Interventions in the House of Commons
 
 
 
RSS feed based on search criteria Export search results - CSV (plain text) Export search results - XML
Add search criteria
View Ralph Goodale Profile
Lib. (SK)
View Ralph Goodale Profile
2018-06-18 16:43 [p.21205]
moved:
That Bill C-59, An Act respecting national security matters, be read the third time and passed.
He said: Mr. Speaker, as I open this final third reading debate on Bill C-59, Canada's new framework governing our national security policies and practices, I want to thank everyone who has helped to get us to this point today.
Historically, there were many previous studies and reports that laid the intellectual groundwork for Bill C-59. Justices Frank Iacobucci, John Major, and Dennis O'Connor led prominent and very important inquiries. There were also significant contributions over the years from both current and previous members of Parliament and senators. The academic community was vigorously engaged. Professors Forcese, Roach, Carvin, and Wark have been among the most constant and prolific of watchdogs, commentators, critics, and advisers. A broad collection of organizations that advocate for civil, human, and privacy rights have also been active participants in the process, including the Privacy Commissioner. We have heard from those who now lead or have led in the past our key national security agencies, such as the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, the RCMP, the Communications Security Establishment, the Canada Border Services Agency, Global Affairs Canada, the Privy Council Office, and many others. While not consulted directly, through their judgments and reports we have also had the benefit of guidance from the Federal Court of Canada, other members of the judiciary, and independent review bodies like the Security Intelligence Review Committee, and the commissioner for the Communications Security Establishment.
National security issues and concerns gained particular prominence in the fall of 2014, with the attacks in Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu and here in Ottawa, which spawned the previous government's BillC-51, and a very intense public debate.
During the election campaign that followed, we undertook to give Canadians the full opportunity to be consulted on national security, actually for the first time in Canadian history. We also promised to correct a specific enumerated list of errors in the old BillC-51. Both of those undertakings have been fulfilled through the new bill, Bill C-59, and through the process that got us to where we are today.
Through five public town hall meetings across the country, a digital town hall, two national Twitter chats, 17 engagement events organized locally by members of Parliament in different places across the country, 14 in-person consultations with a broad variety of specific subject matter experts, a large national round table with civil society groups, hearings by the House of Commons Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security, and extensive online engagement, tens of thousands of Canadians had their say about national security like never before, and all of their contributions were compiled and made public for everyone else to see.
Based upon this largest and most extensive public consultation ever, Bill C-59 was introduced in Parliament in June of last year. It remained in the public domain throughout the summer for all Canadians to consider and digest.
Last fall, to ensure wide-ranging committee flexibility, we referred the legislation to the standing committee before second reading. Under the rules of the House, that provides the members on that committee with a broader scope of debate and possible amendment. The committee members did extensive work. They heard from three dozen witnesses, received 95 briefs, debated at length, and in the end made 40 different amendments.
The committee took what all the leading experts had said was a very good bill to start with, and made it better. I want to thank all members of the committee for their conscientious attention to the subject matter and their extensive hard work.
The legislation has three primary goals.
First, we sought to provide Canada with a modern, up-to-date framework for its essential national security activity, bearing in mind that the CSIS Act, for example, dates back to 1984, before hardly anyone had even heard of the information highway or of what would become the World Wide Web. Technology has moved on dramatically since 1984; so have world affairs and so has the nature of the threats that we are facing in terms of national security. Therefore, it was important to modify the law, to bring it up to date, and to put it into a modern context.
Second, we needed to correct the defects in the old BillC-51, again, which we specifically enumerated in our 2015 election platform. Indeed, as members go through this legislation, they will see that each one of those defects has in fact been addressed, with one exception and that is the establishment of the committee of parliamentarians, which is not included in Bill C-59. It was included, and enacted by Parliament already, in BillC-22.
Third, we have launched the whole new era of transparency and accountability for national security through review and oversight measures that are unprecedented, all intended to provide Canadians with the assurance that their police, security, and intelligence agencies are indeed doing the proper things to keep them safe while at the same time safeguarding their rights and their freedoms, not one at the expense of the other, but both of those important things together.
What is here in Bill C-59 today, after all of that extensive consultation, that elaborate work in Parliament and in the committees of Parliament, and the final process to get us to third reading stage? Let me take the legislation part by part. I noticed that in a ruling earlier today, the Chair indicated the manner in which the different parts would be voted upon and I would like to take this opportunity to show how all of them come together.
Part 1 would create the new national security and intelligence review agency. Some have dubbed this new agency a “super SIRC”. Indeed it is a great innovation in Canada's security architecture. Instead of having a limited number of siloed review bodies, where each focused exclusively on one agency alone to the exclusion of all others, the new national security and intelligence review agency would have a government-wide mandate. It would be able to follow the issues and the evidence, wherever that may lead, into any and every federal department or agency that has a national security or intelligence function. The mandate is very broad. We are moving from a vertical model where they have to stay within their silo to a horizontal model where the new agency would be able to examine every department of government, whatever its function may be, with respect to national security. This is a major, positive innovation and it is coupled, of course, with that other innovation that I mentioned a moment ago: the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians created under BillC-22. With the two of them together, the experts who would be working on the national security and intelligence review agency, and the parliamentarians who are already working on the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians, Canadians can have great confidence that the work of the security, intelligence, and police agencies is being properly scrutinized and in a manner that befits the complexity of the 21st century.
This scrutiny would be for two key purposes: to safeguard rights and freedoms, yes absolutely, but also to ensure our agencies are functioning successfully in keeping Canadians safe and their country secure. As I said before, it is not one at the expense of the other, it is both of those things together, effectiveness coupled with the safeguarding of rights.
Then there is a new part in the legislation. After part 1, the committee inserted part 1.1 in Bill C-59, by adding the concept of a new piece of legislation. In effect, this addition by the committee would elevate to the level of legislation the practice of ministers issuing directives to their agencies, instructing them to function in such a manner as to avoid Canadian complicity in torture or mistreatment by other countries. In future, these instructions would be mandatory, not optional, would exist in the form of full cabinet orders in council, and would be made public. That is an important element of transparency and accountability that the committee built into the new legislation, and it is an important and desirable change. The ministerial directives have existed in the past. In fact, we have made them more vigorous and public than ever before, but part 1.1 would elevate this to a higher level. It would make it part of legislation itself, and that is the right way to go.
Part 2 of the new law would create the new role and function of the intelligence commissioner. For the first time ever, this would be an element of real time oversight, not just a review function after the fact. The national security and intelligence review agency would review events after they have happened. The intelligence commissioner would actually have a function to perform before activities are undertaken. For certain specified activities listed in the legislation, both the Canadian security intelligence agency and the Communications Security Establishment would be required to get the approval of the intelligence commissioner in advance. This would be brand new innovation in the law and an important element of accountability.
Part 3 of Bill C-59 would create stand-alone legislative authority for the Communications Security Establishment. The CSE has existed for a very long time, and its legislation has been attached to other legislation this Parliament has previously passed. For the first time now, the CSE would have its own stand-alone legal authorization in new legislation. As Canada's foreign signals intelligence agency, CSE is also our centre for cybersecurity expertise. The new legislation lays out the procedures and the protection around both defensive and active cyber-operations to safeguard Canadians. That is another reason it is important the CSE should have its own legal authorization and legislative form in a stand-alone act.
Part 4 would revamp the CSIS Act. As I mentioned earlier, CSIS was enacted in 1984, and that is a long time ago. In fact, this is the largest overall renovation of the CSIS legislation since 1984. For example, it would ensure that any threat reduction activities would be consistent with the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. It would create a modern regime for dealing with datasets, the collection of those datasets, the proper use of those datasets, and how they are disposed of after the fact. It would clarify the legal authorities of CSIS employees under the Criminal Code and other federal legislation. It would bring clarity, precision, and a modern mandate to CSIS for the first time since the legislation was enacted in 1984.
Part 5 of the bill would change the Security of Canada Information Sharing Act to the security of Canada information disclosure act. The reason for the wording change is to make it clear that this law would not create any new collection powers. It deals only with the sharing of existing information among government agencies and it lays out the procedure and the rules by which that sharing is to be done.
The new act will clarify thresholds and definitions. It will raise the standards. It will sharpen the procedures around information sharing within the government. It will bolster record keeping, both on the part of those who give the information and those who receive the information. It will clearly exempt, and this is important, advocacy and dissent and protest from the definition of activities that undermine national security. Canadians have wanted to be sure that their democratic right to protest is protected and this legislation would do so.
Part 6 would amend the Secure Air Travel Act. This act is the legislation by which Canada establishes a no-fly list. We all know the controversy in the last couple of years about false positives coming up on the no-fly list and some people, particularly young children, being prevented from taking flights because their name was being confused with the name of someone else. No child is on the Canadian no-fly list. Unfortunately, there are other people with very similar names who do present security issues, whose names are on the list, and there is confusion between the two names. We have undertaken to try to fix that problem. This legislation would establish the legal authority for the Government of Canada to collect the information that would allow us to fix the problem.
The other element that is required is a substantial amount of funding. It is an expensive process to establish a whole new database. That funding, I am happy to say, was provided by the Minister of Finance in the last budget. We are on our way toward fixing the no-fly list.
Part 7 would amend the Criminal Code in a variety of ways, including withdrawing certain provisions which have never been used in the pursuit of national security in Canada, while at the same time creating a new offence in language that would more likely be utilized and therefore more useful to police authorities in pursuing criminals and laying charges.
Part 8 would amend the Youth Justice Act for the simple purpose of trying to ensure that offences with respect to terrorism where young people are involved would be handled under the terms of the Youth Justice Act.
Part 9 of the bill would establish a statutory review. That is another of the commitments we made during the election campaign, that while we were going to have this elaborate consultation, we were going to bring forward new legislation, we were going to do our very best to fix the defects in BillC-51, and move Canada forward with a new architecture in national security appropriate to the 21st century.
We would also build into the law the opportunity for parliamentarians to take another look at this a few years down the road, assess how it has worked, where the issues or the problems might be, and address any of those issues in a timely way. In other words, it keeps the whole issue green and alive so future members of Parliament will have the chance to reconsider or to move in a different direction if they think that is appropriate. The statutory review is built into Part 9.
That is a summary of the legislation. It has taken a great deal of work and effort on the part of a lot of people to get us to this point today.
I want to finish my remarks with where I began a few moments ago, and that is to thank everyone who has participated so generously with their hard work and their advice to try to get this framework right for the circumstances that Canada has to confront in the 21st century, ensuring we are doing those two things and doing them well, keeping Canadians safe and safeguarding their rights and freedoms.
propose;
Que le projet de loi  C-59, Loi concernant des questions de sécurité nationale, soit lu pour la troisième fois et adopté.
— Monsieur le Président, au moment d'entreprendre l'étape de la troisième lecture du projet de loi  C-59, le nouveau cadre fédéral régissant les politiques et les pratiques en matière de sécurité nationale, je tiens à remercier tous ceux qui ont contribué à ce que nous en arrivions là aujourd'hui.
Par le passé, de nombreuses études et de nombreux rapports ont jeté les bases intellectuelles du projet de loi  C-59. Les juges Frank Iacobucci, John Major et Dennis O’Connor ont dirigé des enquêtes très importantes. Au fil des ans, les députés et les sénateurs actuels et ceux qui les ont précédés ont également apporté des contributions importantes. Le milieu universitaire s’est beaucoup engagé. Les professeurs Forcese, Roach, Carvin et Wark figurent parmi les chiens de garde, les commentateurs, les critiques et les conseillers les plus constants et les plus prolifiques. Une vaste gamme d’organisations qui se portent à la défense des droits civils, des droits de la personne et du droit à la vie privée ont aussi participé activement au processus, y compris le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée. Nous avons pris connaissance du point de vue de ceux qui dirigent maintenant ou ont dirigé par le passé nos principaux organismes de sécurité nationale, comme le Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité, la GRC, le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications, l’Agence des services frontaliers du Canada, Affaires mondiales Canada, le Bureau du Conseil privé, et bien d’autres. Même s’ils n’ont pas été consultés directement, des représentants de la Cour fédérale du Canada et d’autres représentants de la magistrature et d’organismes d’examen indépendants, comme le Comité de surveillance des activités de renseignement de sécurité, ainsi que le commissaire du Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications, nous ont aussi fait profiter de leurs conseils grâce à leurs jugements et à leurs rapports.
Les questions et les préoccupations en matière de sécurité nationale ont pris une importance particulière à l’automne 2014, avec les attaques commises à Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu et ici, à Ottawa, qui ont entraîné la création du projet de loi C-51 du gouvernement précédent et qui ont suscité un débat public très intense.
Pendant la campagne électorale qui a suivi, nous nous sommes engagés à donner aux Canadiens la possibilité d’être consultés au sujet de la sécurité nationale, ce qui constituait une première dans l’histoire du Canada. Nous avons également promis de corriger une liste d’erreurs dans l’ancien projet de loi C-51. Ces deux engagements ont été respectés grâce au nouveau projet de loi  C-59 et au processus qui nous a menés là où nous sommes aujourd’hui.
Dans le cadre de cinq assemblées publiques locales tenues un peu partout au pays, d’une assemblée publique numérique, de deux séances de clavardage nationales sur Twitter, de 17 activités organisées localement par des députés dans différentes régions du pays, de 14 consultations sur place auprès d’une gamme d’experts spécialisés, d’une grande table ronde nationale avec des groupes de la société civile, d’audiences du Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale de la Chambre des communes, ainsi que d’une vaste consultation en ligne, des dizaines de milliers de Canadiens ont eu leur mot à dire sur la sécurité nationale, comme jamais cela ne s’était produit auparavant, et toutes leurs contributions ont été compilées et rendues publiques au bénéfice de tous.
Le projet de loi  C-59 a été présenté au Parlement, en juin dernier, par suite de la consultation publique la plus vaste et la plus exhaustive jamais tenue. Il est resté dans le domaine public tout au long de l’été pour que tous les Canadiens puissent l’examiner et l’assimiler.
L’automne dernier, afin de donner une plus grande marge de manoeuvre au comité, nous lui avons renvoyé le projet de loi avant l'étape de la deuxième lecture. Cette façon de faire, autorisée par le Règlement de la Chambre, permet d'élargir, pendant l'étude en comité, la portée des débats et des amendements. Les membres du comité ont accompli beaucoup de travail. Ils ont entendu près d'une quarantaine de témoins, reçu 95 mémoires, débattu en profondeur et, finalement, adopté 40 amendements.
Le comité s'est employé à améliorer un projet de loi dont tous les grands spécialistes avaient dit qu'il s'agissait d'un très bon début. Je tiens à remercier tous les membres du comité de leur excellent travail et d'avoir étudié consciencieusement la question.
Le projet de loi a trois objectifs.
Premièrement, nous voulions moderniser le cadre du Canada en ce qui concerne les activités essentielles en matière de sécurité nationale, sachant, par exemple, que la Loi sur le Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité remonte à 1984, soit à une époque où pratiquement personne n'avait entendu parler de l'autoroute de l'information ou de ce qui allait devenir le Web. La technologie a énormément évolué depuis 1984, tout comme les affaires mondiales et la nature des menaces à la sécurité nationale auxquelles nous sommes confrontés. Il était donc important de modifier la loi, de la moderniser pour l'adapter à la réalité actuelle.
Deuxièmement, nous devions corriger les lacunes de l'ancien projet de loi C-51, ce qui, encore une fois, faisait expressément partie des engagements énumérés dans notre programme électoral de 2015. Ainsi, les députés constateront que, dans ce projet de loi, nous avons corrigé toutes les lacunes, à l'exception d'une seule, celle ayant trait au comité de parlementaires. Le projet de loi  C-59 n'aborde pas ce point puisque le Parlement y a déjà remédié en adoptant le projet de loi C-22.
Troisièmement, nous avons lancé la nouvelle ère de transparence et de reddition de comptes dans le domaine de la sécurité nationale à l'aide de mesures d'examen et de surveillance sans précédent. Ces mesures visent à donner aux Canadiens l'assurance que leurs forces policières et leurs organismes de sécurité et de renseignement prennent bel et bien les bonnes mesures pour garantir leur sécurité et protéger leurs droits et leurs libertés et qu'ils s'efforcent d'atteindre ces deux objectifs simultanément au lieu d'en favoriser l'un aux dépens de l'autre.
Après avoir mené de vastes consultations, effectué des travaux complexes au Parlement ainsi qu'aux comités parlementaires et suivi le processus final menant à l'étape de la troisième lecture, quelles sont les dispositions incluses dans le projet de loi  C-59 aujourd'hui? Je vais décortiquer le projet de loi partie par partie. Dans une décision qu'il a rendue plus tôt aujourd'hui, la présidence a indiqué la façon dont la Chambre sera appelée à voter sur les différentes parties. J'aimerais profiter de cette occasion pour expliquer les liens entre toutes les parties.
La partie 1 créerait le nouvel Office de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité nationale et de renseignement. Certains ont qualifié cette nouvelle agence de « super CSARS ». En fait, l’Office constitue une grande innovation dans l’architecture de sécurité du Canada. Au lieu d’avoir un nombre limité d’organismes d’examen cloisonnés, où chacun se concentre exclusivement sur une seule organisation à l’exclusion de toutes les autres, le nouvel organisme de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité nationale et de renseignement aurait un mandat pangouvernemental. Il serait en mesure d’assurer le suivi des problèmes et des données probantes, peu importe où cela peut mener, dans tous les ministères ou organismes fédéraux qui ont une fonction de sécurité nationale ou de renseignement. Le mandat est très large. Nous passons d’un modèle vertical où chaque organisme doit fonctionner en vase clos, à un modèle horizontal où la nouvelle agence serait en mesure d’examiner chaque ministère, quelle que soit sa fonction, sous l’angle de la sécurité nationale. Il s’agit d’une innovation importante et positive qui s’ajoute, bien sûr, à l’autre innovation dont je parlais il y a un instant, soit le Comité des parlementaires sur la sécurité nationale et le renseignement créé en vertu du projet de loi C-22. Avec ces deux groupes réunis, les experts qui travailleraient à l’Office de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité nationale et de renseignement, et les parlementaires qui travaillent déjà au Comité des parlementaires sur la sécurité nationale et le renseignement, les Canadiens pourront avoir l’assurance que le travail des organismes de sécurité, de renseignement et de police sera scruté à la loupe et d’une manière qui correspond à la complexité du XXIe siècle.
Cet examen viserait deux objectifs clés, soit protéger les droits et libertés, effectivement, mais aussi veiller à ce que nos organismes réussissent à assurer la sécurité des Canadiens et de leur pays. Comme je l’ai déjà dit, un objectif ne sera pas atteint au détriment de l’autre. Ces deux objectifs, l’efficacité et la protection des droits, iront de pair.
Ensuite, il y a une nouvelle partie dans la loi. Après la partie 1, le comité a inséré la partie 1.1 dans le projet de loi C-59, en ajoutant le concept d’une nouvelle loi. En fait, cet ajout du comité porterait au niveau législatif la pratique des ministres qui donnent des directives à leurs organismes, leur ordonnant de fonctionner de manière à éviter la complicité du Canada dans la torture ou les mauvais traitements infligés par d’autres pays. À l’avenir, ces instructions seraient obligatoires, et non facultatives, elles existeraient sous forme de décrets du Cabinet et elle seraient rendues publiques. C’est un élément important de la transparence et de la reddition de comptes que le comité a intégré à la nouvelle loi, et c’est un changement important et souhaitable. Les directives ministérielles ont déjà existé. En fait, nous les avons rendues plus vigoureuses et publiques que jamais auparavant, mais la partie 1.1 rehausserait ce niveau. Elle ferait partie de la loi en soi, et c’est la bonne façon de procéder.
La partie 2 du projet de loi créerait le rôle et la fonction de commissaire au renseignement. Pour la toute première fois, il s'agirait d'exercer une surveillance en temps réel et non plus de réaliser un examen après coup. L’Office de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité nationale et de renseignement examinerait les événements après le fait. Le commissaire au renseignement aurait une fonction à remplir avant que ces activités n’aient lieu. Pour certaines activités désignées dans le projet de loi, l’Agence canadienne du renseignement de sécurité et le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications seraient tenus d’obtenir l’approbation préalable du commissaire au renseignement. Ce serait là une véritable innovation législative et un élément primordial en matière de reddition de comptes.
La partie 3 du projet de loi  C-59 créerait un pouvoir législatif indépendant pour le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications. Ce centre existe depuis très longtemps, et la loi qui le régit est rattachée à d’autres mesures législatives déjà adoptées par le Parlement. Pour la première fois, le Centre aurait son propre régime d’autorisation indépendant en vertu de la nouvelle loi. En tant qu’organisme canadien du renseignement électromagnétique étranger, le Centre est aussi notre centre d’expertise en matière de cybersécurité. Le projet de loi énonce les procédures et les mesures de protection entourant les cyberopérations aussi bien défensives qu'actives visant à protéger les Canadiens. Voilà une raison de plus qui justifie la nécessité pour le Centre d'avoir son propre régime d’autorisation et sa propre forme législative aux termes d’une loi indépendante.
La partie 4 moderniserait la Loi sur le Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité. Comme je l’ai dit précédemment, cette loi a été adoptée en 1984, c'est-à-dire il y a bien longtemps. En fait, il s’agit de la refonte la plus exhaustive de la Loi depuis son adoption. Par exemple, le projet de loi ferait en sorte que toute activité de réduction de la menace soit conforme à la Charte canadienne des droits et libertés. Il créerait un régime moderne pour traiter les ensembles de données, leur collecte, leur utilisation judicieuse et leur élimination ultérieure. Il préciserait les pouvoirs juridiques des employés du Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité en vertu du Code criminel et d’autres lois fédérales. Pour la première fois depuis l’adoption de la Loi, en 1984, le Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité aurait un mandat clair, précis et moderne.
La partie 5 du projet de loi modifierait le libellé anglais de la Loi sur la communication d’information ayant trait à la sécurité du Canada en remplaçant le mot « sharing » par le mot « disclosure ». Le nouveau libellé préciserait clairement que cette loi ne crée aucun nouveau pouvoir de collecte d'information. Elle ne concerne que la mise en commun de données existantes entre des organismes gouvernementaux et elle énonce la procédure et les règles à suivre pour communiquer de l’information.
La nouvelle loi clarifiera les seuils et les définitions. Elle rehaussera les normes. Elle précisera les procédures relatives à la communication de renseignements au sein de l'appareil gouvernemental. Ces mesures amélioreront la tenue de dossiers, tant par ceux qui fournissent l’information que par ceux qui la reçoivent. Il est important de souligner que les activités de défense d'une cause, de manifestation d'un désaccord ou de protestation seront expressément exclues de la définition des activités portant atteinte à la sécurité nationale. Les Canadiens veulent que leur droit démocratique de manifester soit protégé, et ce projet de loi leur en donne l’assurance.
La partie 6 modifierait la Loi sur la sûreté des déplacements aériens. Cette loi est celle par laquelle le Canada établit une liste d’interdiction de vol. Nous avons tous entendu parler de la controverse des deux ou trois dernières années au sujet des faux positifs sur la liste d’interdiction de vol et du fait que certaines personnes, surtout des jeunes enfants, n’ont pu prendre l’avion parce que leur nom a été confondu avec celui de quelqu’un d’autre. Aucun enfant ne figure sur la liste canadienne d’interdiction de vol. Malheureusement, il y a d’autres personnes qui ont des noms très semblables et qui sont associées à des problèmes de sécurité dont le nom figure sur la liste, et il y a confusion entre les deux noms. Nous nous sommes engagés à essayer de régler ce problème. Cette mesure législative donnerait au gouvernement du Canada le pouvoir juridique de recueillir des renseignements qui nous permettraient de régler le problème.
L’autre élément qui est nécessaire, c’est un financement substantiel. Établir une toute nouvelle base de données coûte cher. Je suis heureux de dire que ce financement a été octroyé par le ministre des Finances dans le dernier budget. Nous sommes en voie de corriger la liste d’interdiction de vol.
La partie 7 modifierait le Code criminel de diverses façons, notamment en retirant certaines dispositions qui n’ont jamais été utilisées pour assurer la sécurité nationale au Canada, tout en créant une nouvelle infraction dans un libellé qui serait plus probablement utilisé et donc plus utile aux autorités policières pour poursuivre les criminels et porter des accusations.
La partie 8 modifierait la Loi sur le système de justice pénale pour les adolescents dans le seul but de faire en sorte que les infractions liées au terrorisme commises par des jeunes soient traitées en vertu de la Loi sur le système de justice pénale pour les adolescents.
La partie 9 du projet de loi prévoit un examen législatif. C’est un autre des engagements que nous avons pris pendant la campagne électorale, à savoir que, même si nous allions tenir cette vaste consultation, nous allions présenter un nouveau projet de loi et faire de notre mieux pour corriger les lacunes du projet de loi C-51 et faire progresser le Canada au moyen d’une nouvelle architecture de sécurité nationale adaptée au XXIe siècle.
Nous inclurons également dans la loi la possibilité pour les parlementaires d’examiner de nouveau cette question quelques années plus tard, d’évaluer comment cela a fonctionné, où les problèmes pourraient se trouver et régler ces problèmes en temps opportun. Autrement dit, cela permet de garder toute la question à l’avant-plan afin que les futurs députés aient la possibilité de revoir la loi ou d’aller dans une autre direction s’ils le jugent approprié. L’examen prévu par la loi est intégré à la partie 9.
Voilà qui résume le projet de loi. Il a fallu beaucoup de travail et d’efforts de la part de beaucoup de gens pour en arriver là aujourd’hui.
Je veux terminer mon intervention en reprenant là où j’ai commencé il y a quelques instants, c’est-à-dire en remerciant tous ceux qui ont participé si généreusement et qui ont donné des conseils pour essayer de mettre en place un cadre adéquat pour la situation à laquelle le Canada doit faire face au XXIe siècle, pour veiller à ce que nous réalisions bien nos deux grands objectifs, soit assurer la sécurité des Canadiens et protéger leurs droits et libertés.
View Pierre Paul-Hus Profile
CPC (QC)
Mr. Speaker, I thank the minister for his speech.
On June 20, 2017, almost a year ago to the day, the minister introduced Bill C-59 in the House. Shortly after that, he said that, instead of bringing it back for second reading, it would be sent straight to the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security so the committee could strengthen and improve it. Opposition members thought that was fantastic. We thought there would be no need for political games for once. Since this bill is about national security, we thought we could work together to ensure that Bill C-59 works for Canadians. When it comes to security, there is no room for partisanship.
Unfortunately, the opposition soon realized that it was indeed a political game. The work we were asked to do was essentially pointless. I will have more to say about that later.
The government introduced BillC-71, the firearms bill, in much the same way. It said it would sever the gun-crime connection, but this bill does not even go there. The government is targeting hunters and sport shooters, but that is another story.
Getting back to Bill C-59, we were invited to propose amendments. We worked very hard. We got a lot of work done in just under nine months. We really took the time to go through this 250-page omnibus bill. We Conservatives proposed 45 specific amendments that we thought were important to improve Bill C-59, as the minister had asked us to do. In the end, none of our amendments were accepted by the committee or the government. Once again, we were asked to do a certain job, but then our work was dismissed, even though everything we proposed made a lot of sense.
The problem with Bill C-59, as far as we are concerned, is that it limits the Canadian Security Intelligence Service's ability to reduce terrorist threats. It also limits the ability of government departments to share data among themselves to protect national security. It removes the offence of advocating and promoting terrorist offences in general. Finally, it raises the threshold for obtaining a terrorism peace bond and recognizance with conditions. One thing has been clear to us from the beginning. Changing just two words in a 250-page document can sometimes make all the difference. What we found is that it will be harder for everyone to step in and address a threat.
The minister does indeed have a lot of experience. I think he has good intentions and truly wants this to work, but there is a prime minister above him who has a completely different vision and approach. Here we are, caught in a bind, with changes to our National Security Act that ultimately do nothing to enhance our security.
Our allies around the world, especially those in Europe, have suffered attacks. Bill C-51 was introduced in 2014, in response to the attacks carried out here, in Canada. Right now, we do not see any measures that would prevent someone from returning to the Islamic State. This is a problem. Our act is still in force, and we are having a hard time dealing with Abu Huzaifa, in Toronto. The government is looking for ways to arrest him—if that is what it truly wants to do—and now it is going to pass a law that will make things even harder for our security services. We are having a hard time with this.
Then there is the whole issue of radicalization. Instead of cracking down on it, the government is trying to put up barriers to preventing it. The funny thing is that at the time, when they were in the opposition, the current Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness and Prime Minister both voted with the government in favour of BillC-51. There was a lot of political manoeuvring, and during the campaign, the Liberals said that they would address Bill C-51, a bill they had supported. At the time, it was good, effective counter-terrorism legislation. However, the Liberals listened to lobby groups and said during the campaign that they would amend it.
I understand the world of politics, being a part of it. However, there are certain issues on which we should set politics aside in the interest of national security. Our allies, the Five Eyes countries are working to enhance their security and to be more effective.
The message we want to get across is that adding more red tape to our structures makes them less operationally effective. I have a really hard time with that.
Let me share some examples of amendments we proposed to Bill C-59. We proposed an amendment requiring the minister to table in Parliament a clear description of the way the various organizations would work together, namely, the NSIC, CSE, CSIS, the new committee of parliamentarians, as well as the powers and duties of the minister.
In our meetings with experts, we noticed that people had a hard time understanding who does what and who speaks to whom. We therefore drafted an amendment that called on the minister to provide a breakdown of the duties that would be clear to everyone. The answer was no. The 45 amendments we are talking about were not all ideological in nature, but rather down to earth. The amendments were rejected.
It was the Conservative government that introduced Bill C-51 when it was in office. Before the bill was passed, the mandate of CSIS prevented it from engaging in any disruption activities. For example, CSIS could not approach the parents of a radicalized youth and encourage them to dissuade their child from travelling to a war zone or conducting attacks here in Canada. After Bill C-51 was passed, CSIS was able to engage in some threat disruption activities without a warrant and in others with a warrant. Threat disruption refers to efforts to stop terrorist attacks while they are still in the planning stages.
Threat disruption activities not requiring a warrant are understood to be any activities that are not contrary to Canadian laws. Threat disruption activities requiring a warrant currently include any activity that would infringe on an individual's privacy or other rights and any activity that contravenes Canada's laws. Any threat disruption activities that would cause bodily harm, violate sexual integrity, or obstruct justice are specifically prohibited.
Under BillC-51, warrants were not required for activities that were not against Canadian law. BillC-51 was balanced. No one could ask to intervene if it was against the law to do so. When there was justification, that worked, but if a warrant was required, one was applied for.
At present, Bill C-59 limits the threat reduction activities of CSIS to the specific measures listed in the bill. CSIS cannot employ these measures without a warrant. At present CSIS requires a warrant for these actions, which I will describe. First, a warrant is required to amend, remove, replace, destroy, disrupt, or degrade a communication or means of communication. Second, a warrant is also required to modify, remove, replace, destroy, degrade, or provide or interfere with the use or delivery of all or part of something, including files, documents, goods, components, and equipment.
The work was therefore complicated by the privacy objectives of Canadians. BillC-51 created a privacy problem. Through careful analysis and comparison, it eventually became clear that the work CSIS was requesting was not in fact a privacy intrusion, as was believed. Even the privacy commissioners and witnesses did not analyze the situation the same way we are seeing now.
BillC-51 made it easier to secure peace bonds in terrorism cases. Before BillC-51, the legal threshold for police to secure a peace bond was that a person had to fear that another person will commit a terrorism offence.
Under BillC-51, a peace bond could be issued if there were reasonable grounds to fear that a person might commit a terrorism offence. It is important to note that Bill C-59 maintains the lower of the two thresholds by using “may”. However, Bill C-59 raises the threshold from “is likely” to “is necessary”.
Earlier when I mentioned the two words that changed out of the 250 pages, I was referring to changing “is likely” to “is necessary”. These two words make all the difference for preventing a terrorist activity, in order to secure a peace bond.
It would be very difficult to prove that a peace bond, with certain conditions, is what is needed to prevent an act of terrorism. This would be almost as complex as laying charges under the Criminal Code. What we want, however, is to get information to be able to act quickly to prevent terrorist acts.
We therefore proposed an amendment to the bill calling for a recognizance order to be issued if a peace officer believes that such an order is likely to prevent terrorist activities. The Liberals are proposing replacing the word “likely” with the words “is necessary”. We proposed an amendment to eliminate that part of the bill, but it was refused. That is the main component of Bill  C-59 with respect to managing national security.
Bill  C-59 has nine parts. My NDP colleague wanted to split the bill, and I thought that was a very good idea, since things often get mixed up in the end. We are debating Bill  C-59 here, but some parts are more administrative in nature, while others have to do with young people. Certain aspects need not be considered together. We believe that the administrative parts could have been included in other bills, while the more sensitive parts that really concern national security could have been dealt with publicly and separately.
Finally, the public and the media are listening to us, and Bill C-59 is an omnibus bill with so many elements that we cannot oppose it without also opposing some aspects that we support. For example, we are not against reorganizing the Communications Security Establishment. Some things could be changed, but we are not opposed to that.
We supported many of the bill's elements. On balance, however, it contains some legislation that is too sensitive and that we cannot support because it touches on fundamental issues. In our view, by tinkering with this, security operations will become very bureaucratic and communications will become difficult, despite the fact the the main goal was to simplify things and streamline operations.
The Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security heard from 36 witnesses, and several of them raised this concern. The people who work in the field every day said that it complicated their lives and that this bill would not simplify things. A huge structure that looks good on paper was put in place, but from an operational point of view, things have not been simplified.
Ultimately, national security is what matters to the government and to the opposition. I would have liked the amendments that we considered important to be accepted. Even some administrative amendments were rejected. We believe that there is a lack of good faith on the part of the government on this file. One year ago, we were asked to work hard and that is what we did. The government did not listen to us and that is very disappointing.
Monsieur le Président, je remercie le ministre de son discours.
Le 20 juin 2017, il y a un an presque jour pour jour, le ministre a déposé le projet de loi  C-59 à la Chambre. Peu de temps après, il a dit qu'au lieu d'en faire la deuxième lecture, on l'enverrait immédiatement au Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale, afin de le renforcer et de l'améliorer. Nous, dans l'opposition, avions dit que c'était fantastique, et que pour une fois, nous n'aurions pas à faire de jeux politiques. En outre, comme cela concernait la sécurité nationale, nous pourrions travailler ensemble pour nous assurer de l'efficacité du projet de loi  C-59 pour les Canadiens. Lorsque nous parlons de sécurité, il n'y a pas d'enjeu partisan avec cela.
Malheureusement, l'opposition a rapidement constaté qu'il s'agissait encore d'un jeu politique. Le travail qu'on nous a demandé n'a pas réellement servi. J'en parlerai un peu plus longuement.
On présente le projet de loi C-71, concernant les armes à feu, un peu de la même façon, en disant qu'on va enlever l'aspect criminel entourant les armes à feu, alors qu'il n'y a absolument rien sur cela dans le projet de loi. On s'attaque aux chasseurs et aux tireurs sportifs, mais c'est une autre histoire.
Concernant le projet de loi  C-59, on nous a invités à proposer des amendements. Nous avons travaillé très fort. Nous avons fait beaucoup de travail pendant presque neuf mois. Nous avons vraiment pris le temps de passer à travers ce projet de loi omnibus de 250 pages. Nous, les conservateurs, avons proposé 45 amendements qui étaient précis, et que nous considérions importants pour améliorer le projet de loi  C-59, comme le ministre nous avait demandé de le faire. Au bout du compte, aucun de nos amendements n'a été retenu par le comité et par le gouvernement. Encore une fois, on nous a demandé de faire un travail, et on n'a pas considéré ce que nous avons fait, alors que tout ce que nous avions proposé avait beaucoup de sens.
En ce qui nous concerne, le problème avec le projet de loi  C-59, c'est qu'il limite la capacité du Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité à réduire les menaces terroristes, ainsi que la capacité des ministères à partager des données pour protéger la sécurité nationale, en plus d'éliminer l'infraction de préconiser et de promouvoir les infractions de terrorisme en général, et d'augmenter le seuil pour l'obtention d'un engagement de paix et d'un engagement de terrorisme avec des conditions. Pour nous, depuis le début, c'est clair: sur 250 pages, il suffit parfois de changer deux mots et cela fait toute la différence. Ce que nous avons constaté, c'est que ce sera plus difficile pour tout le monde d'intervenir pour contrer la menace.
Le ministre est en effet un homme d'expérience. Je pense que son intention est louable et qu'il a vraiment l'objectif que cela fonctionne, mais au-dessus de lui, il y a un premier ministre qui a une vision et une façon de voir les choses totalement différentes. On se retrouve donc dans un étau, avec des changements à notre Loi sur la sécurité nationale qui, au bout du compte, ne font rien pour améliorer notre sécurité.
Des attentats se sont produits chez nos alliés partout dans le monde, notamment dans différents pays d'Europe. Chez nous, le projet de loi C-51 a été déposé en 2014, à la suite des attentats perpétrés ici, au Canada. Or nous ne voyons actuellement pas de mesures qui empêcheraient, par exemple, les gens de retourner auprès du groupe État islamique. C'est un problème. Notre loi est encore en vigueur et nous avons de la difficulté à intervenir auprès du fameux Abu Huzaifa qui est à Toronto. Le gouvernement cherche des moyens de l'arrêter — s'il veut bien l'arrêter —, et on va maintenant adopter une loi qui va compliquer encore plus les choses pour le service de sécurité. Nous avons beaucoup de difficulté avec cela.
En outre, il y a tout ce qui concerne la radicalisation. Au lieu de la réprimer, on cherche à mettre des barrières pour en empêcher le contrôle. Ce qui est plus drôle encore, c'est qu'à l'époque, l'actuel ministre de la Sécurité publique et de la Protection civile et le premier ministre, qui étaient dans l'opposition, avaient voté avec le gouvernement en faveur du projet de loi C-51. Il y a eu différentes tractations politiques, et en campagne électorale, les libéraux ont dit qu'ils s'attaqueraient au projet de loi C-51, alors qu'ils avaient voté en faveur de ce projet de loi. À l'époque, c'était une loi bonne et efficace pour contrer le terrorisme. Toutefois, pour écouter les groupes de pression, les libéraux ont dit en campagne électorale qu'ils changeraient cela.
La politique est une réalité que je comprends, car j'en fais partie. Toutefois, il y a des choses pour lesquelles on devrait laisser la politique de côté et travailler dans l'intérêt de la sécurité nationale. Nos alliés, les pays des « Five Eyes », travaillent à renforcer leur sécurité et à être plus efficaces.
Quant à nous, on passe le message que, finalement, on crée des structures, mais en les rendant plus administratives, on réduit l'efficacité opérationnelle. C'est un côté qui me fatigue énormément.
Voici des exemples d'amendements que nous avons proposés pour le projet de loi  C-59. Par exemple, nous avons proposé un amendement qui exigeait que le ministre dépose au Parlement une description claire de la façon dont toutes les organisations travailleraient ensemble, en occurrence, le CSNR, le CST, le SCRS, le nouveau comité des parlementaires, ainsi que les pouvoirs et les fonctions du ministre.
Au cours de nos rencontres avec les experts, nous avons constaté que les gens avaient de la difficulté à comprendre qui fait quoi et qui parle à qui. Nous avons donc rédigé un amendement qui demandait au ministre de donner une description de tâches claire à tout le monde. La réponse a été non. Pourtant, les 45 amendements dont nous parlons n'étaient pas tous liés à des choses idéologiques, mais plutôt terre à terre. Les amendements ont été rejetés.
C'est le gouvernement conservateur qui avait proposé le projet de loi C-51, à l'époque. Avant que ce projet de loi ne soit adopté, le mandat du SCRS l'empêchait de participer à des activités de perturbation. À titre d'exemple, le SCRS ne pouvait pas approcher les parents d'un jeune radicalisé et les encourager à dissuader leur enfant de se rendre dans une zone de guerre ou de mener des attaques, ici, au Canada. Avec l'adoption du projet de loi C-51, le SCRS a obtenu le pouvoir de participer à certaines activités de perturbation des menaces sans mandat, et certaines activités de perturbation des menaces exigeant un mandat. La perturbation de la menace fait référence aux efforts visant à arrêter les attaques terroristes, alors qu'elles sont encore en cours de planification.
La perturbation de la menace qui ne nécessite pas de mandat doit être comprise comme une activité qui n'est pas contraire à la loi canadienne. Les activités de perturbation des menaces qui nécessitent un mandat comprennent actuellement toute activité qui porterait atteinte à la vie privée ou à d'autres droits d'une personne ou à toute autre activité contraire à la loi canadienne. En outre, la perturbation de la menace interdisait spécifiquement toute atteinte corporelle, toute atteinte à l'intégrité sexuelle ou toute entrave à la justice.
En vertu du projet de loi C-51, des mandats n'étaient pas requis pour les activités qui n'étaient pas contraire à la loi canadienne. Le projet de loi C-51 était équilibré. On ne pouvait pas demander d'intervenir si c'était contraire à la loi de le faire. Quand c'était logique, cela fonctionnait, mais quand il y avait le besoin de demander un mandat, on en demandait un.
Actuellement, le projet de loi  C-59 limite les activités de perturbation des menaces du SCRS à des mesures précises énumérées dans le projet de loi. Présentement, le SCRS ne peut prendre ces mesures qu'avec un mandat. Je vais mentionner les points où le SCRS a effectivement besoin d'un mandat. Premièrement, il en a besoin pour modifier, supprimer, remplacer, détruire, perturber ou dégrader une communication ou des moyens de communication. Deuxièmement, il en a aussi besoin pour modifier, enlever, remplacer, détruire, dégrader ou fournir ou interférer avec l'utilisation ou la livraison de tout ou partie d'une chose, y compris des dossiers, des documents, des biens, des composantes et de l'équipement.
Par conséquent, le travail était compliqué par les objectifs de la population canadienne par rapport à la vie privée. Le projet de loi C-51 créait un problème concernant la vie privée. En analysant et en comparant tout cela, on se rend finalement compte que le travail demandé par le SCRS ne s'ingérait pas dans la vie privée de la population, comme on le croyait. Même les commissaires à la vie privée et les gens qui sont venus témoigner ne faisaient pas la même analyse de la situation que celle que nous voyons actuellement.
À l'époque, le projet de loi C-51 avait facilité l'obtention de l'engagement de ne pas troubler l'ordre public en cas de terrorisme. Avant le projet de loi C-51, la loi indiquait qu'il fallait craindre qu'un individu commette une infraction terroriste, avant que la police puisse obtenir un engagement de ne pas troubler l'ordre public.
En vertu du projet de loi C-51, l'engagement de ne pas troubler l'ordre public pourrait être émis s'il y avait des motifs raisonnables de craindre qu'une personne puisse commettre une infraction terroriste. Il est important de noter que le projet de loi  C-59 maintient le seuil inférieur de ces deux critères de « s'engager » à « peut s'engager ». Cependant, le projet de loi  C-59 augmente le seuil de « est susceptible » à « est nécessaire ».
Comme je le disais tantôt, sur 250 pages, cela fait partie des deux mots qui changent: « est susceptible » à « est nécessaire ». Cela vient tout changer pour empêcher une activité terroriste, afin d'obtenir un engagement de paix.
Il est très difficile de prouver qu'un engagement de ne pas troubler la paix, assorti de certaines conditions, est nécessaire pour empêcher un acte de terrorisme. Ce serait presque aussi complexe que de déposer des accusations en vertu du Code criminel. Pourtant, ce qu'on veut, c'est obtenir de l'information pour intervenir rapidement afin d'empêcher des actes terroristes.
Nous avons donc proposé un amendement à ce projet de loi visant à ce qu'une ordonnance d'engagement puisse être délivrée si un agent de la paix estime qu'une telle ordonnance est susceptible d'empêcher des activités terroristes. Les libéraux proposent de remplacer les mots « est susceptible » par « est nécessaire ». Nous, nous avons proposé un amendement qui éliminerait cette partie du projet de loi, mais cela a été refusé. C'est l'élément principal du projet de loi  C-59 en ce qui concerne la gestion de la sécurité nationale.
Le projet de loi  C-59 comporte neuf parties. Mon collègue du NPD voulait les séparer, et je trouvais que c'était une très bonne idée, car on finit par mélanger les choses. Ici, nous débattons du projet de loi  C-59, mais il y a des parties plutôt administratives et d'autres qui concernent les jeunes. Certains éléments n'ont pas à être évalués ensemble. Selon nous, les parties administratives auraient pu faire partie d'autres projets de loi, tandis que les parties plus délicates qui concernent vraiment la sécurité nationale auraient pu être traitées publiquement et séparément.
En fin de compte, les gens et les médias nous écoutent, et le projet de loi  C-59 est un projet de loi omnibus qui contient tellement d'éléments que nous ne pouvons nous y opposer sans nous opposer également à certaines idées que nous appuyons. Par exemple, nous ne sommes pas contre celle de refaire la structure du Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications. Certaines choses pourraient être changées, mais nous ne sommes pas fondamentalement contre cela.
Nous étions en faveur de plusieurs éléments du projet de loi, mais dans son ensemble, il contient des éléments trop délicats que nous ne pouvons appuyer parce qu'ils touchent des questions fondamentales. Selon nous, en jouant avec cela, on va faire de la sécurité un monde où il y aura beaucoup de bureaucratie et où la communication sera complexe, alors que le but premier était de simplifier les choses et de faciliter les opérations.
Au Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale, nous avons rencontré 36 témoins, et plusieurs d'entre eux ont soulevé cette préoccupation. Les gens qui travaillent sur le terrain tous les jours ont dit que cela leur compliquait la vie et que ce projet de loi n'allait pas simplifier les choses. On a mis en place une immense structure qui paraît bien sur papier, mais d'un point de vue opérationnel, on n'a pas simplifié les choses.
Finalement, c'est la sécurité nationale qui est importante, tant pour le gouvernement que pour les gens de l'opposition. J'aurais aimé que les amendements que nous considérions importants soient acceptés. Il y a même des amendements de nature administrative qui ont été refusés. Nous croyons que la bonne foi du gouvernement dans ce dossier fait défaut. Il y a un an, on nous a demandé de travailler fort, et c'est ce que nous avons fait. On ne nous a pas écoutés, et c'est très décevant.
View Matthew Dubé Profile
NDP (QC)
View Matthew Dubé Profile
2018-06-18 17:36 [p.21212]
Mr. Speaker, I thank my colleagues for their speeches. Here we are again, debating Bill C-59 at third reading, and I would like to start by talking about the process of debate surrounding a bill, which started not with this government, but rather during the last Parliament with the former Bill C-51.
Contrary to what we have been hearing from the other side today and at other times as well, the NDP and the Green Party were the only ones that opposed Bill C-51 in the previous Parliament. I have heard many people talk about how they were aware that Canadians had concerns about their security, about how a balanced approach was vital, and about how they understood the bill was flawed. They took it for granted that they would come to power and then fix the many, many, many flaws in the bill. Some of those flaws are so dangerous that they threaten the rights, freedoms, and privacy of Canadians. Of course, I am talking about the Liberal Party, which supported Bill C-51 even as it criticized it. I remember that when it was before committee, the member for Malpeque, who is still an MP, spend his time criticizing it and talking about its flaws. Then the Liberal Party supported it anyway.
That is problematic because now the government is trying to use the bill to position itself as the champion of nuanced perspectives. The government keeps trying to say that there are two objectives, namely to protect Canadians and to protect Canadians' rights. I myself remember a rather different situation, which developed in the wake of the 2014 attack on Parliament. The Conservative government tried to leverage people's fear following that terrible event to make unnecessary legislative changes. I will comment further on what was really necessary to protect Canadians.
A legislative change was therefore proposed to increase the powers given to national security agencies, but nothing was done to enhance the oversight system, which already falls short of where it needs to be to ensure that their work is done in full compliance with our laws and in line with Canadians' expectations regarding their rights and freedoms. Surveys showed that Canadians obviously welcomed those measures because, after all, we were in a situation where ISIS was on the rise, and we had the attack in Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, which is not far from my region. We also had the attack right here in Parliament. They took advantage of people's fear, so there was some support for the measures presented in the bill.
To the NDP, our reflection in caucus made it very clear that we needed to stand up. We are elected to this place not only to represent our constituents, but also to be leaders on extremely difficult issues and to make the right decision, the decision that will ensure that we protect the rights of Canadians, even when that does not appear to be a popular decision.
Despite the fact that it seemed to be an unpopular decision, and despite the fact that the Liberals, seeing the polls, came out saying “We are just going to go with the wind and try and denounce the measures in the bill so that we can simultaneously protect ourselves from Conservative attacks and also try and outflank the NDP on the progressive principled stand of protecting Canadians' rights and freedoms,” what happened? The polls changed. As the official opposition, we fought that fight here in Parliament. Unlike the Liberals, we stood up to Stephen Harper's draconian BillC-51. We saw Canadians overwhelmingly oppose the measures that were in Bill C-51.
What happened after the election? We saw the Liberals try to square the circle they had created for themselves by denouncing and supporting legislation all at the same time. They said not to worry, because they were going to do what they do best, which is to consult. They consulted on election promises and things that were already debated in the previous Parliament.
The minister brought forward his green paper. The green paper was criticized, correctly and rightfully so, for going too far in one direction, for posing the question of how we could give more flexibility to law enforcement, how we could give them more tools to do their jobs, which is a complete misunderstanding of the concerns that Canadians had with Bill C-51 to begin with. It goes back to the earlier point I made. Instead of actually giving law enforcement the resources to create their tools, having a robust anti-radicalization strategy, and making sure that we do not see vulnerable young people falling through the cracks and being recruited by terrorist organizations like ISIS or the alt right that we see in these white supremacist groups, what happened?
We embarked on this consultation that was already going in one direction, and nearly two years after the Liberals coming into power, we finally see legislation tabled. The minister, in his speech earlier today, defended tabling that legislation in the dying days of a spring sitting of Parliament before the House rises for the summer by saying that we would have time to consider and contemplate the legislation over the summer. He neglected to mention that the very same powers that stood on shaky constitutional ground that were accorded to agencies like CSIS by the Conservatives' BillC-51 remain on the books, and as Michel Coulombe, the then director of CSIS, now retired, said repeatedly in committee, they are powers that were being used at that time.
It is all well and good to consult. Certainly, no one is opposed to the principles behind consultation, but when the consultation is about promises that were made to the Canadian people to fix legislation that undermined their rights while the very powers that undermined their rights are still on the books and being used, then one has to recognize the urgency to act.
The story continues because after this consultation the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security conducted a consultation. We made recommendations and the NDP prepared an excellent supplementary report, which supports the committee's unanimous recommendations, but also includes our own, in support of the bill introduced by my colleague from Esquimalt—Saanich—Sooke, which is on the Order Paper. He was the public safety critic before me and he led the charge, along with the member for Outremont, who was then the leader of the official opposition, against BillC-51. The bill introduced by my colleague from Esquimalt—Saanich—Sooke entirely repeals all of the legislation in Bill C-51.
Interestingly, the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness defended the fact that he did not repeal it all by stating that several MPs, including the member for Spadina—Fort York, said that the reason not to do so was that it would be a highly complex legislative endeavour. My colleague introduced a bill that is on the Order Paper and that does exactly that. With due respect to my colleague, it cannot be all that complex if we were able to draft a bill that achieved those exact objectives.
Bill C-59 was sent to the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security before second reading, on the pretext that this would make it possible to adopt a wider range of amendments, give the opposition more opportunities to be heard, and allow for a robust study. What was the end result? A total of 55 amendments were adopted, and we are proud of that. However, of those 55 amendments, two come from the NDP, and one of those relates to the preamble to one part of the bill. While I have no desire to impugn the Liberals' motives, the second amendment was adopted only once the wording met their approval. None of the Conservatives' amendments were adopted. Ultimately, it is not the end of the world, because we disagree on several points, but I hear all this talk about collaboration, yet none of the Green Party's amendments were adopted. This goes to show that the process was rigged and that the government had already decided on its approach.
The government is going to brag about the new part 1.1 of the legislation that has been adopted. Contrary to what the minister said when answering my question earlier today in debate, that would not create any new legal obligation in terms of how the system currently works. The ministerial directives that are adopted to prohibit—despite loopholes, it is important to note—the use of information obtained under torture will remain just that, ministerial directives. The legal obligation that the minister or the Governor in Council “may” recommend the issuing of directives to deputy heads of departments is just not good enough. If it were, the Liberals would have had no problem voting for amendments that I read into record at committee. Time does not permit me to reread the amendments into the record, but I read them into the record in my question for the minister. The amendments would have explicitly and categorically prohibited acquiring, using, or, in way, shape, or form, interacting with information, from a public safety perspective, that may have been obtained under the use of torture. That is in keeping with our obligations under international law conventions that Canada has signed on to.
On a recorded vote, on every single one of those amendments, every member of the committee, Liberal and Conservative alike, voted against them. I invite Canadians to look at that record, and I invite Canadians to listen to what the minister said in response to me. When public safety may be at risk, there is no bigger admission that they are open to using information obtained under the use of torture than saying that they want to keep the flexibility when Canadians are at risk. Let Canadians be assured that it has been proven time and again that information obtained under the use of torture is of the most unreliable sort. It not only does nothing to protect Canadians and ensure public safety, but most of the time it does the opposite, by leading law enforcement on wild goose chases with erroneous information that could put their lives at risk, and Canadian lives at risk, not to mention the abhorrent and flagrant breach of human rights here and elsewhere through having those types of provisions. Therefore, I will let the Liberals explain why they voted against those amendments to explicitly prohibit torture, and why they feel that standing on ministerial directives and words like “may”, that are anything but binding, is good enough.
The Minister of Public Safety loves to boast that he has the support of various experts, and I have the utmost respect for those experts. I took the process in committee very seriously. I tried to unpack the extremely complex elements of the bill.
My Conservative colleague mentioned the Chair's decision to apply Standing Order 69.1. In my opinion, separating the votes on the different elements of the bill amounts to an acknowledgement that it is indeed an omnibus bill. A former director of CSIS, who served as a national security advisor to Prime Minister Harper and the current Prime Minister, said that the bill was beginning to rival the Income Tax Act in terms of complexity. Furthermore, several witnesses were forced to limit their testimony to just one part of the bill. In addition, elements were added concerning the Communications Security Establishment, or CSE, and those elements fall within the scope of national defence, yet they were never mentioned during the consultations held by the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security or by the Minister of Public Safety.
Before anyone jumps on me, I want to say that we realize the CSE's statutory mandate needs to be updated. We recognize that cybersecurity threats exist. However, when a government rams something through, as the government is doing with Bill C-59, we end up with flawed definitions, in particular with respect to the information available to the public, and with vague allocation of powers. Furthermore, the government is already announcing the position of a director of a new centre that is being created, under which everything will be consolidated, even though the act that is set out in the budget and, according to the minister, should be introduced this fall, has not yet been introduced.
This bill has many parts. The committee heard from some impressive experts, including professors Carvin, Forcese, and Wark, authors of some very important and interesting briefs, all of which are well thought out and attempt to break down all of the complicated aspects of the bill, including the ones I just mentioned. In their columns in The Globe and Mail, they say that some parts of the bill are positive and others require a more in-depth study. One of these parts has to do with information sharing.
Information sharing was one of the most problematic aspects of BillC-51.
Information sharing is recognized by the experts whom the minister touts as those supporting his legislation, by civil liberties associations and others, as one of the most egregious elements of what was BillC-51, and that is changed only in a cosmetic way in this legislation.
We changed “sharing” to “disclosure”, and what does that mean? When there are consequential amendments to changing “disclosure” everywhere else in all of these acts, it does not change anything. All experts recognize that. The problematic information-sharing regime that was brought in, which is a threat to Canadians' rights and freedoms, still exists.
If we want to talk about what happened to Maher Arar, the Liberals voted down one of my amendments to include Global Affairs as one of the governmental departments that Canadians could make a complaint about to the new review agency. Yet, when it comes to consular services, when it comes to human rights breaches happening to Canadians abroad, Global Affairs and consular services have a role to play, especially when we see stories in the news of CSIS undermining efforts of consular affairs to get Canadians out of countries with horrible human rights records and back here.
This has all fallen on deaf ears. The information-sharing regime remains in place. The new powers given to CSE, in clause 24, talk about how CSE has the ability to collect. Notwithstanding the prohibition on it being able to collect information on Canadians, it can, for the sake of research and other things, and all kinds of ill-defined terms, collect information on the information infrastructure related to Canadians.
Incidentally, as a matter of fact, it voted down my amendments to have a catch-and-release provision in place for information acquired incidentally on Canadians. What does that do? When we read clause 24 of part 3 of the bill related to CSE, it says that it is for the purposes of “disclosing”. Not only are they now exempt from the explicit prohibition that they normally have in their mandate, they can also disclose.
What have the Liberals done to the information-sharing regime brought in by the Conservatives under BillC-51? It is called “disclosure” now. Members can do the math. We are perpetuating this regime that exists.
I know my time is very limited, so I want to address the issue of threat disruption by CSIS. As I said in my questions to my Conservative colleague, the very reason CSIS exists is that disruption is a police duty. As a result, leaving the power to disrupt threats granted in former Bill C-51 in the hands of CSIS still goes against the mandate of CSIS and its very purpose, even if the current government is making small improvements to the constitutionality of those powers. That is unacceptable.
I am not alone in saying this. As I said in my questions to my Conservative colleagues, I am talking about the excellent interview with former RCMP commissioner Paulson. He was interviewed by Professors Carvin and Forcese on their podcast. That interview raised concerns about that power.
In closing, I would like to talk about solutions. After all, I did begin my remarks by saying that we do not want to increase the legislative powers, which we believe are already sufficient. I am talking here about Bill C-51, which was introduced in the previous Parliament. We need to look at resources for police officers, which were cut by the previous government. The Conservatives eliminated the police recruitment fund, which allowed municipalities and provinces to recruit police officers and improve police services in their jurisdictions. I am thinking in particular of the Montreal police, or SPVM, and the Eclipse squad, which dealt with street gangs. It was a good thing the Government of Quebec was there to fill the gap left by the elimination of the funding that made it possible for the squad to exist. The current government is making some efforts in the fight against radicalization, but it needs to do more. The Conservatives are dumping on and ridiculing those efforts. The radicalization that we are seeing on social media and elsewhere targets vulnerable young people. Ridiculing and minimizing the government's efforts undermines the public safety objectives that we need to achieve.
We cannot support a bill that so deeply undermines the protection of Canadians' rights and privacy. Despite what they claim across the way, this bill does nothing to protect the safety of Canadians, which, let us be clear, is an objective all parliamentarians want to achieve. However, achieving that objective must not be done to the detriment of rights and freedoms, as was the case under the previous government and as is currently still the case with this bill.
Monsieur le Président, je remercie mes collègues de leurs discours. Nous voilà encore à étudier le projet de loi  C-59 en troisième lecture et j'aimerais tout d'abord parler du processus du débat entourant un projet de loi, qui a débuté non pas à l'arrivée de ce gouvernement, mais plutôt à la dernière législature avec l'ancien projet de loi C-51.
Contrairement aux propos entendus de l'autre côté plus tôt aujourd'hui et à d'autres moment aussi, le NPD et le Parti vert étaient les seuls à s'opposer au projet de loi C-51 à la dernière législature. Maintenant, j'entends beaucoup d'histoires pour nous dire qu'on était conscient que les Canadiens avaient des préoccupations concernant leur sécurité, qu'il fallait trouver un approche équilibrée, et qu'on comprenait que le projet de loi avait des failles. Donc, on a pris pour acquis qu'on allait accéder au pouvoir et réparer par la suite les nombreuses — je dis bien les nombreuses — failles de ce projet de loi, voire même des failles dangereuses qui représentaient des menaces pour les droits et libertés et la protection de la vie privée des Canadiens. Je parle bien sûr du Parti libéral qui a offert son appui au projet de loi C-51, tout en le dénonçant. Je me souviens à l'époque de l'étude en comité, il y avait le député de Malpeque qui est toujours député à la Chambre qui a passé son temps à dénoncer le projet de loi, à parler de toutes ses lacunes et pourtant le Parti libéral lui a donné son appui.
Cela est problématique parce qu'ultimement on essaie de présenter cette position vis-à-vis du projet de loi comme le porte-étendard des perspectives nuancées. On essaie de nous dire qu'il fallait accomplir les deux objectifs: protéger les Canadiens et protéger leurs droits. Personnellement, je me souviens d'une situation pas mal différente à l'époque, une situation découlant de l'attentat que nous avons tous vécu ici, dans l'enceinte du Parlement en 2014. Le gouvernement conservateur a tenté de profiter de la peur qui existait au sein de la population à la suite cet horrible événement pour apporter un changement législatif qui n'était pas nécessaire. Je vais revenir à ce qui était réellement nécessaire pour protéger les Canadiens.
Donc, on a proposé un changement législatif. On a voulu accroître les pouvoirs accordés aux agences de sécurité nationale sans rien faire pour un système de surveillance qui n'était déjà pas à la hauteur de ce dont elles avaient besoin pour s'assurer que leur travail était fait en tout respect et en conformité de nos lois, mais aussi des attentes que les Canadiens ont par rapport à leurs droits et libertés. On a constaté dans les sondages que les Canadiens étaient, évidemment, favorables à ces mesures parce qu'après tout on était dans une situation où il y avait la montée du groupe État islamique, l'attentat à Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu — pas loin de chez nous — et l'attentat ici même au Parlement. On a profité de cette peur et on a vu un appui pour les mesures présentes dans le projet de loi.
Au NDP, notre réflexion en caucus nous amené à nous dire que nous devions nous tenir debout. On nous envoie ici non seulement pour représenter nos concitoyens, mais pour être des leaders sur des questions extrêmement difficiles et pour prendre la bonne décision, la décision qui va vous permettre de protéger les droits des Canadiens, et ce, même si cela semble être une décision qui n'est pas populaire.
Malgré que cela semblait être une décision impopulaire, et malgré le fait que les libéraux, en voyant les sondages, se sont dit « Suivons simplement le courant et dénonçons les mesures du projet de loi, de sorte que nous puissions simultanément nous protéger des attaques des conservateurs et faire mieux que le NPD sur la position de principe progressiste de la protection des droits et libertés des Canadiens », que s’est-il passé? L’opinion publique a changé. À titre d’opposition officielle, nous avons fait ce combat ici, au Parlement. À la différence des libéraux, nous avons tenu tête à Stephen Harper sur le projet de loi radical qu'était le C-51. Nous avons vu les Canadiens s’opposer farouchement aux mesures se trouvant dans le projet de loi C-51.
Qu’est-il arrivé après les élections? Nous avons vu les libéraux tenter de résoudre le problème qu’ils s’étaient créé en dénonçant et en appuyant tout à la fois le projet de loi. Ils ont dit de ne pas s’inquiéter parce qu’ils allaient faire ce qu’ils font le mieux, c’est-à-dire consulter. Ils ont consulté sur des promesses électorales et des choses dont on avait déjà débattu au cours de la précédente législature.
Le ministre a déposé son livre vert. Le livre vert a été critiqué, à bon droit, parce qu’il allait trop loin dans une direction, parce qu'il demandait comment nous pourrions accorder plus de souplesse aux organismes d’application de la loi, leur donner plus d’outils pour faire leur travail, ce qui dénote une incompréhension totale des craintes que les Canadiens avaient au départ à l’égard du projet de loi C-51. On revient à l’argument que j’ai exposé tout à l’heure. Plutôt que de donner aux organismes d’application de la loi les ressources qui leur permettraient de créer leurs propres outils, de mettre au point une solide stratégie de prévention de la radicalisation et de veiller à ce que des jeunes gens vulnérables ne tombent pas entre les mailles du filet pour être recrutés par des organisations terroristes — telles que Daech ou la droite alternative militant pour la suprématie blanche — qu'a-t-on fait?
Nous avons participé à ces consultations qui étaient déjà orientées, et presque deux ans après l’arrivée au pouvoir des libéraux, nous voyons enfin le dépôt du projet de loi. Le ministre, dans son allocution de tout à l’heure, a défendu le dépôt du projet de loi dans les derniers jours d’une session du printemps du Parlement, juste avant que la Chambre des communes n’ajourne, en disant que nous aurions le temps au cours de l’été d’examiner la loi et d’y réfléchir. Il a oublié de mentionner que les pouvoirs accordés par le projet de loi C-51, sur des bases constitutionnelles fragiles, à des agences telles que le SCRS, restent en vigueur et que, comme l’a dit de manière répétée devant le comité M. Michel Coulombe, le directeur de l’époque du SCRS qui est maintenant à la retraite, ce sont des pouvoirs dont on se servait déjà à ce moment.
C’est très bien de consulter. Sans nul doute, personne ne s’objecte aux principes qu’incarnent les consultations, mais, lorsque ces consultations portent sur des promesses faites au peuple canadien de corriger une loi qui mine leurs droits, alors que les pouvoirs mêmes minant ces droits demeurent en vigueur et qu’on les utilise, il faut être conscient de l’urgence d’agir.
L'histoire se poursuit, car après cette consultation, le Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale a mené une consultation. Nous avons fait des recommandations et le NPD a produit un excellent rapport supplémentaire, qui appuie les recommandations unanimes du Comité mais qui ajoute les nôtres aussi, en appui au projet de loi de mon collègue de Esquimalt—Saanich—Sooke, qui est au Feuilleton. Il était porte-parole en matière de sécurité publique avant moi et il a mené la charge, avec le député d'Outremont, qui était à ce moment chef de l'opposition officielle, contre le projet de loi C-51. Le projet de loi de mon collègue de Esquimalt—Saanich—Sooke abroge complètement tous les éléments qui étaient contenus dans le projet de loi C-51.
C'est intéressant, parce que le ministre de la Sécurité publique et de la Protection civile s'est défendu de ne pas complètement abroger ces éléments en disant que plusieurs députés de la Chambre, dont le député de Spadina—Fort York, ont dit que la raison pour laquelle on n'abrogeait pas tous ces éléments, c'était parce que ce serait un exercice législatif trop compliqué. Mon collègue a déposé un projet de loi, qui est au Feuilleton, et qui fait exactement cela. En tout respect envers mon collègue, cela ne peut pas être si compliqué que cela si on a été capable de rédiger un projet de loi qui atteint exactement ces objectifs.
On a renvoyé le projet de loi  C-59 au Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale avant la deuxième lecture en disant que cela permettrait d'adopter un plus grand éventail d'amendements, que cela permettrait à l'opposition d'être entendue et que cela permettrait de faire une étude robuste. Qu'est-ce que cela a donné? Ce sont 55 amendements qui ont été adoptés, et on est bien fier. Or, sur ces 55 amendements, deux proviennent du NPD, dont un qui concerne le préambule d'une partie du projet de loi. Sans vouloir nier la bonne foi des libéraux, le deuxième amendement a été adopté avec une formulation qui faisait leur affaire. Aucun amendement des conservateurs n'a été adopté. Ultimement, ce n'est pas la fin du monde, parce que nous sommes en désaccord sur plusieurs points, mais néanmoins, on parle de collaboration et on n'a adopté aucun amendement du Parti vert. Cela reflète le fait que les jeux étaient faits et que le gouvernement avait déjà déterminé son approche.
Le gouvernement va se vanter de la nouvelle partie 1.1 de la loi qui a été adoptée. Contrairement à ce que le ministre a dit en répondant à ma question pendant le débat d’aujourd’hui, cela ne créerait aucune obligation juridique en ce qui a trait au fonctionnement actuel du système. Les directives ministérielles adoptées afin d’interdire — malgré les échappatoires, il importe de le souligner — l’utilisation de renseignements obtenus par la torture ne seront toujours que cela: des directives ministérielles. L’obligation juridique selon laquelle le ministre ou le gouverneur en conseil « peut » donner des instructions aux administrateurs généraux des ministères n’est pas suffisante. Si elle l’était, les libéraux n’auraient eu aucune réticence à voter pour les amendements que j’ai proposés au comité. Le temps qui me reste ne me permet pas de relire ces amendements, mais je l'ai fait dans ma question au ministre. Les amendements auraient explicitement et catégoriquement interdit l’acquisition ou l’utilisation, d’une façon ou d’une autre, d’information qui, du point de vue de la sécurité publique, pourrait avoir été obtenue par la torture. C’est conforme à nos obligations aux termes des conventions en droit international que le Canada a signées.
Lors d'un vote par appel nominal, tous les membres du comité, libéraux et conservateurs, on voté contre chacun de ces amendements sans exception. J’invite les Canadiens à consulter ce compte rendu et j’invite les Canadiens à écouter la réponse que le ministre m’a faite. Lorsque la sécurité publique est en danger, il n’existe pas d’admission plus flagrante qu’ils sont prêts à utiliser de l’information obtenue par la torture que de dire qu’ils veulent conserver de la latitude si les Canadiens sont en péril. Je veux assurer aux Canadiens qu’il a été prouvé maintes et maintes fois que l’information obtenue par la torture est la moins fiable. Non seulement elle n’a aucune utilité pour protéger les Canadiens et assurer la sécurité publique, mais elle a la plupart du temps l’effet contraire en lançant les organismes d’application de la loi sur de fausses pistes à partir de renseignements erronés, ce qui peut mettre en danger les membres de ces organismes ainsi que la vie des Canadiens, sans parler de la violation abjecte et flagrante des droits de la personne, ici et ailleurs, permise par ce genre de dispositions. Je laisserai par conséquent les libéraux expliquer pourquoi ils ont voté contre ces amendements visant explicitement à interdire la torture, et pourquoi ils croient que se fier à des directives ministérielles et à des mots tel que « peut », qui n’ont rien de contraignant, est suffisant.
Le ministre de la Sécurité publique aime bien se vanter de l'appui qu'il a eu de plusieurs experts, et je respecte beaucoup ceux-ci. J'ai pris le processus en comité très au sérieux. J'ai tenté de décortiquer les éléments extrêmement complexes du projet de loi.
Par ailleurs, mon collègue conservateur a mentionné la décision de la présidence d'appliquer l'article 69.1 du Règlement. Selon moi, en séparant les votes sur divers éléments du projet de loi, on reconnaît par le fait même la nature omnibus de celui-ci. L'ancien directeur du SCRS, qui a été le conseiller en matière de sécurité nationale du premier ministre Harper et du premier ministre actuel, a dit que le projet de loi était quasiment plus compliqué que les lois sur l'impôt. Plusieurs témoins ont quant à eux dû se limiter à une partie du projet de loi. De plus, on a ajouté des éléments concernant le CST, le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications, qui sont du ressort de la défense nationale et qui n'ont jamais été mentionnés lors des consultations menées par le Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale ou par le ministre de la Sécurité publique.
Avant qu'on me critique là-dessus, j'aimerais dire que nous reconnaissons la nécessité de mettre à jour le mandat législatif du CST. Nous reconnaissons qu'il y a des menaces à la cybersécurité. Cependant, en précipitant l'exercice comme on l'a fait avec le projet de loi  C-59, on se retrouve avec des définitions défaillantes, notamment en ce qui concerne l'information disponible au public, et avec l'attribution de pouvoirs nébuleux. De plus, on annonce déjà le poste de directeur d'un nouveau centre qu'on est en train de créer et où on va tout consolider sous un toit, alors que la loi qui est prévue par le budget et qui, selon le ministre, devait être déposée cet automne n'a pas encore été déposée.
Bref, ce projet de loi contient de nombreux éléments. Des experts impressionnants, comme les professeurs Carvin, Forcese et Wark, ont témoigné devant le comité et ont écrit des textes extrêmement importants et intéressants. Ils les ont conçus avec beaucoup d'intérêt et ont tenté de décortiquer tous les éléments complexes, dont ceux que je viens de mentionner. Dans leurs chroniques du Globe and Mail, ils disent que certains éléments du projet de loi sont positifs et que d'autres méritent une étude plus approfondie. Un de ces éléments est le partage d'information.
L'échange d'information était l'un des éléments les plus problématiques du projet de loi C-51
La communication d’information est reconnue par les experts dont le ministre se targue d'avoir le soutien pour son projet de loi ainsi que par les associations de défense des libertés civiles et autres comme l’un des éléments les plus notables de ce qui était le projet de loi C-51, et cela n’est changé que de manière cosmétique dans le présent projet de loi.
On a remplacé la « communication » par la « divulgation », et qu’est-ce que cela signifie? Lorsqu’il y a des modifications corrélatives au changement de « divulgation » partout ailleurs dans toutes ces lois, cela ne change rien. Tous les experts le reconnaissent. Le régime problématique de communication d’information qui a été amené, qui menace les droits et les libertés des Canadiens, existe encore.
Si nous voulons parler de ce qui est arrivé à Maher Arar, les libéraux ont rejeté l’un de mes amendements visant à inclure Affaires mondiales Canada parmi les ministères auxquels les Canadiens pourraient présenter une plainte concernant le nouvel Office de surveillance. Pourtant, lorsqu’il s’agit des services consulaires, lorsqu’il s’agit de violations des droits de la personne subies par les Canadiens à l’étranger, Affaires mondiales Canada et les services consulaires ont un rôle à jouer, particulièrement quand nous voyons des reportages aux nouvelles à propos du SCRS, qui mine les efforts des affaires consulaires pour sortir les Canadiens des pays dont les bilans en matière de droits de la personne sont horribles et pour les ramener ici.
Tout cela est tombé dans l’oreille d’un sourd. Le régime de communication d’information demeure en place. Les nouveaux pouvoirs conférés au CST, à l'article 24, expliquent comment le CST peut recueillir des renseignements. Malgré l’interdiction de recueillir des renseignements sur les Canadiens qui lui est imposée, il peut, à des fins de recherche et autres, et au regard d’une panoplie de termes mal définis, recueillir des renseignements sur l’infrastructure de l’information en lien avec les Canadiens.
Soit dit en passant, il a rejeté mes amendements visant à mettre en place un principe de saisie et de rejet des renseignements sur les Canadiens obtenus de manière incidente. Qu’est-ce que cela fait? Quand on lit l'article 24 de la partie 3 du projet de loi liée au CST, on voit que c’est aux fins de « divulguer ». Non seulement sont-ils exemptés maintenant de l’interdiction explicite qui figure normalement dans leur mandat, mais ils peuvent aussi divulguer de l’information.
Qu’est-ce que les libéraux ont fait du régime de communication d’information mis en place par les conservateurs en vertu du projet de loi C-51? On l’appelle maintenant « divulgation ». Les députés peuvent tirer les conclusions qui s’imposent. Nous perpétuons le régime existant.
Je sais que mon temps de parole est très limité, alors je vais aborder la question des perturbations faites par le SCRS. Comme je l'ai dit dans mes questions à mon collègue conservateur, l'existence même du SCRS repose sur le fait que le pouvoir de perturbation est un devoir policier. Par conséquent, le fait de maintenir le pouvoir de perturbation, qui a été accordé par l'ancien projet de loi C-51, dans les mains du SCRS, même si on améliore légèrement la possible constitutionnalité de ces pouvoirs, va tout de même à l'encontre du mandat du SCRS et de sa raison d'être. Selon nous, c'est inacceptable.
Je ne suis pas le seul à le dire. Comme je l'ai dit dans mes questions à mes collègues conservateurs, je parle de l'excellente entrevue avec l'ancien commissaire de la GRC, le commissaire Paulson, qui a été interviewé par les professeurs Carvin et Forcese, sur leur balado. Cette entrevue soulève des inquiétudes par rapport à ce pouvoir.
En terminant, je vais parler des solutions. Après tout, j'ai dit d'entrée de jeu que nous ne voulons pas augmenter les pouvoirs législatifs, qui sont déjà suffisants, à notre avis. Je parle ici du projet de loi C-51 déposé lors de la dernière législature. Il faut examiner les ressources pour les policiers, qui ont été réduites par le gouvernement précédent. On a éliminé le fonds de recrutement de la police, qui permettait aux municipalités et aux provinces de recruter des policiers et de bonifier les services policiers sur leur territoire. On pense notamment au SPVM et à l'Escouade Éclipse, qui s'attaquait aux gangs de rue. Une chance que le gouvernement du Québec était là pour combler la brèche créée par l'élimination de ce fonds qui permettait l'existence de cette escouade. Dans la lutte contre la radicalisation, le gouvernement actuel déploie des efforts, mais ils devraient être bonifiés. Les conservateurs crachent sur ces efforts et essaient de les ridiculiser. La radicalisation que nous voyons sur les réseaux sociaux et ailleurs concerne des jeunes qui sont vulnérables. Ridiculiser ces efforts et les minimiser va à l'encontre des objectifs de sécurité publique que nous devons atteindre.
Nous ne pouvons pas appuyer un projet de loi qui crée autant de brèches dans la protection des droits des Canadiens, dans la protection de leur vie privée. Malgré ce qu'on plaide de l'autre côté, il ne fait rien pour réellement protéger la sécurité des Canadiens qui — disons-le franchement, ne mélangeons pas les choses — est un objectif partagé par tous les parlementaires. Toutefois, l'atteinte de cet objectif ne doit pas se faire au détriment des droits et libertés, comme ce fut le cas sous le gouvernement précédent et comme ce l'est toujours actuellement avec cette mesure législative.
View Randall Garrison Profile
NDP (BC)
Madam Speaker, I rise tonight to speak against Bill C-59 at third reading. Unfortunately, it is yet another example of the Liberals breaking an election promise, only this time it is disguised as promise keeping.
In the climate of fear after the attacks on Parliament Hill and in St. Jean in 2014, the Conservative government brought forward BillC-51. I heard a speech a little earlier from the member for Bellechasse—Les Etchemins—Lévis, and he remembers things slightly different than I. The difference is that I was in the public safety committee and he, as the minister, was not there. He said that there was a great clamour for new laws to meet this challenge of terrorism. I certainly did not hear that in committee. What I heard repeatedly from law enforcement and security officials coming before us was that they had not been given enough resources to do the basic enforcement work they needed to do to keep Canadians safe from terrorism.
However, when the Conservatives finally managed to pass their Anti-terrorism Act, they somehow managed to infringe our civil liberties without making us any safer.
At that time, the New Democrats remained firm in our conviction that it would be a mistake to sacrifice our freedoms in the name of defending them. BillC-51 was supported by the Liberals, who hedged their bets with a promise to fix what they called “its problematic elements” later if they were elected. Once they were elected in 2015, that determination to fix Bill C-51 seemed to wane. That is why in September of 2016, I introduced BillC-303, a private member's bill to repeal Bill C-51 in its entirety.
Some in the House at that time questioned why I introduced a private member's bill since I knew it would not come forward for a vote. In fact, this was an attempt to get the debate started, as the Liberals had already kept the public waiting for a year at that point. The New Democrats were saying, “You promised a bill. Well, here's our bill. It's very simple. Repeal all of C-51.”
Now, after more than two years and extensive consultations, we have this version of Bill C-59 before us, which does not repeal BillC-51 and fails to fix most of the major problems of Bill C-51, it actually introduces new threats to our privacy and rights.
Let me start with the things that were described, even by the Liberals, as problematic, and remain unfixed in Bill C-59 as it stands before us.
First, there is the definition of “national security” in the Anti-terrorism Act that remains all too broad, despite some improvements in Bill C-59. Bill C-59 does narrow the definition of criminal terrorism speech, which BillC-51 defined as “knowingly advocates or promotes the commission of terrorism offences in general”. That is a problematic definition. Bill C-59 changes the Criminal Code wording to “counsels another person to commit a terrorism offence”. Certainly, that better captures the problem we are trying to get at in the Criminal Code. There is plenty of existing case law around what qualifies as counselling someone to commit an offence. Therefore, that is much better than it was.
Then the government went on to add a clause that purports to protect advocacy and protest from being captured in the Anti-terrorism Act. However, that statement is qualified with an addition that says it will be protected unless the dissent and advocacy are carried out in conjunction with activities that undermine the security of Canada. It completes the circle. It takes us right back to that general definition.
The only broad definition of national security specifically in BillC-51 included threats to critical infrastructure. Therefore, this still raises the spectre of the current government or any other government using national security powers against protesters against things like the pipeline formerly known as Kinder Morgan.
The second problem Bill C-59 fails to fix is that of the broad data collection information sharing authorized by BillC-51, and in fact maintained in Bill C-59. This continues to threaten Canadians' basic privacy rights. Information and privacy commissioners continue to point out that the basis of our privacy law is that information can only be used for the purposes for which it is collected. Bill C-51 and Bill C-59 drive a big wedge in that important protection of our privacy rights.
Bill C-51 allowed sharing information between agencies and with foreign governments about national security under this new broad definition which I just talked about. Therefore, it is not just about terrorism and violence, but a much broader range of things the government could collect and share information on. Most critics would say Bill C-59, while it has tweaked these provisions, has not actually fixed them, and changing the terminology from “information sharing” to “information disclosure” is more akin to a sleight of hand than an actual reform of its provisions.
The third problem that remains are those powers that BillC-51 granted to CSIS to act in secret to counter threats. This new proactive power granted to CSIS by Bill C-51 is especially troubling precisely because CSIS activities are secret and sometimes include the right to break the law. Once again, what we have done is returned to the very origins of CSIS. In other words, when the RCMP was both the investigatory and the enforcement agency, we ran into problems in the area of national security, so CSIS was created. Therefore, what we have done is return right back to that problematic situation of the 1970s, only this time it is CSIS that will be doing the investigating and then actively or proactively countering those threats. We have recreated a problem that CSIS was supposed to solve.
Bill C-59 also maintains the overly narrow list of prohibitions that are placed on those CSIS activities. CSIS can do pretty much anything short of committing bodily harm, murder, or the perversion of the course of democracy or justice. However, it is still problematic that neither justice nor democracy are actually defined in the act. Therefore, this would give CSIS powers that I would argue are fundamentally incompatible with a free and democratic society.
The Liberal change would require that those activities must be consistent with the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. That sounds good on its face, except that these activities are exempt from scrutiny because they are secret. Who decides whether they might potentially violate the charter of rights? It is not a judge, because this is not oversight. There is no oversight here. This is the government deciding whether it should go to the judge and request oversight. Therefore, if the government does not think it is a violation of the charter of rights, it goes ahead and authorizes the CSIS activities. Again, this is a fundamental problem in a democracy.
The fourth problem is that Bill C-59 still fails to include an absolute prohibition on the use of information derived from torture. The member for Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan made some eloquent statements on this with which I agree. What we have is the government saying that now it has included a cabinet directive on torture in Bill C-59, which gives the cabinet directive to force of law. The cabinet directive already has the force of law, so it absolutely changes nothing about this.
However, even worse, there is no absolute prohibition in that cabinet directive on the use of torture-implicated information. Instead, the prohibition says that information from torture can be used in some circumstances, and then it sets a very low threshold for when we can actually use information derived from fundamental rights violations. Not only is this morally repugnant, most likely unconstitutional, but it also gives us information that is notoriously unreliable. People who are being tortured will say precisely what they think the torturer wants them to say to stop the torture.
Finally, Bill C-59 would not do one of the things it could have done, and that is create a review agency for the CBSA. The CBSA remains without an independent review and complaints mechanism. It is one of our only law enforcement or security agencies that has no direct review agency. Yes, the new national security intelligence review agency will have some responsibility over the CBSA, but only in terms of national security questions, not in terms of its basic day-to-day operations.
We have seen quite often that the activities carried out by border agencies have a major impact on fundamental rights of people. We can look at the United States right now and see what its border agency is doing in the separation of parents and children. Therefore, it is a concern that there is no place in Canada, if we have a complaint about what CBSA has done, to file that complaint except in a court of law, which requires information, resources, and all kinds of other things that are unlikely to be available to those people who need to make those complaints.
The Liberals will tell us that there are some areas where they have already acted outside of Bill C-59, and we have just heard the member for Winnipeg North talk about BillC-22, which established the national security review committee of parliamentarians.
The New Democrats feel that this is a worthwhile first step toward fixing some of the long-standing weaknesses in our national security arrangements, but it is still only a review agency, still only an agency making recommendations. It is not an oversight agency that makes decisions in real time about what can be done and make binding orders about what changes have to be made.
The government rejected New Democrat amendments on the bill, amendments which would have allowed the committee to be more independent from the government. It would have allowed it to be more transparent in its public reporting and would have given it better integration with existing review bodies.
The other area the Liberals claim they have already acted on is the no-fly list. It was interesting that the minister today in his speech, opening the third reading debate, claimed that the government was on its way to fixing the no-fly list, not that it had actually fixed the no-fly list. Canada still lacks an effective redress system for travellers unintentionally flagged on the no-fly list. I have quite often heard members on the government side say that no one is denied boarding as a result of this. I could give them the names of people who have been denied boarding. It has disrupted their business activities. It has disrupted things like family reunions. All too often we end up with kids on the no-fly list. Their names happen to be Muslim-sounding or Arabic-sounding or whatever presumptions people make and they names happen to be somewhat like someone else already on the list.
The group of no-fly list kids' parents have been demanding that we get some effective measures in place right away to stop the constant harassment they face for no reason at all. The fact that we still have not fixed this problem raises real questions about charter right guarantees of equality, which are supposed to be protected by law in our country.
Not only does Bill C-59 fail to correct the problems in BillC-51, it goes on to create two new threats to fundamental rights and freedoms of Canadians, once again, without any evidence that these measures will make it safer.
Bill C-59 proposes to immediately expand the Communications Security Establishment Canada's mandate beyond just information gathering, and it creates an opportunity for CSE to collect information on Canadians which would normally be prohibited.
Just like we are giving CSIS the ability to not just collect information but to respond to threats, now we are saying that the Communications Security Establishment Canada should not just collect information, but it should be able to conduct what the government calls defensive cyber operations and active cyber operations.
Bill C-59 provides an overly broad list of purposes and targets for these active cyber operations. It says that activities could be carried out to “degrade, disrupt, influence, respond to or interfere with the capabilities, intentions or activities of a foreign individual, state, organization or terrorist group as they relate to international affairs, defence or security.” Imagine anything that is not covered there. That is about as broad as the provision could be written.
CSE would also be allowed to do “anything that is reasonably necessary to maintain the covert nature of the activity.” Let us think about that when it comes to oversight and review of its activities. In my mind that is an invitation for it to obscure or withhold information from review agencies.
These new CSE powers are being expanded without adequate oversight. Once again, there is no independent oversight, only “after the fact” review. To proceed in this case, it does not require a warrant from a court, but only permission from the Minister of National Defence, if the activities are to be domestic based, or from the Minister of Foreign Affairs, if the activities are to be conducted abroad.
These new, active, proactive measures to combat a whole list and series of threats is one problem. The other is while Bill C-59 says that there is a still a prohibition on the Canadian Security Establishment collecting information on Canadians, we should allow for what it calls “incidental” acquisition of information relating to Canadians or persons in Canada. This means that in situations where the information was not deliberately sought, a person's private data could still be captured by CSE and retained and used. The problem remains that this incidental collecting, which is called research by the government and mass surveillance by its critics, remains very much a part of Bill C-59.
Both of these new powers are a bit disturbing, when the Liberal promise was to fix the problematic provisions in BillC-51, not add to them. The changes introduced for Bill C-51 in itself are minor. The member for Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan talked about the changes not being particularly effective. I have to agree with him. I do not think they were designed to be effective. They are unlikely to head off the constitutional challenges to Bill C-51 already in place by organizations such as the Canadian Civil Liberties Association. Those constitutional challenges will proceed, and I believe that they will succeed.
What works best in terrorism cases? Again, when I was the New Democrats' public safety critic sitting on the public safety committee when BillC-51 had its hearings, we heard literally dozens and dozens of witnesses who almost all said the same thing: it is old-fashioned police work on the front line that solves or prevents terrorism. For that, we need resources, and we need to focus the resources on enforcement activities at the front end.
What did we see from the Conservatives when they were in power? There were actual cutbacks in the budgets of the RCMP, the CBSA, and CSIS. The whole time they were in power and they were worried about terrorism, they were denying the basic resources that were needed.
What have the Liberals done since they came back to power? They have actually added some resources to all of those agencies, but not for the terrorism investigation and enforcement activities. They have added them for all kinds of other things they are interested in but not the areas that would actually make a difference.
We have heard quite often in this House, and we have heard some of it again in this debate, that what we are talking about is the need to balance or trade off rights against security. New Democrats have argued very consistently, in the previous Parliament and in this Parliament, that there is no need to trade our rights for security. The need to balance is a false need. Why would we give up our rights and argue that in doing so, we are actually protecting them? This is not logical. In fact, it is the responsibility of our government to provide both protection of our fundamental rights and protection against threats.
The Liberals again will tell us that the promise is kept. What I am here to tell members is that I do not see it in this bill. I see a lot of attempts to confuse and hide what they are really doing, which is to hide the fundamental support they still have for what was the essence of BillC-51. That was to restrict the rights and freedoms of Canadians in the name of national security. The New Democrats reject that false game. Therefore, we will be voting against this bill at third reading.
Madame la Présidente, je prends la parole ce soir contre le projet de loi  C-59 à l'étape de la troisième lecture. Malheureusement, nous avons là un autre exemple de promesse électorale des libéraux qui n'est pas tenue, sauf que, cette fois-ci, il font passer cela pour une promesse tenue.
Dans le climat de peur qui a suivi les attentats sur la Colline du Parlement et à Saint-Jean, en 2014, le gouvernement conservateur a présenté le projet de loi C-51. J'ai entendu une allocution un peu plus tôt du député de Bellechasse—Les Etchemins—Lévis, et il me semble que ses souvenirs sont légèrement différents des miens. La différence vient du fait que je siégeais au comité de la sécurité publique et lui, qui était ministre, n'y siégeait pas. Il a dit qu'on réclamait à grands cris de nouvelles mesures législatives pour faire face au terrorisme. Je n'ai certainement pas entendu cela au comité. Ce que j'ai entendu à maintes reprises des policiers et des responsables de la sécurité qui ont comparu devant nous, c'est qu'on ne leur avait pas donné suffisamment de ressources pour s'acquitter du travail de base qu'ils devaient faire pour garder les Canadiens à l'abri du terrorisme.
Toutefois, lorsque les conservateurs ont réussi à faire adopter leur loi antiterrorisme, ils ont réussi, d'une certaine façon, à empiéter sur nos libertés civiles sans accroître notre sécurité pour autant.
À l'époque, les néo-démocrates ont toujours maintenu que ce serait une erreur de sacrifier nos libertés au nom de la défense de celles-ci. Les libéraux ont appuyé le projet de loi C-51, et ils se sont couverts avec la promesse de corriger plus tard — une fois qu'ils seraient élus — ce qu'ils ont appelé « ses éléments problématiques ». Une fois élus, en 2015, leur détermination à corriger le projet de loi C-51 est vraisemblablement disparue. C'est pourquoi, en septembre 2016, j'ai présenté le projet de loi C-303, un projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire visant à abroger entièrement le projet de loi C-51.
À l'époque, certains députés ont remis en question mon idée de présenter un projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire, puisque je savais qu'il ne serait jamais soumis à un vote. En réalité, c'était une tentative de faire entamer le débat, puisque cela faisait déjà une année que les libéraux faisaient attendre le public à ce sujet. C'était une façon, pour les néo-démocrates, de dire: « Vous avez promis un projet de loi. Eh bien, voici le nôtre. C'est très simple: il faut abroger le projet de loi C-51. »
Maintenant, après deux ans et de longues consultations, nous voici, saisis de cette version du projet de loi  C-59, qui n'abroge pas le projet de loi C-51 et qui ne corrige pas la majorité des problèmes que présente ce dernier. En fait, il introduit de nouvelles menaces à notre vie privée et à nos droits.
Je commencerai par les aspects que même les libéraux ont décrits comme étant problématiques, et qui demeurent non corrigés dans le projet de loi  C-59 actuel.
Premièrement, la définition de « sécurité nationale » qui figure dans la Loi antiterroriste reste trop vague, malgré quelques améliorations apportées dans le projet de loi  C-59, qui resserre la définition de discours lié au terrorisme. Le projet de loi C-51 la définissait comme toute personne qui « préconise ou fomente la perpétration d’infraction de terrorisme en général ». Cette définition pose problème. Le projet de loi  C-59 modifie le libellé du Code criminel en ces termes: « conseille à une autre personne de commettre une infraction de terrorisme ». Ce libellé cerne mieux le problème à régler en vertu du Code criminel. La jurisprudence entourant ce qui constitue « conseiller quelqu’un à commettre une infraction » est abondante. En conséquence, la nouvelle définition est bien meilleure que l’ancienne.
Le gouvernement ajoute ensuite un article censé exclure de la Loi antiterroriste les activités de défense d’une cause et de manifestation d’un désaccord. Toutefois, cet article est assorti d'une déclaration d’une réserve selon laquelle les activités de défense d’une cause ou de manifestation d’un désaccord ne doivent avoir aucun lien avec une activité portant atteinte à la sécurité du Canada. La boucle est bouclée et cela nous ramène directement à la définition générale.
La seule définition globale de sécurité nationale qui figure dans le projet de loi C-51 comprend les menaces aux infrastructures essentielles. Cela soulève le spectre que le gouvernement actuel ou un gouvernement à venir se serve de ses pouvoirs relatifs à la sécurité nationale contre des gens qui manifestent par exemple contre le pipeline anciennement appelé Kinder Morgan.
Le deuxième problème que le projet de loi  C-59 ne corrige pas est la vaste autorisation à communiquer les données recueillies qui se trouvait dans le projet de loi C-51 et qui est maintenue dans le projet de loi  C-59. Cela perpétue la menace au droit fondamental des Canadiens à la vie privée. Les commissaires à l'information et à la protection de la vie privée continuent de signaler que le principe de base de notre Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels est que l'information peut uniquement être utilisée aux fins pour lesquelles elle est recueillie. Or, les projets de loi C-51 et C-59 créent une grosse brèche dans cette importante protection de notre droit à la vie privée.
Le projet de loi C-51 autorisait la communication, entre les organismes ainsi qu'à des gouvernements étrangers, de renseignements concernant la sécurité nationale, au sens large de la nouvelle définition dont je viens de parler. Par conséquent, ces renseignements ne portent pas seulement sur le terrorisme et la violence, mais sur un éventail beaucoup plus large de sujets à propos desquels le gouvernement pourrait recueillir de l'information et la communiquer. La plupart des détracteurs du projet de loi  C-59 diraient que, bien que ce dernier modifie les dispositions à ce sujet, il ne les corrige pas, et changer la terminologie anglaise d'« information sharing » à « information disclosure » tient davantage d'un tour de passe-passe que d'une véritable réforme des dispositions de la loi.
Le troisième problème qui reste non résolu est celui des pouvoirs que le projet de loi C-51 a accordé au SCRS et qui lui permettent d'agir en secret pour contrer les menaces. Le nouveau pouvoir proactif accordé au SCRS par le projet de loi C-51 est particulièrement inquiétant précisément parce que les activités du SCRS sont secrètes et qu'il a parfois le droit d'enfreindre la loi. Encore une fois, nous en sommes revenus aux origines du SCRS. Autrement dit, quand la GRC était l'organisme d'enquête et d'application, cela posait des problèmes de sécurité nationale. C'est pourquoi le SCRS a été créé. Ainsi, nous nous retrouvons face à la même situation problématique que dans les années 1970, seulement cette fois-ci, c'est le SCRS qui va faire enquête, pour ensuite contrer les menaces de façon active ou proactive. Nous avons recréé un problème que le SCRS devait régler.
Le projet de loi  C-59 conserve également la liste bien trop étroite d'interdictions qui sont imposées sur les activités du SCRS. Le SCRS peut pratiquement tout faire sauf causer des blessures, commettre un meurtre ou nuire à la démocratie ou à la justice. Toutefois, il est toujours problématique que ni la justice ni la démocratie ne soient définies dans la loi. Ainsi, le projet de loi accorderait au SCRS des pouvoirs qui, selon moi, sont fondamentalement incompatibles avec une société libre et démocratique.
Les activités du SCRS devront encore être conformes à la Charte des droits et libertés. À première vue, cela semble bien, sauf que ces activités étant secrètes, il sera impossible de les passer au crible. Qui déterminera si elles violent la Charte? Pas un juge, puisqu'il ne s'agit pas ici de contrôle. Ce sera donc le gouvernement qui décidera s'il saisira ou non un juge de la question. Autrement dit, si le gouvernement déclare que la Charte n'a pas été enfreinte, il pourra autoriser sans crainte les activités du SCRS. Là encore, il s'agit d'une situation inacceptable en démocratie.
Le quatrième problème du projet de loi  C-59, c'est qu'il n'interdit pas complètement le recours aux renseignements obtenus sous la torture. Le député de Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan l'a démontré de manière éloquente, et je suis d'accord avec lui. Le gouvernement nous dit que nous n'avons rien à craindre puisqu'il a inclus la directive du Cabinet dans le texte du projet de loi, ce qui veut dire qu'elle aura force de loi. Elle a déjà force de loi, alors cette entourloupette ne change absolument rien à l'affaire.
Il y a toutefois pire, puisqu'absolument rien dans cette même directive n'interdit le recours aux renseignements obtenus sous la torture. On y dit que cette information, qui va à l'encontre des droits de la personne les plus fondamentaux, peut être utilisée seulement dans certaines circonstances, sauf que le seuil établi est extrêmement bas. D'abord, c'est moralement répugnant, voire carrément inconstitutionnel, mais en plus, l'information ainsi obtenue est d'une fiabilité à peu près nulle. Sous la torture, les gens vont dire exactement ce que leur bourreau veut entendre pour que cessent leurs supplices.
Enfin, le projet de loi  C-59 ne ferait pas ce qu'on aurait pu faire, c'est-à-dire créer un comité de surveillance pour l'ASFC. Il n'y a toujours pas de mécanisme indépendant d'examen et de traitement des plaintes pour l'ASFC. C'est l'un des rares organismes de sécurité ou d'application de la loi à ne pas faire l'objet d'une surveillance directe. Il est vrai que le nouveau Comité de surveillance des activités de renseignement de sécurité se penchera en partie sur les activités de l'ASFC, mais seulement lorsqu'il est question de sécurité nationale et non de ses activités quotidiennes.
Nous avons très souvent constaté que les activités menées par les organismes responsables des services frontaliers ont d'énormes conséquences sur le plan du respect des droits fondamentaux de la personne. Nous n'avons qu'à observer la situation actuelle aux États-Unis, où l'organisme chargé des services frontaliers sépare des parents de leurs enfants. Il est donc préoccupant qu'il n'y ait aucun recours au Canada, qu'on ne puisse pas porter plainte au sujet d'un incident impliquant l'ASFC, à part en s'adressant à une cour de justice, ce qui nécessite des renseignements, des ressources et toutes sortes d'autres choses qui ne sont probablement pas accessibles à ceux qui pourraient avoir à porter plainte.
Les libéraux nous diront qu'ils ont déjà pris certaines mesures qui ne sont pas couvertes par le projet de loi  C-59. Par exemple, le député de Winnipeg-Nord vient de dire que le projet de loi C-22 a permis d'établir le Comité des parlementaires sur la sécurité nationale et le renseignement.
Les néo-démocrates pensent que c’est une première étape utile pour corriger certaines lacunes de longue date des arrangements en matière de sécurité nationale, mais cette instance ne reste qu’un organisme d’examen, un organisme qui fait des recommandations. Il ne s'agit pas d'un organisme de contrôle qui prend des décisions en temps réel sur ce qui peut être fait et qui rend des ordonnances contraignantes sur les changements à apporter.
Le gouvernement a rejeté les amendements des néo-démocrates qui auraient permis au comité d’être plus indépendant. Ils lui auraient permis d’être plus transparent dans ses rapports au public et de mieux s’intégrer aux organes de surveillance existants.
L’autre sujet auquel les libéraux prétendent avoir donné suite concerne la liste d’interdiction de vol. Fait intéressant, dans son discours prononcé aujourd’hui, à l’ouverture du débat à l'étape de la troisième lecture, le ministre a affirmé que le gouvernement s’apprêtait à régler le problème de la liste d’interdiction de vol et non pas qu’il l’avait réglé. Le Canada n’a toujours pas de mécanisme efficace de recours que peuvent utiliser les voyageurs dont le nom figure par erreur sur cette liste. J’ai entendu très souvent des députés ministériels déclarer que, de toute façon, on ne refuse à personne l’accès à bord. Je peux leur donner le nom de gens qui se sont vu refuser l’accès à bord, ce qui a perturbé leurs activités commerciales ou d'autres choses, comme des réunions de famille. Bien trop souvent, des enfants se retrouvent sur les listes d’interdiction de vol. Leur nom a une consonance musulmane, arabe ou autre qui le fait ressembler au nom de gens qui figurent déjà sur ces listes.
Le groupe de parents dont les enfants figurent sur ces listes a exigé que des mesures efficaces soient immédiatement mises en oeuvre pour faire cesser le harcèlement constant dont ils sont victimes sans aucune raison. Le fait que nous n’ayons pas encore réglé ce problème suscite des questions sérieuses sur les garanties à l’égalité que confère la Charte et qui sont censées être protégées par la loi dans notre pays.
Non seulement le projet de loi  C-59 ne corrige pas les lacunes du projet de loi C-51, mais il crée deux nouvelles menaces aux droits et aux libertés des Canadiens, là encore, sans preuve que ces mesures accroîtront la sécurité.
Le projet de loi  C-59 propose d'élargir immédiatement le mandat du Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications au-delà de la simple collecte de renseignements pour lui donner la possibilité de recueillir sur les Canadiens des renseignements qu'il lui serait normalement interdit de recueillir.
Tout comme nous permettons au SCRS non seulement de recueillir des renseignements, mais aussi de réagir aux menaces, nous disons maintenant que le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications ne devrait pas uniquement recueillir de l'information, mais qu'il devrait aussi pouvoir mener ce que le gouvernement appelle des cyberopérations défensives et des cyberopérations actives.
Le projet de loi  C-59 fournit une liste trop générale de buts et de cibles pour les cyberopérations actives. Il dit que des activités pourraient être menées afin « de réduire, d’interrompre, d’influencer ou de contrecarrer, selon le cas, les capacités, les intentions ou les activités de tout étranger ou État, organisme ou groupe terroriste étrangers, dans la mesure où ces capacités, ces intentions ou ces activités se rapportent aux affaires internationales, à la défense ou à la sécurité, ou afin d’intervenir dans le déroulement de telles intentions ou activités. » Pensons à tout ce qui n'est pas couvert. La disposition ne pourrait être plus générale.
Le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications serait en outre autorisé à prendre « toute mesure qui est raisonnablement nécessaire pour assurer la nature secrète de l'activité ». Pensons à ce que cela suppose pour la surveillance et l'examen de ses activités. Je vois là une invitation à dissimuler de l'information aux organismes de surveillance.
On élargit les pouvoirs du Centre sans prévoir de surveillance adéquate. Encore une fois, il n'y a pas de surveillance indépendante, seulement un examen « après coup ». Ici, pour mener ses activités, il n'a pas à obtenir de mandat d'un tribunal, l'autorisation d'un ministre suffit, celle du ministre de la Défense nationale s'il s'agit d'activités à l'échelle nationale et celle du ministre des Affaires étrangères dans le cas d'activités menées à l'étranger.
Ces nouvelles mesures actives et proactives pour lutter contre toute une série de menaces constituent un des problèmes. Voici l'autre: bien que, aux termes du projet de loi  C-59, il soit toujours interdit au Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications de recueillir des renseignements sur les Canadiens, nous sommes censés lui permettre d'acquérir « incidemment » de l'information qui se rapporte à un Canadien ou à une personne se trouvant au Canada. Ainsi, même si ce n'était pas le but visé, le Centre pourrait tout de même recueillir, conserver et utiliser des renseignements personnels sur une personne. Ce qui ne va pas ici, c'est que la possibilité d'acquérir de l'information incidemment — ce qui est considéré comme de la recherche par le gouvernement et de la surveillance de masse par les détracteurs de cette façon de faire — demeure clairement un élément du projet de loi  C-59.
Ces deux nouveaux pouvoirs sont un peu troublants, quand on pense que la promesse des libéraux était de corriger les dispositions problématiques du projet de loi C-51, et non d'en ajouter d'autres. En soi, les modifications apportées au projet de loi C-51 sont mineures. Le député de Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan a mentionné que les changements n'étaient pas particulièrement efficaces. Je dois avouer que je suis d'accord avec lui. À mon avis, ils n'ont pas été conçus pour être efficaces. Il est peu probablement qu'ils empêchent les contestations constitutionnelles à l'égard du projet de loi C-51 qui ont déjà été déposées par des organismes comme l'Association canadienne des libertés civiles. Ces contestations constitutionnelles iront de l'avant et, selon moi, elles seront couronnées de succès.
Quelle est la meilleure solution dans les cas de terrorisme? Je le répète, lorsque j'étais le porte-parole du NPD en matière de sécurité publique et que je siégeais au comité de la sécurité publique lors des témoignages entourant le projet de loi C-51, nous avons entendu littéralement des dizaines et des dizaines de témoins qui ont presque tous dit la même chose: ce sont les bonnes vieilles méthodes policières en première ligne qui permettent de régler le problème du terrorisme ou d'empêcher des actes terroristes. Pour ce faire, il faut des ressources et il faut concentrer les ressources sur les mécanismes d'application de la loi en amont.
Qu'ont fait les conservateurs lorsqu'ils étaient au pouvoir? Ils ont réduit les budgets de la GRC, de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada et du Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité. Pendant tout le temps qu'ils ont été au pouvoir et qu'ils s'inquiétaient du terrorisme, ils ont refusé d'accorder les ressources élémentaires dont on avait besoin.
Qu'ont fait les libéraux depuis leur retour au pouvoir? Ils ont affecté de nouvelles ressources à tous ces organismes, mais pas pour les activités d'enquête et d'application de la loi en matière de terrorisme. Ces ressources serviront à toutes sortes de choses qui les intéressent, mais pas à celles qui permettraient vraiment d'améliorer les choses.
On a entendu souvent à la Chambre, notamment au cours du présent débat, qu'il faut faire des compromis entre les droits et la sécurité. Au cours de la dernière législature et durant la présente législature, les néo-démocrates ont soutenu régulièrement qu'il n'est pas nécessaire de faire des compromis entre les droits et la sécurité. Il est faux de prétendre qu'un juste équilibre doit être atteint. Comment pourrions-nous abandonner nos droits et, ce faisant, prétendre que nous les protégeons? Ce n'est pas logique. En fait, il incombe au gouvernement de protéger les droits fondamentaux des Canadiens et de les protéger contre les menaces.
Les libéraux nous diront encore qu'ils ont rempli leur promesse. Or, ce n'est pas ce que je vois dans ce projet de loi. Ce que je vois, ce sont de multiples tentatives de semer la confusion et de cacher ce qu'ils sont vraiment en train de faire, soit qu'ils continuent d'appuyer l'essence même du projet de loi C-51, c'est-à-dire restreindre les droits et libertés des Canadiens au nom de la sécurité nationale. Les néo-démocrates rejettent ce petit jeu. Ils vont donc voter contre ce projet de loi à l'étape de la troisième lecture.
View Pierre Paul-Hus Profile
CPC (QC)
At the time, the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness decided not to give Bill  C-59 second reading and sent it directly to the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security. He said that committee meetings were needed to get additional information in order to improve the bill, so that is what we did.
During the committee's study of Bill  C-59, 235 amendments were proposed. The Conservative Party proposed 29 and the Green Party 45. The Liberals rejected all of them. Four NDP amendments and 40 Liberal amendments were adopted. Twenty-two of the Liberal amendments had more to do with the wording and with administrative issues. The Liberals also proposed one very important amendment that I will talk about later on.
The committee's mandate was to improve the bill. We, the Conservatives, undertook that work in good faith. We proposed important amendments to try to round out and improve the bill presented at second reading. The Liberal members on the committee rejected all of our amendments, even though they made a lot of sense. The Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security held 16 meetings on the subject and heard from a number of witnesses, including people from all walks of life and key stakeholders in the security field. In the end, the government chose to reject all of our amendments.
There were two key points worth noting. The first was that under Bill  C-59, our security agencies will have fewer tools to combat the ongoing terrorist threat around the world. The second was that our agencies will have a harder time sharing information.
One important proposal made in committee was the amendment introduced by the Liberal member for Montarville regarding the perpetration of torture. Every party in the House agrees that the use of torture by our intelligence or security agencies is totally forbidden. There is no problem on that score. However, there is a problem with the part about torture, in that our friends across the aisle are playing political games because they are still not prepared to tell China and Iran to change their ways on human rights. One paragraph in the part about torture says that if we believe, even if we do not know for sure, that intelligence passed on by a foreign entity was obtained through torture, Canada will not make use of that intelligence. For example, if another country alerts us that the CN Tower in Toronto is going to be blown up tomorrow, but we suspect the information was extracted through some form of torture, we will not act on that intelligence if the law remains as it is. That makes no sense. We believe we should protect Canadians first and sort it out later with the country that provided the intelligence.
It is little things like that that make it impossible for us to support the bill. That element was proposed at the end of the study. Again, it was dumped on us with no notice and we had to vote on it.
There are two key issues. The national security and intelligence review agency in part 1 does not come with a budget. The Liberals added an entity, but not a budget to go with it. How can we vote on an element of the bill that has no number attached to it?
Part 2 deals with the intelligence commissioner. The Liberals rejected changes to allow current judges, who would retire if appointed, and retirees from being considered, despite testimony from the intelligence commissioner who will assume these new duties. Currently, only retired judges are accepted. We said that there are active judges who could do the work, but that idea was rejected. It is not complicated. It makes perfect sense. We could have the best people in the prime of their lives who may have more energy than those who are about to retire and may be less interested in working 40 hours a week.
In part 3 on the Communications Security Establishment, known as CSE, there are problems concerning the restriction of information. In fact, some clauses in Bill C-59 will make capturing data more complicated. Our intelligence agencies are facing additional barriers. It will be more difficult to obtain information that allows our agencies to take action, for example against terrorists.
Part 4 concerns the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, or CSIS. The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and the privacy issue often come up in connection with CSIS. A common criticism of BillC-51 is that this bill would allow agencies to breach people's privacy. Witnesses representing interest groups advocating for Canadians' privacy and people whose daily work is to ensure the safety of Canadians appeared before the committee. For example, Richard Fadden said that the agencies are currently working in silos. CSIS, the CSE, and the RCMP work in silos, and the situation is too complex. There is no way to share information, and that is not working.
Dr. Leuprecht, Ph.D., from the Royal Military College, Lieutenant-General Michael Day from the special forces, and Ray Boisvert, a former security adviser, all made similar comments. Conservative amendment No. 12 was rejected. That amendment called for a better way of sharing information. In that regard, I would like to remind members of the Air India bombing in 1985. We were given the example of that bombing, which killed more than 200 people on a flight from Toronto to Bombay. It was determined that this attack could have been prevented had it been easier to share information at the time.
The most important thing to note about part 7, which deals with the Criminal Code, is that it uses big words to increase the burden for obtaining arrest warrants to prevent terrorist acts. Amendments were made regarding the promotion of terrorism. Section 83.221 of the Criminal Code pertains to advocating or promoting the commission of terrorism offences. The Liberals changed the wording of that section with regard to unidentified terrorist offences, for example, ISIS videos on YouTube. They therefore created section 83.221.
That changes the recognizance orders for terrorism and makes it more difficult to control threats. Now, rather than saying “likely”, it says “is necessary”. Those are just two little words, but they make all the difference. Before, if it was likely that something would happen, our security agencies could intervene, whereas now, intervention must be necessary. It is a technicality, but we cannot support Bill C-59 because of that change in wording. This bill makes it harder for security agencies and police to do their work, when it should be making it easier for them.
We are not opposed to revising our national security legislation. All governments must be prepared to do that to adapt. BillC-51, which was introduced at the time by the Conservatives, was an essential tool in the fight against terrorist attacks in Canada and the world. We needed tools to help our agents. The Liberals alluded to BillC-51 during the election campaign and claimed that it violated Canadians' freedoms and that it did not make sense. They promised to introduce a new bill and here it is before us today, Bill C-59.
I would say that Bill C-59, a massive omnibus bill, is ultimately not much different from Bill C-51. There are a number of parts I did not mention, because we have nothing to say and we agree with their content. We are not against everything. What we want, no matter the party, is to be effective and to keep Canadians safe. We agree on that.
Nevertheless, some parts are problematic. As I said earlier, the government does not want to accept information from certain countries on potential attacks, because this information could have been obtained through torture. This would be inadmissible. Furthermore, the government is changing two words, which makes it harder to access the information needed to take action. We cannot agree with this.
Now the opposite is being done, and most of the witnesses who came to see us in committee, people in the business of privacy, did not really raise any issues. They did not show up and slam their fists on the desk saying that it was senseless and had to be changed. Everyone had their views to express, but ultimately, there were not that many problems. Some of the witnesses said that Bill C-59 made no sense, but upon questioning them further, we often reached a compromise and everyone agreed that security is important.
Regardless, the Liberals rejected all of the Conservatives' proposed amendments. I find that hard to understand because the minister asked us to do something, he asked us to improve Bill C-59 before bringing it back here for second reading—it is then going to go to third reading. We did the work. We did what we were supposed to do, as did the NDP, as did the Green Party. The Green Party leader had 45 amendments and is to be commended for that. I did not agree with all her amendments, but we all worked to improve Bill C-59, and in turn, to enhance security in Canadians' best interest, as promised. Unfortunately, that never happened. We will have to vote against this bill.
Since I have some time left, I will give you some quotes from witnesses who appeared before the committee. For example, everyone knows Richard Fadden, the Prime Minister's former national security adviser. Mr. Fadden said that Bill  C-59 was “beginning to rival the Income Tax Act for complexity. There are sub-sub-subsections that are excluded, that are exempted. If there is anything the committee can do to make it a bit more straightforward”, it would help. Mr. Fadden said that to the committee. If anyone knows security, it is Canada's former national security adviser. He said that he could not understand Bill  C-59 at all and that it was worse than the Income Tax Act. That is what he told the committee. We agreed and tried to help, but to no avail. It seems like the Liberals were not at the same meeting I was at.
We then saw the example of a young man who goes by the name Abu Huzaifa. Everyone knows that two or three weeks ago, in Toronto, this young man boasted to the New York Times and then to CBC that he had fought as a terrorist for Daesh in Iraq and Syria. He admitted that he had travelled there for the purposes of terrorism and had committed atrocities that are not fit to be spoken of here. However, our intelligence officers only found out that this individual is currently roaming free in Toronto from a New York Times podcast. Here, we can see the limitations of Bill  C-59 in the specific case of a Canadian citizen who decided to fight against us, to go participate in terrorism, to kill people the Islamic State way—everyone here knows what I mean—and then to come back here, free as a bird. Now the Liberals claim that the law does not allow such and such a thing. When we tabled Bill C-51, we were told that it was too restrictive, but now Bill  C-59 is making it even harder to get information.
What do Canadians think of that? Canadians are sitting at home, watching the news, and they are thinking that something must be done. They are wondering what exactly we MPs in Ottawa are being paid for. We often see people on Facebook or Twitter asking us to do something, since that is what we are paid for. We in the Conservative Party agree, and we are trying; the government, not so much. Liberal members are hanging their heads and waiting for it to pass. That is not how it works. They need to take security a little more seriously.
This is precisely why Canadians have been losing confidence in their public institutions and their politicians. This is also why some people eventually decide to take their safety into their own hands, but that should never happen. I agree that this must not happen. That would be very dangerous for a society. When people lose confidence in their politicians and take their safety into their own hands, we have the wild west. We do not want that. We therefore need to give our security officers, our intelligence officers, the powerful tools they need to do their jobs properly, not handcuff them. Handcuffs belong on terrorists, not on our officers on the ground.
Christian Leuprecht from Queen's University Royal Military College said that he respected the suggestion that CSIS should stick to its knitting, or in other words, not intervene. In his view, the RCMP should take care of some things, such as disruption. However, he also indicated that the RCMP is struggling on so many fronts already that we need to figure out where the relative advantage of different organizations lies and allow them to quickly implement this.
The questions that were asked following the testimony focused on the fact that the bill takes away our intelligence officers' ability to take action and asks the RCMP to take on that responsibility in CSIS's place, even though the RCMP is already overstretched. We only have to look at what is happening at the border. We have to send RCMP officers to strengthen border security because the government told people to come here. The RCMP is overstretched and now the government is asking it to do things that it is telling CSIS not to do. Meanwhile, western Canada is struggling with a crime wave. My colleagues from Alberta spoke about major crimes being committed in rural communities.
Finland and other European countries have said that terrorism is too important an issue and so they are going to allow their security agencies to take action. We cannot expect the RCMP to deal with everything. That is impossible. At some point, the government needs to take this more seriously.
After hearing from witnesses, we proposed amendments to improve Bill  C-59, so that we would no longer have any reason to oppose it at second reading. The government could have listened to reason and accepted our amendments, and then we would have voted in favour of the bill. However, that is not what happened, and in my opinion it was because of pure partisanship. When we are asked to look at a bill before second or third reading and then the government rejects all of our proposals, it is either for ideological reasons or out of partisanship. In any case, I think it is shameful, because this is a matter of public safety and security.
When I first joined the Canadian Armed Forces, in the late 1980s, we were told that the military did not deal with terrorism, that this was the Americans' purview. That was the first thing we were told. At the time, we were learning how to deal with the Warsaw Pact. The wars were highly mechanized and we were not at all involved in fighting terrorism.
However, times have changed. Clearly, everything changed on September 11, 2001. Canada now has special forces, which did not exist back then. JTF2, a special forces unit, was created. Canada has had to adapt to the new world order because it could also be a target for terrorist attacks. We have to take off our blinders and stop thinking that Canada is on another planet, isolated from any form of wickedness and cruelty. Canada is on planet Earth and terrorism knows no borders.
The G7 summit, which will soon be under way, could already be the target of a planned attack. We do not know. If we do not have tools to prevent and intercept threats, what will happen? That is what is important. At present, at the G7, there are Americans and helicopters everywhere. As we can see on the news, U.S. security is omnipresent. Why are there so many of them there? It is because confidence is running low. If Americans are not confident about Canadians' rules, military, and ability to intervene, they will bring everything they need to protect themselves.
That is why we need to take a position of strength. Yes, of course we have to show that we are an open and compassionate country, but we still need to be realistic. We have to be on the lookout and ready to take action.
À cette époque, le ministre de la Sécurité publique a décidé de ne pas faire la deuxième lecture et d'envoyer directement le projet de loi  C-59 au Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale. Selon lui, il fallait tenir des rencontres pour avoir encore plus d'informations afin d'améliorer le projet de loi, et c'est ce qu'on a fait.
Pendant l'étude du projet de loi  C-59 en comité, 235 modifications ont été proposées: le Parti conservateur en a soumis 29 et le Parti vert, 45. Toutes ont été défaites par les libéraux. Quatre modifications proposées par le NPD et 40 modifications présentées par les libéraux ont été adoptées. Celles des libéraux concernaient plus des questions de libellé, soit 22 modifications, et des questions d'administration. Les libéraux ont aussi proposé une modification très importante dont je vais parler plus tard.
Le mandat du Comité était d'améliorer le projet de loi. Nous, les conservateurs, avons entrepris ce travail de bonne foi. Nous avons proposé des amendements importants pour que le projet de loi présenté à l'étape de la deuxième lecture soit plus complet et meilleur. Les membres libéraux du comité ont refusé d'adopter tous nos amendements, qui avaient beaucoup de bon sens. Le Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale a tenu 16 réunions sur ce sujet lors desquelles nous avons reçu plusieurs témoins: des gens de tous les horizons et des personnalités importantes de la sécurité. Finalement, le gouvernement a préféré dire non à nos amendements.
Nous retenons deux choses importantes. Premièrement, avec le projet de loi  C-59, il y aura moins d'outils pour nos agences de la sécurité, alors que la menace terroriste demeure présente dans notre monde. Deuxièmement, les agences auront encore plus de difficultés à s'échanger de l'information.
Une des choses importantes qui ont été proposées lors des réunions du comité, c'est l'amendement déposé par le député libéral de Montarville qui concerne la perpétration de la torture. Tous les partis à la Chambre s'entendent pour dire que l'utilisation de la torture par nos différentes agences de renseignement ou de sécurité est absolument interdite. Là-dessus, il n'y a aucun problème. Par contre, dans la partie sur la torture, il y a actuellement un problème et un jeu politique alors que nos amis d'en face ne sont pas encore prêts à dire à la Chine et à l'Iran de changer leurs façons de faire en ce qui concerne les droits de la personne. Dans un paragraphe de la partie sur la torture, il est écrit que si on pense — sans vraiment le savoir — qu'un renseignement qui provient de l'étranger a été obtenu par la torture, le Canada n'utilisera pas l'information. Par exemple, si un pays nous avertit qu'un attentat se prépare pour faire sauter demain la Tour CN, à Toronto, et qu'on pense que l'information a été soutirée par une forme de torture, on ne fera rien avec l'information si la loi reste comme cela. Cela n'a aucun sens. Nous pensons qu'il faut protéger les Canadiens d'abord et régler le problème avec le pays concerné après.
Ce sont des petits éléments comme celui-là qui font que nous ne pouvons pas appuyer le projet de loi. Cet élément a été proposé à la fin de l'étude. Encore une fois, il a été garroché sans avis, et nous avons dû voter.
Il y a des enjeux clés. Dans la partie 1 qui porte sur l'Office de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité nationale et de renseignement, il n'y a aucun budget prévu. Les libéraux ont donc augmenté la structure, mais n'y ont pas associé de budget. Comment pouvons-nous voter sur un élément du projet de loi alors qu'aucun chiffre n'y est rattaché?
Dans la partie 2, il est question du commissaire au renseignement. Les libéraux ont rejeté les modifications visant à permettre aux juges actuels, qui prendront leur retraite à leur nomination, et aux retraités d'être considérés, et ce, malgré le témoignage du commissaire au renseignement qui assumera ces nouvelles fonctions. Actuellement, on prend seulement des juges retraités. Nous avons dit qu'il y a des juges en fonction qui pourraient faire le travail, mais cela a été refusé. Pourtant, ce n'est rien de compliqué, c'est plein de bon sens. On pourrait avoir les meilleures personnes, dans la force de l'âge, qui ont une énergie peut-être plus grande que celle des personnes qui prennent leur retraite et qui sont moins intéressées à travailler 40 heures par semaine.
Dans la partie 3 sur le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications ou CST, il y a des problèmes relatifs à la restriction de l'information. En effet, dans le projet de loi  C-59, des clauses font en sorte que la capture de l'information sera plus compliquée. Nos agences de renseignement font face à des barrières supplémentaires. Il sera donc plus difficile d'obtenir l'information qui permet à nos agences d'engager des actions, entre autres contre des terroristes.
La partie 4 porte sur le Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité ou SCRS. En ce qui concerne le SCRS, on a souvent fait référence à la Charte canadienne des droits et libertés, ainsi qu'à la vie privée. On a souvent reproché cela au projet de loi C-51; on disait qu'en vertu de ce projet de loi, on pouvait interférer dans la vie privée des gens. Des témoins, qui représentaient les groupes d'intérêts pour les droits à la vie privée des gens, et des personnes qui travaillent quotidiennement pour assurer la sécurité des Canadiens, ont comparu. Par exemple, Richard Fadden a dit qu'on travaillait actuellement en silo. Le SCRS, le CST et la GRC travaillent en silo, et c'est trop compliqué. Il n'y a pas moyen de faire un partage d'information, cela ne fonctionne pas.
Ces commentaires ont été faits également par M. Leuprecht, Ph.D., du Collège militaire, par le lieutenant-général Michael Day, des forces spéciales, et par Ray Boisvert, ancien conseiller à la sécurité. L'amendement 12 des conservateurs a été rejeté. Cet amendement demandait une meilleure façon de faire pour le transfert d'information. À ce sujet, je rappelle l'attentat d'Air India en 1985. On nous a donné l'exemple de cet attentat qui a tué plus de 200 personnes dans un vol en partance de de Toronto pour Bombay. Il a été déterminé que si le transfert d'information avait été plus facile à l'époque, on aurait pu éviter cet attentat.
Le point le plus important dans la partie 7 qui traite du Code criminel est le fait d'augmenter le fardeau pour l'obtention de mandats d'arrestation afin d'empêcher des actes terroristes, en se servant de mots importants, Des mesures ont été prises pour modifier la promotion du terrorisme. À l'article 83.221 concernant l'incitation au terrorisme, libéraux ont changé une partie du libellé pour les activités terroristes non identifiées, comme par exemple les vidéos du groupe État islamique sur Youtube. Ils ont donc créé l'article 83.221.
Avec cela, on modifie les ordonnances d'engagement pour terrorisme, afin qu'il soit plus difficile de contrôler les menaces. Maintenant, au lieu de dire « probable », on dit « est nécessaire ». Ce sont tout simplement deux mots, mais ils font toute la différence. Avant, si c'était probable que quelque chose arrive, on pouvait intervenir, alors que maintenant, il faut que ce soit nécessaire. C'est un aspect technique, mais ces deux mots font en sorte que l'ensemble du projet de loi  C-59 ne peut être acceptable pour nous. En effet, on augmente la difficulté, alors qu'on devrait aider les agences et nos policiers à faire leur travail.
Nous ne sommes pas contre l'idée de remanier notre projet de loi sur la sécurité nationale. Tout gouvernement a besoin de le faire pour s'adapter à la situation. Le projet de loi C-51, déposé à l'époque par les conservateurs, était un outil essentiel dans les cas d'attentat terroriste au Canada et partout dans le monde. Nous avions besoin d'outils pour aider nos agents. En campagne électorale, les libéraux se sont servis du projet de loi C-51, disant qu'il allait à l'encontre de la liberté des Canadiens, que c'était un outil qui n'avait pas de bon sens. Ils ont d'ailleurs promis de déposer un nouveau projet de loi et nous l'avons devant nous aujourd'hui, le projet de loi  C-59.
Au bout du compte, je dirais que le projet de loi  C-59, un projet de loi omnibus et majeur, n'est pas nécessairement trop différent du projet de loi C-51. Il y a plusieurs parties dont je n'ai pas parlé, parce que nous n'avons rien à dire et que nous sommes d'accord avec ce qu'elles contiennent. Nous sommes pas contre tout dans la vie. Ce que nous voulons, c'est d'être efficaces et d'assurer la sécurité des Canadiens, peu importe le parti. On s'entend là-dessus.
Par contre, certains éléments sont problématiques. Comme je l'ai dit tantôt, on ne voudra pas accepter de l'information sur des attentats possibles provenant de certains pays, parce qu'elle a peut-être été obtenue sous la torture. Cela ne peut pas être admissible. De plus, on change deux mots, ce qui complique l'accès à l'information afin d'intervenir. On ne peut pas être d'accord avec cela.
Actuellement, on fait le contraire et la plupart des témoins qui sont venus nous voir au Comité, des gens qui s'occupent de la vie privée, n'avaient pas vraiment de problèmes à signaler. Ils ne sont pas arrivés en tapant sur le bureau, en disant que cela n'avait pas de bon sens, qu'il fallait changer cela. Tout le monde y allait de ses propositions, mais enfin de compte il n'y avait pas tant de problèmes. Oui, certains sont arrivés en disant que C-51 était insensé, mais quand on posait nos questions en contre-argument, on arrivait souvent à un compromis et tout le monde disait que la sécurité était importante.
Il demeure que les amendements proposés par les conservateurs ont tous été défaits par les libéraux. Je ne peux pas le comprendre alors que le ministre nous a demandé de faire un travail, d'aider à améliorer C-59 avant de l'amener ici en deuxième lecture — par la suite il va être en troisième lecture. Nous avons fait le travail. Nous avons fait ce que nous avions à faire, comme le NPD, comme le Parti vert. La chef du Parti vert, que je félicite, avait 45 amendements; je n'étais pas d'accord sur tous ses amendements, mais il y a un travail qui a été fait justement pour améliorer C-59 afin d'améliorer la sécurité, dans l'intérêt des Canadiens, tel que promis. Malheureusement, cela n'a pas été fait. Nous allons devoir voter contre le projet de loi.
Puisque j'ai du temps, je vais vous donner des exemples de citations des témoins qui sont venus au Comité. Par exemple, Richard Fadden, tout le monde connaît l'ancien conseiller à la sécurité nationale du premier ministre, a dit que le projet de loi  C-59 commençait « à rivaliser de complexité avec la Loi de l'impôt sur le revenu. Certains sous-alinéas sont exclus. S'il y a quelque chose que le Comité peut faire, c'est le simplifier un peu. » M. Fadden se présente au Comité, il nous dit cela. S'il y a quelqu'un qui connaît la sécurité, c'est bien l'ancien conseiller à la sécurité nationale du Canada. Il nous a dit qu'il ne comprenait rien à C-59, que c'était pire que l'impôt. C'est ce qu'il nous a dit en comité. Nous avons acquiescé et essayer d'aider, en vain. Il semble que les libéraux n'étaient pas à la même réunion que moi.
Ensuite, on a eu l'exemple d'une personne connue sous le nom Abu Huzaifa, un gentil petit monsieur. Tout le monde sait qu'il y a deux ou trois semaines à Toronto, le gentil petit monsieur s'est vanté au New York Times puis à CBC d'avoir été avec Daech, en Irak et en Syrie, d'avoir travaillé avec cette organisation comme terroriste. Il a avoué avoir voyagé pour faire du terrorisme et avoir commis des crimes odieux — je pense que cela ne peut même pas se dire ici —, puis nos agents de renseignement apprennent en écoutant les balados du New York Times que cet individu, qui est à Toronto actuellement, se promène en toute liberté. On voit les limites de C-59 avec le cas précis d'un Canadien qui a décidé de se battre contre nous, d'aller faire du terrorisme, de tuer des gens à la façon de l'État islamique — tout le monde sait ce que c'est — puis de revenir ici, et maintenant il se promène en liberté. Là, on nous dit que le loi ne permet pas ceci ou cela. Avec C-51, nous nous faisions dire que nous étions trop restrictifs, mais là on augmente les problèmes pour avoir de l'information avec C-59.
Que pensent les Canadiens de cela? Les Canadiens sont chez eux, ils regardent les nouvelles en se disant que quelque chose doit être fait et se demandent pourquoi les députés sont payés, à Ottawa. On voit cela souvent sur Facebook ou Twitter: les gens demandent que nous fassions quelque chose, car on nous paie pour cela. Nous, les conservateurs nous sommes d'accord et nous poussons. Le gouvernement est de l'autre bord; il penche la tête et il attend que cela passe. Cela ne fonctionne pas de cette manière. Il faut être un peu plus sérieux au chapitre de la sécurité.
C'est ce genre de chose qui fait que les Canadiens perdent confiance envers leurs institutions, envers leurs politiciens. C'est pour cela que les gens en viennent à un moment donné à vouloir prendre en charge leur sécurité eux-mêmes, mais il ne faut pas que cela arrive. Je suis d'accord qu'il ne faut pas que cela arrive. C'est ce qui est dangereux pour une société. Quand les gens perdent confiance envers leurs politiciens, décident de prendre en main leur sécurité, c'est le far west. Nous ne voulons pas cela. Nous avons donc besoin d'outils forts, qui permettent à nos agents de sécurité, nos agents de renseignement, de bien faire leur travail et non pas de les menotter. Les menottes vont aux terroristes, elles ne vont pas à nos agents sur le terrain.
Christian Leuprecht, du Collège militaire royal de l'Université Queen's, a dit qu'il respectait les suggestions selon lesquelles le SCRS devrait s'en tenir au tricotage, c'est-à-dire ne pas intervenir. Selon lui, la GRC devrait faire certaines choses comme des perturbations, mais il estime qu'elle a déjà des difficultés sur bien des fronts et qu'on devrait déterminer l'avantage relatif des différentes organisations et leur permettre de le mettre à profit rapidement.
Les questions que nous avons reçues à la suite des témoignages portaient donc sur le fait qu'on enlève à nos agents de renseignement du SCRS la possibilité d'intervenir et qu'on demande à la GRC de le faire, alors que celle-ci est débordée. Regardons ce qui se passe à la frontière. On doit envoyer des agents de la GRC pour la renforcer parce qu'on fait signe aux gens de venir ici. La GRC est donc débordée et on lui demande de faire des choses qu'on dit au SCRS de ne pas faire, et pendant ce temps, il y a des crimes dans l'Ouest. Mes collègues de l'Alberta parlaient des crimes majeurs qui ont lieu dans des communautés rurales.
La Finlande et d'autres pays d'Europe ont dit que le terrorisme était une question trop importante et qu'ils allaient permettre à leurs agents d'intervenir. On ne peut pas toujours dire que la GRC va tout régler, c'est impossible. À un moment donné, il faut être plus sérieux.
À la suite de ces témoignages, nous avions proposé des amendements pour améliorer le projet de loi  C-59 de telle sorte que nous n'ayons plus de raison de nous y opposer à l'étape de la deuxième lecture. Le gouvernement aurait pu entendre raison et accepter nos amendements, puis nous aurions eu un beau vote, mais cela n'a pas été le cas. Selon moi, c'est de la pure partisanerie. Quand on nous demande de faire un travail préalable à la deuxième lecture ou à la troisième lecture et qu'on rejette ensuite tout ce que nous proposons, c'est soit parce qu'on impose son idéologie, soit parce qu'on fait preuve de partisanerie. Quoi qu'il en soit, lorsqu'il est question de sécurité publique, cela me répugne.
À mes débuts dans les Forces armées canadiennes, à la fin des années 1980, on nous disait qu'au Canada, les militaires ne touchaient pas au terrorisme et que c'était un sujet qui concernait les Américains. C'était les premières choses qu'on nous disait. À l'époque, nous apprenions à nous battre contre le pacte de Varsovie. Il s'agissait des grandes guerres mécanisées; nous ne touchions pas du tout au terrorisme.
Toutefois, les temps ont changé. Évidemment, le 11 septembre 2001 a tout changé. Maintenant, le Canada a des forces spéciales, ce qu'il n'avait pas à l'époque. La FOI 2, une unité de forces spéciales, a été créée. Le Canada a dû s'adapter à la réalité mondiale, puisqu'il peut aussi être la cible d'attentats terroristes. Il faut cesser de se mettre des oeillères et de penser que le Canada est sur une autre planète, isolé de toute forme de méchanceté ou de cruauté. Le Canada est sur la planète Terre et le terrorisme n'a pas de frontières.
Le G7 approche, et n'importe qui pourrait avoir planifié un attentat là-bas. On ne le sait pas. Si on n'a pas d'outils pour prévenir et intercepter les menaces, que va-t-il arriver? C'est cela qui est important. Présentement, au G7, il y a des Américains et des hélicoptères partout. Des reportages télévisés nous montrent l'omniprésence de la sécurité américaine. Pourquoi y a-t-il autant de monde? C'est parce qu'il y a une perte de confiance. Si les Américains ne font pas confiance aux Canadiens en ce qui concerne nos règles, nos forces et notre capacité d'intervention, ils vont apporter tout ce dont ils ont besoin pour se défendre eux-mêmes.
Il faut donc prendre une position forte. Oui, il faut démontrer que nous sommes un pays ouvert et compatissant, bien sûr. Cependant, il ne faut pas se mettre des oeillères; il faut être à l'affût et prêt à agir.
Results: 1 - 5 of 5