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Results: 106 - 120 of 71935
View Michel Picard Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Michel Picard Profile
2019-07-15 13:57
I would like to preface my remarks by pointing out that the incident we are discussing today falls entirely within the parameters of the study we began in January on cybersecurity and financial crime.
As suggested by my fellow Liberal members, I put forward a motion that we study the issue. That shows how deeply concerned we are about cybersecurity in financial institutions. I'm delighted that Mr. Scheer commended our efforts in relation to the study. He fully supports my motion, and I'm glad that his party is joining the Liberal Party in its efforts to address the issue of cybersecurity in financial institutions, so thank you.
Mr. Flynn, I think it's important to speak to Canadians today to help people manage their expectations when something as serious as identity theft occurs.
The public wants the police to conduct a criminal investigation. Generally, people want something done about the loss of their personal information. They want their identity to be restored, without having to worry that five, 10 or 15 years down the road, they will once again be targeted. In terms of a criminal investigation, what are people's expectations?
View Michel Picard Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Michel Picard Profile
2019-07-15 13:59
It's very hard for people to understand just how difficult it is to prove that you are the person you say you are. How are people supposed to prove their identity? It's extremely challenging when three different people are out there using the same name and social insurance number.
View Michel Picard Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Michel Picard Profile
2019-07-15 14:00
To a certain extent, the criminal investigation is a way to ensure justice is served, provided that it leads to the perpetrators being nabbed, the evidence being used to successfully prosecute them and their being punished, mainly sent to prison.
That said, data on the black market represent virtual assets, ones that aren't housed in a physical location. Data can be located in many places. I'm not trying to alarm people, but it's important for them to understand that, even if the perpetrators are arrested, it doesn't necessarily mean that their data are no longer vulnerable and their identity can be restored.
View Michel Picard Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Michel Picard Profile
2019-07-15 14:02
Mr. Boucher, your centre provides advice to other organizations. How can a business protect itself from its own staff? What advice do you have for businesses in that regard?
As we saw this winter, there is every reason to believe that banks, financial institutions and financial service companies have the best possible technology to protect their data from outside threats. What concerns us are threats from the inside. I don't think any software out there can protect against that risk. How do you advise organizations to safeguard against the human element when it comes to fraud?
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
Thank you, Mr. Chair. I'm very pleased to be here today.
Thank you, gentlemen, for being here and giving up your time to reassure Canadians and answer our questions.
One of the cornerstones of the social contract that exists across this land is the protection of citizens, not just the protection they offer one another, but also the protection provided to them by the government. For the past three weeks, constituents in all of our ridings have been profoundly concerned. Two days after the data breach was made public, people started coming to my office. When I would knock on people's doors, that's all they would talk about. That tells me people are genuinely concerned and feel that the government has done nothing in response.
The question my constituents want you to answer, Mr. Boucher, is very simple. Can the Canadian Centre for Cyber Security indeed ensure the 2.9 million Canadians affected by this data breach are properly protected, yes or no?
Does your centre have the tools to respond to the situation and ensure the victims of identity theft are protected?
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
I'm not talking about what's already happened. I'm talking about what's going to happen next. That's what worries people. I want to know whether the Canadian Centre for Cyber Security has the capacity to deal with international or national fraudsters who send text messages or whatever it may be.
Does your centre have the capacity to deal with that?
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
I'm going to take advantage of your cybersecurity expertise.
Is Canada's current social insurance number regime appropriate in a modern age dominated by the Internet? We are at the point now where people shop on their cell phones and pay for their purchases at the cash in mere seconds. Is our system of social insurance numbers adequate in the world we live in?
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
Superintendent, my next question is along the same lines as that of my fellow member, Mr. Motz.
Whether they've approached me on the street, come to my office or answered the door when I was canvassing, everyone has asked me the same question. They want to know what crimes these fraudsters are going to commit down the road. They want to know what to expect. What crimes will the 2.9 million victims of this massive data breach be the target of in the future?
In addition, how long will it be before those crimes are committed? The media are reporting all kinds of things. We are hearing that it will take five or 10 years before the fraudsters do anything—that they'll wait until the dust has settled.
View David de Burgh Graham Profile
Lib. (QC)
About 15 years ago, I was in an IRC channel—I'm not sure whether you're familiar with that forum—and someone was selling credit card numbers, along with the three-digit code on the back and the billing address. Everything was ready to go. The person was offering to sell them to people. I felt that was wrong and I wanted to call the police or some other authority, but no one replied or knew what to do.
If someone saw something similar happening on the Internet today, is there someplace they could call to report it?
View David de Burgh Graham Profile
Lib. (QC)
What powers does the Canadian Centre for Cyber Security have? What can the centre do?
View David de Burgh Graham Profile
Lib. (QC)
I mean generally. At the centre, do you accept comments from people on the outside, or do you work only with businesses? Explain how it works, if you don't mind.
View David de Burgh Graham Profile
Lib. (QC)
Earlier, we were talking about passwords. Nowadays, we see two-factor authentication being used a lot more for bank accounts. Could the same thing be done for social insurance numbers?
View Michel Picard Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Michel Picard Profile
2019-07-15 14:23
I'd like to revisit the issue of a unique identifier.
Other models exist. On other committees, we've talked about the popular Estonian model, I believe. It's a system that's in line with our discussions on open banking. All the information is centralized and people can access it using a unique identification number.
At the end of the day, no matter what you call it, a social insurance number is a unique identification number, so it's important to understand the system's limitations. It's all well and good to have the ultimate ultra-modern system, but if a single unique identifier is assigned to an individual, the information will always be vulnerable if someone gets a hold of it.
View Michel Picard Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Michel Picard Profile
2019-07-15 14:24
Does your centre manage its employees' personal information itself?
View Michel Picard Profile
Lib. (QC)
View Michel Picard Profile
2019-07-15 14:24
How do you protect against an employee who wakes up in a foul mood one day and decides to help the other side?
Results: 106 - 120 of 71935 | Page: 8 of 4796

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