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Results: 1 - 30 of 22070
View Karine Trudel Profile
NDP (QC)
View Karine Trudel Profile
2019-06-20 10:15 [p.29465]
moved for leave to introduce Bill C-469, An Act to amend the Parks Canada Agency Act (Canada’s tentative list for world heritage protection).
She said: Mr. Speaker, I am proud to rise today to introduce a bill to amend the Parks Canada Agency Act.
In 2017, the government opened Canada's tentative list for UNESCO world heritage sites to applications. Arvida, a company town, enthusiastically applied but, unfortunately, was not selected.
As an ambassador for Arvida and as a member of the House, I am proposing today that the Parks Canada Agency Act be amended so as to meet three main objectives, which are that the tentative list be reviewed every four years, that the list always include 15 sites following a review, and that the Minister of Canadian Heritage be included in the process so that the sites reflect a balance between cultural and natural sites.
I hope that these amendments will make the process more predictable and frequent, thereby enabling the volunteers and stakeholders championing their causes, such as Arvida's, to participate more easily and effectively. I would like to give a shout-out to the Committee for the Recognition of Arvida’s Heritage Value, or CORPA, and its members for their great perseverance. We will not give up.
View Linda Duncan Profile
NDP (AB)
View Linda Duncan Profile
2019-06-20 10:18 [p.29465]
Mr. Speaker, this will be my last opportunity to table a petition on behalf of my constituents.
It is my honour to table yet another petition from my constituents calling on the government to enact a Canadian environmental bill of rights. The petitioners state that Canadians share a deep concern about the environment and recognize its inherent value; that it is important to safeguard the right of present and future generations to a healthy and ecologically balanced environment; and that it is the federal government's duty, a public trust duty, to protect the environment.
Therefore, citizens should be given the tools to hold the government accountable to protect their environment.
View Richard Cannings Profile
NDP (BC)
Mr. Speaker, I rise today with two petitions from residents in my riding of South Okanagan—West Kootenay.
The first petition points out that one in 10 Canadians cannot afford their prescription medication; that the current system benefits drug companies, not Canadians; that a universal pharmacare plan could save our country over $4 billion a year; and that we are the only OECD country that has a universal health care system that does not cover prescription drugs. Therefore, the petitioners call on the Government of Canada to eliminate the current patchwork system of care and to introduce a universal, comprehensive and public pharmacare plan that will reduce drug costs and keep people healthier longer.
View Richard Cannings Profile
NDP (BC)
Mr. Speaker, the second petition draws attention to the fact that the Canadian government declared the Sinixt tribal group extinct in 1956. The petitioners also point out that the Sinixt never ceased to exist as a tribal group and that their territory remains unceded. They call on the government to reverse the wrongful declaration of the extinction of the Sinixt tribal group and to take immediate steps to recognize the Sinixt as an autonomous tribal group within their traditional and ancestral Canadian territory.
I want to take this opportunity again, since this is the last regular day of this Parliament, to thank you personally for the good job you have done in often very trying circumstances. I appreciate it, and I think all Canadians do.
View Peter Julian Profile
NDP (BC)
View Peter Julian Profile
2019-06-20 10:25 [p.29467]
Mr. Speaker, it is indeed a sad day. I know that we will have an opportunity to pay tribute in an hour or two, but I too would like to pass on condolences to Diane Warawa, the children, the grandchildren and all of Mark's family. It is a very sad day for the House.
I am presenting a petition on behalf of the Elizabeth Fry Society. A few hundred Canadians are adding their names to the tens of thousands who have tabled petitions in the House so far. The petition calls on the Government of Canada to extend benefits and allowances to children who are in irregular situations. In a case where a parent is incarcerated or homeless, or the child is being raised in foster care, the children do not have the right to access the same benefits and allowances other children do. This contravenes the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child.
Tens of thousands of Canadians have written to Parliament in this regard. To date, the government's response has not been satisfactory. We are hoping the government will table a comprehensive response and end the discrimination so that all children can benefit from the benefits and allowances available from the federal government.
View Nathan Cullen Profile
NDP (BC)
View Nathan Cullen Profile
2019-06-20 12:15 [p.29468]
Mr. Speaker, today I rise to join colleagues in paying tribute to a friend and colleague, Mark Warawa. I think all of us agree that we would have given anything to be talking about something else here today than Mark's passing.
It is such a tribute to Mark that there are so many of us here today, choosing not to head home to our own families, and that all parties are here, and independents, regardless of whether we often or even ever agreed with Mark on his politics and policies. I am including my Conservative colleagues in that. He was a man of such deep faith and conviction, and he held those convictions with such a degree of grace and certainty, which is sometimes too rare in our world.
Today was meant to be a day of ending, as we conclude this Parliament, as we reflect as parliamentarians on our time here, be it these past four years or for some of us many more years. It is also a day, by bad circumstance, that we are talking about a different kind of ending.
It is a privilege to stand in this place. Mark always saw that to be true for him, so much so that even as he was so sick, he was determined to come back and give his farewell address to the House, despite his doctors not necessarily agreeing with that.
I am honoured to speak on behalf of my New Democratic colleagues. Mark was an opponent, yet never an enemy. Our friendship was most unlikely. We come from different generations and opposite ends of the political spectrum on almost every issue, yet we found some common ground in the humanity we could share in this place. I think I can speak for many colleagues who also saw that humanity on display.
I do have to tell one story, though. I was reflecting this morning about one day when, in the heat of debate, I said something that really upset Mark. I honestly do not remember what it was. I guess I have one of those memories.
Mark came right up to me in my seat. He got right in my face and was really mad, almost on the edge of asking me to step outside. I was a bit shocked. It seemed out of character for him, yet, within minutes, he was back at my desk, apologizing and wanting to make things right. It is important to consider that I do not remember what we were arguing about, but I do remember the apology. I remember the humanity.
For him, I think politics was very personal, but he never made it personal, and that is a rare gift.
I was raised in the church. I do not claim to know definitively what a good Christian is, but Mark strove in every way to be one.
I also think we are talking a lot about family today, political family and Mark's family, Diane, Jonathan, Ryan, Nathan, Eric and Kristen. There are families we are born into and there are families we choose.
Diane and Mark were married for just a little less time than I have been alive. Mark, in his final comments to me, said, “I always thought of you as a son”, again, curious and somewhat unlikely, our friendship.
Today is about an ending. It is about mourning and it is about honouring. I join my colleagues and friends in honouring the memory of Mark, and I wish Diane and his entire family the very best and peace.
View Ruth Ellen Brosseau Profile
NDP (QC)
Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to rise today to say a few words about Gilles Gervais and to wish him a happy retirement.
Mr. Gervais has worked on the Hill for more than 30 years. He started out in the 1980s as a constable, then he was a sergeant in the galleries, and more recently an Assistant Deputy Sergeant-at-Arms. Throughout all that time he always carried out his duties with professionalism. He always treated his assignments with care and treated others with respect.
Soon he will be retired and will no longer have to take time off when the fishing is not so great. He will have plenty of time to work on his sculptures and take up new hobbies.
We will all remember his sunny disposition and we will certainly miss his special sense of humour. Right, Darryl?
I thank him for his commitment to the House of Commons and for his fine service to all parliamentarians and everyone who has worked here.
Gilles, on behalf of all my colleagues, I wish you a happy retirement. Thank you for your dedication.
View Sheri Benson Profile
NDP (SK)
View Sheri Benson Profile
2019-06-19 14:20 [p.29384]
Mr. Speaker, I rise to pay tribute to the wonderful, passionate Betsy Bury and to honour her 97 years of a life well lived. Betsy died in April.
Betsy fought for a world that was safe from nuclear weapons and war, a world safe for all women and children. She did this both as part of social movements and in the realm of partisan politics.
In 1962, when Saskatchewan doctors went on strike to oppose universal health care, Betsy, along with a small group of women, started the Saskatoon Community Clinic to provide free care to anyone who needed it. Those women are a big reason that we have universal health care today. She helped start the first planned parenthood organization in Saskatchewan and the first public kindergarten in Saskatoon, and the list goes on.
From Tommy Douglas's campaign to my own personal campaign, from the CCF to the NDP, Betsy was there volunteering, leading, advising and supporting.
In 2017, Betsy received the Governor General's Award in Commemoration of the Persons Case for her lifetime dedication to bringing about gender equality.
Losing Betsy is devastating, but our broken hearts are comforted by the lives she touched and the young leaders who will follow in her inspiring footsteps.
View Jagmeet Singh Profile
NDP (BC)
View Jagmeet Singh Profile
2019-06-19 14:31 [p.29386]
After a year of higher temperatures and more floods and forest fires, people across the country are feeling the effects of climate change. The decision to approve the Trans Mountain expansion is not going to help people deal with climate change.
The Liberals are spending more than $10 billion to expand a pipeline. Why are the Liberals not investing this money in green initiatives to build a secure future for generations to come?
View Jagmeet Singh Profile
NDP (BC)
View Jagmeet Singh Profile
2019-06-19 14:33 [p.29386]
Mr. Speaker, that is a ludicrous proposition, given that no profits are going to be made in this project.
The race to the bottom with this pipeline, between the Liberals and Conservatives, is taking us in the wrong direction. Instead of ending fossil fuel subsidies, the Prime Minister is buying pipelines. Instead of legally binding emissions targets, the Prime Minister is continuing with Stephen Harper's targets. Instead of building a new relationship with indigenous communities, the Prime Minister has stuck with grand symbolism. New Democrats are proposing a better way.
Why is the Prime Minister refusing to protect coastal communities, indigenous communities and our environment?
View Jagmeet Singh Profile
NDP (BC)
View Jagmeet Singh Profile
2019-06-19 14:34 [p.29386]
Mr. Speaker, I can summarize the Liberals' position on the environment. On one day, they pass a motion recognizing a climate emergency, and then on the very next day, they approve a pipeline. That is the government's track record.
The Liberals will dramatically increase our emissions, threaten coastlines and disrespect coastal and indigenous communities. The new hearings failed to look at the impact of climate, and they failed to meaningfully consult.
Why is the Prime Minister refusing to back up symbolic gestures with concrete actions to defend our environment?
View Jagmeet Singh Profile
NDP (BC)
View Jagmeet Singh Profile
2019-06-19 14:35 [p.29387]
Mr. Speaker, that is a pretty low bar to set when we have the Harper Conservatives to compare with.
Indigenous and coastal communities vehemently oppose this project. Tanker traffic will increase nearly sevenfold. The risk of spills will increase considerably for those living on our coasts. The Prime Minister is ignoring those very valid concerns. We need to take decisive action to protect our environment.
How can the Prime Minister tell people that approving this pipeline will protect our environment, when that is not the case?
View Alexandre Boulerice Profile
NDP (QC)
Mr. Speaker, the Liberals have suddenly realized that green-lighting the expansion of Trans Mountain will not wash, especially after declaring a climate emergency the day before. Now they are trying to create a diversion by saying that any profits from the pipeline will go into a green fund.
They are spending $15 billion to create more pollution. That is what I would call trading four quarters for a dollar, especially when that dollar is the equivalent of three million cars' worth of pollution.
Why not immediately invest that $15 billion in renewable energy and the good jobs of tomorrow, as the NDP is proposing?
View Peter Julian Profile
NDP (BC)
View Peter Julian Profile
2019-06-19 14:46 [p.29389]
Mr. Speaker, there are no profits. It is losing $150 million a year. What an empty gesture. That is just our point. The Prime Minister asks Canadians to wait for pharmacare, affordable housing and so much else and then he splurges $15 billion on Trans Mountain. He says he respects reconciliation and then runs roughshod over indigenous rights. He pushes a climate emergency motion and then, within hours, is trying to ram through a raw bitumen pipeline that trashes the Paris Agreement.
Why did the Prime Minister choose oil lobbyists over a future generation?
View Ruth Ellen Brosseau Profile
NDP (QC)
Mr. Speaker, the dairy and cheese industries are losing $450 million a year. In 2014, my motion to compensate producers following the signing of the Comprehensive and Economic Trade Agreement was adopted unanimously by the House of Commons. Five years later nothing has been done. There is still no money in the budget for the compensation, and we are still waiting for measures and a program to support our farmers. Successive Conservative and Liberal governments have failed our Quebec farmers.
When will the government take action and announce a compensation plan for our farmers?
View Rachel Blaney Profile
NDP (BC)
Mr. Speaker, a man living in Ottawa Centre has been denied OAS because of his rare form of dementia. The family is now owed $18,000, and the Liberal government is refusing it because he does not meet their criteria.
A one-size-fits-all approach to dementia patients is completely inappropriate.
Will the Liberal MP for Ottawa Centre stand up for her constituent or will the Liberals continue to make empty gestures, while abandoning Canadians in need of dementia care?
View Georgina Jolibois Profile
NDP (SK)
Mr. Speaker, the Denesuline of northern Saskatchewan and Manitoba were supposed to sign an agreement with the government after 18 years of negotiating for their land, harvesting and resource rights. A week ago, the minister backed away and now refuses to meet with them. She broke her promise and betrayed the Dene.
Meaningful reconciliation is about working with indigenous people and meeting in good faith. Will the minister meet with the Dene while they are in Ottawa and explain why she broke her promise, face to face?
View Richard Cannings Profile
NDP (BC)
Mr. Speaker, today a report on the state of Canada's birds is expected, with findings of dramatic declines in many species, most of this resulting from habitat loss. For instance, over the last 40 years, we have lost over half of our grassland bird populations, birds like meadowlarks and burrowing owls.
The Liberals promised to protect 17% of Canada's wildlands and water by 2020, but have only hit 11%. An NDP government would protect 30% by 2030.
Why are the Liberals making nothing but empty gestures and breaking their promise to protect our wildlife?
View Jagmeet Singh Profile
NDP (BC)
View Jagmeet Singh Profile
2019-06-19 15:12 [p.29393]
Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister's symbolic gestures do not match up with his actions. He promised change, but four years later medicine is still unaffordable, corporations are still avoiding billions in taxes, Canadians are still paying sky-high cellphone bills, and people still cannot afford to find a place to live.
The Liberals are buying pipelines and still using Stephen Harper's climate targets.
I believe better is possible. Why do the Liberals keep trying to convince Canadians that they have to settle for less?
View Cheryl Hardcastle Profile
NDP (ON)
View Cheryl Hardcastle Profile
2019-06-19 15:18 [p.29394]
Mr. Speaker, there have been discussions among the parties, and I am hopeful that if you seek it, you will find unanimous consent for the following motion.
I move:
That the House, (a) extend its condolences to all the victims of violence and war in Sri Lanka; (b) call on the Government of Sri Lanka to promote justice for those affected by the Easter Sunday attacks, protect the rights of religious minorities and defend all places of worship; (c) reaffirm Canada's call for Sri Lanka to implement its obligations within a clearly specified time frame, as mandated under the UN Human Rights Council resolutions 30/1 and 40/1 as well as Canada's support in advancing accountability, peace and reconciliation among all people on the island; and (d) call upon the United Nations to establish an international independent investigation into allegations of genocide against Tamils committed in Sri Lanka, including during the last phase of the armed conflict in 2009.
View Ruth Ellen Brosseau Profile
NDP (QC)
moved to introduce Bill C-464, An Act to amend the Income Tax Act (small brewery, winery or distillery tax credit).
She said: Mr. Speaker, I want to thank my colleague and friend, the member for Jonquière.
This important bill seeks to introduce a tax credit that would help businesses increase their productivity, hire employees, and generate more revenue. That money would be entirely reinvested in the business and would help stimulate the local economy. I would like to see this bill passed soon. I know that people love their microbreweries, their vineyards and their distilleries, and this is a way to encourage them. I would like to list some of the companies in Berthier—Maskinongé.
In D'Autray, there is the Aux pieds des noyers vineyard, Vignoble Carone Wines, the Lano d’Or vineyard, the Saint-Gabriel vineyard, the Vent maudit vineyard and Domaine du Mont d'Or. In Maskinongé, there is the Prémont vineyard, Domaine & Vins Gélinas and Vignoble et Domaine Beauchemin.
We also have extraordinary microbreweries such as Microbrasserie Nouvelle-France, Brasserie Dépareillée and Microbrasserie L'Arsenal. There is also a distillery in Louiseville, the Distillerie Mariana.
This tax credit would help businesses across Canada and Quebec.
View Pierre-Luc Dusseault Profile
NDP (QC)
View Pierre-Luc Dusseault Profile
2019-06-19 16:03 [p.29400]
moved for leave to introduce Bill C-465, An Act to amend the Canada Labour Code (automated external defibrillators).
He said: Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to introduce this bill, which is the result of a collaboration with one of my constituents, Claude Leblanc, who was recently honoured. Sadly, he passed away a few weeks after I met him.
We worked together on the idea of this bill. Claude Leblanc was instrumental in getting automated defibrillators installed all over the riding of Sherbrooke and even all across Quebec. He wanted to push his idea even further and make it mandatory to install defibrillators in government buildings and buildings housing federally regulated businesses.
The bill would amend the Canada Labour Code to ensure that federally regulated businesses and federal government offices with a certain number of employees, which will be prescribed by regulation, install automated defibrillators in the workplace. We estimate that this would save hundreds of lives a year. It would ensure that this kind of assistance is available in all regions of Canada when needed.
I am grateful to Claude Leblanc for his years of hard work.
View Carol Hughes Profile
NDP (ON)
Mr. Speaker, it is always a pleasure for me to rise in this House on behalf of the good people of Algoma—Manitoulin—Kapuskasing.
I have two petitions to table. The first petition is from people from Hearst, Dubreuilville, White River, Echo Bay, Wawa, Richards Landing, Hawk Junction, Elliot Lake and Sault Ste. Marie.
The petition is in support of public, universal and comprehensive pharmacare for all. The petitioners note that right now, one in 10 Canadians cannot afford their prescription medication under the current system that prioritizes drug companies' bottom line. If we replace our current system with single-payer pharmacare that benefits everyone, the country will save $4.2 billion each year. The petitioners add that Canada is behind the times, as we are the only OECD country with a universal health system that does not cover prescription drugs.
They point out that implementing a universal pharmacare program will give Canadians collective buying power that will lower the cost of drugs and health care. People could therefore feel more secure about their health in the future.
The petitioners are calling on the Government of Canada to eliminate this oversight in the health care system and bring in a public universal and public comprehensive pharmacare plan.
View Carol Hughes Profile
NDP (ON)
Mr. Speaker, the second petition is in support of the creation of the defence of Canada medal for the men and women who defended our country during the Cold War. The medal would officially honour those who served in the defence of Canada's borders from 1946 to 1989.
The petitioners note that this medal would recognize the support of the many men and women who gave countless hours of service to their country as they trained and prepared in case of an attack on Canadian soil, which fortunately never happened.
The petitioners call on the government to support Bill C-270, which would create a defence of Canada medal.
View Gord Johns Profile
NDP (BC)
View Gord Johns Profile
2019-06-19 16:19 [p.29403]
Madam Speaker, I am presenting a number of petitions from my riding of Courtenay—Alberni.
The first is a petition for pharmacare for all.
View Gord Johns Profile
NDP (BC)
View Gord Johns Profile
2019-06-19 16:20 [p.29403]
Madam Speaker, the second is a petition to withdraw Bill C-27 to protect defined benefit plans.
View Gord Johns Profile
NDP (BC)
View Gord Johns Profile
2019-06-19 16:20 [p.29404]
Madam Speaker, the third is a petition to honour the automatic guaranteed income supplement program.
View Gord Johns Profile
NDP (BC)
View Gord Johns Profile
2019-06-19 16:20 [p.29404]
Madam Speaker, the fourth petition calls for a national cycling strategy.
View Gord Johns Profile
NDP (BC)
View Gord Johns Profile
2019-06-19 16:20 [p.29404]
Madam Speaker, the fifth petition is in support of my motion, Motion No. 151, to combat plastic pollution in aquatic environments.
View Gord Johns Profile
NDP (BC)
View Gord Johns Profile
2019-06-19 16:20 [p.29404]
Madam Speaker, the sixth petition asks to create a zero-waste Canada.
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