Committee
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 30 of 17501
View Colin Fraser Profile
Lib. (NS)
View Colin Fraser Profile
2019-07-25 11:49
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Thank you very much, Ms. Campbell and Mr. Lametti, for being with us today.
I want to thank you, Ms. Campbell, as you've already done this twice before. This is the third time and I want to sincerely thank you on behalf of all Canadians for the work you and your committee members have done in all three different iterations of these committee processes. Once again it has led to an excellent nomination, of Mr. Kasirer, so thank you for that work.
I'd like to talk a bit more about the timing of the application phase for people who want to be considered for the position. I know that after the first one, which produced Justice Rowe, there was some discussion about the process being too short—I think it was only 22 days—and then for Justice Martin's appointment in 2017, I think it was 63 days.
You've talked a little about some recommendations that you think could be made to encourage more people to be ready to apply when the time comes. This time around there were 30 days. Do you think that was sufficient?
Are there any other recommendations you would like to give the committee so that we could perhaps recommend to the government, going forward, a process in which there is enough time for the people who may wish to be considered to get their applications together?
View Colin Fraser Profile
Lib. (NS)
View Colin Fraser Profile
2019-07-25 11:52
Okay. Thank you very much for that.
I know this time around it was a bit of a unique process, given the fact that it was filling one of the Quebec seats, so there was an advisory board set up for Quebec. As you mentioned, the Supreme Court Act recognizes that there are to be at least three seats from Quebec, given the uniqueness of the civil law jurisdiction.
Were there any differences in the criteria in the minds of the members of the committee in putting forward names for the Quebec seat, and were there any different questions in the questionnaire this time, as opposed to the previous two that you did?
View Colin Fraser Profile
Lib. (NS)
View Colin Fraser Profile
2019-07-25 11:54
Thank you.
Minister Lametti, I want to ask you the following, because you touched on the qualifications of Mr. Kasirer. I agree with you that he's an excellent appointment.
You talked about collegiality and temperament, and obviously in reviewing Mr. Kasirer's application it's clear that he has the legal mind and ability to do this job and has been widely regarded as an excellent choice. His collegiality will also be an asset that he'll bring to the bench. Can you talk a little about why it is so important for a justice of the Supreme Court of Canada to have that collegiality and the temperament that is appropriate, along with the legal skill and mind that he has?
View Bill Casey Profile
Lib. (NS)
I call the meeting to order.
Ladies and gentlemen, this is meeting 154 of the Standing Committee on Health and our last meeting for this Parliament.
We have a jammed schedule here today. Actually, we have a vote. We understand the bells will ring at 5:30. I'm seeking unanimous consent to go to 5:45.
Some hon. members: Agreed.
The Chair: Thank you very much. We'll go to 5:45.
Our first witness is Commissioner Brenda Lucki, commissioner of the RCMP. We have her here for half an hour.
Thanks very much for coming on short notice. We appreciate it very much.
View Bill Casey Profile
Lib. (NS)
It's a short round so we're going to have one question from each party. We're going to start with....
Sorry, Ms. Lucki, you have an opening statement of 10 minutes. Go ahead.
View Bill Casey Profile
Lib. (NS)
Thank you very much.
That's the shortest 10-minute opening statement we've ever had.
We'll go right to our questions with Mr. Ouellette.
You have seven minutes.
View Bill Casey Profile
Lib. (NS)
Thank you.
Now we'll go to Ms. Gladu.
View Bill Casey Profile
Lib. (NS)
Okay.
Mr. Davies.
View Bill Casey Profile
Lib. (NS)
No, you're done.
View Bill Casey Profile
Lib. (NS)
Thanks very much.
Now we're going to go back to that side. Is there anyone...? I know that Mr. Ouellette wants a question.
Mr. McKinnon, go ahead, please.
View Bill Casey Profile
Lib. (NS)
Did you have a question Mr. Ayoub?
View Bill Casey Profile
Lib. (NS)
Mr. Ouellette.
View Bill Casey Profile
Lib. (NS)
Thank you very much. That brings us to exactly four o'clock.
I want to thank you again for coming on such short notice.
View Bill Casey Profile
Lib. (NS)
I believe that's the shortest notice we've ever given anybody, and I know you're very busy so I wanted to thank you.
Now we're going to take a break for a couple of minutes and change panels.
Thank you very much.
View Bill Casey Profile
Lib. (NS)
We'll reconvene our meeting number 154.
Welcome, guests. We appreciate your taking the time to come to provide us with testimony. We are going to go to 5:10.
I'll introduce our guests. Dr. Judith Bartlett is a retired professor from the faculty of medicine, University of Manitoba. From the DisAbled Women's Network of Canada, we have Sonia Alimi, research coordinator, and Jihan Abbas, researcher. From the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons, we have Dr. Lisa Richardson, chair, indigenous health committee. From the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada, we have Dr. Jennifer Blake, chief executive officer.
Thank you very much for coming.
We're going to ask each of you for an opening statement and then we'll go to questions. We'll start with Dr. Bartlett.
View Bill Casey Profile
Lib. (NS)
I have to ask you to wind up, if you would. Thanks.
View Bill Casey Profile
Lib. (NS)
Dr. Bartlett, I'm sorry. We have to go to the DisAbled Women's Network of Canada now. Thank you.
View Bill Casey Profile
Lib. (NS)
Thanks very much.
Now we go to Dr. Richardson.
View Bill Casey Profile
Lib. (NS)
Thank you.
Now we go to Dr. Blake.
View Bill Casey Profile
Lib. (NS)
I just have to say that you're all amazing. I think we're so lucky to have access to your experience, your knowledge and your thoughts.
As you did, Dr. Blake, I thought we were talking about something historical when this first came up.
View Bill Casey Profile
Lib. (NS)
For a lot of us here, we're just scratching the surface in learning about this.
We will now go to questions. We're going to start with Dr. Eyolfson.
View Bill Casey Profile
Lib. (NS)
Now we have Ms. Gladu.
View Bill Casey Profile
Lib. (NS)
I'm sorry. We're done.
Mr. Davies.
View Bill Casey Profile
Lib. (NS)
We're over time.
View Bill Casey Profile
Lib. (NS)
Mr. McKinnon, we have two minutes left.
View Bill Casey Profile
Lib. (NS)
I'm sorry. The time is up.
View Bill Casey Profile
Lib. (NS)
To the panel, thank you so much for your contribution. I hope we can do justice to your testimony. I know we'll try. We probably won't turn this around overnight, but we'll give it our best shot. Thanks very much, on behalf of the entire committee, for your testimony.
We'll take a little break and then go in camera. We have two important things to do.
Thank you very much.
[Proceedings continue in camera]
View Mark Eyking Profile
Lib. (NS)
Good morning, everyone. Welcome, you early risers.
Before we get into our pre-study here, I have a bit of a request. Colleagues, as you know, we're pretty close with the British and their trade committee, or their new-found trade committee, with what they're going through with Brexit and what they're trying to develop and what they're getting into with their own committee. They're very close to us and they visit us. They have reached out to me and they want to talk a little more, through a video conference, maybe. It will be very hard for us to do this in the next couple of days, with the time zones, but we can, if you want me to reach out to them.
Anybody from the committee is welcome to be in on that video conference, but maybe it should just be me and the vice-chairs, or whoever wants to be in. I'm going to try to pick a time within the next two days, and if it's good for you we'll do a video conference with them. They know our situation, that Parliament is winding down and they know the time difference. They just want to have a chat with us. I was thinking we could do that for a half hour. I think they want to get a feel on how our committee runs and what we're doing with our trade agreements.
Maybe the clerk could explain it a bit.
View Mark Eyking Profile
Lib. (NS)
To me it's more of reaching out to them. They may want to talk to the next Parliament, or whatever, but I think it's kind of saying okay.... I'm suggesting we just have a half-hour video conference at a time that would be good for them because there is a four-hour difference. Are you okay with my just reaching out? If anybody can make it, then we'll set something up and we'll just do a half hour and see what they want to say and we'll wish them well, that kind of thing.
Some hon. members: Agreed.
The Chair: Maybe we could do it on Thursday morning or something, just for a half hour. Looking at their time, we could do something like 10:30 a.m. on Thursday, which would be 2:30 p.m. in England. We'll give them an opening and if it works, it works, and whoever wants can chime in. We'll go to a meeting room somewhere, and away we go.
Sorry for the delay. We have a big morning ahead of us, colleagues.
We are going to divide this up into three segments to try to do an hour and 15 minutes with each segment with a little break in between to get people switched over. For anybody who is listening out there, besides the witnesses who are coming forth today, anyone else, Canadians and stakeholders, can send in a brief with a maximum of 2,500 words. It should come to the clerk of the committee. The information is available on the committee's website.
Without further ado, welcome, witnesses. Many of you have been here before. As you know, our topic is Bill C-100, a new NAFTA, I guess you would call it. Usually five minutes per witness is fine. If it goes over or under, that's fine too. We're not being too strict today. Then we'll just open it up for dialogue with the MPs.
First is the Business Council of Canada. We have Mr. Kingston. Go ahead, sir.
View Mark Eyking Profile
Lib. (NS)
Thank you, Mr. Kingston.
We're going to the Canadian Vintners Association. We have the CEO.
Mr. Paszkowski, welcome again to our committee. Thanks for coming on short notice.
You have the floor, sir.
Results: 1 - 30 of 17501 | Page: 1 of 584

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
>
>|
Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data