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Results: 121 - 135 of 45477
View John Aldag Profile
Lib. (BC)
Great. Thank you.
Now by video conference, we'll going to Mr. Kraus for his opening statements.
View John Aldag Profile
Lib. (BC)
Excellent. Thank you for your opening comments as well.
We're going to get right into our questions and answers. We will use six minutes per side.
Before we do that, I welcome Mr. Shipley and Mr. Berthold back to our table as our guests for today.
First up, we have Mr. Amos for six minutes of questions and answers.
View John Aldag Profile
Lib. (BC)
We'll go over now to Mr. Fast for his six minutes of questions.
View Ed Fast Profile
CPC (BC)
View Ed Fast Profile
2019-06-17 16:20
I think that my questions will be directed mostly to Mr. Chan.
It's nice to hear that you're from my alma mater. I don't know if you studied there, but you're teaching there, I assume, and researching there.
On the issue of efficient versus inefficient subsidies, you touched on the issue of fossil fuel subsidies and making sure that, if there are going to be subsidies, they actually lead in a direction of improved sustainability. At one of our last meetings, we had the environment commissioner here, and the Department of Finance was questioned about whether we are actually delivering on the commitments we've made internationally at the G20, I believe—commitments to move away from inefficient fossil fuel subsidies.
I'd be interested to hear your take on whether the term “inefficient” has any meaning within that dialogue and whether there's a definition of efficient versus inefficient that you can provide us with.
View Ed Fast Profile
CPC (BC)
View Ed Fast Profile
2019-06-17 16:23
Mostly you're right. The commissioner pointed out that how you define efficient and inefficient is going to determine the degree to which government defends the subsidies it continues to provide for the fossil fuel industry. She rightly pointed out that if you don't have a proper definition nailed down, you're likely not going to achieve the goals you had committed to at the G20.
View Ed Fast Profile
CPC (BC)
View Ed Fast Profile
2019-06-17 16:24
Thank you.
I believe it was Mr. Kraus who referred to a continental approach. Was that you or was it Mr. Kerr—
View Ed Fast Profile
CPC (BC)
View Ed Fast Profile
2019-06-17 16:24
—in one of the responses.
We can have a parochial approach here and assume that Canada is an island unto itself and try to address our species challenges here. We can look at a global approach and maybe escape some accountability for what we're doing at home. However, you had mentioned a continental approach.
It does make sense, because our species are migrating across our borders; they don't recognize borders. Have you found the United States in any way receptive to a continental approach?
View Ed Fast Profile
CPC (BC)
View Ed Fast Profile
2019-06-17 16:26
Thank you.
View John Aldag Profile
Lib. (BC)
Mr. Stetski, for six minutes.
View Wayne Stetski Profile
NDP (BC)
Thank you very much to all of you for being here today. Great witnesses.
I was a former regional manager with the ministry of environment for southeastern B.C., responsible for ecosystems, fish and wildlife. Then I was manager of the East Kootenay conservation program involved in purchasing private land for conservation; so inherently, I care about every species.
The challenge we have is that many people look at life through economics rather than conservation. I'm wondering if we're starting to do a better job.
I know, Professor Kerr, you started to talk about the economic importance of species winking out, but why should people care about species winking out, from an economic perspective as well as a personal one?
I'll start with Mr. Chan and Mr. Kerr, and then I'd be interested in hearing from all of you on that.
View Wayne Stetski Profile
NDP (BC)
Professor Kerr.
View Wayne Stetski Profile
NDP (BC)
I very much appreciate that.
Mr. Kraus.
View John Aldag Profile
Lib. (BC)
We're out of time.
That takes up the amount of time we had for our first panel. We do have our second panel on standby—the threat of votes is still hanging over our heads.
I'd like to ask the members to stay at the table; we're going to suspend for a minute to swap out the witnesses.
Thank you so much for what you've been able to share today and for being part of this discussion. Unfortunately, because of where we are in the session, we're not going to be able to do a report, but we thought it was important to at least invite you here to have a discussion and allow Canadians to hear from you. Thank you so much for what you've been able to share today.
View John Aldag Profile
Lib. (BC)
We'll get our next panel started.
Alison Woodley is here, and we have Harvey Locke. It's always a pleasure to see both of you.
Alison, if you want to go right into your opening statement, I'll give you about seven minutes. We'll use the same card system when one minute is left and it's time to wrap it up.
View John Aldag Profile
Lib. (BC)
I'm sorry to jump in here.
The bells have just started ringing, and once they do, we need unanimous consent to continue. Because we are just down the hall, is there agreement that we go longer? Is there a willingness to do that? If we could go 20 minutes into the bells, that would still give us 10 minutes to get down to the chamber.
Some hon. members: Agreed.
The Chair: We'll keep going and at least get the witness testimony, and then we'll see if there's any time for questions and answers at that point.
My apologies.
Results: 121 - 135 of 45477 | Page: 9 of 3032

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