Committee
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 100 of 334
View Amarjeet Sohi Profile
Lib. (AB)
Thank you, Mr. Chair, and good afternoon, everyone.
I first of all want to acknowledge something that is on everyone's mind today, which is the passing of a colleague and a friend to many. On behalf of our government and my family, I want to extend my deepest condolences to the family of Mark Warawa, my colleague, and to our colleagues from the Conservative Party and many others who have lost a friend today.
I would also like to take a moment to recognize that I am speaking to you from Treaty No. 7 territory. Such acknowledgements are important, particularly when we are meeting to talk about doing resource development the right way. Our government's approach to the Trans Mountain expansion project and the start of the construction season is a great example of that—of resource development done right.
Let me also begin by recognizing that I know this expansion project inspires strong opinions on both sides—for and against—and with respect to both sides of the debate, I want to assure everyone that our government took the time required to do the hard work necessary to hear all voices, to consider all evidence and to be able to follow the guidance we received from the Federal Court of Appeal last August.
That included asking the National Energy Board to reconsider its recommendation, taking into account the environmental impact of project-related marine shipping. It also included relaunching phase III consultations with indigenous groups potentially impacted by the project, by doing things differently and engaging in a meaningful two-way dialogue.
On that note, I would like to take a moment to sincerely thank the many indigenous communities that welcomed me into their communities for meetings over the last several months. I appreciate your openness, your honesty and your constructive ideas and sincerity of views.
Honourable members, no matter where you stand on TMX, this decision is a positive step forward for all Canadians. It shows how in 2019, good projects can move forward when we do the hard work necessary to meet our duty to consult indigenous peoples and when we take concrete action to protect the environment for our kids, grandkids and future generations.
When we came into office, we took immediate steps to fix the broken review system the Conservatives left behind. When the risks made it too difficult for the private sector to move forward, we stepped in to save the project. When the Federal Court of Appeal made its decision back in August of 2018, we made the choice to move forward in the right way.
When we finished this process, we were able to come to the right decision to deliver for workers in our energy sector, for Albertans and for all Canadians, a decision to support a project that will create jobs, diversify markets, support clean energy and open up new avenues for indigenous economic prosperity in the process.
Where do we go from here, now that the expansion has been approved? While these are still early days, we have a clear path forward for construction to begin this season and beyond. The Prime Minister laid out a lot of this on Tuesday afternoon as he announced our decision. Minister Morneau expanded on some of these details when he was in Calgary yesterday, talking about the road ahead and about launching exploratory discussions with indigenous groups interested in economic participation and about using TMX's revenues to ensure Canada is a leader in providing more energy choices.
We have also heard from the Trans Mountain Corporation about both its readiness and its ambition to get started on construction. Ian Anderson, the CEO of the Trans Mountain Corporation, made this very clear yesterday.
That's also what I heard when I visited with Trans Mountain Corporation workers yesterday in Edmonton. There were a number of contractors there. They are ready to proceed on the expansion of the Edmonton terminal, as well as on many of the pumping stations that are required to be built in this expansion.
The message is clear. We want to get shovels in the ground this season, while continuing to do things differently in the right way.
The NEB will soon issue an amended certificate of public convenience and necessity for the project. It will also ensure that TMC has met the NEB's binding pre-construction conditions. The Trans Mountain Corporation, meanwhile, will continue to advance its applications for municipal, provincial and federal permits. We stand ready to get the federal permits moving.
As all of that is happening, our government continues to consult with indigenous groups, building and expanding our dialogue with indigenous groups as part of phase IV consultations by discussing the potential impacts of the regulatory process on aboriginal and treaty rights and by working with indigenous groups to implement the eight accommodation measures that were co-developed during consultations, including building marine response capacity, restoring fish and fish habitats, enhancing spill prevention, monitoring cumulative effects and conducting further land studies.
We are also moving forward with the NEB's 16 recommendations for enhancing marine safety, protecting species at risk, improving how shipping is managed and boosting emergency response.
What is the bottom line? There is no doubt that there are a lot of moving parts. This is a project that stretches over 1,000 kilometres, but it is moving forward in the right way, as we have already proven with our $1.5-billion oceans protection plan, our $167-million whale initiative, our additional $61.5 million to protect the southern resident killer whale, and our investment of all of the new corporate tax revenues, as well as profits earned from the sale of TMX, in the clean energy projects that will power our homes, businesses and communities for generations to come.
Before making a decision, we needed to be satisfied that we had met our constitutional obligations, including our legal duty to consult with indigenous groups potentially affected by the project, upholding the honour of the Crown and addressing the issues identified by the Federal Court of Appeal last summer.
We have done that. We accomplished this by doing the hard work required by the court, not by invoking sections of the Constitution that don't apply or by launching fruitless appeals, both of which would have taken longer than the process we brought in.
While Conservatives were focused on making up solutions that wouldn't work, we focused on moving this process forward in the right way. We have confirmation of that, including from the Honourable Frank Iacobucci, former Supreme Court justice, who was appointed as a federal representative to provide us with oversight and direction on the revised consultation and accommodation process.
I will close where I began, which is by saying that we have done the hard work necessary to move forward on TMX in the right way, proving that Canada can get good resource projects approved and that we can grow the economy and deliver our natural resources to international markets to support workers, their families and their communities, all while safeguarding the environment, investing in clean growth and advancing reconciliation with indigenous peoples.
Mr. Chair, I think this is a good place to stop and invite questions.
Thank you so much once again for having me here today.
Je vous remercie, monsieur le président. Bonjour à tous
Je tiens tout d'abord à reconnaître ce que tout le monde a en tête aujourd'hui, c'est-à-dire le décès d'un collègue et ami d'un grand nombre de personnes. Au nom du gouvernement et de ma famille, je tiens à offrir mes plus sincères condoléances à la famille de mon collègue, Mark Warawa, à mes collègues du Parti conservateur et aux nombreuses autres personnes qui ont perdu un ami aujourd'hui.
Je voudrais aussi prendre un moment pour reconnaître que je vous adresse la parole depuis le territoire du Traité no 7. Cette reconnaissance est importante, en particulier au moment où nous nous réunissons pour parler de l'exploitation adéquate des ressources. L'approche adoptée par notre gouvernement à l'égard du projet d'agrandissement du réseau Trans Mountain, ainsi que le début de la construction au cours de cette saison, en est un parfait exemple.
Permettez-moi également de commencer par reconnaître que je suis conscient que cet agrandissement suscite des arguments solides des deux côtés — des « pour » et des « contre ». Nous respectons les deux côtés du débat, et je tiens à vous assurer que notre gouvernement a pris le temps nécessaire et n'a ménagé aucun effort pour faire le travail nécessaire, pour entendre toutes les voix, pour examiner tous les éléments probants et pour être en mesure de suivre l'orientation donnée par la Cour d'appel fédérale en août dernier.
Ce travail consistait, entre autres, à demander à l'Office national de l'énergie de réexaminer sa recommandation, en tenant compte des incidences environnementales de la navigation maritime liée au projet. Il s'agissait également de relancer les consultations de la phase III auprès des Autochtones potentiellement touchés par le projet, en faisant les choses différemment et en nouant un dialogue bidirectionnel constructif.
À ce sujet, j'aimerais prendre quelques instants pour remercier sincèrement les nombreuses collectivités autochtones qui m'ont accueilli sur leur territoire pour des rencontres au cours des derniers mois. J'ai aimé votre ouverture, votre honnêteté, vos idées constructives et la sincérité de vos opinions.
Honorables députés, peu importe votre position sur le projet TMX, cette décision est un pas dans la bonne voie pour tous les Canadiens. Elle montre qu'en 2019, les bons projets peuvent aller de l'avant lorsque nous faisons le travail acharné qui est nécessaire pour nous acquitter de notre obligation de consulter les peuples autochtones, et lorsque nous prenons des mesures concrètes pour protéger notre environnement pour nos enfants, nos petits-enfants et les générations futures.
À notre arrivée au pouvoir, nous sommes intervenus immédiatement pour corriger le système d'examen brisé que les conservateurs nous avaient légué. Lorsque les risques ont rendu trop difficiles les démarches du secteur privé, nous sommes intervenus pour sauver le projet. Lorsque la Cour d'appel fédérale a rendu sa décision en août 2018, nous avons fait le choix d'avancer de la bonne façon.
Et lorsque nous avons terminé ce processus, nous avons pu en venir à la bonne décision, c'est-à-dire celle de servir les travailleurs de notre secteur de l'énergie, les Albertains et tous les Canadiens, une décision visant à soutenir un projet qui créera des emplois, diversifiera les marchés, favorisera l'énergie propre et, ce faisant, ouvrira de nouvelles voies à la prospérité économique des Autochtones.
Alors, quelles seront les prochaines étapes maintenant que l'agrandissement a été approuvé? Même si nous n'en sommes qu'au tout début, nous disposons d'un plan à suivre clair pour que la construction commence cette saison. Le premier ministre a décrit une grande partie du travail qui nous attend mardi après-midi, lorsqu'il a annoncé notre décision. Le ministre Morneau a donné de plus amples renseignements à ce sujet à Calgary hier, lorsqu'il a présenté les prochaines étapes du projet, soit le lancement des discussions exploratoires avec des groupes autochtones intéressés par une participation économique au projet d'agrandissement, et l'utilisation des recettes du projet TMX pour garantir que le Canada est un chef de file pour ce qui est d'offrir plus de choix énergétiques.
La Trans Mountain Corporation nous a également parlé de son état de préparation et de sa hâte de commencer la construction. Ian Anderson, le président-directeur général de la Trans Mountain Corporation, l'a exposé très clairement hier.
Et c'est aussi ce que j'ai entendu en rendant visite à des travailleurs de la Trans Mountain Corporation hier, à Edmonton. Il y avait un certain nombre d'entrepreneurs là-bas qui étaient prêts à amorcer l'agrandissement du terminal d'Edmonton, ainsi que la construction de nombreuses stations de pompage qui seront requises pour agrandir le réseau.
Le message est clair. Nous voulons que les travaux commencent cette saison, tout en continuant de faire les choses différemment, mais de la bonne façon.
L'ONE délivrera bientôt le certificat de commodité et de nécessité publiques modifié pour le projet. De plus, l'ONE veillera à ce que la Trans Mountain Corporation remplisse les conditions imposées par l'ONE avant la construction. Entretemps, la Trans Mountain Corporation poursuivra ses démarches pour obtenir les autorisations municipales, provinciales et fédérales nécessaires. Nous sommes prêts à démarrer le processus d'obtention des permis fédéraux.
Au cours de ce processus, notre gouvernement poursuit ses consultations avec des groupes autochtones. Nous renforçons et nous élargissons notre dialogue avec des groupes autochtones dans le cadre de la phase IV des consultations, en discutant des incidences potentielles du processus réglementaire sur les Autochtones et les droits issus de traités et en unissant nos efforts avec ceux des Autochtones afin de mettre en œuvre les huit mesures d'accommodement élaborées conjointement au cours des consultations. Ces mesures consistent, entre autres, à renforcer la capacité d'intervention en mer, à rétablir les poissons et leurs habitats, à améliorer la prévention des déversements, à surveiller les effets cumulatifs et à réaliser d'autres études en milieu terrestre.
Nous allons aussi de l'avant avec les 16 recommandations de l'ONE, des recommandations qui visent à améliorer la sécurité maritime, à protéger les espèces en péril, à améliorer la gestion de la navigation et à renforcer les mesures d'intervention en cas d'urgence.
Quel est le bilan? Il ne fait aucun doute que le train des mesures est en marche. Il s'agit d'un projet qui s'étend sur 1 000 kilomètres, et il avance de la bonne façon. Nous l'avons d'ailleurs déjà prouvé avec notre Plan de protection des océans de 1,5 milliard de dollars, avec notre initiative sur les baleines de 167 millions de dollars, avec notre investissement supplémentaire de 61,5 millions de dollars visant à protéger la population des épaulards résidant dans le Sud, et avec notre réinvestissement de tous les nouveaux revenus de l'impôt des sociétés et des produits de la vente du projet TMX dans les projets d'énergie propre qui alimenteront nos résidences, nos entreprises et nos collectivités pendant des générations à venir.
Avant de prendre une décision, nous devrions être convaincus d'avoir respecté nos obligations constitutionnelles, y compris notre obligation juridique de consulter les groupes autochtones potentiellement touchés par le projet, en plus de maintenir l'honneur de la Couronne et d'aborder les problèmes relevés par la Cour d'appel fédérale l'été dernier.
Nous l'avons fait, et nous l'avons accompli en faisant le travail difficile que le tribunal exigeait, non pas en évoquant des articles de la Constitution qui ne s'appliquent pas ou en lançant des appels futiles, ce qui aurait dans les deux cas été plus long que le processus que nous avons établi.
Alors que les conservateurs cherchaient à inventer des solutions qui ne fonctionneraient pas, nous avons cherché à faire avancer ce processus de la bonne façon. Et nous en avons eu la confirmation, y compris par l'ancien juge de la Cour suprême, l'honorable Frank Iacobucci, qui a été nommé représentant fédéral pour superviser notre travail et orienter le processus révisé des consultations et des accommodements.
Je terminerai donc là où j'ai commencé, c'est-à-dire en mentionnant que nous avons fait le travail nécessaire pour avancer de la bonne façon relativement au projet TMX, prouvant ainsi que le Canada peut faire approuver de bons projets de ressources et que nous pouvons développer notre économie et vendre nos ressources naturelles sur les marchés internationaux pour appuyer les travailleurs, leur famille et leur collectivité, tout en préservant l'environnement, en investissant dans la croissance propre et en faisant progresser la réconciliation avec les peuples autochtones.
Monsieur le président, je pense que c'est le moment d'arrêter pour que les membres du Comité puissent poser des questions.
J'aimerais vous remercier infiniment une fois de plus de m'avoir invité à comparaître devant vous aujourd'hui.
View Kent Hehr Profile
Lib. (AB)
Just prior to my asking questions of the minister, I'd like to applaud the chair for his exceptional work and leadership for this committee. You've done excellent work.
Some hon. members: Hear, hear!
Hon. Kent Hehr: Minister, it's a thrill to have you back. I was in Calgary yesterday for Minister Morneau's presentation and his address to the Economic Club of Canada in Calgary. The excitement was present in the air, and there was a hop in the step of people in the room, which was good to see.
I think it's fair to say that last year's Federal Court of Appeal decision came somewhat out of the blue. The court said—and it was clear—that we needed to do our indigenous consultation better and our environmental considerations better.
I was chatting with Hannah Wilson in my office this morning, and I learned that this is happening not only here in Canada but also in the United States. In the case of Keystone XL, Enbridge Line 3 and other energy projects around the United States, the courts have been clear that this is the way things need to be done. Our government is trying to see that through, with indigenous consultation and environmental protections being at the forefront.
What was done differently this time, in consideration of the court decision that we were working with?
Avant de poser des questions au ministre, j'aimerais féliciter le président de son travail exceptionnel et du leadership dont il a fait preuve au sein du Comité. Vous avez fait un excellent travail.
Des députés: Bravo!
L'hon. Kent Hehr: Monsieur le ministre, nous sommes ravis de vous revoir. J'étais à Calgary hier pour assister à l'exposé du ministre Morneau et à son discours devant l'Economic Club of Canada. Il y avait de l'électricité dans l'air, et les gens dans la salle marchaient avec entrain, ce qui était beau à voir.
Je crois qu'il est juste de dire que la décision rendue l'année dernière par la Cour d'appel fédérale a été plutôt inattendue. La cour a indiqué — et c'était clair — que nous devions mener de meilleures consultations auprès des Autochtones et que nous devions mieux évaluer les incidences environnementales.
Pendant que je clavardais avec Hannah Wilson dans mon bureau ce matin, j'ai découvert que le Canada n'était pas le seul pays à faire face à ce genre de situation. Les tribunaux des États-Unis ont indiqué clairement que, dans le cas du pipeline Keystone XL, de la Canalisation 3 d’Enbridge et d'autres projets énergétiques en voie d'élaboration aux États-Unis, c'est ainsi que les choses doivent être faites. Notre gouvernement tente de donner suite à ces exigences en prévoyant dès le début des consultations auprès des Autochtones et la prise de mesures de protection de l'environnement.
Compte tenu de la décision rendue par la cour, qu'avons-nous fait différemment cette fois?
View Amarjeet Sohi Profile
Lib. (AB)
The process we put in place this time was quite different from what was done in past consultations.
First of all, we co-developed the engagement process with input from indigenous communities. We provided proper training to our staff and we doubled the capacity of our consultation teams. They worked tirelessly to engage in a meaningful two-way dialogue.
We also provided participation funding to indigenous communities so they could properly participate in the consultation process. We held more meetings and we met with indigenous communities in their communities. I personally held 45 meetings with indigenous communities and met with more than 65 leaders to listen to and engage with their concerns.
I am very proud of the outcome. We are offering accommodations to indigenous communities to deal with their concerns over fish, fish habitat, protection of cultural sites and burial grounds, as well as issues related to oil spills, the health of the Salish Sea, the southern resident killer whales, underwater noise and many others.
The accommodations we are offering, Mr. Chair, actually go beyond mitigating the impact of this project and will also go a long way toward resolving some of the issues and repairing some of the damage that has been done through industrial development in the Salish Sea. They will respond to many of the outstanding issues that communities have identified, related not only to this project but also to many of the other cumulative effects of the development that communities have experienced.
Le processus que nous avons mis en place cette fois-ci était très différent des consultations menées dans le passé.
Premièrement, nous avons élaboré conjointement le processus de participation, en tenant compte des commentaires des collectivités autochtones. Nous avons offert à nos employés une formation adéquate, et nous avons doublé la capacité de nos équipes de consultation. Nos employés ont travaillé sans relâche afin de nouer un dialogue bidirectionnel constructif.
Nous avons également fourni aux collectivités autochtones un financement afin qu'elles puissent participer adéquatement au processus de consultation. Nous avons organisé un plus grand nombre de réunions, et nous avons rencontré les Autochtones dans leur collectivité. J'ai personnellement participé à 45 réunions avec des collectivités autochtones, et j'ai rencontré plus de 65 dirigeants pour écouter leurs préoccupations et nouer un dialogue avec eux.
Je suis très fier du résultat. Nous offrons des accommodements aux collectivités autochtones afin d'apaiser leurs préoccupations relatives aux poissons, à leurs habitats, à la protection des sites culturels et des lieux de sépulture, ainsi qu'aux problèmes liés aux déversements de pétrole, à la santé de la mer des Salish, aux épaulards résidant dans le Sud, au bruit sous-marin et à un grand nombre d'autres enjeux.
Les accommodements que nous offrons, monsieur le président, vont en fait plus loin que l'atténuation des répercussions du projet TMX, et ils contribueront grandement à résoudre certains des problèmes causés par le développement industriel de la mer des Salish et à réparer certains des dommages occasionnés. Les accommodements régleront bon nombre des problèmes en attente que les collectivités ont signalés, qui sont liés non seulement au projet, mais aussi aux nombreux autres effets cumulatifs du développement de ces collectivités.
View Amarjeet Sohi Profile
Lib. (AB)
I think it is very important, and I will encourage the honourable member to look at the Federal Court of Appeal decision. The appeal was very clear that when the decision was made to not undertake the study of tanker traffic and its impact on the marine environment, it was done completely under the Stephen Harper government.
We were in a good process—
Je pense que c'est très important, et j'encouragerais l'honorable député à examiner la décision de la Cour d’appel fédérale. On y indique très clairement que la décision de ne pas entreprendre l'étude sur le trafic de pétroliers et sur son incidence sur l'environnement marin a été entièrement prise sous le gouvernement de Steven Harper.
Nous étions dans un bon processus…
View Amarjeet Sohi Profile
Lib. (AB)
You cannot do that. You have to discharge your duty to consult, which means that you have to engage in a two-way meaningful dialogue. Relying on a transportation report is not a substitute for discharging your section 35 obligations.
Vous ne pouvez pas faire cela. Vous devez remplir votre obligation de consulter, ce qui signifie que vous devez participer à un dialogue bidirectionnel constructif. Vous ne pouvez pas remplacer vos obligations en vertu de l'article 35 par un rapport sur les transports.
View Amarjeet Sohi Profile
Lib. (AB)
I think one of the fundamental differences is how we engaged with the communities, and also how we responded to their concerns. There are more accommodations offered in this than ever was done in the past. We're actually dealing with the cumulative impacts of development. We are engaging in how we better respond to spills; how we prevent spills from happening; how we protect water, fish, fish habitat, southern resident killer whales; how we protect cultural sites and burial grounds and all of those things that have been identified by indigenous communities.
Another thing that we have done differently is that we have engaged at the political level. You know, pipelines are controversial. The northern gateway was controversial. Energy east was controversial. The Trans Mountain pipeline expansion was controversial and is still controversial, but I compare the effort that we have put in and the effort that I have personally put in through the 45 meetings that I have held with indigenous communities. I compare that effort with the few meetings the Conservative ministers held with indigenous communities. For 10 years under Stephen Harper, ministers made no effort to actually meet with indigenous communities and listen to their concerns and then work with them to resolve those concerns. We have put our time in and we are very proud of the work we have done.
Je crois que l'une des différences principales, c'est la façon dont nous avons interagi avec les communautés et la façon dont nous avons répondu à leurs préoccupations. Il y a plus de mesures d'adaptation offertes dans le cadre de ce projet que jamais auparavant. Nous nous occupons des répercussions cumulatives du développement. Nous nous efforçons d'améliorer nos interventions en cas de déversement, de déterminer comment prévenir les déversements, de déterminer comment protéger les plans d'eau, les poissons, leur habitat et les épaulards résidents du Sud, de déterminer comment protéger les sites culturels et les cimetières et toutes les choses qui ont été cernées par les communautés autochtones.
Une autre chose que nous avons faite différemment, c'est que nous nous sommes engagés au niveau politique. Comme vous le savez, les pipelines soulèvent la controverse. La porte d'entrée du Nord a également soulevé la controverse, tout comme Énergie Est. Le projet d’agrandissement du réseau de Trans Mountain a soulevé et soulève toujours la controverse, mais je compare les efforts que nous avons déployés et les efforts que j'ai personnellement investis dans les 45 rencontres avec les communautés autochtones auxquelles j'ai participé au petit nombre de rencontres organisées par les ministres conservateurs avec les communautés autochtones. Au cours des 10 années sous le gouvernement Harper, les ministres n'ont déployé aucun effort pour rencontrer les communautés autochtones et écouter leurs préoccupations et ensuite collaborer avec ces gens pour régler leurs préoccupations. Nous avons consacré le temps nécessaire à ces initiatives et nous sommes très fiers du travail que nous avons accompli.
View Kelly McCauley Profile
CPC (AB)
I want to move on.
The PMO, we know through an ATIP request, ordered a review of the integrity regime. There were about 60 organizations consulted for the integrity regime process update.
Only three private companies.... Two of them volunteered. We contacted them and they volunteered to do it. Only one, which was SNC, was invited to participate in the integrity regime consultations. Of course, SNC-Lavalin is the only company that has received an administrative leave from the integrity regime.
I'm just curious as to why SNC was brought into the consultations, as really the only private company that was invited to join in on consultations.
Je vais passer à un autre sujet.
Nous savons, par une demande d'accès à l'information, que le Cabinet du premier ministre a ordonné un examen du Régime d'intégrité. Une soixantaine d'organisations ont été consultées pour mettre à jour le processus du Régime d'intégrité.
Seulement trois entreprises du secteur privé... Deux d'entre elles se sont proposées. Nous les avons contactées et elles ont proposé leur participation. Seulement une, SNC, a été invitée à participer aux consultations sur le Régime d'intégrité. Évidemment, SNC-Lavalin est la seule entreprise qui a obtenu un congé administratif du Régime d'intégrité.
Je me demande pourquoi on a invité SNC à participer aux consultations, comme la seule entreprise du secteur privé invitée, d'ailleurs.
View Kelly McCauley Profile
CPC (AB)
From your own report that you published, it listed the companies consulted.
We went through it, and we got from your department the companies listed. There were about 63 that consulted on the integrity regime. Most of them were associations; there were only three private companies.
We spoke to Bell and BMO, and they said, “Oh, yes. We volunteered to do this. We saw this. Only SNC was invited.”
SNC is the only company that has received an administrative review, granted by this government, from the integrity regime. Does it not all seem a bit odd?
Le rapport que vous avez vous-même publié dresse la liste des entreprises consultées.
Nous l'avons parcouru et nous avons obtenu de votre ministère la liste des entreprises. Environ 63 ont été consultées sur le Régime d'intégrité. La plupart d'entre elles sont des associations. En fait, il n'y avait que trois entreprises du secteur privé.
Nous avons parlé à Bell et à BMO, et elles nous ont déclaré avoir proposé de participer à ces consultations, mais que seule SNC avait été invitée.
SNC est la seule entreprise qui a fait l'objet d'un examen administratif du Régime d'intégrité, examen accordé par le gouvernement actuel. Tout cela ne paraît-il pas un peu curieux?
View Kelly McCauley Profile
CPC (AB)
Have you gone back to consult with SNC as well, seeing that you invited them to consult the first time around?
Êtes-vous retourné consulter SNC aussi, étant donné que vous l'avez invitée aux premières consultations?
View Kelly McCauley Profile
CPC (AB)
View Randy Boissonnault Profile
Lib. (AB)
I want to extend an olive branch, because I think you're trying to do really important work and I want to see this resolved in my lifetime.
On your tour, would you come to Edmonton and do a round table? I will sit next to you. I will moderate.
J'aimerais vraiment qu'on fasse la paix, parce que je pense que vous essayez de faire un travail très important et j'aimerais que cette question soit résolue de mon vivant.
Quand vous partirez en tournée, accepteriez-vous de venir à Edmonton participer à une table ronde? J'irai m'asseoir à côté de vous. Je pourrais animer le débat.
View Randy Boissonnault Profile
Lib. (AB)
I'll be there like a bridge. I will be there as a bridge to the Alberta community.
Je serai là pour faire le pont. J'assurerai la liaison avec les gens de l'Alberta.
View Tom Kmiec Profile
CPC (AB)
My question, then, is for both of you, because both of you work closely with builders or as builders of units in this country. Were either of you consulted before the announcement of the shared equity mortgage program was made?
Ma question s'adresse donc à vous deux, car vous travaillez tous les deux en étroite collaboration avec les constructeurs ou êtes vous-mêmes constructeurs de logements. Avez-vous, l'un ou l'autre, été consultés avant l'annonce du programme de prêts hypothécaires avec participation à la mise de fonds?
View Shannon Stubbs Profile
CPC (AB)
View Shannon Stubbs Profile
2019-05-14 16:02
And there is no tar in the oil sands.
Quickly on the Liberal fuel standard, I just wonder if you have you been consulted as a department in the development of the Liberal fuel standard. While the environment department admits they have no modelling for emissions reductions or the cost consequences of the fuel standard, I just wonder if your department has been engaged in the development of it—or maybe you are now, now that they're consulting in the back end, even though they announced it in December—particularly with regard to cost consequences for refiners in Canada.
Et les sables bitumineux ne sont pas du bitume à proprement parler.
Brièvement, en ce qui concerne la norme libérale sur les carburants, je me demande si votre ministère a été consulté dans le cadre de l’élaboration de cette norme. Bien que le ministère de l’Environnement admette qu’il n’a pas de modèle pour la réduction des émissions ou les conséquences financières de la norme sur les carburants, je me demande si votre ministère a participé à l’élaboration de cette norme. Est-ce que vous participez maintenant à ce processus, alors que votre ministère mène des consultations en aval, même si cette norme a été annoncée en décembre? Ma question porte notamment sur les conséquences financières pour les raffineurs au Canada.
View Stephanie Kusie Profile
CPC (AB)
It's fair to say, then, that you were not consulted by the minister or by ministerial staff until Bill C-76 came to the clause-by-clause procedure, until it became public.
Est-il donc juste de dire que vous n’avez pas été consulté par la ministre ou par le personnel ministériel avant que le projet de loi C-76 soit étudié article par article, avant qu’il soit rendu public?
View Stephanie Kusie Profile
CPC (AB)
To summarize then, you were not included in the drafting stage of Bill C-76. You were not consulted by the minister or her staff as this government went forward with Bill C-76 in an effort to determine electoral reform for Canada.
En résumé, vous n’avez pas été inclus à l’étape de la rédaction du projet de loi C-76. Vous n’avez pas été consulté par la ministre ou son personnel lorsque le gouvernement a présenté le projet de loi C-76 dans le but de déterminer la réforme électorale du Canada.
View Glen Motz Profile
CPC (AB)
Thank you to both witnesses for being here.
Were either of your organizations consulted prior to this bill? Do you see that your objections.... Obviously, I know the answer to my next question, but your objections are obviously not reflected in the current legislation.
Je remercie nos deux témoins de leur présence.
Est-ce que l'un ou l'autre de vos organismes a été consulté avant l'adoption de ce projet de loi? Pouvez-vous voir que vos objections... Évidemment, je connais la réponse à ma prochaine question, mais vos objections ne sont évidemment pas prises en compte dans les lois actuelles.
View Blaine Calkins Profile
CPC (AB)
Thank you, Chair.
Thank you to the witnesses.
Al, I wanted to check in with you on whether or not RMA, through its process or through the Federation of Canadian Municipalities or any of the organizations you've worked with within these confines, has ever had any resolutions pass at any of its assemblies requesting something from the government—the federal government in particular—in regard to aquatic invasive species?
Merci, monsieur le président.
Je remercie tous les témoins.
Monsieur Kemmere, je voulais vérifier avec vous si les municipalités rurales de l'Alberta, par l'entremise de son processus ou par la Fédération canadienne des municipalités ou toute autre organisation avec laquelle vous travaillez à ce sujet, ont adopté ou non des résolutions à l'une ou l'autre de leurs assemblées pour demander que le gouvernement fasse quelque chose — le gouvernement fédéral en particulier — par rapport aux espèces aquatiques envahissantes.
View Glen Motz Profile
CPC (AB)
Thank you very much, Mr. Chair, and thank you to both witnesses for being here today. I want to ask you both the same question.
Were either one of your organizations consulted in the drafting of this bill? I know your answer to my second question, were your objectives met in this bill? Obviously, they weren't. From the Police Association, you answered both. Were either of your groups consulted before the drafting of this bill?
Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président, et merci à nos deux témoins d'être là aujourd'hui. Je tiens à vous poser à tous les deux la même question.
Vos organisations ont-elles été consultées dans le cadre de la rédaction du projet de loi? Je connais la réponse à ma deuxième question: vos objectifs ont-ils été atteints grâce au projet de loi? Évidemment que non. Pour ce qui est de l'association des policiers, vous avez répondu aux deux. Vos groupes ont-ils été consultés avant la rédaction du projet de loi?
View Amarjeet Sohi Profile
Lib. (AB)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Good afternoon, everyone.
It's great to be here again to talk about what important investments our government has made in forestry, mining and the energy sector since October 2015, and how we can continue to invest in the future of Canada's natural resource sectors. This is a critically important time for our resource sectors and, more importantly, for Canadian workers.
As we all know, the world's energy needs are changing. Countries are increasingly looking to import sustainably sourced products. There is a growing consensus on the need to take immediate and sustained action on climate change. Some may choose to ignore these changes, keep their heads in the sand and hope for the best, but that is not the Canadian way. We are innovators.
Let's not forget that it was Canadians who first discovered how to get oil out of the oil sands. It was Canadians who created the first all-electric, battery-powered gold mine. It was Canadians who first built the largest North American passive house.
So how do we prepare for the future while also responding to the needs of today?
It starts with listening. In 2015, Canadians made it clear that protecting the environment and growing the economy could no longer be treated by the government as opposing goals.
Through Generation Energy, over 380,000 workers and leaders from renewable energy and clean tech, from oil and gas, from municipalities, indigenous leaders and Canadians helped build the idea of what our energy future could look like and how we can get there. We listened, and we have taken action to deliver for middle-class Canadians and those working hard to join the middle class.
We have done this by attracting new investment, extending the mineral exploration tax credit for five years, which is the first ever multi-year extension, and unveiling a plan that will position Canada as the world's undisputed mining leader. It is creating tens of thousands of jobs by supplying the minerals that will drive the clean growth economy.
We are reimagining the forest sector so our vast forests continue to play an essential role in our economy, not just here in Canada but around the world.
Through our investment of over $1 billion in energy efficiency, we are helping Canadians save money on their energy bills while fighting climate change.
We are building our energy future with a clear focus on expanding our renewable sources of energy, gaining access to global markets and making our traditional resources, such as oil and gas, more sustainable than ever.
Continuing this work and building on our progress to date is the big picture behind our main estimates. It mirrors a lot of what you have studied in your work as a parliamentary committee and the valuable recommendations you have provided to our government. I want to thank you for your work on behalf of Canadians.
The funding contained in this year's main estimates would support our department as we address the challenges in front of us, but also the opportunities ahead. This funding includes: advancing the use of new, clean technologies in the resource sector; helping remote, northern indigenous communities reduce their reliance on diesel; combatting the spruce budworm outbreak through early intervention; and extending our support to the many communities impacted by the unjustified tariffs on softwood lumber.
It will also give us the funds needed to implement key pillars of budget 2019. This includes new investments to encourage more Canadians to buy zero-emission vehicles; engage indigenous communities in major resource projects; improve our energy data, a key study from your committee; and enhance our ability to prepare for and respond to disasters that increasingly require federal action.
As I noted at the beginning of my remarks, this is a pivotal moment in our country's history and it is not without its challenges, whether they are building pipeline capacity in the west, fending off protectionist measures to our south or changes across our economy in all regions of our country.
Canada's unemployment rate may be at a 40-year low, but we need to be mindful of Canadians who are anxious about their future. ln my home province of Alberta, we have seen ongoing challenges for many workers because of fluctuating commodity prices. Our government sees all of these challenges, and we are taking them head-on.
That is why we announced a $1.6-billion action plan to support workers and enhance competitiveness in our oil and gas sector. That is why our government is providing up to $2 billion to respond to the U.S. tariffs that are threatening Canadian workers in our steel and aluminum sectors. lt is why we built on the $867 million through our softwood lumber action plan with continued support to the forest sector in budget 2019.
lt is why we are providing $150 million to ensure a just transition for workers and communities affected by the phasing out of coal-powered electricity. lt is why we are improving the way we make decisions on major projects, so that all Canadians have trust in their reviews, ensuring that we can advance nation-building projects that will grow our economy without putting our health, environment or communities in harm's way.
It is also why we have been doing the hard work necessary to follow the path set out in the Federal Court of Appeal's decision on the proposed Trans Mountain pipeline expansion. While that decision was a disappointment to many, it provided clear guidance on how the process could move forward in the right way, in a specific and focused way.
Some argue we should ignore that guidance, disregard the court and respond with lengthy appeals designed to avoid our obligations to the environment and to indigenous peoples. Our government took the responsible and more efficient path. We directed the National Energy Board to conduct a review of marine shipping and committed to getting phase three consultations right.
That important work is well under way. The NEB report was delivered on time on February 22. ln parallel, our consultation teams have been hard at work on phase three consultations. These teams, nearly double their original size, have been engaging in meaningful, two-way dialogue to discuss and understand priorities of indigenous communities and to offer responsive accommodations where appropriate. I have also personally met with many indigenous communities to help build a relationship based on trust.
Our work to date has put us in the strong position we are in today to deliver this process for all Canadians. Our work on TMX, our historic investments in solar, wind, geothermal and other forms of energy and our commitment to innovation and the development of new technologies are laying the foundation for a strong Canada both for today and for tomorrow.
Mr. Chair, our government sees our resource industries playing a key role in driving Canada's clean growth economy. We value the expertise and experience at Natural Resources and the drive of all Canadians to help make it happen.
These main estimates are a down payment on Canada's future, a future that our children will inherit with pride and build upon with confidence, a future that will continue to create well-paying, middle-class jobs for Canadians and future generations.
With that, I would be happy to take your questions.
Thank you for having us here.
Merci, monsieur le président.
Bonjour à tous.
Je suis très heureux d'être de nouveau ici. Je parlerai des investissements importants faits par notre gouvernement dans les domaines de la foresterie, de l'exploitation minière et de l'énergie depuis octobre 2015, ainsi que de la façon dont nous pouvons continuer d'investir dans l'avenir des secteurs des ressources naturelles du Canada. C'est un moment très important pour les secteurs des ressources naturelles et, surtout, pour les travailleurs canadiens.
Comme nous le savons tous, les besoins énergétiques de la planète sont en train de changer. Les pays cherchent de plus en plus à importer des produits provenant de sources durables. Il y a un consensus croissant sur la nécessité de prendre des mesures immédiates et durables relativement aux changements climatiques. Certains peuvent choisir de ne pas tenir compte de ces changements, de garder la tête dans le sable et d'espérer pour le mieux, mais ce n'est pas la façon de faire du Canada. Nous sommes des innovateurs.
N'oublions pas que ce sont les Canadiens qui ont découvert la façon d'obtenir du pétrole des sables bitumineux. Ce sont les Canadiens qui ont créé la première mine d'or entièrement alimentée en électricité par batterie. De plus, ce sont les Canadiens, qui, les premiers, ont construit la plus grande maison passive en Amérique du Nord.
Alors, comment allons-nous nous préparer pour l'avenir tout en répondant aux besoins d'aujourd'hui?
Cela commence par l'écoute. En 2015, les Canadiens ont clairement indiqué que la protection de l'environnement et la croissance de l'économie ne pouvaient plus être considérées par le gouvernement comme étant des objectifs opposés.
Dans le cadre de Génération Énergie, plus de 380 000 travailleurs et chefs de file des domaines de l'énergie renouvelable, des technologies propres et du pétrole et du gaz, des municipalités, des dirigeants autochtones et des Canadiens ont aidé à élaborer l'idée de ce à quoi notre avenir énergétique pourrait ressembler et de la façon d'y arriver. Nous avons écouté et nous avons pris des mesures pour obtenir des résultats pour les Canadiens de la classe moyenne et ceux qui travaillent dur pour rejoindre la classe moyenne.
Nous avons attiré de nouveaux investissements, prolongé le crédit d'impôt pour l'exploration minière de cinq ans, la première prolongation pluriannuelle, et dévoilé un plan qui fait du Canada un chef de file mondial incontesté du secteur minier. Nous avons créé des dizaines de milliers d'emplois en fournissant les minéraux qui stimuleront l'économie à croissance propre.
Nous réimaginons le secteur forestier afin que nos vastes forêts continuent de jouer un rôle essentiel dans notre économie, non seulement ici, au Canada, mais partout dans le monde.
Grâce à notre investissement de plus de 1 milliard de dollars dans l'efficacité énergétique, nous aidons les Canadiens à économiser de l'argent sur leur facture d'énergie tout en combattant les changements climatiques.
Nous bâtissons notre avenir énergétique en nous concentrant sur l'expansion de nos sources d'énergies renouvelables, en obtenant l'accès aux marchés mondiaux et en rendant nos ressources traditionnelles, comme le pétrole et le gaz, plus durables que jamais.
La poursuite de ce travail et le fait de s'appuyer sur nos progrès à ce jour constituent le tableau d'ensemble de notre Budget principal des dépenses. Cela reflète une grande partie de ce que vous avez étudié dans le cadre de votre travail en tant que comité parlementaire et les recommandations précieuses que vous avez fournies à notre gouvernement. Je tiens à vous remercier pour votre travail au nom des Canadiens.
Le financement contenu dans le Budget principal des dépenses de cette année appuiera notre ministère alors que nous relevons les défis qui se trouvent devant nous, mais aussi alors que nous voulons saisir les possibilités à venir. Le financement vise ceci: faire progresser l'utilisation de nouvelles technologies propres dans le secteur des ressources; aider les collectivités autochtones éloignées du Nord à réduire leur dépendance à l'égard du diesel; combattre l'épidémie de tordeuse des bourgeons de l'épinette au moyen d'une intervention précoce et étendre notre appui aux nombreuses collectivités touchées par les droits de douane injustifiés visant l'industrie du bois d'œuvre.
Ce financement nous donnera également les fonds nécessaires pour mettre en œuvre les principaux piliers du budget de 2019. Cela comprend de nouveaux investissements pour encourager un plus grand nombre de Canadiens à acheter des véhicules à émission zéro; faire participer les collectivités autochtones dans de grands projets de ressources naturelles; améliorer nos données sur l'énergie, une étude clé de votre comité, et améliorer notre capacité de nous préparer et de réagir aux catastrophes, qui exigent de plus en plus des mesures fédérales.
Comme je l'ai fait remarquer au début de mon exposé, c'est un moment charnière dans l'histoire de notre pays, qui comporte son lot de difficultés, qu'il s'agisse de l'augmentation de la capacité des pipelines dans l'Ouest, du fait de se défendre contre les mesures protectionnistes de notre voisin du Sud ou des changements dans l'ensemble de notre économie et dans toutes les régions de notre pays.
Le taux de chômage au Canada est à son plus bas depuis 40 ans, mais nous devons garder à l'esprit les Canadiens qui sont inquiets au sujet de leur avenir. Dans ma province, l'Alberta, nous avons constaté des défis constants pour de nombreux travailleurs en raison de la fluctuation des prix des produits de base. Notre gouvernement voit tous ces défis et nous les affrontons directement.
C'est la raison pour laquelle nous avons annoncé un plan d'action de 1,6 milliard de dollars pour appuyer les travailleurs et accroître la compétitivité de nos secteurs pétrolier et gazier. C'est la raison pour laquelle également notre gouvernement fournit jusqu'à 2 milliards de dollars pour répondre aux tarifs américains qui menacent les Canadiens qui travaillent dans les secteurs de l'acier et de l'aluminium. C'est la raison pour laquelle nous nous servons des 867 millions de dollars obtenus par l'entremise de notre plan d'action du bois d'œuvre pour continuer d'appuyer le secteur forestier dans le budget de 2019.
C'est la raison pour laquelle aussi nous fournissons 150 millions de dollars pour assurer une transition équitable pour les travailleurs et les collectivités touchés par l'élimination progressive de l'électricité produite par les centrales au charbon. C'est la raison pour laquelle nous améliorons la façon dont nous prenons les décisions sur de grands projets, de sorte que tous les Canadiens aient confiance dans les examens qui sont effectués. Nous veillons à pouvoir faire progresser les projets d'édification de la nation qui contribueront à la croissance de notre économie, sans mettre en péril notre santé, notre environnement ou les collectivités.
De plus, c'est également la raison pour laquelle nous avons fait le travail nécessaire pour respecter la décision de la Cour d'appel fédérale sur le projet proposé d'agrandissement du réseau Trans Mountain. Même si cette décision a été une déception pour beaucoup de personnes, elle a fourni des directives claires sur la façon dont le processus pourrait aller de l'avant de la bonne façon et dans un contexte précis et ciblé.
Même si certaines personnes ont fait valoir que nous devrions faire fi de ces directives, ne pas tenir compte de la cour et répondre à l'aide de longs appels conçus de façon à éviter nos obligations envers l'environnement et les peuples autochtones, notre gouvernement a choisi la voie responsable et plus efficace. Nous avons ordonné à l'Office national de l'énergie d'effectuer un examen du transport maritime et nous nous engageons à effectuer la phase trois des consultations de la bonne façon.
Ce travail important est en cours. Le rapport de l'Office national de l'énergie a été livré à temps, le 22 février. Parallèlement, nos équipes de consultation ont travaillé avec acharnement sur la phase trois des consultations. Ces équipes, qui ont presque doublé par rapport à leur taille originale, ont participé à un dialogue bilatéral significatif visant à discuter des priorités des collectivités autochtones et à les comprendre ainsi qu'à offrir des mesures d'adaptation adaptées, le cas échéant. J'ai aussi personnellement rencontré de nombreuses collectivités autochtones pour les aider à établir des relations fondées sur la confiance.
Notre travail à ce jour nous a placés dans la solide position que nous occupons aujourd'hui pour effectuer ce processus pour tous les Canadiens. Notre travail sur le projet Trans Mountain, nos investissements historiques dans l'énergie solaire, l'énergie éolienne, l'énergie géothermique et d'autres formes d'énergie, ainsi que notre engagement à l'égard de l'innovation et de l'élaboration de nouvelles technologies jettent les fondements pour un Canada fort, tant aujourd'hui que demain.
Monsieur le président, notre gouvernement voit que nos industries des ressources naturelles jouent un rôle clé dans la stimulation de la croissance d'une économie propre au Canada. De plus, nous apprécions l'expertise et l'expérience du ministère des Ressources naturelles et la volonté de tous les Canadiens de nous aider à y arriver.
Le Budget principal des dépenses est un versement initial sur l'avenir du Canada, un avenir dont nos enfants hériteront avec fierté et qu'ils mettront à profit avec confiance, un avenir qui continuera de créer de bons emplois bien rémunérés pour les Canadiens de la classe moyenne ainsi que pour les générations à venir.
Maintenant, je répondrai volontiers à vos questions.
Je vous remercie de m'avoir invité.
View Kent Hehr Profile
Lib. (AB)
It's my understanding that the Trans Mountain pipeline consultations and review are continuing. I saw the announcement that there will be a further extension in consultations. I'm wondering if you can give us an update on where we are in this process.
Je crois savoir que les consultations et l'examen relatifs au projet Trans Mountain se poursuivent. J'ai vu qu'on a annoncé que la période des consultations sera à nouveau prolongée. Pourriez-vous faire le point à ce sujet?
View Amarjeet Sohi Profile
Lib. (AB)
We have eight teams consisting of 60 individuals, professionals who have been engaging in meaningful two-way dialogue with indigenous communities over the last number of months. During that consultation, indigenous communities requested an extension to the timelines. In order to accommodate that reasonable request, we extended the timeline by three weeks. This week we sent out a draft copy of the Crown's consultation and accommodation report to all the communities who engaged with us. Now they're able to comment on that draft report. We want to make sure they have enough time to actually read it and go through it and analyze it and give us good input.
Our goal is to make a decision on this project by June 18. The way things are going, I think we're in a good position to achieve that.
Nous avons huit équipes composées de 60 personnes, des professionnels qui ont procédé à un dialogue significatif avec des collectivités autochtones au cours des derniers mois. Durant ces consultations, des collectivités autochtones ont demandé que la période prévue pour les consultations soit prolongée. Pour accéder à cette demande raisonnable, nous avons prolongé de trois semaines la période des consultations. Cette semaine, nous avons fait parvenir à toutes les collectivités avec lesquelles nous avons discuté une copie du rapport provisoire sur la consultation et l'accommodement de la Couronne. Les collectivités sont maintenant en mesure de formuler des commentaires au sujet de ce rapport provisoire. Nous voulons nous assurer qu'elles disposent de suffisamment de temps pour le lire et l'analyser, afin de nous donner de bons commentaires.
Notre objectif est de prendre une décision au sujet du projet d'ici le 18 juin. Vu le bon déroulement des choses, je pense que nous serons en mesure d'atteindre cet objectif.
View Amarjeet Sohi Profile
Lib. (AB)
First of all, through you, Mr. Chair, there were two issues the Federal Court identified in the ruling of August 30, 2018. One was the issue of not conducting the review of marine safety related to marine tanker traffic. That was the process which the NEB had undertaken, and they have made a decision and a recommendation to approve this project.
The other issue is the indigenous consultation that my department has been undertaking. We have been clear from day one that our goal is to get the process right, so we never set a deadline on the conclusion of those consultations. We've always said that we will make a decision when we feel that we have adequately discharged our constitutional obligation for meaningful consultation with the indigenous communities. Now we feel with the work that has been done that our goal is to make that decision by June 18.
Premièrement, par votre entremise, monsieur le président, j'aimerais répondre que la Cour fédérale a souligné deux problèmes dans le jugement qu'elle a rendu le 30 août 2018. Le premier est le fait de ne pas avoir mené un examen de la sécurité maritime liée à la circulation des pétroliers. C'est un processus que l'Office national de l'énergie avait entrepris, au terme duquel il a décidé de recommander d'approuver le projet.
L'autre problème concerne les consultations avec les Autochtones menées par mon ministère. Dès le début, nous avons dit clairement que notre objectif était de bien faire les choses à cet égard, alors nous n'avons jamais fixé un délai pour la fin des consultations. Nous avons toujours dit que nous allons prendre une décision lorsque nous estimerons que nous nous serons adéquatement acquittés de notre obligation constitutionnelle de tenir des consultations en bonne et due forme avec les collectivités autochtones. Compte tenu du travail qui a été fait, nous nous sommes donné comme objectif de prendre une décision d'ici le 18 juin.
View Amarjeet Sohi Profile
Lib. (AB)
We extended the consultation process by three weeks at the request of the indigenous communities. I think it is a reasonable request coming from our partners who we are engaging. Cabinet would have to make a decision on this project, and I cannot predetermine the decision of cabinet. Once that decision is made, the next part of the process will unfold.
Nous avons prolongé de trois semaines la période des consultations à la demande des collectivités autochtones. Je crois qu'il s'agit d'une demande raisonnable de la part de nos partenaires. C'est le cabinet qui devra prendre une décision, et je ne peux pas déterminer à l'avance quelle sera cette décision. Une fois que la décision aura été prise, la prochaine étape s'enclenchera.
View Amarjeet Sohi Profile
Lib. (AB)
Through you, Mr. Chair, we are very serious about how we engage with indigenous communities. We learn new things and look for new opportunities to engage in a meaningful way.
In this particular case, those drilling projects had a number of conditions that were imposed, and rightfully so. I think we have a lot of expertise in our offshore authorities and the bodies that do the consultations. We've continued to learn how to engage, and in some cases, some processes are better than others, so we will continue to explore and learn.
Monsieur le président, nous sommes très sérieux quant à la manière dont nous consultons les communautés autochtones. Nous apprenons de nouvelles choses et nous sommes à l'affût de nouvelles occasions de faire participer les parties prenantes de manière constructive.
Dans ce cas précis, les projets de forage étaient assujettis à un certain nombre de conditions, et avec raison. Je pense que les autorités extracôtières et les organes qui mènent les consultations possèdent une expertise considérable. Nous continuons d'apprendre comment faire participer les parties prenantes et, dans certains cas, certains processus sont meilleurs que d'autres. Nous allons donc continuer d'explorer et d'apprendre.
View Amarjeet Sohi Profile
Lib. (AB)
I would say one of the ways of being open and responsive is to listen to your partners in a sincere way. They made a sincere request to us for an extension and we responded. I think our responding to the request that indigenous communities made to us shows our commitment.
Je dirais qu'une des manières d'être ouvert et souple consiste à écouter ses partenaires avec sincérité. Les communautés autochtones nous ont sincèrement demandé une prolongation, que nous leur avons accordée. Je pense qu'en agréant leur demande, nous avons fait la preuve de notre engagement.
View Jim Eglinski Profile
CPC (AB)
View Jim Eglinski Profile
2019-04-29 17:23
Prior to your bringing out Bill C-93, did you have discussions with any stakeholders? Can you tell us of any concerns that the different groups may have had, whether you were talking to the RCMP or municipalities that may have to provide these records or have people research these records? Can you give me any indication about whom you met with?
Avant de déposer le projet de loi C-93, avez-vous discuté avec des intervenants? Pouvez-vous nous parler des préoccupations que les divers groupes, que ce soit la GRC ou les municipalités, pouvaient avoir à propos de fournir ces dossiers ou de demander à des gens de faire des recherches à ce sujet? Pouvez-vous me parler des groupes avec qui vous avez discuté?
View Jim Eglinski Profile
CPC (AB)
View Jim Eglinski Profile
2019-04-29 17:25
Have you addressed any of them? Can you give me some examples?
En avez-vous réglé certains? Pouvez-vous me donner quelques exemples?
View Kent Hehr Profile
Lib. (AB)
Your recommendation is early engagement: before you draft your plans, consult with the indigenous groups and that will guide the process going forward.
Vous recommandez une participation précoce; avant d'établir des plans, il faut consulter les groupes autochtones, ce qui guidera la démarche ultérieure.
View Shannon Stubbs Profile
CPC (AB)
View Shannon Stubbs Profile
2019-04-09 16:38
I think that's why you're one of the most important elected leaders in the entire country. You're leading a fight that is imperative for every single Canadian citizen in every community in every province.
You made an interesting point earlier in your comments in talking about the best practices and the successes of the B.C. government in your negotiations, in the context of best practices for indigenous engagement on major resource projects. This is actually a point of concern for the Liberals' Bill C-69. As you probably know, the definitions of major and minor projects, the potential of in situ development to fall under the legislation, and the potential for—exactly as you just said—provincial projects and provincial jurisdictions to actually get caught up under that legislation will not really be established until the details are, through the development of regulations out until 2021, so it remains a real risk.
There are also numerous indigenous leaders speaking out against Bill C-69, because in fact it really does nothing concrete in terms of expanding or increasing the rights of indigenous communities to a consultation or accommodation, nor does it increase the scope of the measures, really, or the imperative on government to fully meet the Crown's duty to consult. The removal of the standing test will ensure that literally anyone, anywhere, can intervene in Canada's review process for major resource projects, rather than having it be confined to locally impacted communities, Canadian citizens, locally impacted indigenous communities or subject matter and technical experts.
In the context of engaging best practices for engagement of indigenous communities on resource projects, would you agree that it is completely backwards that a major regulatory and impact assessment overhaul of research projects that explicitly relates to the duty of the Crown to consult with indigenous communities is actually in the Senate right now, weeks or months away from becoming law, and that only now is this committee actually doing an extensive review of best practices for indigenous consultation on major resource project development?
Voilà pourquoi vous êtes l’un des dirigeants élus les plus importants au Canada. La lutte que vous menez revêt une importance impérieuse pour chaque citoyen canadien dans chacune des collectivités de toutes les provinces.
Dans le contexte des pratiques exemplaires favorisant la participation des Autochtones aux grands projets d’exploitation des ressources, vous avez soulevé un point intéressant tout à l’heure lorsque vous avez parlé des pratiques exemplaires et des réussites du gouvernement de la Colombie-Britannique dans vos négociations. Il s’agit en fait d’un sujet de préoccupation à propos du projet de loi C-69 des libéraux. Comme vous le savez probablement, tant que les détails ne seront pas réglés par voie réglementaire, ce qui pourrait n'arriver qu'en 2021, les définitions des grands et des petits projets, la possibilité que l’exploitation in situ soit visée par la loi et la possibilité — exactement comme vous venez de le dire — que les projets provinciaux et les compétences provinciales soient effectivement visés par cette loi ne seront pas vraiment établies. Le risque demeure donc réel.
De nombreux dirigeants autochtones dénoncent également le projet de loi C-69, parce qu’en réalité, il ne fait rien de concret pour élargir ou accroître le droit des communautés autochtones à une consultation ou à des mesures d'adaptation. Il n’augmente pas non plus la portée des mesures, au fond, ni de l’obligation pour le gouvernement de respecter pleinement le devoir de la Couronne de mener des consultations. L’élimination du critère de la qualité pour agir aura pour conséquence que n’importe qui, n’importe où, pourra intervenir dans le processus d’examen du Canada pour les grands projets d’exploitation des ressources. On ne se limitera pas aux collectivités touchées localement, aux citoyens canadiens, aux collectivités autochtones touchées localement, aux experts en la matière ou aux techniciens.
Dans le contexte de l’adoption de pratiques exemplaires pour la participation des collectivités autochtones aux projets d’exploitation des ressources, seriez-vous d’accord pour dire qu'on prend les choses complètement à l'envers? En effet, on entreprend une refonte majeure de la réglementation et de l’évaluation de l’impact des projets de recherche qui portent explicitement sur l’obligation de la Couronne de consulter les collectivités autochtones, refonte actuellement à l'étude au Sénat, à des semaines ou des mois de devenir loi, et ce n'est que maintenant que le comité sénatorial procède à un examen approfondi des pratiques exemplaires en matière de consultation des Autochtones sur les grands projets d’exploitation des ressources.
View Kent Hehr Profile
Lib. (AB)
I'd like to thank the guests for coming today. This has been a fascinating discussion. Your knowledge is very deep and you bring a lot to the table for us both to understand our duty to consult and to accommodate our indigenous people here on major energy projects. I come from a city called Calgary, the energy capital of Canada. In Canada, we are also treaty 7 people. We share the land with the indigenous people of that region, and build community with them here today.
Nevertheless, I was listening to the discussion about the Sami people and the mitigation of climate change, wherein you found a successful practice implementing a large-scale windmill and a process that worked all right. Was that because there was early engagement on the file? Were people connected very quickly. What led to a successful outcome in that case?
J'aimerais remercier les témoins d'être ici aujourd'hui. Cette discussion est fascinante. Vos connaissances sont très approfondies, et vous nous apprenez beaucoup de choses, pour nous permettre de bien comprendre notre obligation de consulter et d'accommoder les peuples autochtones dans le cadre des grands projets énergétiques. Je viens de Calgary, la capitale de l'énergie du Canada. Au Canada, nous sommes également signataires du Traité no 7. Nous partageons les terres avec les peuples autochtones de cette région, et nous bâtissons une collectivité avec eux, ici, aujourd'hui.
Néanmoins, j'écoutais la discussion sur le peuple sami et sur l'atténuation du changement climatique, où vous disiez avoir trouvé une façon de mettre en oeuvre avec succès un projet éolien à grande échelle et avoir établi un processus qui a bien fonctionné. Est-ce parce qu'il y a eu une mobilisation précoce dans ce dossier? Une relation a-t-elle été très rapidement établie? Qu'est-ce qui a mené à une issue favorable dans ce cas?
View Kent Hehr Profile
Lib. (AB)
I get that it's a chicken-and-egg sort of proposition, and I appreciate that.
Recently in your area, the Alberta government announced a new park out there, the Kitaskino Nuwenëné Wildland Provincial Park. It's created out of the oil sands leases from proponents that have been up there. Has that process worked for you? Has that ability to go back onto the land been something that you felt committed to, connected to and consulted on?
Je comprends que c’est un peu comme la poule et l’oeuf.
Récemment, dans votre région, le gouvernement de l’Alberta a annoncé la création d’un nouveau parc, le Kitaskino Nuwenëné Wildland Provincial Park. Il a été créé à partir des concessions de sables bitumineux par des promoteurs qui ont travaillé là-bas. Ce processus a-t-il fonctionné selon vous? Vous êtes-vous senti partie prenante dans cette possibilité de retourner sur vos terres, avez-vous participé au projet et avez-vous été consulté?
View Shannon Stubbs Profile
CPC (AB)
View Shannon Stubbs Profile
2019-04-02 16:07
Thank you, Chair.
Thanks to both of our witnesses for being here.
I'm from the Treaty 6 area. I'm very proud to represent a total of nine indigenous and Métis communities. Almost all of them are actively involved in resource development, responsible oil and gas development, and supporting pipelines.
Chief Isaac, I know you've worked with a number of the chiefs from my area, such as leaders of the Frog Lake Energy Resources Corporation and others, who talk about the importance of resource development to indigenous communities and to future generations of indigenous communities, and also about the importance of ownership and direct involvement in resource development.
I do find it curious that we, at this committee, are doing a study on the best practices of indigenous communities when a bill that very much impacts that issue is in the Senate right now. Chief Isaac, I wonder if you have any comments about the scenario in which we find ourselves, which is that Bill C-69 is in its final stages of becoming law—unless it is stopped by the Senate—and this committee did not have an opportunity to review that piece of legislation.
You remarked originally on the association of chiefs that initially supported the legislation, but now yesterday or last week, I think, have come out opposing it. We can get into a little bit more of the details if you like, but I wonder if you do consider it to be a best practice that legislation like this could be on its way to completion right now without any of the committees having done a study on indigenous engagement. Do you have any comments on the degree to which you or other indigenous communities were consulted in the development of the legislation?
Merci, monsieur le président.
Merci à nos deux témoins d’être ici.
Je viens de la région visée par le Traité no 6. Je suis très fière de représenter un total de neuf collectivités autochtones et métisses. Presque toutes participent activement à l’exploitation des ressources, à l’exploitation responsable du pétrole et du gaz et à l'appui des pipelines.
Chef Isaac, je sais que vous avez travaillé avec un certain nombre de chefs de ma région, comme les dirigeants de la Frog Lake Energy Resources Corporation et d’autres, qui parlent de l’importance de l’exploitation des ressources pour les collectivités autochtones et les générations futures de collectivités autochtones, ainsi que de l’importance de la propriété et de la participation directe à l’exploitation des ressources.
Je trouve curieux que le Comité étudie les pratiques exemplaires des collectivités autochtones alors qu’un projet de loi qui a une grande incidence sur cette question est actuellement au Sénat. Chef Isaac, je me demande si vous avez des commentaires à faire au sujet du scénario dans lequel nous nous trouvons, c’est-à-dire que le projet de loi C-69 en est aux dernières étapes de son adoption — à moins qu’il ne soit bloqué par le Sénat — et que le Comité n’a pas eu l’occasion d’examiner cette mesure législative.
Au départ, vous avez parlé de l’association des chefs qui appuyait le projet de loi, mais je crois qu’hier ou la semaine dernière, elle s’y est opposée. Nous pouvons entrer un peu plus dans les détails si vous le voulez, mais je me demande si vous considérez comme une pratique exemplaire le fait qu'un projet de loi comme celui-ci puisse être sur le point d’être terminé sans qu’aucun des comités n’ait fait d’étude sur la participation des Autochtones. Dans quelle mesure vous-même ou d’autres collectivités autochtones avez été consultés dans l’élaboration de ce projet de loi?
View Shannon Stubbs Profile
CPC (AB)
View Shannon Stubbs Profile
2019-04-02 16:10
Yes, it does. In fact, there has been a broad base of legal consensus that Bill C-69 won't expand either the duty of the Crown to indigenous people or change the rights of indigenous communities and people in the consultation related to major resource projects in federal jurisdiction.
We, of course, agree and have heard the concerns about capacity and resourcing for capacity loud and clear, and we share those concerns. Overall Bill C-69 doesn't meet that need. In fact, the national chiefs council, the Indian Resource Council, the Eagle Spirit Chiefs Council and the majority of Treaty 7 first nations all oppose Bill C-69.
Chief Roy Fox said, “I don't have any confidence in Bill C-69. I am fearful, and I am confident, that it will keep my people in poverty.”
I just wonder if you agree with that statement.
Oui. En fait, il y a eu un large consensus juridique selon lequel le projet de loi C-69 n’élargira ni les obligations de la Couronne envers les peuples autochtones ni ne modifiera les droits des collectivités et des peuples autochtones dans la consultation relative aux grands projets d’exploitation des ressources relevant de la compétence fédérale.
Bien sûr, nous sommes tout à fait d’accord et nous avons entendu les préoccupations au sujet de la capacité et des ressources en la matière et nous les partageons. Dans l’ensemble, le projet de loi C-69 ne répond pas à ce besoin. En fait, le conseil des chefs national, le Conseil des ressources indiennes, le conseil des chefs du projet Eagle Spirit et la majorité des Premières Nations signataires du Traité no 7 s’opposent tous au projet de loi C-69.
Le chef Roy Fox a dit: « Je n’ai aucune confiance dans le projet de loi C-69. Je crains et j’ai la certitude, que cela maintiendra mon peuple dans la pauvreté. »
Je me demande si vous êtes d’accord avec cette affirmation.
View Shannon Stubbs Profile
CPC (AB)
View Shannon Stubbs Profile
2019-04-02 16:11
In the international context, not only would Bill C-69 obviously put Canada at a disadvantage, but another bill—Bill C-48, which is the shipping ban on oil off B.C.'s north coast—is another example, in the context of discussing best practices for this study, where I understand there was a limited or complete lack of consultation on the bill with indigenous communities.
I know that you yourself have said, “This tanker ban is not just going to hurt us at the moment, which it's doing, but it's going to hurt future generations.”
I wonder if there is anything that you wanted to share about the process in that consultation on Bill C-48. Also, do you consider it to be a best practice of a government imposing anti-energy legislation on indigenous communities and all Canadians without consulting?
Dans le contexte international, non seulement le projet de loi C-69 désavantagerait manifestement le Canada, mais un autre projet de loi — le projet de loi C-48, qui interdit le transport du pétrole au large de la côte nord de la Colombie-Britannique — est aussi un exemple, dans le cadre de la discussion sur les pratiques exemplaires pour cette étude, pour lequel je crois comprendre que les consultations au sujet du projet de loi auprès des collectivités autochtones ont été limitées, voire inexistantes.
Je sais que vous avez vous-même dit: « Cette interdiction des pétroliers ne va pas seulement nous nuire aujourd'hui, ce qui est le cas, mais elle va aussi nuire aux générations futures. »
Je me demande si vous avez quelque chose à dire au sujet du processus de consultation sur le projet de loi C-48. De plus, considérez-vous qu’il s’agit d’une pratique exemplaire lorsqu'un gouvernement impose une loi anti-énergie aux collectivités autochtones et à tous les Canadiens sans les consulter?
View Martin Shields Profile
CPC (AB)
View Martin Shields Profile
2019-02-28 16:04
I really appreciate that.
I think that with regard to the bill, Ms. Joe, you're explaining that in the consultation on the specifics, as we have heard from others, you feel very left out of this process. You're not the only one we've heard from who was very concerned at the lack of consultation.
Once again, I'll give you a few seconds to explain how critical that was do. We've heard what you had to do, but how left out did you feel when you received this thing and realized who else had already known about it?
Je comprends.
Madame Joe, au sujet du projet de loi, vous avez dit, comme d'autres nous l'ont dit également, avoir le sentiment de ne pas avoir eu votre mot à dire sur ses particularités. Vous n'êtes pas la seule à nous avoir dit être très inquiète du manque de consultations.
Je vais vous donner encore une fois quelques secondes pour nous expliquer l'importance de cela. Vous nous avez dit ce que vous aviez eu à faire, mais à quel point vous êtes-vous senties exclues lorsque vous l'avez reçu et vous êtes demandé qui d'autres étaient déjà au courant?
View Martin Shields Profile
CPC (AB)
View Martin Shields Profile
2019-02-28 16:06
You didn't get a chance to be consulted on that.
Vous n'avez pas eu la chance d'être consultées à ce sujet.
View Arnold Viersen Profile
CPC (AB)
Okay, so it is coming.
Mr. Alex Lakroni: Yes, definitely.
Mr. Arnold Viersen: Very good.
Minister, in the horizons items of the 2018-19 supplementary estimates, the funding for the reconsideration of the Trans Mountain expansion project, INAC received $312,000 for operation expenditures to support consultations with indigenous peoples. I'm sure you've heard from first nations across the country that have said that there have been no real consultations on Bill C-48 or Bill C-69. They say these bills are flawed because they've proceeded without their consent. Do you believe that the consultation process for Bill C-48, the tanker ban, and Bill C-69 was flawed, considering that's what the first nations are claiming?
D'accord. Donc, cela s'en vient.
M. Alex Lakroni: Oui, cela ne fait aucun doute.
M. Arnold Viersen: Très bien.
Madame la ministre, l'un des postes horizontaux du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses de 2018-2019 est le fonds pour le réexamen de l'agrandissement du réseau de pipelines de Trans Mountain. Affaires autochtones et du Nord Canada a reçu 312 000 $ pour les dépenses de fonctionnement et le soutien aux consultations des peuples autochtones. Je suis certain que vous avez déjà entendu ce qu'ont dit les Premières Nations du Canada: il n'y a pas eu de véritables consultations sur les projets de loi C-48 et C-69. Elles affirment que ces projets de loi sont viciés parce que le gouvernement a agi sans leur consentement. Selon vous, le processus de consultation entourant le projet de loi C-48, sur l'interdiction des pétroliers, et le projet de loi C-69 était-il imparfait, puisque c'est ce que disent maintenant les Premières Nations?
View Martin Shields Profile
CPC (AB)
View Martin Shields Profile
2019-02-27 16:31
You understand it so well. I can understand it only so little, but you understand it. To listen to you and how you express that and how you understand.... The words we use don't describe what we need to understand. That is so missing for us.
Politicians have to make decisions, and you understand that as well, but the problem is that the consultation that I see, which could have occurred with people who are sitting here in this room, didn't happen. It didn't happen. We're missing that passion. We're missing those key parts of understanding the situation. That's sad to me. You're much sadder than I am because you know the results.
Vous le comprenez si bien. Moi je le comprends plus ou moins, mais vous, vous le comprenez à fond. Vous écouter, votre manière de vous exprimer et de comprendre... Les mots que nous utilisons ne suffisent pas pour décrire ce que nous devons comprendre. Ils nous manquent gravement.
Les politiciens doivent prendre des décisions, et c'est tout à fait compréhensible. L'ennui, c’est que la consultation telle que je l'aurais imaginée, auprès de gens qui sont ici dans cette salle, n’a pas eu lieu. Elle ne s’est pas produite. Cette passion nous échappe. Il nous manque ces éléments clés pour comprendre la situation. Cela m'attriste, mais vous, vous êtes sans doute encore plus triste que moi, car vous connaissez les résultats.
View Kent Hehr Profile
Lib. (AB)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Thank you, Chief Erasmus and Ms. Mack, for being with us today to discuss international best practices, how we can move forward on the duty to consult, and how we engage on energy projects that benefit all concerned.
I'll start with you, Ms. Mack. Given your work with the Arctic Council, can you comment on the differences you may have seen or observed in terms of the different ways in which council members integrate the different voices you're hearing from indigenous people and how they then bring them forward to make decisions on projects on a go-forward basis?
Merci, monsieur le président.
Merci, chef Erasmus et madame Mack, d'être des nôtres aujourd'hui pour discuter des pratiques exemplaires utilisées dans le monde, des mesures que nous pouvons prendre pour faire avancer l'obligation de consulter et de nos démarches pour assurer la participation aux projets énergétiques qui profitent à tous les intéressés.
Je vais commencer par vous, madame Mack. Compte tenu de votre travail auprès du Conseil de l'Arctique, pouvez-vous dire un mot sur les différences que vous avez peut-être notées ou observées quant à la façon dont les membres du conseil tiennent compte des différents points de vue des peuples autochtones pour ensuite prendre des décisions en conséquence sur des projets à long terme?
View Kent Hehr Profile
Lib. (AB)
You were mentioning in your discussion with us today that often there are different groups of people within a jurisdiction and that how you engage with them can be a little bit different on many occasions. In your relationship with the Alaskan government and your arrangements there, do they have any formal arrangements that guide their process that are working and that you feel have evolved over time in terms of how that jurisdiction has dealt with major energy projects to benefit both indigenous people and Alaska as a whole?
Vous avez dit, dans le cadre de vos observations aujourd'hui, qu'il y a souvent différents groupes de personnes à l'intérieur d'une administration et que la façon de les mobiliser peut varier à bien des égards. Dans vos relations avec le gouvernement de l'Alaska et aux termes de vos ententes là-bas, y a-t-il des arrangements officiels qui guident le processus et qui fonctionnent bien? Avez-vous l'impression que les choses ont évolué avec le temps en ce qui concerne la façon dont l'administration s'occupe de grands projets énergétiques qui profitent aux peuples autochtones et à l'Alaska dans son ensemble?
View Shannon Stubbs Profile
CPC (AB)
View Shannon Stubbs Profile
2019-02-26 16:12
Thanks, I appreciate that.
Thank you to both of the witnesses for being here and for your testimony as we consider international best practices for engaging indigenous communities, particularly in Canada's context, with the challenges around indigenous consultation on major energy and other natural resource projects.
I wonder if each of you might be able to shed some light on a challenge relating to indigenous engagement on energy projects when it comes to who exactly would be the decision-makers or the ideal people at the table with the government representative, the government representative being one who has decision-making authority and can make reasonable accommodations based on concerns and feedback from indigenous communities.
I raise this because there have been a couple of examples recently that we heard about in this committee, for example, with the Lax Kw'alaams on the north coast of B.C., whose elected leaders had supported the establishment of an LNG project there. There were also individuals who claimed to be hereditary leaders of the community, and their perspective, which they certainly had a right to express, was opposed to the potential LNG project that the elected leaders supported. They claimed to be representatives of the band, and they opposed the LNG project against the will of the elected leadership. That matter was later settled in court, where a judge ruled that the person was not, in fact, a hereditary leader.
Sometimes there are differences in the Canadian context. For example, at this committee we've had representatives of the Assembly of First Nations come here to attempt to give an overarching perspective on behalf of indigenous communities, but there are many representatives of individual indigenous communities who say the representatives of the AFN don't speak for them or don't necessarily reflect their views or positions.
Chief Erasmus and Dr. Mack, do you have any feedback for us on how to sort through the complications with regard to who should be consulted with and who should be making the ultimate decisions in that consultation process?
Dr. Mack, Chief Erasmus is giving you the green light to go first.
Merci, je l'apprécie.
Je remercie nos deux témoins de leur présence et des témoignages qu'ils nous ont livrés pour étayer notre examen des pratiques exemplaires internationales en matière de participation des collectivités autochtones — notamment en ce qui a trait au contexte canadien — et des défis que pose la consultation des peuples autochtones dans le cadre de grands projets énergétiques et d'autres projets d'exploitation des ressources naturelles.
Je me demande si vous pourriez nous éclairer au sujet d'un problème découlant de la sollicitation des Autochtones lors de projets énergétiques, nommément la difficulté de déterminer qui seraient exactement les décideurs ou les personnes idéales qu'il conviendrait d'inviter à la table avec le représentant du gouvernement, c'est-à-dire avec cette personne qui, au nom de l'État, a le pouvoir de prendre des décisions et des mesures raisonnables en fonction des préoccupations et des observations exprimées par les collectivités autochtones.
Je pose cette question parce que le Comité s'est récemment fait rapporter deux exemples à cet égard. Il y a eu ce cas avec les Lax Kw'alaams, sur la côte nord de la Colombie-Britannique, dont les dirigeants élus avaient appuyé l'établissement d'un projet de gaz naturel liquéfié. Cependant, il y avait aussi des individus qui prétendaient être des chefs héréditaires de cette communauté, et qui étaient opposés à ce projet. C'était leur opinion et ils avaient assurément le droit de l'exprimer. Ils ont affirmé être des représentants de la bande et ils se sont opposés au projet contre la volonté des dirigeants élus. L'affaire a éventuellement été réglée en cour. Le juge a statué que la personne n'était pas, en fait, un chef héréditaire.
À l'intérieur du contexte canadien, il y a parfois des différences. Par exemple, des représentants de l'Assemblée des Premières Nations, l'APN, sont venus ici pour tenter de donner un point de vue global au nom des communautés autochtones, mais de nombreux représentants de ces diverses communautés ont affirmé que les représentants de l'APN ne parlaient pas en leur nom ou ne relayaient pas nécessairement leurs opinions ou leurs positions.
Chef Erasmus, madame Mack, avez-vous des observations à formuler sur la façon de régler les complications découlant du choix des représentants qui devraient être consultés et qui devraient être habilités à avoir le dernier mot lors de ce processus de consultation?
Madame Mack, le chef Erasmus vous prie de bien vouloir commencer.
View Kent Hehr Profile
Lib. (AB)
Thank you very much, ladies and gentlemen, for your very forthright presentations.
It's great to have indigenous voices here to guide us on international best practices and how we move forward on having better resource development.
I was listening very intently, and it seemed that your suggestion is that early engagement with the community is very important to successful resource development, and understanding, from both the resource company as well as the people on the land, what is going to work among all parties. Have you undertaken a lot of the work in seeing a successful energy project move forward?
Merci beaucoup, mesdames et messieurs, de vos exposés très francs.
C'est formidable qu'il y ait des voix autochtones avec nous pour nous éclairer sur les pratiques exemplaires à l'échelle internationale et guider notre manière de procéder à l'avenir de façon à favoriser une meilleure exploitation de ressources.
J'écoutais très attentivement, et vous semblez dire qu'il est très important de mobiliser la collectivité dès le départ pour réussir à exploiter les ressources et s'assurer que la société exploitant les ressources et les gens qui occupent la terre comprennent les solutions envisageables pour les deux parties. Avez-vous réalisé une bonne partie du travail nécessaire pour assurer la mise en oeuvre réussite d'un projet?
View Kent Hehr Profile
Lib. (AB)
To my friends at the Indian Resource Council from Treaty No. 6 and Onion Lake and Lloydminster, I actually had the privilege of playing hockey up in Lloydminster in 1987-88, and I worked at the Lloydminster upgrader. I know a bit about the area, and it's an honour to have you gentlemen here.
My question for you is around early engagement, on having that process whereby you're really fully integrated into the community. Do you think this would lead to more success? Should it be incorporated into our best practices to ensure that we have that communication dialogue that leads to a win-win situation?
À mes amis du Conseil des ressources indiennes du territoire visé par le Traité no 6, de Onion Lake et de Lloydminster, j'ai en fait eu le privilège de jouer au hockey à Lloydminster en 1987 et 1988, et j'ai travaillé à l'usine de traitement de Lloydminster. Je connais un peu la région, et c'est un honneur de vous avoir avec nous messieurs.
Ma question concerne la mobilisation précoce, le fait de mettre en place ce processus selon lequel vous êtes pleinement intégrés à la collectivité. Pensez-vous que cela engendre plus de réussites? Devrait-on intégrer cette façon de faire à nos pratiques exemplaires pour nous assurer d'établir cette communication qui mène à une situation avantageuse pour tous?
View Garnett Genuis Profile
CPC (AB)
Thank you so much to all of you. This is such powerful and important testimony, and I hope many Canadians will have the opportunity to hear what you've said today and to hear all of you in the future. One of my frustrations is with the politicians who talk about listening to indigenous people but then only want to reflect those indigenous people whose voices agree exactly with them on everything. It's very important that you, as indigenous leaders, have this opportunity to speak for yourself and your experience, and that we listen.
I just want to bring greetings and share the regrets of our shadow minister for natural resources, Shannon Stubbs, who I know is a great fan of all of you. She wishes she could be here today. I have the honour of subbing for her.
I wanted to ask about the requirement to consult when governments bring in anti-energy, anti-development policies. We recently had public servants before the committee who told us clearly that their understanding is that there is a legal duty to consult on any decision that impacts indigenous communities. In this context, that includes not only decisions to develop a resource but also decisions to impose restrictions on the development of the resource. In other words, when you have the imposition of a policy for a tanker exclusion zone that prohibits the export of natural resources off the northern coast of B.C., there is a duty to consult with indigenous peoples before imposing that policy. Prior to the imposition of the off-shore drilling ban in the Arctic, there was a legal duty to consult.
What we also heard at that time from those public servants was that they had no information about any consultation having taken place with any indigenous communities before the imposition of those policies.
Let's start, in particular, with the representatives of the Indian Resource Council. Do you agree there is a duty to consult when anti-energy, anti-development policies are imposed? Was there any meaningful consultation undertaken by the government in these areas? What kind of recourse do you have if it is the case that the government is running roughshod over your rights and your opportunities?
Je remercie chaleureusement chacun d'entre vous. Ce sont des témoignages éloquents et importants, et j'espère que nombre de Canadiens auront l'occasion d'entendre ce que vous avez dit aujourd'hui et ce que vous aurez à dire dans l'avenir. Une de mes frustrations, ce sont les politiciens qui disent écouter les peuples autochtones, mais seulement lorsque ceux-ci sont entièrement d'accord avec eux sur tout. Il est très important que vous, en tant que chefs autochtones, ayez l'occasion de parler pour vous-mêmes de votre expérience et que nous vous écoutions.
J'aimerais vous transmettre les salutations de notre porte-parole des ressources naturelles, Shannon Stubbs, qui regrette de ne pas pouvoir être ici et qui, je le sais, vous admire tous beaucoup. Elle aurait aimé être parmi nous aujourd'hui. J'ai l'honneur d'être ici en son nom.
Je voulais vous parler de l'obligation de mener des consultations lorsque les gouvernements instaurent des politiques anti-énergie et anti-développement. Nous avons récemment reçu des fonctionnaires au Comité qui nous ont dit clairement qu'ils croient qu'il existe une obligation juridique de mener des consultations relativement à toute décision qui a des incidences sur des communautés autochtones. Dans ce contexte, cela inclut non seulement les décisions d'exploiter une ressource, mais également celles d'imposer des restrictions sur l'exploitation de la ressource. Autrement dit, avant d'imposer une politique qui crée une zone interdite aux navires-citernes et qui interdit l'exportation de ressources naturelles au large de la côte nord de la Colombie-Britannique, on doit consulter les peuples autochtones. Avant l'imposition de l'interdiction du forage au large des côtes de l'Arctique, on avait l'obligation juridique de mener des consultations.
Ce que les fonctionnaires nous ont dit également à ce moment-là, c'était qu'ils ne disposaient d'aucune information sur des consultations qui auraient été menées auprès de communautés autochtones avant l'imposition de ces politiques.
Commençons, en particulier, par les représentants du Conseil des ressources indiennes. Convenez-vous qu'il y a une obligation de mener des consultations lorsqu'on impose des politiques anti-énergie et anti-développement? Le gouvernement a-t-il mené des consultations concrètes à cet égard? Quel genre de recours avez-vous si le gouvernement fait fi de vos droits et de vos possibilités?
View Garnett Genuis Profile
CPC (AB)
Does the imposition of anti-energy, anti-development policies by this government without consultation with indigenous communities reflect international best practices?
Est-ce que l'imposition par l'actuel gouvernement de politiques anti-énergie et anti-développement sans consultation des communautés autochtones reflète les pratiques exemplaires utilisées dans le monde?
View Garnett Genuis Profile
CPC (AB)
Thank you very much. That's an important point.
Have you as rights holders, as leaders of indigenous communities, as leaders of nations that are supposed to have that nation-to-nation relationship with the federal government—your information is so important—had an opportunity to meet with the Prime Minister, to meet with the Minister of Natural Resources?
Merci beaucoup. C'est un point important.
Avez-vous eu, en tant que titulaires de droits, chefs de communautés autochtones et chefs de nations qui sont censés avoir une relation de nation à nation avec le gouvernement fédéral — votre information est très importante —, l'occasion de rencontrer le premier ministre et le ministre des Ressources naturelles?
View Garnett Genuis Profile
CPC (AB)
Very clearly, then, your expectation would be to be consulted not just before a project moves forward but also before policies are put in place that will block projects. If I'm understanding correctly what you're saying, your view is that there is an absolute requirement to do that consultation not only before you say yes but also before you put in place those barriers like we're seeing in Bill C-48 and Bill C-69.
Alors, vous vous attendez très clairement à être consultés non pas seulement juste avant qu'un projet aille de l'avant, mais également avant que les politiques qui bloqueront les projets soient mises en place. Si je comprends bien ce que vous dites, vous êtes d'avis qu'il y a une obligation absolue de mener des consultations non pas seulement avant votre approbation, mais également après la mise en place d'obstacles comme ceux qui se dressent dans les projets de loi C-48 et C-69.
View Kevin Sorenson Profile
CPC (AB)
I know that this consultation has taken place, and on the maps we've just published, I like the way that Mr. Scott said that they'd just published the maps—those maps have been out. I saw those maps in 2013 or 2014, I'm sure. Now we're publishing the maps, showing where there's lack of coverage, and these consultations as to why there's no delivery in those underserved areas outside big urban areas—they've been going on forever.
Is there a cut-off date on the consultation?
Je sais que cette consultation a eu lieu, et je me réjouis d'entendre M. Scott dire que le ministère vient de publier les cartes. J'en avais pris connaissance en 2013 ou 2014, j'en suis sûr. Nous publions maintenant les cartes pour montrer les régions où l'accès aux services à large bande fait défaut, mais nous menons des consultations à n'en plus finir pour savoir pourquoi il n'y a pas de services dans les régions mal desservies qui se trouvent à l'extérieur des grands centres urbains.
Y a-t-il une date butoir pour les consultations?
View Kevin Sorenson Profile
CPC (AB)
The question that the analysts have given me is what has the department learned from its consultations? But you're saying that these consultations are ongoing. Is it the kind of thing there's an assessment for at some point? I ask because the consultations have been going on for four years. If it's the same consultation, I'm not sure, but are they being assessed regularly, or when? There is no cut-off; it's ongoing.
La question que les analystes m'ont transmise est la suivante: qu'est-ce que le ministère a appris des consultations qu'il a menées? Or, vous dites que ces consultations se poursuivent en permanence. Est-ce le genre de chose qui fera l'objet d'une évaluation à un moment donné? Je pose la question parce que les consultations durent depuis quatre ans. S'il s'agit des mêmes consultations, je n'en suis pas sûr, mais est-ce qu'elles sont évaluées régulièrement ou, sinon, quand le seront-elles? Il n'y a pas de date butoir; c'est une pratique permanente.
View Kent Hehr Profile
Lib. (AB)
Thank you, Mr. Chair, and thanks to the guests for coming and taking part in this very important study on how we engage with our indigenous peoples both in the duty to consult and in the way we move projects forward. I appreciated the commentary on how we move from a discussion on the duty to consult, and how people are adversely impacted, to how we make them proponents of projects and part of the apparatus that sees projects through and communities thrive.
On that note, can you discuss the topic of early engagement? It seems to me that this has to be one of the ways that successful projects happen. With early engagement, people can get everything out on the table concerning how we move forward.
Mr. Jacobsen, do you mind starting us off on that?
Merci, monsieur le président. Je remercie également nos invités d'être venus et de participer à cette étude très importante portant sur la façon dont nous pouvons faire participer nos peuples autochtones, à la fois dans le cadre de notre obligation de les consulter et dans notre façon de faire avancer des projets. Je me suis réjoui d'entendre les commentaires, qui ont été formulés au sujet de la façon de passer d'une discussion sur l'obligation de consulter et sur la façon dont les gens sont durement touchés, à une discussion sur la façon de les transformer en promoteurs de projets et en participant à l'appareil qui veille à ce que les projets soient menés à bien et à ce que les collectivités prospèrent.
Cela dit, pouvez-vous aborder le sujet de la mobilisation précoce? Il me semble que ce doit être l'une des façons d'assurer la réussite des projets. Grâce à la mobilisation précoce, les gens peuvent jouer cartes sur table en ce qui concerne la façon d'aller de l'avant.
Monsieur Jacobsen, voyez-vous une objection à lancer le débat?
View David Yurdiga Profile
CPC (AB)
Once again, thank you Madam Chair.
Ms. Laurendeau, we understand that you went through a consultation process of some sort. Can you clarify when that process started? Obviously, it took some time. It didn't happen last week.
Encore une fois, je vous remercie, madame la présidente.
Madame Laurendeau, nous croyons savoir que vous avez suivi un certain genre de processus de consultation. Pouvez-vous préciser quand ce processus a commencé? Manifestement, il a duré un certain temps. Il n'a pas eu lieu la semaine dernière.
View David Yurdiga Profile
CPC (AB)
Thank you.
We heard about first nations, Métis and Inuit, and all these people belong to a group. You did mention Métis government. To me, that's referring to the settlements where they are recognized as a governing body. Many of them are societies, so I'm not sure.... For example, the Métis Nation of Alberta is a society. There are a lot of people who are indigenous who don't belong to a society.
How much are the future consultations, when we're trying to develop guidelines, going to cost? How are we going to roll it out and so forth? What are your plans? What are the second steps? Who are you going to consult? What's the time frame? There's a large group that you guys are missing and that's the Métis. The Métis don't belong to any particular group because you have to be a member of a society and the only governing body, like I said, was the settlement. How are you going to address this?
Merci.
Nous avons entendu parler des Premières Nations, des Métis et des Inuits, et tous ces gens appartiennent à un groupe. Vous avez mentionné le gouvernement métis. À mes yeux, il est question des établissements, où ils sont reconnus en tant qu'organisme dirigeant. Un grand nombre d'entre eux sont des sociétés, alors je ne suis pas certain... Par exemple, la Métis Nation of Alberta est une société. Il existe beaucoup d'Autochtones qui n'appartiennent pas à une société.
Combien coûteront les consultations à venir, quand nous tenterons d'élaborer des lignes directrices? Comment déploierons-nous le processus, et ainsi de suite? Quels sont vos plans? Quelles sont les étapes ultérieures? Qui allez-vous consulter? Quelle sera la période? Vous manquez un grand groupe, et il s'agit des Métis. Ils n'appartiennent à aucun groupe particulier parce qu'il faut être membre d'une société et que le seul organisme dirigeant, comme je l'ai dit, était l'établissement. Comment allez-vous régler ce problème?
View David Yurdiga Profile
CPC (AB)
I understand that.
Did you meet with the settlements yet?
Je comprends.
Avez-vous déjà rencontré les responsables des établissements?
View David Yurdiga Profile
CPC (AB)
They're a separate body, so a separate invitation would have to be made.
Il s'agit d'un organisme distinct, alors il aurait fallu envoyer une invitation distincte.
View David Yurdiga Profile
CPC (AB)
I don't get invited to some meetings because I don't know about them.
Je ne me fais pas inviter à certaines séances parce que je ne suis pas au courant de leur tenue.
View David Yurdiga Profile
CPC (AB)
The Métis settlements are large, the group and the land mass. That would be one of the groups I would have focused on.
Les établissements métis sont grands, du point de vue du nombre et de la superficie du territoire. Il s'agit de l'un des groupes sur lesquels je me serais concentré.
View David Yurdiga Profile
CPC (AB)
You're dealing with Métis societies but you're not actually dealing with the Métis government, which is a settlement. I think we missed an opportunity.
Vous avez affaire à des sociétés métisses, mais vous ne transigez pas vraiment avec le gouvernement métis, qui est un établissement. Je pense que nous avons raté une occasion.
View David Yurdiga Profile
CPC (AB)
You can get a different perspective, so I would really encourage that you reach out to the settlements. I think you'll get a different perspective on a lot of things.
Vous pouvez obtenir un point de vue différent, alors je vous encouragerais vraiment à tendre la main aux établissements. Je pense que vous obtiendrez un autre point de vue sur beaucoup de choses.
View Stephanie Kusie Profile
CPC (AB)
Thank you very much, Mr. Nater.
Thank you very much, Minister, for being here today.
I know that something that has been of great importance to you has been to have participation in this process from all the other political parties. Could you please expand on what consultation process has taken place to this point with the other political parties to further this process?
Je vous remercie beaucoup, monsieur Nater.
Je vous remercie beaucoup, madame la ministre, pour votre présence aujourd'hui.
Je sais que vous accordez beaucoup d'importance à la participation au processus de tous les autres partis politiques. Pouvez-vous nous expliquer le processus de consultation qui a eu lieu jusqu'à maintenant avec les autres partis politiques pour faire avancer les choses?
View Shannon Stubbs Profile
CPC (AB)
View Shannon Stubbs Profile
2019-02-05 17:14
Yes, and whether or not there was consultation on the development of Bill C-48.
Oui, et de la question de savoir s'il y a eu des consultations sur l'élaboration du projet de loi C-48.
View Shannon Stubbs Profile
CPC (AB)
View Shannon Stubbs Profile
2019-02-05 17:15
Maybe we can talk about that. There is a member of your community, Calvin Helin. He said:
...what the chiefs are starting to see a lot now is that there is a lot of underhanded tactics where certain people are paid in communities and they're used as...spokespersons—essentially puppets and props—...to kill resource development.
He goes on to say:
It's outrageous. People should be upset about that, and the chiefs are [upset].
There are linkages of millions of dollars in foreign funding going into anti-energy campaigns in B.C., including for the explicit purpose of imposing Bill C-48 on B.C.'s north coast. I think most Canadians probably find that a little bit unbelievable. They don't know and they can't imagine that this could actually be happening.
Since you did mention it, could you expand on the experience of your community?
Nous pouvons peut-être en parler. Un membre de votre communauté, Calvin Helin, a dit:
[...] ce que les chefs constatent de plus en plus maintenant, c'est qu'on a recours à beaucoup de tactiques sournoises, où certaines personnes dans les communautés se font payer pour devenir porte-parole [...]. Essentiellement, [ce sont] des marionnettes et des accessoires [...] ayant pour but de torpiller l'exploitation des ressources.
Il ajoute:
C'est scandaleux. Les gens devraient être en colère qu'on agisse ainsi, et les chefs sont [indignés].
On a révélé que des milliers de dollars en financement étranger avaient été acheminés à des groupes de pression hostiles au secteur de l'énergie en Colombie-Britannique, notamment dans le but explicite d'imposer le projet de loi C-48 aux gens de la côte nord de la Colombie-Britannique. Je sais que la plupart des Canadiens trouvent cela probablement un peu difficile à croire. Ils ne sont pas au courant de la situation et ils n'arrivent pas à imaginer qu'une telle chose puisse réellement se produire.
Puisque vous en avez fait mention, pourriez-vous nous en dire plus sur l'expérience de votre communauté?
View Shannon Stubbs Profile
CPC (AB)
View Shannon Stubbs Profile
2019-02-05 17:17
Is that at all related to the confusion over claims of who are hereditary chiefs and who aren't, and then also with your being an elected leader?
Est-ce lié à la confusion entourant la question de savoir qui sont les chefs héréditaires et qui ne le sont pas, sans compter le fait que vous êtes un chef élu?
View Shannon Stubbs Profile
CPC (AB)
View Shannon Stubbs Profile
2019-02-05 17:18
I think it would alarm most Canadians everywhere that resource development in Canada could be stopped by foreign interests, robbing indigenous communities of the ability to make decisions on their own territory for their own economic opportunities now and long into the future.
I have another question about the offshore drilling ban. Along the same lines, and given our discussion about the need for governments to engage with indigenous communities on resource development, it seems to me to follow that they should also probably consult on legislation and policies related to resource development too. Was there consultation on the moratorium on northern offshore oil and gas drilling?
Je crois que la plupart des Canadiens d'un bout à l'autre du pays seraient alarmés d'apprendre que l'exploitation des ressources au Canada pourrait être empêchée par des intérêts étrangers, qui privent les communautés autochtones de la capacité de prendre des décisions sur leur propre territoire pour saisir des possibilités économiques dans l'immédiat et à très long terme.
J'ai une autre question sur l'interdiction de forage en mer. Dans le même ordre d'idées, et compte tenu de notre discussion sur la nécessité, pour les gouvernements, de collaborer avec les communautés autochtones en vue de l'exploitation des ressources, il s'ensuit, me semble-t-il, que les gouvernements devraient peut-être aussi les consulter au sujet des lois et des politiques liées à l'exploitation des ressources. Y a-t-il eu une consultation sur le moratoire imposé aux forages pétroliers et gaziers extracôtiers dans le Nord?
View Shannon Stubbs Profile
CPC (AB)
View Shannon Stubbs Profile
2019-02-05 17:19
What would you say should happen now? I think it would be within the government's power to revoke its moratorium and engage in meaningful consultation with you and with the territory.
Que devrait-il se passer maintenant, selon vous? Je crois que le gouvernement aurait le pouvoir d'annuler son moratoire et d'entreprendre une consultation constructive avec vous et avec le territoire.
View Kent Hehr Profile
Lib. (AB)
Thank you for that answer.
My question is for Mr. Duschenes.
You went into an excellent synopsis of the duty to consult, what it means and what it stems from, the treaties initially signed. It's enshrined in our Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, through section 35, and has made its way through the courts in many forms and fashions. I wonder if your organization, your department, has changed its approach or what it's learned from the Tsleil-Waututh Nation et al. v. Canada decision. Has that augmented your knowledge and changed your approach? What does that decision mean with regard to the way we go forward on projects, in your view?
Merci de votre réponse.
Ma question s'adresse à M. Duschenes.
Vous avez brillamment résumé ce qu'était l'obligation de consulter, ce qu'elle signifiait, d'où elle provenait, les traités signés à l'origine. Elle est consacrée à l'article 35 de notre Charte canadienne des droits et libertés, et elle est passée par nos tribunaux sous diverses formes et de diverses façons.Je me demande si votre organisme, votre ministère, a changé son approche ou quelle leçon il a tirée de l'arrêt Nation des Tsleil-Waututh et d'autres c. Canada. Êtes-vous maintenant plus instruit? Est-ce que cela a changé votre façon de faire? Qu'est-ce que cet arrêt signifie pour notre façon de gérer les projets futurs, d'après vous?
View Garnett Genuis Profile
CPC (AB)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
It was a surprise for me to hear one of the witnesses say that Bill C-69 was the product of consultation with indigenous people. I think it's fairly well known that the National Coalition of Chiefs, the Indian Resource Council, the Eagle Spirit Chiefs Council and a majority of Treaty 7 first nations all opposed Bill C-69. In fact, the more than 30 first nations that compose the Eagle Spirit Chiefs Council say they're going to take the government to court over Bill C-69 because it would make it “impossible to complete a project” and because it would remove the standing test that could lead to foreign interests overriding the interests of aboriginal title holders.
I'll share a few other quotes with you.
Roy Fox, chief of the Blood Tribe First Nation and former CEO of the Indian Resource Council, says Bill C-69 will have a “devastating impact on our ability to support our community members”.
Steve Buffalo, the president and CEO of the Indian Resource Council, says:
Indigenous communities are on the verge of a major economic breakthrough, one that finally allows Indigenous people to share in Canada's economic prosperity. Bill C-69 will stop this progress in its tracks.
I have some comments, which maybe I will share later on, from indigenous leaders who are deeply critical of some of these other government decisions shutting down progress in terms of energy projects.
The general question I want to ask is this. Of course all of us here agree about the importance of a duty to consult and to engage when a project is going forward. Is there a duty to consult indigenous communities when those communities have put time, resources and money into a project going forward and then a government policy stops that progress from being put forward? Is there a duty to consult if indigenous communities are trying to move forward the development of a project and the government puts in place policies to stop that progress? Is there a duty to consult in that case?
The question is for whoever is interested in responding.
Merci, monsieur le président.
Quelle surprise pour moi d'entendre l'un témoin dire que le projet de loi C -69 était l'aboutissement de consultations avec les Autochtones. Je pense qu'il est assez bien connu que la coalition nationale des chefs, le Conseil des ressources indiennes, le conseil des chefs du projet Eagle Spirit et la majorité des Premières Nations signataires du traité no 7 s'y sont tous opposés. En fait, les plus de 30 Premières Nations représentées au conseil des chefs du projet Eagle Spirit promettent de traîner le gouvernement devant les tribunaux, prétendant que le projet de loi les empêchera de réaliser un projet et qu'il supprimera le critère permanent qui empêche les intérêts étrangers de prévaloir sur ceux des détenteurs de titres ancestraux.
Voici quelques autres citations.
Roy Fox, le chef de la Première Nation du Sang et ancien directeur général du Conseil des ressources indiennes dit que le projet de loi C-69 sera dévastateur pour la capacité des communautés de pourvoir au besoin de leurs membres.
Steve Buffalo, président et directeur général du même conseil l'affirme:
Les communautés autochtones sont à la veille d'accomplir une percée économique majeure, qui, enfin, permettra aux Autochtones de participer à la prospérité économique du Canada. Le projet de loi C-69 les arrêtera en plein élan.
J'ai des observations que, peut-être, je vous communiquerai plus tard, de chefs autochtones qui sont très critiques de certaines autres décisions du gouvernement qui ferment la porte au progrès découlant des projets énergétiques.
J'en viens à ma question générale. Bien sûr, nous tous ici présents, nous sommes d'accord sur l'importance de l'obligation de consulter et de mobiliser les Autochtones quand un projet est mis sur pied. Il y a l'obligation de consulter les communautés autochtones, quand elles ont consacré du temps, des ressources et de l'argent à un projet qui suit son cours et qui, soudain, est stoppé à cause d'une politique gouvernementale. Y a-t-il une obligation de consulter ces communautés si elles essaient de faire avancer un projet et que le gouvernement instaure des politiques pour le stopper? Y a-t-il obligation de consulter dans ce cas?
Je pose la question à tous ceux qui veulent bien répondre.
View Garnett Genuis Profile
CPC (AB)
Okay. So any time the government makes a decision to introduce policy that stops projects from going forward, in your view, Mr. Hubbard, that would trigger a duty to consult as well.
D'accord. Donc, chaque fois que le gouvernement décide d'introduire une politique qui bloque des projets, vous, monsieur Hubbard, exprimez l'opinion que ça enclenche pour lui l'obligation de consulter.
View Garnett Genuis Profile
CPC (AB)
Okay. It seems pretty obvious, then, that policies like the offshore drilling moratorium in the Arctic, like Bill C-69, like Bill C-48, like the tanker exclusion zone, would have a significant impact on indigenous communities and on their ability to provide for their own communities through economic development, which they may well have planned, and in many cases did plan, in advance of the introduction of those policies.
Let me drill down on a few of those examples.
What consultation happened by the government before the imposition of the tanker exclusion zone? I'm talking about before Bill C-48 was actually proposed, when the Prime Minister first came into office and introduced the tanker exclusion zone.
D'accord. Il semble donc assez évident que des politiques comme le moratoire sur le forage en mer, dans l'Arctique, comme les projets de loi C-69 et C-48, comme la zone d'exclusion des navires pétroliers auraient des répercussions notables sur les communautés autochtones et leur capacité de pourvoir à leurs propres besoins par le développement économique qu'elles auraient bien pu avoir planifié et, dans de nombreux cas, avoir effectivement planifié avant l'introduction de ces politiques.
Voyons certains de ces exemples de plus près.
Quelles consultations le gouvernement a-t-il faites avant d'imposer la zone d'exclusion des pétroliers? Je parle de la période qui a précédé le dépôt du projet de loi C-48, quand le premier ministre est arrivé au pouvoir et a décrété cette zone d'exclusion.
View Garnett Genuis Profile
CPC (AB)
If I understand correctly, none of your departments, including the department of indigenous affairs, were involved in any consultations with respect to the imposition of the tanker exclusion zone. Is that correct?
Si je comprends bien, aucun de vos ministères, y compris celui des affaires autochtones, n'a participé à une consultation sur l'imposition de la zone d'exclusion des pétroliers. Est-ce exact?
View Garnett Genuis Profile
CPC (AB)
I would presume that you are involved or consulted though, in some sense, on any consultations the government is doing with indigenous people, because the relationship between government and indigenous people is your primary responsibility. In a broad sense, I assume you would be aware of consultations that took place in that context.
Je suppose que vous participez à des consultations ou êtes consultés, dans un certain sens, sur les consultations des Autochtones par le gouvernement, parce que la relation entre lui et les Autochtones est principalement de votre ressort. Dans un sens général, je suppose que vous auriez été au courant de consultations qui auraient eu lieu dans ce contexte.
View Kent Hehr Profile
Lib. (AB)
My question is for Mr. Hubbard.
The process brought in by the Conservatives in 2012 led to how the courts threw out northern gateway, as well as said that we need to do better on the Trans Mountain duty to consult. Both of the phases followed the process laid out by the former government.
Has Bill C-69, in your view, taken into account what was set up in that process? Do we reflect on how the new process is better and will lead to a better duty to consult going forward?
J'ai une question pour M. Hubbard.
Le processus établi par les conservateurs en 2012 est à l'origine de la façon dont les tribunaux ont rejeté Northern Gateway, en plus de dire que nous devions faire mieux concernant le devoir de consulter relatif à Trans Mountain. Dans les deux cas, le processus énoncé par le gouvernement précédent avait été suivi.
Est-ce que d'après vous le projet de loi C-69 tient compte de ce qui a été établi dans le cadre de ce processus? Est-ce que cela reflète un meilleur processus qui nous amènera à mieux respecter l'obligation de consulter à l'avenir?
View Arnold Viersen Profile
CPC (AB)
For sure.
I was interested that the first thing you mentioned off the top as an action that you're taking is a teleconference. Is that going to be a significant enough action to end it? This report—I don't know if it's legitimate or not—says that forced sterilization is still happening, and the government's solution is a teleconference.
Would we not want to engage the justice department on this?
Bien sûr.
Il est intéressant que la première chose que vous ayez mentionnée comme mesure soit une téléconférence. Est-ce que ce sera une mesure assez importante pour mettre fin à cela? Ce rapport — je ne sais pas s'il est légitime ou pas — dit que la stérilisation forcée se fait encore, et la solution du gouvernement est une téléconférence.
Est-ce que nous ne voudrions pas faire intervenir le ministère de la Justice à ce sujet?
View Shannon Stubbs Profile
CPC (AB)
View Shannon Stubbs Profile
2018-12-06 12:23
I know as an Albertan, like I am, he'll want to answer these questions.
The Prime Minister promised legislation on the Trans Mountain expansion to assert federal authority this past spring.
Has that legislation been put before the House, yes or no?
Je sais qu'à titre d'Albertain, comme moi, il voudra répondre à ces questions.
Le printemps dernier, le premier ministre a promis de prendre des mesures législatives liées au projet d'agrandissement du réseau de Trans Mountain, afin d'affirmer l'autorité du gouvernement fédéral.
Cette mesure législative a-t-elle été proposée à la Chambre, oui ou non?
View Amarjeet Sohi Profile
Lib. (AB)
Our goal is to make sure that we are moving forward on the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion in the right way by responding to the issues that the court has identified.
The court has identified two issues, that the review that was undertaken by the previous administration—
Notre objectif est de veiller à progresser de façon appropriée dans le projet d'agrandissement du réseau de Trans Mountain en réglant les enjeux que le tribunal a cernés.
Le tribunal a cerné deux enjeux, c'est-à-dire que l'examen qui avait été mené par l'administration précédente...
View Amarjeet Sohi Profile
Lib. (AB)
We feel that the best way to move forward on the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion is to respond to the issues that the court has identified.
It is not a focused and efficient way to bring in legislation. It's not a focused and efficient way to appeal the decision. The focused and efficient way to move forward is to respond to those concerns. We have instructed the National Energy Board—
Nous pensons que la meilleure façon de progresser dans le projet d'agrandissement du pipeline de Trans Mountain est de régler les enjeux que le tribunal a cernés.
Ce n'est pas une façon ciblée et efficace de présenter un projet de loi. Ce n'est pas une façon ciblée et efficace d'interjeter appel de la décision. Pour procéder de façon ciblée et efficace, il faut d'abord régler ces enjeux. Nous avons chargé l'Office national de l'énergie...
View Shannon Stubbs Profile
CPC (AB)
View Shannon Stubbs Profile
2018-12-06 12:25
So you made the promise and then you didn't bring forward the legislation.
Vous avez donc fait cette promesse, mais vous n'avez pas proposé la mesure législative.
View Shannon Stubbs Profile
CPC (AB)
View Shannon Stubbs Profile
2018-12-06 12:25
In April, when the finance minister announced that you were spending $4.5 billion in tax dollars to purchase the existing pipeline, he said specifically on May 29 that shovels would be in the ground and construction would start immediately. That was his quote.
How many kilometres of pipeline were built on the Trans Mountain expansion this past summer?
En avril, lorsque le ministre des Finances a annoncé que vous dépensiez 4,5 milliards de dollars de l'argent des contribuables pour acheter un pipeline existant, il a dit expressément le 29 mai que les travaux de construction commenceraient immédiatement. C'est ce qu'il a dit.
Combien de kilomètres de pipeline ont été construits dans le cadre du projet d'agrandissement du pipeline de Trans Mountain l'été dernier?
View Amarjeet Sohi Profile
Lib. (AB)
Oil is to Alberta what art is to Ontario and aerospace is to Quebec.
It is so disappointing to see that, when we made the decision to invest $4.5 billion to move this project forward so we can support the oil sector in Alberta the proper way, every single Conservative member of the federal Conservative Party did not support that decision—
Le pétrole est à l'Alberta ce que l'art est à l'Ontario et l'aérospatiale au Québec.
Il a été très décevant de constater que lorsque nous avons pris la décision d'investir 4,5 milliards de dollars pour faire progresser ce projet afin d'appuyer le secteur pétrolier de l'Alberta de façon appropriée, aucun député conservateur du Parti conservateur fédéral n'a appuyé cette décision...
View Shannon Stubbs Profile
CPC (AB)
View Shannon Stubbs Profile
2018-12-06 12:25
Your promise was that construction would start this past summer.
Vous aviez promis que les travaux de construction débuteraient l'été dernier.
View Amarjeet Sohi Profile
Lib. (AB)
—and it's so disappointing to see that they're willing to invest $12 billion and write off $3 billion to support an industry. But when it comes to the Alberta oil and gas sector, they back off. That is the record of the Conservatives—
... et c'est tellement décevant de constater qu'ils sont prêts à investir 12 milliards de dollars et radier 3 milliards de dollars pour appuyer une industrie. Toutefois, lorsqu'il s'agit du secteur gazier et pétrolier de l'Alberta, ils reculent. C'est le bilan des conservateurs...
View Shannon Stubbs Profile
CPC (AB)
View Shannon Stubbs Profile
2018-12-06 12:26
The answer is that zero kilometres of the Trans Mountain expansion has been built—
La réponse, c'est que zéro kilomètre du projet d'élargissement du pipeline de Trans Mountain a été construit...
View Amarjeet Sohi Profile
Lib. (AB)
We're very proud that we have invested $4.5 billion—
Nous sommes très fiers d'avoir investi 4,5 milliards...
View Shannon Stubbs Profile
CPC (AB)
View Shannon Stubbs Profile
2018-12-06 12:27
In the court ruling that your indigenous consultation on the Trans Mountain expansion failed, the judge said that the concerns are “specific and focussed” and that this may “make the corrected consultation process brief and efficient while ensuring it is meaningful. The end result may be a short delay” in the project. That's what the judge said.
Will you commit to the end date for your timeline on consultation with indigenous communities and commit to when construction will start on the Trans Mountain expansion?
Dans la décision du tribunal selon laquelle votre consultation avec les Autochtones au sujet du projet d'agrandissement du pipeline de Trans Mountain a échoué, le juge a dit que les préoccupations étaient « précises et ciblées » et que cela pourrait faire en sorte qu'il est « possible de se pourvoir d'un processus de consultation corrigé bref et efficace, mais véritable. Le résultat final est susceptible de se faire attendre un peu » dans le projet. C'est ce que le juge a dit.
Vous engagerez-vous à préciser la date à laquelle se termineront vos consultations avec les collectivités autochtones et vous engagerez-vous à préciser une date pour le début des travaux de construction dans le cadre du projet d'agrandissement du pipeline de Trans Mountain?
View Amarjeet Sohi Profile
Lib. (AB)
We have instructed the National Energy Board to undertake a review of the main shipping, its impact on the marine environment—
Nous avons chargé l'Office national de l'énergie d'entreprendre un examen de la route de navigation principale et de son impact sur l'environnement marin...
View Shannon Stubbs Profile
CPC (AB)
View Shannon Stubbs Profile
2018-12-06 12:28
That's tanker traffic. I asked about indigenous consultation.
Vous parlez du trafic des pétroliers. J'ai posé une question sur les consultations avec les Autochtones.
View Amarjeet Sohi Profile
Lib. (AB)
The second part of the court challenge was the issues around phase three consultation with indigenous communities. We are undertaking that consultation. We will make sure we don't repeat the mistakes of the past and that we have a meaningful, two-way consultation to understand the concerns of communities and offer them accommodation where accommodation is possible.
It's very important for the interests of the oil and gas sector and for the interests of workers and job creation in the oil and gas sector that we get this right. That's my focus. That's why I'm reaching out to indigenous leaders. I have personally met with 40 indigenous communities to hear their concerns directly. We're going to do this right, because not doing this right will put this project in the same position we have seen it in the past. It is in the best interests of Alberta's oil sector and of families in Alberta that we get this —
La deuxième partie de la contestation judiciaire concernait les enjeux liés à la troisième phase, c'est-à-dire les consultations avec les collectivités autochtones. Nous entreprenons ces consultations. Nous veillerons à ne pas répéter les erreurs du passé et à mener une consultation satisfaisante et bidirectionnelle, afin de comprendre les préoccupations des collectivités et leur offrir des mesures d'adaptation lorsque c'est possible.
Il est très important de bien faire les choses pour le secteur pétrolier et gazier et pour les travailleurs et la création d'emploi dans le secteur pétrolier et gazier. C'est mon objectif. C'est la raison pour laquelle je communique avec les dirigeants autochtones. J'ai personnellement rencontré les représentants de 40 collectivités autochtones afin d'entendre leurs préoccupations. Nous ferons les choses de la bonne façon, car autrement, ce projet se retrouvera dans la même situation qu'auparavant. C'est dans l'intérêt supérieur du secteur pétrolier de l'Alberta et des familles de l'Alberta que cela soit fait...
View Glen Motz Profile
CPC (AB)
You said in your opening remarks that you have been working diligently on the consultation process for the handgun ban, for lack of a better way to describe it. Where in the estimates do I find the costings for this consultation process on the handgun ban?
Vous avez dit dans votre déclaration préliminaire que vous aviez travaillé avec diligence au processus de consultation sur l’interdiction des armes de poing, faute d’une meilleure façon de le décrire. Où trouve-t-on dans le budget les coûts de ce processus de consultation sur l’interdiction des armes de poing?
View Glen Motz Profile
CPC (AB)
Minister, you have said that they're important and that you've travelled across the country, yet I've spoken to a number of individuals who have been at your invitation-only handgun ban consultations, and you weren't there. If they're so important, I'm wondering why you weren't at those meetings that you are supposed to be leading.
Monsieur le ministre, vous avez dit que les consultations sont importantes et que vous avez parcouru le pays. Pourtant, j’ai parlé à un certain nombre de personnes qui ont participé à vos consultations sur invitation seulement au sujet de l’interdiction des armes de poing, et vous n’y étiez pas. Si elles sont si importantes, je me demande pourquoi vous n’avez pas assisté aux réunions que vous êtes censé diriger.
View Glen Motz Profile
CPC (AB)
As part of this consultation process, you have an online survey. How many online surveys have been completed for this consultation process? Do you know offhand?
Dans le cadre de ce processus de consultation, vous menez un sondage en ligne. Combien de personnes ont rempli le sondage en ligne dans le cadre de ce processus de consultation? Le savez-vous de mémoire?
View Glen Motz Profile
CPC (AB)
There have been 130,000 from Canadians. You are aware that you can access that consultation from anywhere in the world?
Il y a eu 130 000 participants canadiens, mais savez-vous que l'on peut avoir accès à cette consultation de n’importe où dans le monde?
View Glen Motz Profile
CPC (AB)
You had no mechanism in place to ensure IP addresses couldn't be used over and over again.
Il n’y avait aucun mécanisme en place pour éviter que les adresses IP ne soient utilisées à répétition.
View Glen Motz Profile
CPC (AB)
Mr. Blair, if you're using that for input and you have a consultation process, you would think that you would want that process to have a reliable base to it. If you're not using IP addresses to track and if you have limited ability to know who is completing your survey from around the world, then any results that you might be able to gather from that would be suspect, in my opinion.
Now, has the Privacy Commissioner—
Monsieur Blair, si vous vous servez de cela pour donner un avis dans le cadre d'un processus de consultation, il vous faut un processus qui ait une base fiable, n'est-ce pas? Si vous n'utilisez pas d'adresses IP pour faire le suivi et si vous avez une capacité limitée de savoir qui dans le monde répond à votre enquête, alors vos résultats seront suspects, à mon avis.
Est-ce que le Commissaire à la protection de la vie privée...
View Glen Motz Profile
CPC (AB)
But you asked for gender, you asked for ethnicity, you asked for—
Mais vous avez demandé le sexe, l’ethnicité, vous avez demandé...
View Martin Shields Profile
CPC (AB)
View Martin Shields Profile
2018-11-27 12:53
Thank you.
Mr. Robertson, I appreciated your comments. One comment you made strongly was about consultation. Can you give me your definition of what consultation would mean? We hear the term used broadly. We hear lots of things, but sometimes results are quite varied.
How would you view consultation, with 600-plus indigenous nations in this country?
Merci.
Monsieur Robertson, j'ai apprécié vos commentaires. Vous avez notamment insisté sur la consultation. Pouvez-vous me donner votre définition du mot consultation? Ce terme est utilisé à toutes les sauces. Nous entendons beaucoup de choses, mais parfois les résultats sont très variés.
Comment imaginez-vous la consultation, avec plus de 600 nations autochtones dans ce pays?
View Martin Shields Profile
CPC (AB)
View Martin Shields Profile
2018-11-27 12:55
So the process is the part that's more critical to you when you look at that.
Le processus est donc l'élément le plus important pour vous.
View Martin Shields Profile
CPC (AB)
View Martin Shields Profile
2018-11-27 12:55
So If you evaluated a process, then the outcomes would be...?
Si vous avez évalué un processus, les résultats devraient donc être...
Results: 1 - 100 of 334 | Page: 1 of 4

1
2
3
4
>
>|
Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data