Hansard
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 271 - 300 of 1672
View Gabriel Ste-Marie Profile
BQ (QC)
View Gabriel Ste-Marie Profile
2018-12-13 15:11 [p.24841]
Mr. Speaker, does this mean that those trains will be more comfortable than the ones that would have been built in La Pocatière? That is nonsense.
Bombardier won a train contract in the United States this year. Seventy per cent of production will be carried out in the U.S. Bombardier just won a contract in China and, yes, the trains will be built in China. When Bombardier signs a contract with Germany, the trains are built in Germany.
Why is it that only Ottawa is unable to require local production from multinationals when our taxpayers are footing the bill?
View Gabriel Ste-Marie Profile
BQ (QC)
View Gabriel Ste-Marie Profile
2018-12-13 15:12 [p.24841]
Mr. Speaker, the problem lies precisely with the bid criteria.
When it comes to Crown corporations, the government needs to consider the economic benefits. It is as simple as that.
Every time that we see the new VIA Rail trains going by, we will remember that good jobs in the regions are not important enough to the member for Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Westmount.
I am amazed that not one single Liberal from Quebec is standing up for the workers in La Pocatière.
What is the point of voting for MPs who use our tax money to fund jobs abroad?
View Gabriel Ste-Marie Profile
BQ (QC)
View Gabriel Ste-Marie Profile
2018-12-13 15:32 [p.24844]
Mr. Speaker, the Bloc Québécois members agree to apply the vote, and I will vote in favour of the motion.
View Luc Thériault Profile
BQ (QC)
View Luc Thériault Profile
2018-12-12 14:07 [p.24761]
Mr. Speaker, on behalf of the Bloc Québécois, I would like to wish all Quebeckers a merry Christmas and a happy new year. I would also like to extend holiday greetings to my fellow members of Parliament.
The holidays give us a chance to spend time with our loved ones and recharge our batteries. New Year's Day being a time for making resolutions, I have a few suggestions for the Prime Minister.
First, he could resolve to pay for his own vacations and avoid bringing too much clothing in his luggage when he travels abroad.
Second, he could resolve to give Davie some really good contracts, increase health transfers and compensate our farmers for losses due to the new free trade agreements.
Last, he could resolve to not run a pipeline through Quebec and, if possible, to not buy pipelines from Americans with our money. He could also resolve to listen to Quebeckers for once. That would be great.
Happy holidays to all.
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, and so it is. VIA Rail would rather sign a $1.3-billion agreement with a German multinational than with a Quebec company, to purchase trains that will be used in Quebec. What a lump of coal.
Workers in La Pocatière are being laid off, and they are popping champagne corks in Sacramento, where the cars are manufactured.
How can the Prime Minister justify abandoning workers in La Pocatière and allowing VIA Rail to choose Siemens?
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, this year's end of session is a little more melancholy than usual, as we get ready to close down this building, which has been a second home for me for 35 years.
As members know, Centre Block had to be rebuilt after a major fire and reopened in its current form in 1920, nearly 100 years ago. I have spent more than a third of a century walking its corridors. I could go on for hours about everything I have seen and heard under this roof. I first set foot in this place in 1984, under the banner of the Progressive Conservatives. That was during the time of the “beau risque”, as it was called by René Lévesque. Quebec nationalists were giving Canada a second chance and wanted to carve out a place for themselves with dignity.
I was a member of the House when that ambition was consummated in the Meech Lake accord. I was also here when that deal failed. I was part of the group that crossed the floor to sit as independent members following that insult to the Quebec nation. I was in the House 27 years ago when that parliamentary group became a party, the Bloc Québécois. Under this new banner, but still in the same building, I was here when separatists formed the official opposition in 1993.
I experienced the days of the 1995 referendum both here and in Quebec. The debates were very acrimonious, as everyone knows. I was also here during the debates on clarity. Today, however, people remember the good times, not the bickering. We remember the historic moments shared by great parliamentarians of all stripes. This Parliament is founded on deep mutual respect among those who are here to serve their constituents. Here, our ideas are different and our debates vigorous, but we recognize that each and every one of us sincerely wants to do the best we can for the people we represent.
I remember some of the great moments we have shared, such as when Nelson Mandela addressed the House in 1990, just a few months after being released from prison, where he had served 27 years for fighting to liberate his people. I remember great moments like the recent visit from young Malala, who was awarded the Nobel Prize at just 17 years of age. I remember great moments like the official apology for residential schools.
I also remember some sad times we experienced together, such as when our former leader, Lucien Bouchard, was fighting for his life. I will never forget that a member of the Reform Party placed a white rose on his desk and that Preston Manning greeted Mr. Bouchard warmly upon his return to the House, as the entire chamber applauded.
I will also never forget the pain we went through when two of our Bloc Québécois colleagues, Benoît Sauvageau and Gaston Péloquin, lost their lives in car accidents while in office.
There have also been some funny and enjoyable moments in the House. With more than 300 members of Parliament and countless staff members spending long hours confined in this building, there is no shortage of funny stories.
For example, I remember when the Hon. Jean Chrétien welcomed Tony Blair and his wife, Cherie Blair, to the House. Mr. Chrétien delighted in calling Mrs. Blair by her first name, Cherie, because he said she was the only woman he could call chérie without his wife giving him that look.
It is for all of those reasons and moments that I feel a bit anxious today at the thought of leaving this building. One gets attached to its decor, its history and its ghosts. I hope that those ghosts will follow us to the new building. If there is one thing that we should keep from this chamber and bring with us to the new building, it is the memory of all those who sat here in a spirit of respect for the ideas of others and with a willingness to serve the people who put their trust in us.
Happy holidays everyone, and I hope the move goes smoothly.
View Mario Beaulieu Profile
BQ (QC)
View Mario Beaulieu Profile
2018-12-11 13:58 [p.24717]
Mr. Speaker, for two years now Ottawa has been bungling its management of the migrants file. There is no triage plan, no plan to speed up processing of asylum claims and work permits, no compensation for the $300 million this has cost Quebec.
Even though the Prime Minister keeps dropping the ball on this file, he is sneaking off to Marrakesh to sign the compact on migration.
The Prime Minister, whose strategy for migrants is to do nothing and let Quebec pay, goes to the UN to give lessons.
He wants to sign the compact when almost every measure it proposes encroaches on Quebec's jurisdiction and Quebeckers will have to foot the bill. What is more, none of this was negotiated with Quebec or debated in the House.
He should start by assuming his responsibilities in the migrant crisis in Quebec and by coming to an agreement with Quebec. Let him bring the debate to Parliament.
We cannot give a blank cheque to a federal government that is incompetent and irresponsible with migrants.
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, VIA Rail would rather award a $1-billion contract to a German multinational than to a Quebec company.
The Minister of Transport could have stood up for Quebec workers in three ways. He could have informed Bombardier of the Siemens bid, he could have included local economic spinoffs in the contract criteria, and he could have cancelled the bidding process and started over, but he did nothing.
Will the minister tell VIA Rail that it must reconsider its decision and give Bombardier a chance to win this contract, or will he let VIA Rail announce on Friday that it is awarding the contract to Germany?
View Rhéal Fortin Profile
BQ (QC)
View Rhéal Fortin Profile
2018-12-11 15:10 [p.24730]
Mr. Speaker, the government allocated $100 billion to shipbuilding, but the Davie shipyard is getting practically nothing. The government allocated billions of dollars to the Trans Mountain pipeline, billions of dollars to the Muskrat Falls project and billions of dollars to the Ontario automotive industry.
Now, VIA Rail is awarding a $1-billion contract for a fleet of trains to a German multinational instead of a Quebec company, and Ottawa is standing idly by, even though the transport minister has the power to act. What is the use of even having a transport minister?
Why did the minister abandon Bombardier workers and their families in La Pocatière?
View Mario Beaulieu Profile
BQ (QC)
View Mario Beaulieu Profile
2018-12-10 13:58 [p.24609]
Mr. Speaker, two years after the Prime Minister invited migrants around the world to Canada via Twitter, Ottawa still has not done anything to respond to Quebec's demands concerning immigration.
Quebec has asked the federal government for $300 million in compensation to cover the cost of caring for migrants, but Ottawa is refusing to pay.
Quebec has asked for a triage plan so that it is not the only province that has to deal with the arrival of migrants, but Ottawa has done nothing.
Quebec has asked that asylum claims be processed quickly, but there are delays of several years.
Quebec has asked the federal government to collaborate to reduce its immigration levels in 2019, but Ottawa is refusing to do so.
That is the Liberals' record on immigration. Now, the Prime Minister has approved and wants to sign a migration pact telling Quebec how to act in its areas of jurisdiction without even consulting Quebec.
He needs to start by taking responsibility here before—
View Luc Thériault Profile
BQ (QC)
View Luc Thériault Profile
2018-12-10 15:03 [p.24621]
Mr. Speaker, the Premier of Quebec made it very clear that we want nothing to do with Alberta's dirty energy. There is no social licence. We do not want pipelines crossing our rivers, and we do not want tank cars rolling through our towns. Will the Prime Minister get the message that if they want to sell their tar sands oil to other countries, it will not be going through Quebec either by pipeline or by train?
View Rhéal Fortin Profile
BQ (QC)
View Rhéal Fortin Profile
2018-12-10 15:04 [p.24622]
Mr. Speaker, speaking of trains, VIA Rail, a Crown corporation, would rather give a contract to Berlin for work that can be done in La Pocatière. They are taking Quebeckers' money and giving it to businesses that are competing with Quebec companies. That is some nerve. We are proud of our workers, and we stand by them.
Will the Minister of Transport stand by Quebec companies and workers and ask VIA Rail to reconsider that decision and award the rail car contract to our own companies?
View Luc Thériault Profile
BQ (QC)
View Luc Thériault Profile
2018-12-10 15:07 [p.24622]
Mr. Speaker, I seek the unanimous consent of the House for the following motion: That this House condemn the government's approval of the global compact for safe, orderly and regular migration in Marrakesh without debate in this House.
View Gabriel Ste-Marie Profile
BQ (QC)
View Gabriel Ste-Marie Profile
2018-12-07 10:24 [p.24556]
Madam Speaker, I also believe that if you seek it, you will find unanimous consent of the House.
If we start working before you come back with your ruling, that means we will have to rely on the English version.
To the Bloc Québécois, that would be completely unacceptable. It would mean that the House is relegating French to second place, which would be an intolerable outrage.
You are the guarantor of our rights. Personally, as a Bloc Québécois member and a Quebecker, I will never agree to let the English version take precedence, even temporarily.
View Gabriel Ste-Marie Profile
BQ (QC)
View Gabriel Ste-Marie Profile
2018-12-07 10:25 [p.24556]
Madam Speaker, I believe that if you seek it, you will find unanimous consent of the House to suspend the sitting until you are ready to give your ruling.
View Gabriel Ste-Marie Profile
BQ (QC)
View Gabriel Ste-Marie Profile
2018-12-07 12:03 [p.24568]
Madam Speaker, the government has lost its marbles. Right in the middle of COP24, where the whole world is preparing to fight climate change, the Prime Minister is talking about purchasing 7,000 railway cars at taxpayers' expense to export more oil from the tar sands.
According to the lowest public estimate available, this will cost $840 million. Quebeckers do not want to spend one cent on buying trains for oil companies, which make massive profits at our expense.
Will the government reverse course?
View Gabriel Ste-Marie Profile
BQ (QC)
View Gabriel Ste-Marie Profile
2018-12-07 12:04 [p.24568]
Madam Speaker, that is going to look really good at COP24.
According to the lowest estimate, it is going to cost taxpayers $840 million to gift these trains to the oil companies, which are the richest in Canada.
In the meantime, the Government of Quebec spent $300 million on the migrant crisis and the federal government is letting that situation deteriorate.
Does the government realize that the compensation Quebec wants for handling the migrant crisis is less than half the minimum cost of these trains?
Will it compensate Quebec instead of giving presents to the oil sands industry?
View Simon Marcil Profile
BQ (QC)
View Simon Marcil Profile
2018-12-07 12:05 [p.24569]
Madam Speaker, sure, they will just write another cheque then.
After buying a pipeline on the taxpayers' dime, the government wants to buy the oil companies trains for Christmas.
Meanwhile, our dairy farmers are driving to Montreal on tractors to explain to the Prime Minister how the last three trade deals are going to cost them $450 million a year.
Does the government realize that that is half the amount it wants to waste on trains for oil companies?
Instead of spoiling the rich, will it compensate our farmers instead?
View Monique Pauzé Profile
BQ (QC)
View Monique Pauzé Profile
2018-12-06 10:22 [p.24477]
Mr. Speaker, it was exactly 29 years ago that Quebec was plunged into a darkness that will never leave us completely. I think that each one of us can remember where we were and what we were doing on December 6, 1989. I was watching television. The program was interrupted and I saw pictures of ambulances and the flashing lights of cruisers. I wondered in what country this horror was unfolding. In that moment, Quebec and I realized that we are not immune to such atrocities, and that hate can leash out here in Canada as it does elsewhere.
On December 6, 1989, 14 women lost their lives and 10 others were hospitalized. They were murdered simply because they were women. They were separated from the men, and one man killed them just because they were women and because they might have been feminists, they might have called for gender equality, they might have dared to believe themselves to be persons in their own right.
We must never forget the names of these victims. I, too, am going to read their names: Geneviève Bergeron, Hélène Colgan, Nathalie Croteau, Barbara Daigneault, Anne-Marie Edward, Maud Haviernick, Maryse Laganière, Maryse Leclair, Anne-Marie Lemay, Sonia Pelletier, Michèle Richard, Annie St-Arneault, Annie Turcotte and Barbara Klucznik-Widajewicz.
These women will not have died in vain if we continue to remember them and remember the day on which violence against women changed the face of Quebec forever.
We must remember their names every year, on December 6, to inspire discussion on the progress we are making towards equality and towards combatting violence against women. Although not everyone will be the victim of a dramatic hate crime like the victims of École Polytechnique in Montreal, many women still experience abuse in many forms.
#MeToo is no doubt the most important political and social movement in recent years. It has shown us that our experiences with abuse are not as uncommon as we think they are. Many of us know what it is like to see fear come to permeate our lives, most often at the hands of men we trust. There are more of us than we knew. In 2014, in Quebec alone, law enforcement reported nearly 16,000 domestic abuse crimes against women.
Young people are not spared this violence. One in five female high school students has been the victim of at least one act of sexual violence at the hands of a partner. The reporting rate for attacks jumped nearly 60% in the wake of the #MeToo movement. However, we must continue to take our place, stand up for our rights, remain united, and speak out against abuse. The names of the women of École Polytechnique must serve as a reminder that there is still a lot of work to be done here at home.
There is still a lot of work to be done here at home, particularly on behalf of indigenous women. Governments need to do more so that our first nations and Inuit sisters have the resources they need to feel safe and to seek refuge when they are the victims of violence.
Ending violence is everyone's responsibility, both men and women, but we women need to find strength in numbers in order to change things. The names of the women who were killed at the École Polytechnique should spur us to action. That is why as long as women do not feel as safe as men, as long as women are disproportionately victims of violence at the hands of men, and as long as women cannot objectively state that they are in every way equal to men, we will remember the women who were killed on December 6. We will do so until each of their names becomes a symbol of the progress we have made.
View Xavier Barsalou-Duval Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister will be meeting with the premiers of Quebec and the provinces. It will be a good opportunity for him to explain what his problem is when it comes to Quebec.
For a party that does not like old conflicts, the Liberal Party has no problem inventing new ones. Over the course of three years, the Liberals have reduced their share of health transfers. They have made concessions on supply management, and they still have not compensated our farmers for the free trade agreements. They directly attacked our consumer protection legislation. They laughed in the face of Davie workers. They gave train contracts to Germany instead of Quebec. They have not yet reimbursed Quebec for costs associated with asylum seekers. The Prime Minister is going to have to explain himself. What is his problem with Quebec?
For us, the problem is not just the Prime Minister, it is all of Canada.
View Gabriel Ste-Marie Profile
BQ (QC)
View Gabriel Ste-Marie Profile
2018-12-06 15:07 [p.24519]
Mr. Speaker, this is the only government not to give these companies special privileges.
While the premiers are meeting in Montreal to discuss the new NAFTA, Quebec is still waiting for a clear commitment to dairy farmers from the Prime Minister.
It has been two months since the House unanimously called on the government to fully compensate supply managed farmers for the three agreements it signed at their expense. It has been two months.
Will the government take advantage of the first ministers conference to commit once and for all to fully compensating supply managed farmers for the three agreements that betrayed them?
View Luc Thériault Profile
BQ (QC)
View Luc Thériault Profile
2018-12-06 15:08 [p.24519]
Mr. Speaker, next week, at the meeting in Marrakesh, the government will discuss the global compact on migration. The issue of migrants is not strictly under federal jurisdiction. In Quebec, we also welcome, integrate and select migrants.
The Prime Minister cannot make unilateral decisions on this and leave the provinces to deal with the consequences of his decisions or his tweets.
Will he take advantage of his meeting with the first ministers to present the compact and promise to sign it only if every premier is on board?
View Mario Beaulieu Profile
BQ (QC)
View Mario Beaulieu Profile
2018-12-05 15:10 [p.24451]
Mr. Speaker, Ottawa never questioned the motives of the Government of Quebec when it unilaterally decided to increase immigration levels. The current government in Quebec was elected with a clear mandate to lower immigration levels in 2019. We expect that, once again, Ottawa will not question the will of Quebeckers.
Can the Prime Minister assure Quebec that it has his government's full co-operation to reduce the number of new arrivals, including in the categories chosen by the federal government?
View Mario Beaulieu Profile
BQ (QC)
View Mario Beaulieu Profile
2018-12-05 15:32 [p.24454]
Mr. Speaker, the Bloc Québécois agrees to apply the vote and will vote no.
View Mario Beaulieu Profile
BQ (QC)
View Mario Beaulieu Profile
2018-12-05 15:38 [p.24456]
Mr. Speaker, the Bloc Québécois agrees to apply the vote and will vote no.
View Mario Beaulieu Profile
BQ (QC)
View Mario Beaulieu Profile
2018-12-05 15:40 [p.24458]
Mr. Speaker, the Bloc Québécois agrees to apply the votes and will vote against the motion.
View Rhéal Fortin Profile
BQ (QC)
View Rhéal Fortin Profile
2018-12-04 13:57 [p.24399]
Mr. Speaker, in 1970, the Trudeau government had 500 people arrested because it was afraid they were criminals. How things have changed. Now we have a government led by the son of that same prime minister, and criminals are openly parading around downtown Montreal.
All of the parties voted against our bill to create a list of criminal organizations. They voted against police officers arresting people who make no attempt to hide their gang membership. Even the Conservatives, who talk so tough, did not stand up when it was time to take action. Ottawa is too cowardly and is forcing municipalities such as Saint-Tite to pass bylaws to stop gangsters from intimidating the locals.
It is pretty hard to be a proud member of Parliament when the people here cannot even agree on such basic values as fighting organized crime and hardly seem to care that our young girls are being forced into the sex trade, that drugs are being sold in our schools, and that gangs are being let off scot free. It is very hard.
View Marilène Gill Profile
BQ (QC)
View Marilène Gill Profile
2018-12-04 15:03 [p.24411]
Mr. Speaker, unions, business people, workers and elected representatives from Quebec's North Shore, the Lower St. Lawrence, Charlevoix, Montérégie, and New Brunswick joined forces today to demand that Ottawa fix the employment insurance spring gap. We have solutions.
They all want protected regions and permanent measures that take the realities of seasonal work into account. Even the Conservatives, who made cuts while in government, have suddenly discovered empathy for our workers.
When will this government show some respect for workers and fix the EI spring gap for good?
View Xavier Barsalou-Duval Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, on January 1, Netflix will start charging QST. The company is collaborating and says that it pays taxes when required to do so by law. Ultimately, it was not all that complicated.
Quebec also collects the GST for Ottawa, but the Liberals are so subservient to multinational corporations that they sent a letter to Netflix saying that it did not have to pay GST, unlike all other Quebec companies.
Why do the Liberals insist on favouring foreign multinationals over Canadian businesses?
View Gabriel Ste-Marie Profile
BQ (QC)
View Gabriel Ste-Marie Profile
2018-12-04 15:15 [p.24413]
Mr. Speaker, I believe you will find the unanimous consent of the House for the following motion: That, with regard to the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the House condemn the violence and abuse committed against hundreds of innocent civilians; condemn gender-based sexual violence, particularly against women and girls; recognize that the deadliest violence since the Second World War is taking place in that country and has killed at least 6 million people since 1996, and that hundreds of thousands of people have reportedly been systematically subjected to gender-based sexual violence; and ask the government to monitor the situation in the country closely, play a leading role in mobilizing the international community to end repeated human rights violations and abuses and protect populations at risk, and encourage the International Criminal Court to continue its work as part of the formal investigation into massacres in that country.
Results: 271 - 300 of 1672 | Page: 10 of 56

|<
<
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
>
>|
Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data