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Results: 1 - 15 of 960
View Kevin Waugh Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you.
Thank you to all of you for coming here today.
Dr. Wong, you said there was still poisoning going on in the community.
Mr. Carreau, in your remarks, you noted that mercury poses a host of human health risks, including for the brain and pregnant women. It can cross the placenta into the fetus.
Health Canada refused to reveal the names of 150 residents who were identified at birth. The umbilical cord blood of babies was tested for 22 years, from 1970 to 1992, and 357 infants on reserve had testing data that sat somewhere. Some of it was, they said, in bank boxes in Thunder Bay and Ottawa. The information was slow and at times never even passed on.
If we're still having issues today, has this improved situation improved at Health Canada and your departments?
View Kevin Waugh Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you. I'll switch over to Mr. Viersen.
View Kevin Waugh Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you, Madam Chair, and thank you, Minister and staff, for joining us once again.
Yes, it was a very emotional day yesterday...the missing and murdered indigenous women and girls, over 1,200 pages of testimony and 231 recommendations.
Let's start there, with the recommendations. The report calls them calls for justice, legal imperatives, and says that they are not optional.
Minister, do you agree with that statement from the commission yesterday?
View Kevin Waugh Profile
CPC (SK)
According to the media's reporting from yesterday, with the recommendations—all 231—it's all or none. The commission would like all the recommendations accepted, not just “pick and choose”. What will your government do?
View Kevin Waugh Profile
CPC (SK)
In 2017, in the interim report by this committee, they talked about little efforts having been made...focused more on reactive than preventative measures. They brought that out two years ago, and they've seen very little movement there—from that interim report that they did.
How can we assure indigenous groups that this is going to change? Very little has happened in two years.
View Kevin Waugh Profile
CPC (SK)
I'm going to move on, Minister, if you don't mind.
Infrastructure in the north is a big topic.
View Kevin Waugh Profile
CPC (SK)
The Inuit-Crown partnership committee released its report at the beginning of April, which suggested that funding delays for Inuit housing and infrastructure were eroding the overall effectiveness of these investments.
How can the government ensure stable, predictable and sustainable funding moving forward?
View Kevin Waugh Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you, Madam Chair, and thank you once again, Minister and staff, for coming.
We'll pick up on the missing and murdered indigenous women and girls report yesterday with its over 1,200 pages and lots of stories. There were 231 recommendations in the commissioner's report. The report calls the calls to justice “legal imperatives” and says they are not options.
I'd like to know your opinion of that, coming out of the national inquiry.
View Kevin Waugh Profile
CPC (SK)
I'm going to move on to the boil water advisories.
As you know, I don't share the government's enthusiasm about this. You're not going to meet your quotas. I'm going to give you some examples.
I know that you're touting the 85 long-term drinking water advisories that have been lifted, but I have met with so many indigenous groups and I'll give you one example: Slate Falls First Nation in northwestern Ontario. They had all 11 long-term boil water advisories—drinking water—lifted last year, in March 2018. I see that some of your staff know where I'm going on this. They got a new water treatment plant. Seventeen days later, it was back under a drinking water advisory. Today, Slate Falls is under a drinking water advisory, and it has been since August 29.
I can tell you that there are dozens of bands in this nation that are going through this problem—
Hon. Seamus O'Regan: Yes.
Mr. Kevin Waugh: —and you keep saying, well, we've removed the long term, but we still have the short term, and we're not going to tell you what the long term is or what the short term is.
There is still a crisis, so don't tell me that we're going to reach this in 2021—because we will not reach it—but I would like to know what your department is going to do. I laugh when I see these reports come out, because I know they're not true. I can go to Slate, and I can give you a list if you want, but where are we going on this? You're not training band members properly. We can give them all the new equipment, but then we leave the reserve and then—in this case, 17 days later—they're back on.
What are we doing to rectify this when we leave the situation and leave them in charge of the water treatment plant? I think that's one of the issues that we need to address with your department.
View Kevin Waugh Profile
CPC (SK)
Yes. The glass is half-empty.
Voices: Oh, oh!
View Kevin Waugh Profile
CPC (SK)
Pardon the pun.
View Kevin Waugh Profile
CPC (SK)
The Sahhaltkum Indian Reserve 4 in B.C., has had dangerous levels of manganese in their water, which has made the water turn brown. This is one of the issues that we have. We've seen this. What are you doing to address the band-aid solutions that we've seen in some of these areas?
View Kevin Waugh Profile
CPC (SK)
Madam Chair, I would agree with the last statement.
We heard from the Saskatoon Tribal Council, off reserve, where there are issues in my city of Saskatoon. There are issues in Manitoba. There are issues in Saskatchewan and Ontario.
I just want it on the record that there are issues off reserve, and this is why this statement is important.
(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])
(Clause 7 agreed to on division)
(On clause 8)
View Kevin Waugh Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you, Madam Chair, and thank you, Minister and departmental officials.
Minister, one of the primary tasks of this bill, as you talked about, is to reverse changes made by the former Conservative government with the Northwest Territories Devolution Act back in 2014. As you mentioned, this included consolidating the four land and water boards in the Mackenzie Valley into one. The Liberal Party at that time supported it, including the current Prime Minister, and even your parliamentary secretary, MP Jones, who is with us here this morning.
I'm going to quote what she said at the time:
As Liberals, we want to see the Northwest Territories have the kind of independence it has sought. We want it to have the ability to make decisions regarding the environment, resource development, business management, growth, and opportunity, which arise within their own lands.
That is from 2014.
These comments actually stand in direct contradiction to Bill C-88, which extends powers to the cabinet to put moratoriums on energy development and to include the national interest, which, to be honest with you, has never really been clearly defined.
I will note that the Prime Minister of the day, when he did the moratorium, wasn't even in this country. He was in Washington, D.C., at the time he talked about the moratorium up north, and the elected northern officials at the time had less than half an hour to scramble to come up with the decision of the day.
I'm also going to talk, if you don't mind, about last night in the Senate, because it has major ramifications for northern Canada and moratoriums on northern development, allowing the north to make its own environmental and economic decisions. We have seen repeated paternalism coming from this government when it comes to energy development, not only in relation to northerners but as we saw last night first nations as well.
We saw it with Bill C-48 in the Senate last night: the B.C. oil tanker ban. As you know, Calvin Helin is the CEO of Eagle Spirit Energy Holdings, which is an indigenous-led group. He has been deeply critical of these types of moratoriums being directed by your government in Ottawa. He said, in response to these bans, “Is this what reconciliation is supposed to represent in Canada?”
That statement last night by Calvin speaks volumes, and we saw it last night in the Senate as they voted against Bill C-48. We'll see what happens when it comes back to the House.
We talk of an “Ottawa-down” approach. Can we let the north make the environmental and economic decisions instead of “Ottawa knows best”?
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