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Results: 211 - 240 of 1672
View Rhéal Fortin Profile
BQ (QC)
View Rhéal Fortin Profile
2019-02-19 11:13 [p.25483]
Madam Speaker, you are right. I apologize.
Regarding the utter mismanagement, I absolutely agree with the position taken by our colleagues from the second opposition party. I support a public inquiry and I agree that the former attorney general of Canada should testify.
That said, we must also consider the equally devastating consequences of this scandal on the third parties involved, namely, the SNC-Lavalin workers, who have nothing to do with the fraudulent acts committed by the former executives at that company. For the workers, suppliers and other third parties who do business with SNC-Lavalin, reaching a remediation agreement seems crucial to me.
Why is there nothing in the motion moved by the second opposition party regarding the importance of reaching a remediation agreement as well as protecting Quebec's civil engineers and their expertise?
View Mario Beaulieu Profile
BQ (QC)
View Mario Beaulieu Profile
2019-02-19 13:58 [p.25507]
Mr. Speaker, the government has at last halted deportations of Haitian citizens and refugees because of the violent crisis that has been raging for months in Haiti. That does not make up for the many years during which it treated Haitians without status as numbers.
The Bloc has been calling on the government to regularize their status for the past five years. Three months ago, as the crisis was escalating, we asked the government to suspend deportations. It refused. For the past three months, Ottawa has been deporting families to a country rocked by violence. On Thursday, a father and his 11-year-old daughter were arrested and deported in the midst of a full-blown crisis.
The government has finally woken up, but the Haitian community is wondering when deportations will resume. The least the government can do is issue a moratorium for as long as the situation in Haiti remains unsafe.
View Rhéal Fortin Profile
BQ (QC)
View Rhéal Fortin Profile
2019-02-19 14:59 [p.25518]
Mr. Speaker, everyone wants the white-collar criminals who were running SNC-Lavalin to be held accountable and brought to justice. That is unanimous.
However, what we in the Bloc Québécois do not want is to lose another head office and thousands of jobs in Quebec. When I put it like that, it sounds simple enough. Meanwhile, the Prime Minister keeps digging himself in deeper and deeper in this matter, desperately trying to blame someone, anyone, for his fiasco.
Can he guarantee that the workers at SNC-Lavalin will not be the ones to suffer because of the many mistakes he has made in this matter?
View Rhéal Fortin Profile
BQ (QC)
View Rhéal Fortin Profile
2019-02-19 15:00 [p.25518]
Mr. Speaker, the number of mistakes that keep piling up in the management of the SNC-Lavalin crisis is unbelievable. What an utter disaster. Compared to this, Trans Mountain almost seems well managed.
While the Prime Minister digs himself into a deeper hole, the jobs of thousands of workers in Quebec are in jeopardy.
Will the government take action within the parameters of the law to protect SNC-Lavalin's head office in Montreal and the thousands of jobs connected with it, or will I continue to make the Prime Minister yawn?
View Rhéal Fortin Profile
BQ (QC)
View Rhéal Fortin Profile
2019-02-19 15:02 [p.25519]
Mr. Speaker, I believe you will find unanimous consent of the House to move the following motion: That, in the opinion of the House, the government must do everything in its power and within the bounds of the law, as set out in subsection 715.31 of the Criminal Code, to reduce the negative consequences of the reprehensible acts of certain SNC-Lavalin executives on individuals, be they employees, clients, retired employees or others, who did not engage in the reprehensible acts, while holding responsible those who did engage in said reprehensible acts, in order to preserve thousands of jobs in Quebec and Canada and to ensure that the company's head office remains in Montreal.
View Gabriel Ste-Marie Profile
BQ (QC)
View Gabriel Ste-Marie Profile
2019-02-19 15:47 [p.25525]
Madam Speaker, first the Prime Minister blamed the former justice minister because she did not complain about not being pressured. Then he said that it was Scott Brison's fault. Surely the Prime Minister mixed up the SNC-Lavalin fiasco with the Davie shipyard file. The latest development is that his top adviser has stepped down, refusing to take the blame for something he did not do and not wanting to be a distraction, though he did in fact become one. It is easy to get lost in all of these versions. This is “Fifty shades of Butts”.
Meanwhile, no party in the House seems concerned about the future of the thousands of workers at SNC-Lavalin.
Can my colleague explain how this motion helps, or does not help, the thousands of SNC-Lavalin workers?
View Simon Marcil Profile
BQ (QC)
View Simon Marcil Profile
2019-02-08 11:56 [p.25459]
Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister indicated that he would have talks with Quebec concerning immigration. The talks did not last long.
The ink on Quebec's bill is not even dry and the government is already saying no. Last week, he refused to discuss knowledge of French as a condition for citizenship. This week, he is refusing to discuss knowledge of French as a condition in earlier steps in the immigration process. French is not a shameful disease.
Why is the government refusing to discuss this? Why is it showing such contempt?
View Monique Pauzé Profile
BQ (QC)
View Monique Pauzé Profile
2019-02-08 11:57 [p.25459]
Mr. Speaker, members will recall that the government refused to seriously discuss the immigration levels in Quebec on the pretext of addressing a labour shortage.
Today, Quebec is legislating to deal with the labour shortage in the regions as quickly as possible, but Ottawa said no without any meetings or discussions.
If the government believes that the labour shortage in the regions is a problem, why does it want to prevent Quebec from legislating in that regard?
View Monique Pauzé Profile
BQ (QC)
View Monique Pauzé Profile
2019-02-08 11:58 [p.25459]
Mr. Speaker, this morning, the Prime Minister said “no”. He closed the door.
Quebec's immigration bill was tabled only yesterday. It will be debated by the National Assembly and the public, which is only natural because that is how democracy works.
However, this morning, the government decided that it could not care less about that process and that, whatever happens, it will say “no”.
Does the government realize that, by so doing, it is attacking the sovereignty of the National Assembly and its capacity to pass effective legislation?
View Simon Marcil Profile
BQ (QC)
View Simon Marcil Profile
2019-02-08 12:06 [p.25461]
Mr. Speaker, I wish to raise a question of privilege.
Yesterday, the Crown answered a question that was not addressed to it, which is a breach of the privileges of the House.
During oral question period, my colleague from La Pointe-de-l'Île asked a question to the chair of the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights, the member for Mount Royal. Unfortunately, the member for Mount Royal left his seat, so the Speaker was not able to call on him.
If you look at the video of yesterday's proceedings, just after 3 p.m., you can clearly see the member scurrying away after my colleague asked his question. The Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship then answered my colleague.
Bosc and Gagnon says the following on page 512:
Questions seeking information about the schedule and agenda of committees may be directed to Chairs of committees.
This is what my colleague from La Pointe-de-l'Île did. He asked a question about the agenda, or the business, of the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights.
At the last second, and given the uproar caused by the erratic behaviour of the member for Mount Royal, the Chair recognized someone else. In the end, the parliamentary secretary to a minister of the Crown answered the question by my colleague and friend from La Pointe-de-l'Île.
It would be completely unacceptable for the Prime Minister to rise in the House and rule on the question of privilege I am raising. That would seriously call into question the independence, authority and dignity of the House. In other words, it would call into question the privileges of the House.
This is a legitimate question. A minister of the Crown is not qualified to answer a question related to the business of a committee, basically, its arm's length relationship to the government. Parliament and parliamentary committees are not servants of the government. By ignoring this fundamental constitutional principle, the government is in breach of the privileges of this House.
I therefore believe that the parliamentary privileges of my colleague from La Pointe-de-l'Île have been breached, as have the privileges of the House.
I believe this situation warrants redress. I therefore raise it to you for consideration, Mr. Speaker, and propose the following solution to address it. I think it would be reasonable for the Chair to recognize the member for La Pointe-de-l'Île for a supplementary question upon our return after the break. He could then ask his question again and you could give the chair of the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights an opportunity to respond.
View Gabriel Ste-Marie Profile
BQ (QC)
View Gabriel Ste-Marie Profile
2019-02-07 12:49 [p.25385]
Madam Speaker, I thank my colleague for his speech, and especially for giving part of it in French.
The Bloc Québécois agrees with the principle of the bill and will definitely vote for it at second reading.
In my riding, members of the Manawan Atikamekw community speak Atikamekw. However, there is not enough funding at present to teach Atikamekw or French at the primary and secondary levels.
Could my colleague tell us if the bill provides for adequate funding for the teaching of these languages?
View Rhéal Fortin Profile
BQ (QC)
View Rhéal Fortin Profile
2019-02-07 13:59 [p.25394]
Mr. Speaker, not only are the Liberals refusing to let Quebec have a single tax return, but they are belittling us as well. They are telling us they do not think we could handle it all by ourselves.
The Minister of Infrastructure, a Quebecker, actually suggested that Quebec should not be allowed to collect tax and that everything should be centralized in Ottawa. We saw how well that worked with the Phoenix system. The Minister of National Revenue, also a Quebecker, even brought up the idea of forcing Quebec to give up its tax return to the federal government. The Prime Minister, another Quebecker, went as far as to say that allowing a single tax return would be pandering to Quebec's childish behaviour. The Liberals are calling Quebec's requests childish.
We need to realize that the Liberals gave the game away with their arrogant answers about the single tax return for Quebec. They figure that trampling on Quebec boosts their image in the rest of Canada, and apparently that is the only thing that matters.
View Gabriel Ste-Marie Profile
BQ (QC)
View Gabriel Ste-Marie Profile
2019-02-07 15:01 [p.25406]
Mr. Speaker, as you know, we are going to pay $13.8 billion for the Trans Mountain project, the Americans' old pipeline that no one else wanted to buy. You also know that the $19-billion deficit has largely gone toward dirty oil and goodies for oil companies in western Canada.
Like us, Mr. Speaker, you think it is time for the federal government to work as hard for Quebec as it does for the oil sands, with all due respect to my colleagues.
When is the Minister of Finance going to start working for Quebeckers and stop handing out goodies to oil companies?
View Monique Pauzé Profile
BQ (QC)
View Monique Pauzé Profile
2019-02-07 15:02 [p.25406]
Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister can shout from rooftops all over the world that he is a champion of climate action, but that does not make it true.
The truth is that the big oil sands polluters have the government—and the official opposition, as well—in their pockets. My question is the following.
Does the Minister of the Environment think that investing $19 billion of public money in dirty oil is a good way to combat climate change?
View Mario Beaulieu Profile
BQ (QC)
View Mario Beaulieu Profile
2019-02-07 15:03 [p.25406]
Mr. Speaker, my question is for the chair of the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights.
The Government of Quebec just tabled a bill requiring permanent residents in Quebec to learn French and Quebec values.
Could the committee chair assure us that his committee will not do anything to thwart the Quebec legislation? I am asking him that because we know him. He thinks it is shameful to have a requirement to learn French.
View Mario Beaulieu Profile
BQ (QC)
View Mario Beaulieu Profile
2019-02-07 15:05 [p.25406]
Mr. Speaker, my question was for the chair of the Standing Committee on Justice and Human rights. Why did he not answer it?
View Marilène Gill Profile
BQ (QC)
View Marilène Gill Profile
2019-02-06 14:04 [p.25319]
Mr. Speaker, these are dark days for French in Ottawa.
Yesterday, the Conservatives tried to seduce Quebec with their single tax return motion, but the Conservative member for Mégantic—L'Érable really put his foot in it when he went after the Minister of National Revenue for being francophone. Neither the minister nor Quebeckers need to apologize for speaking French. We speak French and, unlike the Conservatives, we are proud to speak French.
Ontario's Conservative premier said no to a francophone university. New Brunswick's Conservative premier said no to the Jeux de la Francophonie. The Liberals are not even willing to engage in a debate about whether adequate knowledge of French should be a requirement for immigrants residing in Quebec to be granted citizenship. The minister of Liberal heritage even accused us of being racist. The Liberals also cry foul when we say that federally regulated workers in Quebec should be subject to the Charter of the French Language.
That is what it has come to. These are dark days for French in Ottawa.
View Mario Beaulieu Profile
BQ (QC)
View Mario Beaulieu Profile
2019-02-06 15:54 [p.25336]
Mr. Speaker, on behalf of the Bloc Québécois, I rise to salute the member for Kings—Hants, who is leaving this place at the end of his term after 22 years of public service. For 22 years, the member has been very effective in bringing the concerns of his constituents and his province, Nova Scotia, to this place—perhaps even too effective.
Serving as minister many times over, and as President of the Treasury Board, he has held several important positions and left his mark in the public service, particularly during this term.
In closing, I want to acknowledge his unusual political journey. He is man who stays true to his principles when his values are challenged. When voters go to the polls, they expect to be able to count on people who stand up for them when it matters. The member for Kings—Hants was clearly one such individual.
View Rhéal Fortin Profile
BQ (QC)
View Rhéal Fortin Profile
2019-02-05 11:54 [p.25255]
Mr. Speaker, this issue of protecting jobs is essential. It is important to us in the Bloc Québécois as well. We believe that the government would have to negotiate with the Government of Quebec and the unions to ensure that these workers are properly protected. That goes without saying. I do not think that a debate on this in the House is necessary. I hope that we do not need a debate to tell government members how they should act on these issues.
However, the purpose of the House is to serve the people, and the people of Quebec are tired of having to file two tax returns. They are asking for the single tax return. This is a long-standing request. Minister Séguin asked for this back in 2004, and it has always been recognized that the jurisdiction best prepared to manage the issue of tax returns is the Government of Quebec.
Today, our colleagues in the Conservative Party have joined us in making this request. I thank them for that. However, we have to wonder why, since they were in power for 10 years, after all, and could have taken action on this back then. At least they are taking action this year. We cannot fault them for doing so, and we are very happy about it.
That said, there needs to be some movement. We are here to serve the people. The people need this government to step up and take responsibility, without putting the blame on collective agreements. It makes no sense. It is disgraceful and unworthy of a Parliament.
View Mario Beaulieu Profile
BQ (QC)
View Mario Beaulieu Profile
2019-02-05 12:07 [p.25257]
Mr. Speaker, I believe that just about everyone agrees that having a single tax return makes the most sense and would save time and money.
We know that individuals spend $300 million and businesses spend $400 million every year to prepare their tax returns. I do not understand the Liberal's very weak argument. It is as though they are telling us that even though having a single tax return would save money, it would result in job losses. Could these people not be used to fight tax evasion or improve the efficiency of the Phoenix pay system? I think these public servants would be very happy with that.
Then we have our Conservative friends who, with an election looming and even though they have not taken action on this issue, are suddenly presenting this request. We agree that it is a good thing.
However, we do not agree with their assertion that the Conservative government respects provincial jurisdictions. We have seen their response concerning Quebec: they refuse to reconsider multiculturalism, and they support institutional bilingualism and kick-starting energy east.
The NDP says that it is not necessarily against the principle, but they will not support it in order to save jobs. I believe it would be more logical to support the principle—
View Monique Pauzé Profile
BQ (QC)
View Monique Pauzé Profile
2019-02-05 12:52 [p.25264]
Mr. Speaker, not too long ago, in 2004, Yves Séguin, then the Quebec finance minister, called for a single tax return. In 2008, the Bloc Québécois took up that call on behalf of Quebeckers. Fourteen and a half years have passed since then, four and a half under a Liberal government and 10 under a Conservative one.
Why should we now believe the Conservatives and their call for a single tax return?
View Rhéal Fortin Profile
BQ (QC)
View Rhéal Fortin Profile
2019-02-05 13:19 [p.25267]
Mr. Speaker, how can we trust the Liberals? I would like an answer from my colleague opposite. The Liberal government has not kept any of its promises since it was elected, except for legalizing marijuana, which it did haphazardly.
The Liberals have been unable to crack down on tax havens. They even gave out contracts to KPMG, which is swimming in murky waters, when it comes to tax havens. They have not even been able to pay their employees. How can they tell us today that Quebec cannot effectively administer its own income tax returns? They are already administering the GST and the QST.
Why can Quebec not administer the income tax returns? Unlike this government, Quebec is the only tax authority that honours its commitments.
View Monique Pauzé Profile
BQ (QC)
View Monique Pauzé Profile
2019-02-05 13:35 [p.25270]
Mr. Speaker, I am trying to understand my colleague when he says he wants to make life easier for Quebeckers. He listed a bunch of measures that have been implemented to make it easier for people to file their tax returns. However, when it comes to a single tax return, which would make life easier for Quebeckers, the answer is no.
Let us go back in time. On December 1, 1997, the Liberal government of the day signed a labour transfer implementation agreement with Quebec. The agreement provided for the transfer of 1,338 employees.
If it was possible in 1997, why is it no longer possible in 2019?
View Mario Beaulieu Profile
BQ (QC)
View Mario Beaulieu Profile
2019-02-05 14:00 [p.25273]
Mr. Speaker, in the month of February we celebrate the contribution of Quebeckers from black communities to our shared history. We invite everyone to participate in the many activities taking place across Quebec to mark Black History Month.
The 28th edition in Montreal will focus on emancipation and the accomplished women who emerged from black communities. In Quebec City, the spotlight is on our thousand and one roots. Different activities will be held across the province, from Rouyn-Noranda to Gatineau to Rimouski.
Let us seize the opportunity provided by the many conferences, workshops and panels to learn more about the contributions of different black communities to the Quebec identity, and their history, which we hear too little about.
Let us enjoy the many artistic activities and celebrate the creativity that sets us apart, in Quebec, in all our diversity.
View Gabriel Ste-Marie Profile
BQ (QC)
View Gabriel Ste-Marie Profile
2019-02-05 15:05 [p.25286]
Mr. Speaker, the federal government paid $4.5 billion to purchase an old pipeline, with no negotiation whatsoever. How much do you want for the Trans Mountain pipeline? $4.5 billion? No problem; here is a cheque, and let us add another $9.3 billion to expand the pipeline.
To eliminate the deficit and fight climate change, perhaps the Minister of Finance could stop putting all our money in dirty oil?
View Gabriel Ste-Marie Profile
BQ (QC)
View Gabriel Ste-Marie Profile
2019-02-05 15:06 [p.25286]
Mr. Speaker, I will continue. I was at $13.8 billion for the acquisition and expansion of the Trans Mountain pipeline. To that we can add $2.7 billion in tax breaks for the oil industry over five years and $1.6 billion in support for the industry. Then there is $840 million, if the Liberals buy the railcars to move the dirty oil. In total, that is $19 billion, just like the deficit.
Is the minister of high finance aware that his deficit—
An hon. member: Oh, oh.
Mr. Gabriel Ste-Marie: Let me talk.
Does the minister of high finance realize that dirty oil caused his deficit?
View Michel Boudrias Profile
BQ (QC)
View Michel Boudrias Profile
2019-02-05 16:38 [p.25298]
Mr. Speaker, we are debating a proposal that would benefit all Quebeckers. We have repeated ad nauseam that Quebec's National Assembly reached a unanimous consensus. There are 78 Quebec MPs from all parties, who represent voters of every stripe and from every walk of life. In the last election, they voted in favour of a proposal to file a single tax return.
Maybe my colleague could help me with something I am wondering about. How can certain parties, especially the Liberal Party and the NDP, not be willing to uphold the unanimous consensus of our voters and our provincial counterparts in Quebec City?
View Xavier Barsalou-Duval Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, after many difficult years of austerity, Quebec achieved a balanced budget while still meeting its responsibilities in health, education, early childhood centres and so forth.
While Quebec was tightening its belt, money was flying out the window in Ottawa. A $19-billion deficit is going toward dirty oil in Alberta, a used pipeline, and railcars to transport their oil to Quebec.
Instead of putting Quebec in debt for generations to come, will the government start to use Quebeckers' money for Quebeckers?
View Xavier Barsalou-Duval Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, this is a $19-billion deficit for oil. Considering this government masquerades as the Green Party all over the world, that is a total slap in the face. This money is not going towards compensating our farmers, fighting tax havens or paying for migrants. Furthermore, federal health transfers are declining.
Could the government explain to Quebeckers why it is spending their money left and right without sparing a thought for their priorities?
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, Canadians' confidence in our institutions is largely based on the diligence of those who occupy the highest offices. Those individuals have a duty to be exemplary and above reproach. Auditor General Michael Ferguson lived up to that expectation right up until his death, which we were shocked and saddened to learn of today.
On behalf of the Bloc Québécois, I want to offer my condolences to his family, friends and colleagues.
Mr. Ferguson showed a great deal of respect for the French language. When he was appointed as Auditor General, he did not speak French, but he immediately committed to learning it. Just a year later, he kept that promise when, much to his credit, he delivered his first report in both official languages, demonstrating a very respectable knowledge of French. By so doing, he showed that he understood his responsibilities as Auditor General.
Mr. Ferguson was also known for the quality of his work. He submitted comprehensive, targeted reports that were always relevant. The Bloc Québécois always had a very good relationship with the Office of the Auditor General of Canada and always appreciated Mr. Ferguson's attention to detail, objectivity and warmth.
In closing, Mr. Speaker, I would like to leave Mr. Ferguson's family and friends with a quote by the great French author Alexandre Dumas, who said:
Those whom we love and lose are no longer where they were before. They are now wherever we are.
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