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Results: 1 - 15 of 81
View Cathay Wagantall Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you so much for being here today. I appreciate this opportunity to sit on this committee and hear this conversation.
I'd like to carry on a little in the same vein as the member from Winnipeg in regard to the youth and the next generation. I totally appreciate what's trying to be achieved here and the whole issue around educating the 95% in a balanced way, remembering, but also the importance of celebrating. When I think about reconciliation, something like that requires truth to come forward, an apology—a very intentional apology—to be made and accepted. It requires the opportunity to move forward in ways that forgiveness and healing enable you to do.
I had a wonderful opportunity with a young chief. He was not from my riding, but we sat and he talked to me for hours about his experience. His father, who had also been a chief, and his mom had both been in the residential school system and suffered significantly. When former prime minister Harper gave his apology, this young man called his dad and said, “Dad,” and his dad replied, “I'm listening. I'm listening.” He couldn't talk. He was so overwhelmed with emotion and just sobbing that this was taking place.
This young chief said, “You know, I grew up in a home where both of my parents were survivors.” At that point that's what they were—survivors of the residential schools. They grew up in an atmosphere where they were told to duck if they saw a policeman coming along. He said, “I grew up thinking that I too was a residential school survivor,” until his dad had this experience and began the healing process. He said, “I came to the realization that I am not a residential school survivor,” and he talked about how he chose to go on with his life and is now leading his community and making huge impacts.
There is a lot to celebrate as we go through this whole process. I understand the angst of putting the two together, and yet if we don't I feel like we're failing to accomplish what we truly want to accomplish with my children and your children. I have 10 grandkids. I'm boasting a bit, I know. It's very important to me that they.... Quite honestly, my children grew up in schools where I called them the token whites. It's a different world out there now in so many ways.
When it comes to wrongs done, I come from a Ukrainian heritage. My grandfather came over just before Holodomor, and on Saturday night I'm going to remember millions of Ukrainians who were basically starved to death. They moved to Canada, and they remember, but in the midst of all that they also say to me, “Cathay, we kept our culture. We have our language. We are proud.” In some ways, they feel more Ukrainian here than they did in Ukraine—that is what they literally have said to me.
There are all those dynamics of, yes, remembering and making sure our children know and that we don't repeat, but also to make sure we're celebrating how far we've come and continue to go.
I have one more really brief thing. I'm on the veterans affairs committee as deputy shadow critic. We've travelled this whole last session, visiting with first nations, indigenous, Métis and Inuit veterans, and with Canadian Rangers. They're so amazing. They were not treated fairly, but not one of them regrets having served. This is where I see we have so much hope.
I also have a grandson whose birthday falls on Remembrance Day. As a young boy he said to me, “You know what, grandma? In the morning we are sad. In the afternoon we have a party.” It's important to teach our children that we need to remember, but we can also celebrate.
I just hope you feel there is room for both of those in that expression for this reconciliation day that you're looking for.
View Kevin Waugh Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you.
Welcome to all.
Welcome back, Mr. Joffe. It wasn't that long ago that you were sitting just one over.
You all touched on free, prior, and informed consent, and two of the groups in front of me have had long negotiations. Some go on for months and years.
So let's face it; let's talk about the oil and gas, if we can, Mr. Wapass, because you come from my province. You've had a tenacious relationship, if I can say that, with Husky Energy, just next door to you, if you don't mind my saying that. I think I'm correct on that.
So here we have Kinder Morgan. You talk about moving gas and oil, and we talk about this every day in the House of Commons. How will this bill improve getting oil and gas to where it should, through B.C., when right now we have a number of agencies in British Columbia supporting it, we have a handful not supporting it, and we're deadlocked?
View Kevin Waugh Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you for that. I think we needed to hear that.
Mr. Plant, you're in B.C. Holy God, what's going on there?
Voices: Oh, oh!
Mr. Kevin Waugh: The whole world has stopped in B.C.
You've dealt with this. You're a lawyer. You're in policy. You've had everyone in this country look at you and ask what's going on, so I want you to talk about FPIC, the negotiations, and the right to choose.
I just talked about 33 groups that are directly affected by Kinder Morgan. They want it, and you have a handful who don't. How do you work around this?
View Kevin Waugh Profile
CPC (SK)
A champion would be Grand Chief Bosum.
It took you years and maybe decades to get that agreement with James Bay hydro. Is that something we can build on here now when we look at where Bill C-262 is going, at where you were some 40 years ago, and at where everybody wants to be in terms of that agreement you had with them and still have today?
When we talk around the table here, industry is on eggshells, right? We've heard from some, but maybe you can talk about your journey, the one that you opened up for your people, and there's the hope that it's going to continue.
View Kevin Waugh Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you.
I'm going to pick up on this. In your view, does the declaration provide sufficient protection on violence and discrimination for indigenous women? Perhaps you could elaborate.
View Kevin Waugh Profile
CPC (SK)
Okay, thank you.
Mr. Fox, you talked about relationships, partners and partnerships. We've seen that in the mineral and mining industry for decades, and that is certainly up north right now. Maybe you could expand on what this bill would do.
We've heard some industry concerns throughout the country, but are those concerns warranted? What's your view on this, if this is adopted?
View Kevin Waugh Profile
CPC (SK)
Good.
I'm going to move over to the Quebec bar association, if you don't mind.
Thank you for your presentation. You said that Bill C-262 is not a complete answer; it's symbolic. We have said all along that Justice needs to be at this committee. You mentioned that.
Can you elaborate a little more on this angle? I mean, you're just one province out of 10 and the territories. How would Justice be involved here, in your opinion?
View Kevin Waugh Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you to all three for coming here this afternoon.
You're right, it's framework, but legislation needs clarity. We haven't provided advice on how consent is defined. We have asked for it to be clearly defined in this legislation for clarity. We've asked the Department of Justice to give us a definition. We are still waiting for that. This is to keep FPIC out of court. We need to get this piece of legislation, this law. It will be law when we pass this, so we need to clarify it. The purpose of our clarifying it is to streamline this process, not to stall it. To ensure that everyone is clear on this process, legislation has to be clear. We're waiting for that from the Department of Justice, and I just remind the clerk of that.
We have spent enough money at the Supreme Court over the years on clarification, so when we bring a bill like this forward, it is our duty as members of Parliament to see that it is done right. It is my belief that this is one of many committees that should study this bill. I just mentioned Justice. You're talking economic development. Well, I think we should have a study of that. In my opinion, all these discussions have to come forward before we go forward with this legislation.
Anyway, we'll start with your thoughts on what I just said, Sheryl, because you did make a number of statements here that I want to clarify.
View Kevin Waugh Profile
CPC (SK)
Sharon, whom do you speak for? You say it's the National Indigenous Economic Development Board. Give us some insight about that board. How many are on it? You say you have representation from all the territories and provinces. Maybe fill us in, because you've made some statements here that I'm going to ask you about after you tell us. Are you a national spokes—
View Kevin Waugh Profile
CPC (SK)
I wanted a clarification. The board also believes that implementing the declaration would ensure the protection of reserve lands and traditional territories—and here's where I need clarification—and would allow for reserve sizes to go back to what they originally were.
What were they originally? How far back are you going here?
This is the first time this committee has seen this piece. I'm sure everyone around here is saying, “back to where they originally were?” Please clarify.
View Kevin Waugh Profile
CPC (SK)
If issues are bound to wind up in litigation, like you said, why not define terms prior to litigation?
You made that statement.
View Kevin Waugh Profile
CPC (SK)
We've seen the provincial government selling crown lands, as Mr. Lake has said.
Mr. Coates, because you're from Saskatchewan, what are your thoughts? You're sitting at the University of Saskatchewan, and our government, whether it was this year or last year or the year before—every day you see it in the ads and newspapers—continues to sell crown lands.
I wonder if you could comment and maybe back up what Mr. Lake said earlier.
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