Interventions in the House of Commons
 
 
 
RSS feed based on search criteria Export search results - CSV (plain text) Export search results - XML
Add search criteria
View Erin O'Toole Profile
CPC (ON)
View Erin O'Toole Profile
2018-06-18 20:21 [p.21198]
Madam Speaker, it is a real pleasure for me to rise and speak to an important bill and issues related to public safety and security in general.
I would like to begin my remarks with a positive word of thanks for those men and women who are charged with keeping our communities safe, certainly the front-line police officers and first responders, but a lot of the people in the intelligence networks from CSIS, to CSE, to think tanks that analyze these things, to engaged citizens who are constantly advocating on issues related to public safety and security. These are probably some of the most important debates we have in this chamber because we are charged with making sure we have a safe community and finding the right balance between the remarkable freedoms we enjoy in a democracy like ours and the responsibility to ensure that there is safety for Canadians. We thank those who are charged with doing that both in uniform and behind the scenes and sometimes under the cloak of secrecy. All Canadians respect that work.
I am going to talk about Bill C-59 from a few vantage points, some of the things that I thought were positive, but I am also going to express three areas of very serious concern I have with this legislation. In many ways, Bill C-59 is a huge step back. It is taking away tools that were responsibly provided to law enforcement agencies to be used in accordance with court supervision. In a lot of the rhetoric we hear on this, that part has been forgotten.
I am going to review some of it from my legal analysis of it, but I want to start by reminding the House, particularly because my friend from Winnipeg, the parliamentary secretary to the government House leader is here, that here we are debating yet another omnibus bill from the Liberal Party, something that was anathema to my friend when he was in opposition. Omnibus bills of this nature that cobbled together a range of things were an assault on democracy, in his words then, but here we are in late night sittings with time already allocated debating yet another Liberal omnibus bill. The irony in all of this is certainly not lost on me or many Canadians who used to see how the Liberals would howl with outrage whenever this happened.
Bill C-59 came out of some positive intentions. My friend from Victoria, the NDP's lead on the parliamentary security oversight committee of parliamentarians is here. I want to thank him for the work that we did together recommending some changes to the minister ahead of what became Bill C-59. The NDP member and I as the public safety critic for the Conservative Party sent two letters to the minister providing some general advice and an indication of our willingness to work with the government on establishing the committee of parliamentarians for security and intelligence oversight.
My friend from Victoria ably serves on that committee now and as a lawyer who has previously practised in the area of national security and finding the right balance between liberty and security, he is a perfect member for that committee as are my friends from the caucus serving alongside the Liberal members. That is very important work done by that committee and I wish them well in their work. We indicated pre Bill C-59 that we would be supportive of that effort.
In those letters we also indicated the need for a super-SIRC type of agency to help oversee some of the supervision of agencies like CSIS and CSE. We were advocating for an approach like that alongside a number of academics, such as Professor Forcese and others. We were happy to see an approach brought in that area as well.
It is important to show that on certain issues of national safety and security where we can drive consensus, we can say we will work with the government, because some of these issues should be beyond partisanship. I want to thank my NDP colleague for working alongside me on that. It took us some time to get the minister to even respond, so despite the sunny ways rhetoric, often we felt that some of our suggestions were falling on deaf ears.
I am going to commit the rest of my speech tonight to the three areas that I believe are risks for Canadians to consider with Bill C-59. I am going to use some real-world examples in the exploration of this, because we are not talking in abstract terms. There are real cases and real impacts on families that we should consider in our debate.
The first area I want to raise in reference to the fact that when Bill C-59 was introduced, it was one day after a Canadian was convicted in a Quebec court in a case involving travelling abroad from Canada to join and work with a terrorist organization. Mr. Ismael Habib was sentenced the day before the government tabled this omnibus security legislation, and I think there is a certain irony in that. In his judgment, Justice Délisle said, “Did Ismael Habib intend to participate in or knowingly contribute to a terrorist activity? The entirety of the evidence demonstrates the answer is yes.” There is such an irony in the fact that the day before this debate there was a conviction for someone who was leaving Canada to train and participate with a terrorist organization.
Only a short time before Mr. Habib left Canada to do this, the previous government criminalized that activity. Why? Really, there was no need to have in the Criminal Code a charge for leaving Canada to train or participate in a terrorist organization, but this was a reaction to a troubling and growing trend involving radicalized people and the ability for people to go and engage in conflicts far from home. Mr. Habib's case was the first of its kind, and the charge he was convicted of by a Quebec court was for an offence that just a few years before did not exist. This is why Parliament must be seized with real and tangible threats to public safety and security. Unfortunately, a lot of the elements of Bill C-59 are going to make it hard for law enforcement to do that, to catch the next Mr. Habib before he leaves, while he is gone, or before he returns and brings that risk back home.
The first area that I have serious concerns with in the bill relates to preventative arrest. This was a controversial but necessary part of BillC-51 from the last Parliament. Essentially it moved a legal threshold from making it “necessary” to prevent a criminal activity or a terrorist act instead of “likely” to prevent. By changing the threshold to “necessary”, as we see in this bill, the government would make it much harder for law enforcement agencies to move in on suspects that they know present a risk yet do not feel they have enough proof to show that it is necessary to prevent an attack. I think most Canadians would think that the standard should be “likely”, which is on balance of probabilities. If we are to err on the reality of a threat that there is violence to be perpetrated or potential violence by someone, then err on the side of protection. We still have to have the evidentiary burden, but it is not too hard.
It is interesting who supported the preventative arrest portions of BillC-51 in the last Parliament. The Prime Minister did as the MP for Papineau. I loved BillC-51 in so many ways, because it showed the hypocrisy of the Liberal Party at its best. The Liberals were constantly critical of BillC-51, but they voted for it. Now they are in a position that they actually have to change elements of it, and they are changing some elements that the Prime Minister praised when he was in opposition, and they had this muddled position. My friends in the NDP have referred to this muddled position before, because now they think their Liberal friends are abandoning the previous ground they stood on.
What did the Prime Minister, then the leader of the third party and MP for Papineau, say about preventative arrest in the House of Commons on February 18, 2015? He said:
I believe that BillC-51, the government's anti-terrorism act, takes some proper steps in that direction. We welcome the measures in Bill C-51 that build on the powers of preventative arrest, make better use of no-fly lists, and allow for more coordinated information sharing by government departments and agencies.
What is ironic is that he is undoing all of those elements in Bill C-59, from information sharing to changing the standard for preventative arrest to a threshold that is unreasonably too high, in fact recklessly too high, and law enforcement agencies have told the minister and the Prime Minister this.
The Prime Minister, when he was MP for Papineau, thought these important powers were necessary but now he does not. Perhaps society is safer today. I would suggest we are not. We just have to be vigilant, vigilant but balanced. That is probably why in opposition he supported these measures and now is rolling them back.
Nothing illustrates the case and the need for this more than the case of Patrice Vincent. He was a Canadian Armed Forces soldier who was killed because of the uniform he wore. He was killed by a radicalized young man named Martin Couture-Rouleau. That radicalized young man was known to law enforcement before he took the life of one of our armed forces members. Law enforcement officers were not sure whether they could move in a preventative arrest public safety manner.
The stark and moving testimony from Patrice's sister, Louise Vincent, at committee in talking about BillC-51 should be reflected upon by members of the Liberal Party listening to this debate, because many of them were not here in the last Parliament. These are real families impacted by public safety and security. Louise Vincent said this:
According to Bill C-51, focus should be shifted from “will commit” to “could commit”, and I think that's very important. That's why the RCMP could not obtain a warrant from the attorney general, despite all the information it had gathered and all the testimony from Martin Couture-Rouleau's family. The RCMP did its job and built a case, but unfortunately, the burden of proof was not met. That's unacceptable.
It is unacceptable. What is unacceptable is the Liberals are raising the bar even higher with respect to preventative arrest. It is like the government does not trust our law enforcement agencies. This cannot be preventative arrest on a whim. There has to be an evidentiary basis for the very significant use of this tool, but that evidentiary basis should not be so high that it does not use the tool, because we have seen what can happen.
This is not an isolated case. I can recite other names, such as Aaron Driver. Those in southwestern Ontario will remember that thanks to the United States, this gentleman was caught by police on his way to commit a terror attack in southwestern Ontario. He was already under one of the old peace bonds. This similar power could be used against someone like Alexandre Bissonnette before his horrendous attack on the mosque in Quebec City. This tool could be used in the most recent case of Alek Minassian, the horrific van attack in Toronto.
Preventative arrest is a tool that should be used but with an evidentiary burden, but if the burden is too high necessary to prevent an attack, that is reckless and it shows the Prime Minister should review his notes from his time in opposition when he supported these powers. I suggest he did not have notes then and probably does not have notes now.
The second issue I would like to speak about is the deletion of charges and the replacing with a blanket offence called counselling commission of a terrorism offence.
What would that change from BillC-51? It would remove charges that could be laid for someone who was advocating or promoting a terrorism attack or activity. Promotion and advocation are the tools of radicalization. If we are not allowing charges to be laid against someone who radicalized Mr. Couture-Rouleau, do we have to only catch someone who counsels him to go out and run down Patrice Vincent? Should we be charging the people who radicalized him, who promoted ISIS or a radical terrorist ideology, and then advocated for violence? That should be the case. That actually conforms with our legal test for hate speech, when individuals are advocating or promoting and indirectly radicalizing.
Therefore, the government members talk about the government's counter-radicalization strategy, and there is no strategy. They have tried to claim the Montreal centre, which was set up independently of the government, as its own. The government would not tour parliamentarians through it when I was public safety critic, but it tours visiting guests from the UN and other places. That was an initiative started in Montreal. It has nothing to do with the Liberals' strategy. I have seen nothing out of the government on counter-radicalization, and I would like to.
The same should be said with respect to peace bonds, another tool that law enforcement agencies need. These have been asked for by law enforcement officials that we trust with their mandate. They are peace officers, yet the government is showing it does not trust them because it is taking away tools. The peace bond standard is now in a similar fashion to the preventative arrest standard. Agencies have to prove that it is necessary to prevent violent activity or terrorism, as opposed to the BillC-51 standard of “likely to prevent”. A protection order, better known as “a peace bond”, is a tool, like preventative arrest, that can set some constraints or limitations on the freedom of a Canadian because that person has demonstrated that he or she is a potential threat. To say the individuals have to be a certain threat, which a “necessary” standard promotes, is reckless and misguided.
I wish the MP for Papineau would remember what he said a few years ago about the reduction of the high burden on law enforcement in preventative arrest situations. Sadly, there are going to be more Aaron Drivers out there. I always use the case of Aaron Driver, because sometimes members of specific groups, some Muslim Canadians, have been unfairly targeted in discussions about radicalization. This is a threat that exists and not just in one community. Aaron Driver's father was in the Canadian Armed Forces, a career member of the military. Their son was radicalized by people who advocated and promoted radical ideology and violence. With this bill, we would remove the ability to charge those people who helped to radicalize Aaron Driver. However, this is a risk that exists.
Let us not overstate the risk. There is not a bogeyman around every corner, but as parliamentarians we need to be serious when we try to balance properly the freedom and liberties we all enjoy, and that people fought and died for, with the responsibility upon us as parliamentarians to give law enforcement agencies the tools they need to do the job. They do not want a situation where they are catching Aaron Driver in a car that is about to drive away. We have to find the right balance. The movement of standards to “necessary” to prevent the commission of a terrorism offence shows that the Liberals do not trust our law enforcement officers with the ability to collect evidence and lay charges, or provide a peace bond, when they think someone is “likely” to be a threat to public safety and security.
I started by saying that there were elements I was happy to see in Bill C-59, but I truly hope Canadians see that certain measures in this would take away tools that law enforcement agencies have responsibly asked for, and this would not make our communities any safer.
Madame la Présidente, c'est un plaisir de prendre la parole au sujet d'un projet de loi important et des enjeux en matière de sécurité publique et de sécurité en général.
Je vais commencer mes commentaires par des remerciements aux hommes et aux femmes qui ont la tâche de garder les collectivités canadiennes en sûreté, notamment les agents de police de première ligne et les premiers intervenants, mais aussi les gens qui travaillent dans le secteur du renseignement au SCRS ou au Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications, les gens qui font partie des groupes de réflexion qui analysent ces questions, ainsi que les citoyens engagés qui militent toujours pour les questions liées à la sécurité publique et à la sécurité. Il s'agit probablement des enjeux les plus sérieux dont nous puissions débattre à la Chambre parce que nous avons le devoir d'assurer la sécurité de la collectivité en maintenant l'équilibre entre les formidables libertés dont nous jouissons dans les démocraties comme la nôtre et la responsabilité d'assurer la sécurité des Canadiens. Nous sommes reconnaissants envers les personnes qui s'en chargent, qu'elles soient en uniforme ou en coulisses, parfois même sous le couvert du secret. Tous les Canadiens respectent leurs efforts.
Je vais aborder le projet de loi  C-59 sous différents angles. Je soulignerai certains de ses aspects positifs, mais aussi trois points qui suscitent chez moi de vives inquiétudes. À bien des égards, le projet de loi  C-59 représente un recul considérable. Il retire aux organismes d'application de la loi des outils dont ils se servent de manière responsable, selon les directives des tribunaux. À entendre les beaux discours prononcés jusqu'ici, on constate que ce point a été oublié.
Je vais donc présenter mon analyse juridique du projet de loi, mais, tout d'abord, je veux rappeler à la Chambre et en particulier au député de Winnipeg, le secrétaire parlementaire de la leader du gouvernement à la Chambre des communes vu qu'il est présent, que nous sommes à débattre d'un autre projet de loi omnibus des libéraux — une véritable abomination aux dires du député alors qu'il était dans l'opposition. Les projets de loi omnibus de cette nature, qui réunissent un ensemble disparate de mesures, lui paraissaient alors comme une atteinte à la démocratie. Et pourtant, nous voilà à débattre jusque tard en soirée un autre projet de loi omnibus des libéraux qui fait l'objet d'une motion d'attribution de temps. L'ironie de la situation n'échappe certainement pas aux Canadiens, qui se souviennent d'avoir vu les libéraux déchirer leur chemise dès qu'une telle chose se produisait.
Le projet de loi  C-59 part de bonnes intentions. Mon collègue de Victoria, le porte-parole néo-démocrate au sein du comité de surveillance parlementaire de la sécurité, est présent. Je veux le remercier du travail que nous avons fait ensemble en vue de recommander certains changements au ministre avant la rédaction du projet de loi  C-59. Le député néo-démocrate et moi, à titre de porte-parole du Parti conservateur en matière de sécurité publique, avons envoyé deux lettres au ministre afin de lui fournir des conseils d'ordre général, ainsi que de lui indiquer notre volonté de travailler avec le gouvernement à l'établissement d'un comité de parlementaires sur la surveillance des activités de renseignement et de sécurité.
Mon collègue de Victoria sert actuellement ce comité de façon compétente. En tant qu'avocat ayant déjà pratiqué dans le domaine de la sécurité nationale et ayant dû trouver un juste équilibre entre la liberté et la sécurité, il est le membre idéal pour ce comité, tout comme le sont mes collègues de caucus qui siègent aux côtés des députés libéraux. Les membres du comité font un travail fort important, et je leur souhaite bonne chance. Avant la présentation du projet de loi  C-59, nous avions indiqué que nous allions appuyer leurs efforts.
Dans les deux lettres mentionnées plus tôt, nous avons souligné la nécessité de la création d'un supercomité de surveillance des activités de renseignement de sécurité, qui contribuerait à la surveillance d'organismes comme le Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité et le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications. Nous plaidions en faveur de ce genre d'approche à l'instar de plusieurs universitaires, comme le professeur Forcese. Nous étions heureux de voir aussi l'adoption d'une approche dans ce domaine.
Il est important, sur certaines questions de sécurité nationale pouvant faire l'objet d'un consensus, de montrer que nous travaillerons de concert avec le gouvernement, parce que certaines de ces questions devraient aller au-delà de la partisanerie. Je tiens à remercier mon collègue néo-démocrate d'avoir collaboré avec moi dans ce dossier. Il a fallu un certain temps avant que le ministre réponde. Malgré les beaux discours, nous avons souvent eu l'impression que nos suggestions tombaient dans l'oreille d'un sourd.
Je vais axer le reste de mon allocution sur trois éléments du projet de loi  C-59 qui, selon moi, présentent des risques pour les Canadiens. Je vais utiliser des exemples réels, parce que nous ne sommes pas en train de parler de quelque chose d'abstrait. Dans le cadre du débat, nous devons tenir compte de cas véritables et de répercussions véritables sur les familles.
Le premier élément dont j'aimerais parler, c'est le fait que le projet de loi  C-59 a été présenté un jour après qu'un Canadien a été reconnu coupable par un tribunal du Québec de vouloir se rendre à l'étranger pour se joindre à une organisation terroriste et pour participer aux activités de cette organisation. M. Ismaël Habib a été reconnu coupable une journée avant que le gouvernement présente le projet de loi omnibus en matière de sécurité. Je crois que c'est quelque peu paradoxal. Le juge Délisle a déclaré: « Ismaël Habib avait-il l’intention de participer ou de contribuer sciemment à une activité terroriste? L’ensemble de la preuve démontre que oui. » Il est vraiment paradoxal que, la veille de ce débat, quelqu'un ait été reconnu coupable d'avoir voulu quitter le Canada pour participer aux activités d'une organisation terroriste.
Peu de temps avant que M. Habib ait quitté le Canada pour participer à une telle activité, le gouvernement précédent a criminalisé cette activité. Pourquoi? En réalité, il n'était pas nécessaire d'ériger en infraction au Code criminel le fait de quitter le Canada pour participer à des camps d'entraînement terroristes ou à d'autres activités terroristes, mais il fallait néanmoins s'attaquer à une tendance troublante et grandissante impliquant des extrémistes et leur capacité de participer à des conflits à l'étranger. Le cas de M. Habib était le premier du genre, et l'infraction dont un tribunal du Québec l'a reconnu coupable n'existait pas quelques années auparavant. C'est la raison pour laquelle le Parlement doit se pencher sur les menaces concrètes et tangibles à la sécurité publique. Malheureusement, bon nombre des éléments du projet de loi  C-59 feront en sorte qu'il sera plus difficile pour les organismes d'application de la loi d'épingler le prochain M. Habib avant qu'il ne quitte le pays, pendant qu'il est à l'étranger ou avant qu'il ne revienne et qu'il représente à nouveau un risque pour le Canada.
Le premier élément du projet de loi qui me pose problème concerne les arrestations préventives. L'arrestation préventive s'inscrivait dans le cadre d'une partie controversée, mais nécessaire du projet de loi C-51 de la dernière législature. Essentiellement, le projet de loi faisait passer le seuil de « aura vraisemblablement pour effet d'empêcher » à « est nécessaire pour empêcher » une activité terroriste. En modifiant le seuil dans le projet de loi, il sera beaucoup plus difficile pour les organismes d'application de la loi de mettre le grappin sur des suspects qui posent un risque, mais pour lesquels ils n'ont pas suffisamment de preuves pour démontrer qu'une arrestation est nécessaire pour prévenir une attaque terroriste. Je pense que la majorité des Canadiens s'attendent à ce qu'on puisse ordonner l'arrestation d'une personne si cela « a vraisemblablement pour effet d'empêcher » une activité terroriste, c'est-à-dire selon la prépondérance des probabilités. Si on veut pécher par excès de prudence dans le cas d'une menace de violence, aussi bien se ranger du côté de la protection. Nous aurions encore le fardeau de la preuve, mais il serait moins difficile d'établir la preuve dans ce cas-ci.
Il est intéressant de savoir qui a appuyé les dispositions sur l'arrestation préventive du projet de loi C-51 pendant la dernière législature. Le premier ministre les a appuyées en tant que député de Papineau. J'aimais le projet de loi C-51 à bien des égards, car il mettait si bien en lumière l'hypocrisie du Parti libéral. Les libéraux ont appuyé le projet de loi C-51 alors qu'ils le critiquaient sans cesse. Maintenant ils doivent en changer des parties, dont certaines ont été vantées par le premier ministre lorsqu'il était dans l'opposition. Leur position à l'époque était confuse. Les députés du NPD en ont d'ailleurs déjà parlé, car ils observent maintenant que leurs amis libéraux changent une fois de plus d'idée.
Qu'a dit le premier ministre, qui était à l'époque le chef du troisième parti et député de Papineau, au sujet de l'arrestation préventive à la Chambre des communes le 18 février 2015? Il a dit:
[...] je crois que le projet de loi C-51, le projet [de] loi antiterroriste présenté par le gouvernement, propose des mesures adéquates. Nous sommes favorables aux mesures du projet de loi C-51 qui visent à renforcer les pouvoirs en matière d'arrestation préventive, à mieux utiliser les listes d'interdiction de vol, et à mieux coordonner l'échange de renseignements entre les ministères et les agences.
L'ironie, c'est qu'il défait maintenant tous ces éléments du projet de loi  C-59, autant en ce qui a trait au partage de l'information, au changement des normes d'arrestation préventive qu'à la mise en place d'un seuil beaucoup trop élevé, voire imprudemment élevé, et les organismes d'application de la loi ont prévenu le ministre et le premier ministre de tout cela.
Lorsqu'il était député de Papineau, le premier ministre était d'avis que ces pouvoirs importants étaient nécessaires, mais ce n'est plus le cas. Peut-être que la société est plus sécuritaire aujourd'hui. Je dirais que non. Nous devons simplement être à la fois vigilants et équilibrés. C'est probablement pour cela qu'il appuyait ces mesures lorsqu'il était dans l'opposition et qu'il les renverse maintenant.
Il n'y a pas meilleur argument ici que l'exemple de Patrice Vincent. Ce soldat des Forces armées canadiennes a été tué à cause de l'uniforme qu'il portait. Il a été tué par un jeune homme radicalisé du nom de Martin Couture-Rouleau. Ce jeune homme radicalisé était connu des organismes d'application de la loi avant qu'il n'enlève la vie à un militaire canadien. Les agents des forces de l'ordre n'étaient pas certains de pouvoir agir dans une optique de sécurité publique et procéder à une arrestation préventive.
La soeur de Patrice, Louise Vincent, a livré un témoignage dur et émouvant devant le comité à propos du projet de loi C-51. Les députés libéraux qui écoutent ce débat devraient y réfléchir, car bon nombre d'entre eux n'étaient pas ici à la dernière législature. Il est question de vraies familles pour lesquelles la sécurité publique n'est pas une notion théorique. Voici ce qu'a dit Louise Vincent:
Le projet de loi C-51 stipule qu'il faudrait passer de « commettra » à « pourrait commettre », ce qui est très important à mes yeux. C'est à cause de cela que la GRC n'a pas été en mesure d'obtenir un mandat du procureur général, malgré toute l'information qu'elle avait recueillie et tous les témoignages des proches de Martin Couture-Rouleau. La GRC avait fait ses devoirs et monté un dossier, mais malheureusement, la preuve à ce sujet n'était pas assez élevée. Ce n'est pas acceptable.
C'est inacceptable. Ce qui est inacceptable, c'est que les libéraux placent la barre encore plus haut en ce qui a trait à l'arrestation préventive. C'est comme si le gouvernement ne faisait pas confiance aux organismes d'application de la loi. Il ne peut s'agir d'une arrestation préventive sur un coup de tête. Il doit y avoir un fondement probatoire pour l'utilisation très importante de cet outil. Or, les critères pour ce fondement probatoire ne doivent pas être si élevés que cela empêche les organismes d'utiliser cet outil, car nous avons vu ce qui peut arriver.
Il ne s'agit pas d'un cas isolé. Je peux en nommer d'autres. Prenons l'exemple d'Aaron Driver. Les habitants du Sud-Ouest de l'Ontario se souviendront que, grâce aux États-Unis, cet homme a été intercepté par la police alors qu'il était sur le point de perpétrer une attaque terroriste dans le Sud-Ouest de l'Ontario. Il faisait déjà l'objet de l'un des anciens engagements de ne pas troubler l'ordre public. Ce pouvoir similaire pourrait être utilisé contre quelqu'un comme Alexandre Bissonnette, avant son épouvantable attaque contre une mosquée à Québec. Cet outil pourrait être utilisé dans le cas, récent, d'Alek Minassian, auteur de l'horrible attaque à la minifourgonnette à Toronto.
L'arrestation préventive est un outil qui doit être utilisé, mais avec un fardeau de la preuve. Toutefois, si le fardeau de la preuve est trop élevé pour prévenir une attaque, c'est imprudent, et cela montre que le premier ministre devrait relire ses notes de l'époque où il faisait partie de l'opposition et appuyait ces pouvoirs. Je soupçonne qu'il n'avait pas de notes à l'époque et qu'il n'en a probablement pas non plus aujourd'hui.
Le deuxième problème dont j'aimerais parler est la suppression d'accusations et leur remplacement par une infraction générale appelée « conseiller la commission d’infractions de terrorisme ».
Qu'est-ce que cela changerait par rapport au projet de loi C-51? Cela éliminerait les accusations qui pourraient être déposées contre une personne qui préconisait ou fomentait la commission d'un acte de terrorisme, quel qu'il soit. La préconisation et la fomentation: voilà les outils de la radicalisation. Si on ne peut pas porter d'accusations contre la personne qui a radicalisé M. Couture-Rouleau, doit-on uniquement appréhender la personne qui lui a conseillé de renverser Patrice Vincent? Devrait-on accuser les personnes qui l'ont radicalisé, qui ont fait la promotion du groupe État islamique ou d'une idéologie terroriste radicale, puis qui ont préconisé la violence? Il devrait en être ainsi. En fait, cela respecte notre critère juridique relatif au discours haineux, en ce sens que lorsque des individus préconisent ou fomentent la perpétration d'actes terroristes, ils radicalisent indirectement.
Cela dit, les députés ministériels parlent de la stratégie de lutte contre la radicalisation du gouvernement, alors qu'il n'y a aucune stratégie. Ils ont essayé de prétendre que le centre de Montréal, qui a été établi indépendamment du gouvernement, est leur initiative. Le gouvernement ne le faisait pas visiter aux parlementaires lorsque j'étais porte-parole en matière de sécurité publique, mais il le fait visiter aux invités des Nations unies et d'ailleurs. Cette initiative a vu le jour à Montréal. Elle n'a absolument rien à voir avec la stratégie des libéraux. Le gouvernement n'a pris aucune mesure pour contrer la radicalisation, quoique j'aimerais bien qu'il le fasse.
La même chose vaut pour les engagements de ne pas troubler l'ordre public, un autre outil dont les organismes d'application de la loi ont besoin. C'est ce que réclament les responsables de l'application de la loi en qui nous avons confiance. Ce sont des agents de la paix, et pourtant, le gouvernement montre qu'il n'a pas confiance en eux puisqu'il leur enlève leurs outils. Le critère pour l'engagement de ne pas troubler l'ordre public ressemble à celui de l'arrestation préventive. Les organismes doivent prouver qu'il est nécessaire pour empêcher qu'une activité violente ou terroriste ne soit entreprise, comparativement au projet de loi C-51 aux termes duquel le critère était que l'engagement « aurait vraisemblablement pour effet » d'empêcher que l'activité terroriste ne soit entreprise. Une ordonnance de protection, mieux connue sous le nom d'« engagement de ne pas troubler l'ordre public », est un outil, tout comme l'arrestation préventive, qui peut imposer certaines contraintes ou limites à la liberté d'un Canadien, puisque cette personne a démontré qu'elle constituait une menace potentielle. Par conséquent, il est tout à fait imprudent et malavisé de dire qu'une personne doit représenter un certain danger, ce que sous-entend la mise en place d'un seuil beaucoup trop élevé.
J'aimerais que le député de Papineau se rappelle ce qu'il a dit il y a quelques années, au sujet de la réduction des gros obstacles qui se dressent sur le chemin des responsables de l'application de la loi lorsqu'ils doivent procéder à des arrestations préventives. Malheureusement, il y aura d'autres Aaron Driver. Je donne toujours l'exemple de cet homme parce que certains groupes, comme les Canadiens de confession musulmane, ont parfois été injustement visés dans les discussions sur la radicalisation. Ce danger n'existe pas uniquement au sein d'une communauté. Le père d'Aaron Driver a fait carrière dans les Forces armées canadiennes. Son fils a été radicalisé par des gens qui préconisent et propagent une idéologie radicale et le recours à la violence. Si ce projet de loi est adopté, il serait désormais impossible d'inculper les individus qui ont participé à la radicalisation d'Aaron Driver. Pourtant, le risque est bien réel.
Tâchons néanmoins de ne pas exagérer l'importance de ce risque. Il n'y a pas de bonhomme Sept-Heures à tous les coins de rue, mais les parlementaires que nous sommes doivent être sérieux lorsqu'il s'agit de trouver le juste équilibre entre, d'une part, les libertés dont nous jouissons tous et pour lesquelles des gens se sont battus et ont sacrifié leur vie et, d'autre part, la responsabilité qui nous incombe de fournir aux organismes d'application de la loi les outils dont ils ont besoin pour faire leur travail. Ils ne veulent pas d'une situation où ils rattrapent Aaron Driver dans une voiture alors qu'il est sur le point de partir. Nous devons trouver le juste équilibre. Le remplacement du critère actuel par celui de la nécessité d'une mesure pour empêcher la perpétration d'une infraction de terrorisme est la preuve que les libéraux ne font pas confiance aux agents chargés de l'application de la loi pour recueillir des preuves et déposer des accusations ou pour obtenir un engagement de ne pas troubler l'ordre public lorsqu'ils croient qu'une personne est susceptible de constituer un danger pour la sécurité publique.
J'ai commencé en disant que le projet de loi  C-59 contenait des dispositions dont je me réjouis. Toutefois, j'espère sincèrement que les Canadiens comprendront que certaines dispositions de ce projet de loi auraient pour effet d'enlever aux organismes d'application de la loi certains outils qu'ils avaient réclamés de manière responsable et que cela ne serait pas de nature à améliorer la sécurité de la population.
Result: 1 - 1 of 1