler le problème du terrorisme ou d'empêcher des actes terroristes. Pour ce faire, il faut des ressources et il faut concentrer les ressources sur les mécanismes d'application de la loi en amont.
Qu'ont fait les conservateurs lorsqu'ils étaient au pouvoir? Ils ont réduit les budgets de la GRC, de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada et du Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité. Pendant tout le temps qu'ils ont été au pouvoir et qu'ils s'inquiétaient du terrorisme, ils ont refusé d'accorder les ressources élémentaires dont on avait besoin.
Qu'ont fait les libéraux depuis leur retour au pouvoir? Ils ont affecté de nouvelles ressources à tous ces organismes, mais pas pour les activités d'enquête et d'application de la loi en matière de terrorisme. Ces ressources serviront à toutes sortes de choses qui les intéressent, mais pas à celles qui permettraient vraiment d'améliorer les choses.
On a entendu souvent à la Chambre, notamment au cours du présent débat, qu'il faut faire des compromis entre les droits et la sécurité. Au cours de la dernière législature et durant la présente législature, les néo-démocrates ont soutenu régulièrement qu'il n'est pas nécessaire de faire des compromis entre les droits et la sécurité. Il est faux de prétendre qu'un juste équilibre doit être atteint. Comment pourrions-nous abandonner nos droits et, ce faisant, prétendre que nous les protégeons? Ce n'est pas logique. En fait, il incombe au gouvernement de protéger les droits fondamentaux des Canadiens et de les protéger contre les menaces.
Les libéraux nous diront encore qu'ils ont rempli leur promesse. Or, ce n'est pas ce que je vois dans ce projet de loi. Ce que je vois, ce sont de multiples tentatives de semer la confusion et de cacher ce qu'ils sont vraiment en train de faire, soit qu'ils continuent d'appuyer l'essence même du projet de loi C-51, c'est-à-dire restreindre les droits et libertés des Canadiens au nom de la sécurité nationale. Les néo-démocrates rejettent ce petit jeu. Ils vont donc voter contre ce projet de loi à l'étape de la troisième lecture.
Result: 1 - 1 of 1