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Results: 76 - 90 of 159
View Dan Albas Profile
CPC (BC)
Thank you.
ISED has started to consult on smaller geographic areas for spectrum allocation.
To the Auditor General's office, is that move consistent with the recommendations in your report?
To the industry department, is the thinking that smaller geographic areas will be used for all spectrum auctions going forward?
Philippe Le Goff
View Philippe Le Goff Profile
Philippe Le Goff
2019-02-21 9:58
Mr. Chair, I think it's a move in the right direction, according to what we heard from ISPs, the small Internet service providers. They raised this issue that they don't have the financial and technical capacity to provide the service or to bid on auctions for large tiers such as tiers two, three and even four. I think it's a step in the right direction to look at the tier 5 kind of size to allow small providers to participate.
John Knubley
View John Knubley Profile
John Knubley
2019-02-21 9:58
To clarify, we are consulting on the tier 5, and no decision has yet been made on how we would move to that tier five.
Let me again just give a bit of background. Tier 1 basically is Canada. Tier 2 is basically by province. Tier 3 has 59 regional areas within the higher population cities, if you like, and we use that for mid-range frequency bands. Tier 4 is 172 local areas. We certainly think that we would benefit by going deeper and more granular in terms of our service areas and in that respect agree with what the Auditor General raised, but we haven't made the formal decision on how we will move forward—
View Dan Albas Profile
CPC (BC)
John Knubley
View John Knubley Profile
John Knubley
2019-02-21 9:59
In terms of the consultations, they're ongoing—
Ms. Lisa Setlakwe: Right now.
Mr. John Knubley —right now, so I think we will be reporting on the consultations.... Lisa?
Lisa Setlakwe
View Lisa Setlakwe Profile
Lisa Setlakwe
2019-02-21 9:59
Later this year or early next year.
View Jean Yip Profile
Lib. (ON)
[Technical difficulty—Editor] so how can the groundwork for 5G be started if the most remote communities haven't been serviced? Wouldn't it be better to spend the money to service these communities before paying for the 5G groundwork?
Ian Scott
View Ian Scott Profile
Ian Scott
2019-02-21 10:00
Perhaps I can begin. My colleagues may want to add to this.
I think technology in this area is evolving quite quickly. One of the things we're seeing is that fibre is being pushed farther and farther out into the network, not only to provide broadband service but also to support mobile wireless service and, in future, 5G. I think that a few years from now there may not be much of a distinguishing between the two, so all of this infrastructure for higher capacity, higher bandwidth and higher speed is being pushed out to both small and large communities, and that will enable both high-speed broadband and 5G. I'm not sure if that helps as a starting point in response to your question.
View Jean Yip Profile
Lib. (ON)
I just feel bad, still, for those remote communities that don't have it or don't have—
John Knubley
View John Knubley Profile
John Knubley
2019-02-21 10:01
Maybe I would add, though, that one thing we do, which we looked at really in our last two programs, connect to innovate and connecting Canadians, is that we don't always look for the technology that solves the immediate problem. We are looking for projects that have the capacity to grow, if you like, from 4G to 5G and LTE and that sort of thing. Typically, in the projects for the most remote areas—this is why technology is such an important consideration—we look at how well the technology can evolve and allow for the community to have a service not just today but also in the future.
Although it's not directly related to your question, maybe I could add something on satellite service, which we haven't mentioned yet. Of course, there's evolving technology in the satellite service. We recently funded—it was in the last budget—a LEO satellite initiative by Telesat. This does offer a huge opportunity in the north to provide new access to broadband at higher speeds than ever before.
Again, a big consideration, which you're totally right to raise, is about what technology is the right technology for these remote areas. I think we try to be as flexible as possible and try to see as well if the technology we're putting in today can expand in coverage and service and access in the future.
View Jean Yip Profile
Lib. (ON)
Okay.
How did ISED support small businesses and diverse ISPs in remote and rural regions in accessing CTI funding?
John Knubley
View John Knubley Profile
John Knubley
2019-02-21 10:03
I think about a third of the actual companies in the projects are small ISPs. We certainly are always talking to small ISPs and looking for opportunities for them to participate in projects. That's the short answer.
View Jean Yip Profile
Lib. (ON)
Just to follow up, has the connectivity map been made publicly available?
View Jean Yip Profile
Lib. (ON)
As well, has the connect to innovate program website been opened up to allow third party ISPs and stakeholders interested in the backbone services to apply for those projects? Has that been opened up?
Results: 76 - 90 of 159 | Page: 6 of 11

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