Interventions in the House of Commons
 
 
 
RSS feed based on search criteria Export search results - CSV (plain text) Export search results - XML
Add search criteria
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-06-05 14:18 [p.28575]
Mr. Speaker, this Liberal government is more centralist, paternalistic and, quite simply, arrogant than any other Liberal government in the history of our federation.
For the past four years, the government has repeatedly shown that it is out of touch with the spirit of federalism. It refuses to honour the tradition of appointing a political lieutenant for Quebec and instead made a minister from Toronto responsible for the economic development of our province. It is imposing political conditions on federal transfers. It refuses to give Quebec greater powers in the area of immigration. It refuses to respond favourably to the National Assembly's request for a single tax return, something all Quebeckers want.
I could go on and on. Following in the footsteps of founding fathers Cartier and MacDonald, we the Conservatives will continue to properly honour federalism. In 2008, we recognized that Quebeckers form a nation within a united Canada.
In 2019, when we form the government, we will respond favourably to the demands of Quebeckers and Quebec.
Monsieur le Président, le gouvernement libéral, plus que tout autre dans l'histoire de notre fédération, est centralisateur, paternaliste et tout simplement arrogant.
Depuis quatre ans, le gouvernement a démontré à maintes reprises qu'il n'est pas au diapason de l'esprit du fédéralisme. Il refuse de faire honneur à la tradition en nommant un lieutenant politique pour le Québec, et il a nommé un ministre de Toronto responsable du développement économique de notre province. Il impose des conditions politiques à ses transferts fédéraux. Il refuse de donner plus de pouvoirs au Québec en matière d'immigration. Il refuse de répondre favorablement à la demande de l'Assemblée nationale relativement à la déclaration de revenus unique, une demande de tous les Québécois.
La liste est encore longue. Nous, les conservateurs, dans la lignée des pères fondateurs Cartier et MacDonald, allons continuer d'honorer le fédéralisme en bonne et due forme. En 2008, nous avons reconnu que les Québécois forment une nation au sein du Canada-Uni.
En 2019, lorsque nous formerons le gouvernement, nous allons répondre favorablement aux demandes des Québécois et du Québec.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-05-31 16:21 [p.20002]
Mr. Speaker, thank you for recognizing me. First of all, I would like to say hello to all the people of Beauport—Limoilou, many of whom are listening today, and to thank them for all their work. They are definitely listening. When I go door to door, many of them tell me that they watch CPAC.
I would like to say something about what the hon. Liberal member for Hamilton West—Ancaster—Dundas said in response to the speech of my colleague from Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan. She engaged in the usual Liberal demagoguery. She asked if we believed in climate change. I really would like my constituents to listen closely, because I want to make this clear to them and to all Canadians: we, the Conservatives, believe so strongly in climate change that, in 2007, Mr. Harper held a joint press conference with Mr. Charest to announce the implementation of the new Canada ecotrust program, supported by a total investment of $1.5 billion. The aim of the program was to give each province hundreds of millions of dollars to help with their respective climate change plans. It is easy to look this up on Google by entering “ecoTrust,” “2007,” “Harper,” “Charest.” Not only did Mr. Charest commend the Conservative government’s initiative, but even Steven Guilbeault from Greenpeace at the time—and I am certain that my colleague from Mégantic—L’Érable will find this hard to believe—saluted the initiative as something unheard of.
There is a reason why greenhouse gas emissions decreased by 2% under the decade-long Conservative reign. We had a plan, a plan with bold targets that the Liberals made their own.
Now let us talk a bit about the 2018-19 budget, which continues in the same vein as the other two budgets presented so far by the hon. member for Papineau's Liberal government. I would like to begin by saying that the government has been in reaction mode for the past three years and almost never in action mode.
It is in reaction mode when it comes to the softwood lumber crisis, although we do not hear much about it because the softwood lumber rates are still pretty attractive. However, the fact remains that this is a crisis and that, right now, industrial producers in the U.S. are collecting billions of dollars that they will eventually recover, as they do in every softwood lumber crisis.
The Liberal government is in reaction mode when it comes to NAFTA. They will say that they are not the ones who put Mr. Trump in office, but this is yet another major issue that has been taking up their time in the past year, and they are still in reaction mode. They are also in reaction mode when it comes to the imminent tariffs on aluminum and steel.
The Liberals are in reaction mode when it comes to almost every major issue in Canada. They are in reaction mode when it comes to natural resources development, for example with regard to Kinder Morgan’s Trans Mountain pipeline. Once again they were in reaction mode, because Kinder Morgan said that it would walk if the government could not assume responsibility and tell British Columbia in no uncertain terms that this was a matter of federal jurisdiction.
All of this shows that the Prime Minister is not the great diplomat he pretends to be across the globe, and in celebrity news and other media. He is such a poor diplomat that he was unable to avoid the softwood lumber crisis with Obama. He is such a poor diplomat that he has supposedly had a wonderful relationship with Mr. Trump for the past year and a half. He speaks to him on the telephone I do not know how many times a month, but that did not prevent Mr. Trump from taking deliberate action against Canada, as we saw today with the tariffs on steel and aluminum.
I would like to make a comparison. We, the Conservatives, were a government of action. We negotiated 46 free-trade agreements. We sent Canadian troops to Kandahar to demonstrate our willingness to co-operate with NATO and the G7 and to make a show of military force. We invested hugely in national defence, increasing our investments from 0.8% to almost 1.2% of the GDP following the dark days of Jean Chrétien’s Liberal government. We settled the softwood lumber issue in 2007, during the last crisis. We implemented the national shipbuilding strategy, investing more than $30 billion to renew our military fleet, to renew the Canadian Coast Guard’s exploration fleet in the Canadian Arctic, and to renew the fleet of icebreakers. The first of these icebreakers, the majestic Diefenbaker, will soon be under construction.
Let us not forget that we also told Mr. Putin to get out of Ukraine. There is no doubt that we were a government of action.
When the budget was tabled, several journalists said that it was more of a political platform than a budget. I find that interesting. In their opinion, the political platform contained no concrete fiscal measures to prepare Canada for tomorrow, for the next 10 years, or for the next century, as our founding fathers intended in 1867. Rather, it contained proposals, in particular concerning social housing. The NDP must be very happy. The Liberals promised billions of dollars if the provinces gave their assent. That was a promise.
The Liberals also made proposals concerning pharmacare. Once again, they were conditional on studies demonstrating the usefulness of such a plan. That, too, was a promise. The promises go on page after page in the budget, and it is obvious that it is a political platform. That is why the Liberals used the word “woman” more than 400 times, 30 times on each page. That is just demagoguery and totally abusive.
I would like to quote a very interesting CBC journalist, Chris Hall. Since he works at the CBC, the Liberals will surely believe him. He said that the government recently spent $233,000 to organize round table discussions to find out whether Canadians understood the message, and not the content, of their budget. I will quote Mr. Hall:
In particular, the report said the findings suggest middle-class Canadians—the very demographic the Liberals have been courting since their election with both policy initiatives and political messaging—don't feel their lives are getting better.
They are correct in thinking that their lives are not getting better. Even Chris Hall concluded, in light of these studies, that the 2018-19 budget is not a document that provides guidelines, includes concrete measures, or outlines actual achievements in progress. It is a political document that proposes ideologies.
The budget also contains a number of disappointments and shortcomings, precisely because it does not contain any actions. It does not respond to the fiscal reforms enacted by U.S. President Trump that give American companies an undue competitive advantage.
The 2018-19 federal budget does not address the tariffs on aluminum and steel either, although we all saw them coming. It does not specify what measures will be taken to implement carbon pricing. Most of all, it does not say how much it will cost every single Canadian. You would think it would at least do that. Some analysts say that it will cost approximately $2,500 per Canadian per year.
This budget is full of proposals but has no concrete measures, and it perpetuates broken promises. Instead of $10-billion deficits for two consecutive years, we have $19-billion deficits accumulating year over year until 2045. This year, we were supposed to have a deficit of $6 billion, but it has reached almost $20 billion. The Liberals also broke their promise to balance the budget. This is the first time that the federal government has not had a concrete plan to balance the budget.
We were supposed to run up deficits in order to invest in the largest infrastructure program in history, because with the Liberals everything is historic. Only $7 billion of the $180 billion of this program has been injected into the Canadian economy.
This is a very disappointing budget and, unfortunately, dear people of Beauport—Limoilou, taxes keep going up and the Liberal carbon tax is just the start.
Monsieur le Président, je vous remercie de m'accorder la parole. D'entrée de jeu, je voudrais dire un gros bonjour à tous les citoyens de Beauport—Limoilou qui nous écoutent en grand nombre, et les remercier pour tout leur travail. C'est vrai qu'ils sont bien à l'écoute. Souvent, quand je fais du porte-à-porte, ils m'en parlent et disent qu'ils regardent CPAC.
Je voudrais juste revenir sur ce qu'a dit la députée libérale d'Hamilton-Ouest—Ancaster—Dundas en réponse au discours de mon collègue de Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan. Elle faisait encore de la démagogie propre aux libéraux. Elle demandait si on croyait aux changements climatiques. Je voudrais vraiment que mes citoyens m'entendent bien, car je veux mettre cela au clair pour eux epour tous les Canadiens: nous, les conservateurs, croyons tellement aux changements climatiques qu'en 2007, M. Harper a fait une conférence de presse conjointe avec M. Charest où il a annoncé la mise en oeuvre du nouveau programme Éco-Fiducie Canada, doté d'un investissement total de 1,5 milliard de dollars. Le programme avait pour objectif de fournir des centaines de millions de dollars à chaque province, afin de contribuer à leurs plans respectifs pour répondre aux changements climatiques. Cela peut se vérifier dans Google en inscrivant « Éco-Fiducie », « 2007 », « Harper », « Charest ». Charest a non seulement fait l'éloge de cette approche du gouvernement fédéral sous les conservateurs, mais même Steven Guilbeault, de Greenpeace à l'époque — et je suis sûr que mon collègue de Mégantic—L'Érable va trouver cela incroyable —, a salué cette initiative comme étant quelque chose d'incroyable.
Ce n'est pas pour rien que sous le règne conservateur qui a duré 10 ans, on a réduit de 2 % les gaz à effet de serre au Canada, parce qu'il y avait un plan. Notre plan contenait d'ailleurs des cibles audacieuses que les libéraux ont gardées.
Discutons maintenant quelque peu du budget de 2018-2019, qui continue dans la même lignée que les deux autres budgets présentés jusqu'à ce jour par le gouvernement libéral du député de Papineau. J'aimerais dire au préalable que depuis trois ans, ce gouvernement est en mode réaction et presque jamais en mode action.
Il est en mode réaction par rapport à la crise du bois d'oeuvre, bien qu'on n'en entende pas trop parler, parce qu'en ce moment les taux sur le bois d'oeuvre demeurent substantiellement intéressants. Toutefois, il n'en demeure pas moins que c'est une crise et qu'actuellement, les producteurs industriels américains ramassent des milliards de dollars qu'ils vont recouvrir par la suite, comme ils le font à chaque crise du bois d'oeuvre.
Le gouvernement libéral est en mode réaction face à l'ALENA. Les libéraux vont nous dire que ce n'est pas eux qui ont élu le gouvernement de M. Trump, mais c'est quand même un autre gros dossier qui les accapare jour après jour depuis un an et dans lequel ils sont en mode réaction. Ils sont aussi en mode réaction depuis hier par rapport aux tarifs douaniers éminents sur l'aluminium et l'acier.
Les libéraux sont en mode réaction concernant presque tous les grands enjeux du Canada. Ils sont en mode réaction par rapport au développement économique des ressources naturelles, par exemple pour l'oléoduc Trans Mountain de Kinder Morgan. Ils étaient encore une fois en mode réaction, parce que Kinder Morgan a dit qu'il allait partir si le gouvernement était incapable de prendre ses responsabilités et de dire clairement à la Colombie-Britannique que c'était de compétence fédérale.
Tout cela démontre en fait que le premier ministre n'est pas le grand diplomate comme on aime le faire croire partout sur la planète, dans tous les médias de stars et dans les autres médias. Il n'est tellement pas diplomate qu'avec Obama, il a été incapable de faire éviter la crise du bois d'oeuvre. Il n'est tellement pas diplomate qu'il entretient supposément depuis un an et demi une belle relation avec M. Trump. Il lui parle au téléphone je ne sais pas combien de fois par mois, mais cela n'empêche pas M. Trump d'agir de manière délibérée contre le Canada comme on le voit aujourd'hui avec les tarifs douaniers sur l'acier et l'aluminium.
J'aimerais faire une comparaison: nous, les conservateurs, sommes un gouvernement d'action. Nous avons conclu 46 traités de libre-échange. Nous avons envoyé les troupes canadiennes à Kandahar pour démontrer notre bonne volonté aux pays de l'OTAN et du G7, et la force militaire des Canadiens. Nous avons investi massivement dans la défense nationale, faisant passer les investissements de 0,8 à presque 1,2 % du PIB, à la suite de la période de noirceur des libéraux de Jean Chrétien. Nous avons réglé le dossier du bois d'oeuvre en 2007, soit lors de la crise précédente. Nous avons mis en place la Stratégie nationale de construction navale, en investissant plus de 30 milliards de dollars pour renouveler les flottes militaires, pour renouveler les flottes d'exploration de la Garde côtière canadienne dans l'Arctique canadien, et pour renouveler les flottes de brise-glaces, dont la construction du premier commencera bientôt, soit le majestueux Diefenbaker.
N'oublions pas non plus que nous avons dit à M. Poutine de sortir de l'Ukraine. Nous étions un gouvernement d'action, sans aucun doute.
Quand le budget a été déposé, plusieurs journalistes ont dit qu'il s'agissait d'une plateforme politique et non d'un budget à proprement parler. J'ai trouvé cela intéressant. Selon eux, cette plateforme politique n'énonçait pas de mesures concrètes budgétaires visant à faire avancer le pays pour demain, pour les 10 prochaines années ou pour le prochain siècle, comme le faisaient nos pères fondateurs en 1867. Elle contenait plutôt des propositions, notamment sur les logements sociaux. Cela fait sans doute plaisir au NPD. On promettait des milliards de dollars à condition que les provinces donnent leur accord. C'était donc une promesse.
Les libéraux ont également fait des propositions concernant une assurance médicaments. Encore une fois, c'était conditionnel à des études démontrant la pertinence d'un tel régime. C'est encore une promesse. Cela se poursuit ainsi de page en page dans le budget, et on constate que c'est une plateforme politique. C'est notamment pour cette raison que les libéraux ont utilisé le mot « femme » plus de 400 fois. On le relève 30 fois par page. C'est démagogique et totalement abusif.
J'aimerais citer un journaliste très intéressant de CBC, Chris Hall. Puisqu'il est de CBC, les libéraux vont sans doute le croire. Il nous dit que le gouvernement a dépensé 233 000 $ dernièrement pour organiser des tables rondes afin de savoir si les Canadiens comprenaient le message, et non le contenu, de leur budget. Je cite M. Hall en anglais:
En particulier, le rapport révèle que, selon les conclusions, les Canadiens de la classe moyenne — le groupe démographique que les libéraux courtisent depuis leur élection au moyen d'initiatives stratégiques et de messages politiques — n'ont pas l'impression que leur vie s'améliore.
Ils ont raison de penser que leur vie ne va pas mieux. Même ce journaliste conclut, à la lumière de ces études, que le budget de 2018-2019 n'est pas un document qui donne des directives, qui prévoit des mesures concrètes ou qui met sur la table de vraies réalisations en cours. C'est un document politique qui propose des idéologies.
Le budget contient aussi beaucoup de déceptions et de lacunes, puisqu'il est justement dépourvu d'action. Il ne répond pas aux réformes fiscales perpétrées par le président Trump aux États-Unis et qui donnent un avantage compétitif indûment immense aux compagnies américaines.
Le budget fédéral de 2018-2019 ne répondait pas non plus aux tarifs sur l'aluminium et l'acier. Il était pourtant évident que cela allait arriver. Il ne nous dit pas non plus quelles mesures seront prises pour mettre en oeuvre la tarification du carbone. Surtout, il ne nous dit pas combien cela va coûter à chaque habitant du Canada. Ce serait pourtant la moindre des choses. Certains analystes nous disent qu'elle va coûter environ 2 500 $ par année par habitant.
C'est un budget qui n'a que des propositions et aucune mesure concrète, et il perpétue des promesses brisées. Au lieu d'avoir des déficits de 10 milliards de dollars pour deux années consécutives, on a des déficits de 19 milliards qui s'accumulent d'année en année, et ce, jusqu'en 2045. Cette année, on devait avoir un déficit de 6 milliards de dollars, or il atteint presque 20 milliards de dollars. Par ailleurs, les libéraux ont également rompu leur promesse d'équilibrer le budget. C'est la première fois que le gouvernement fédéral n'a aucun plan concret pour équilibrer le budget.
Tous ces déficits étaient censés servir à investir dans le plus grand programme d'infrastructure de l'histoire, puisque avec les libéraux, tout est toujours historique. Or seulement 7 milliards des 180 milliards de dollars de ce programme ont été injectés dans l'économie canadienne.
C'est un budget fort décevant et malheureusement, chers concitoyens de Beauport—Limoilou, les taxes et les impôts augmentent, et cela ne fait que commencer avec la taxe libérale sur le carbone.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-05-30 20:43 [p.19928]
Mr. Speaker, here we are in the House, on Wednesday, May 30, at 8:45. I should mention that it is 8:45 p.m., for the many residents of Beauport—Limoilou who I am sure are tuning in. To all my constituents, good evening.
We are debating this evening because the Liberal government tabled very few significant government bills over the winter. Instead, they tabled an astounding number of private members' bills on things like swallows' day and beauty month. Sometimes my colleagues and I can hardly help laughing at this pile of utterly trivial bills. I also think that this process of randomly selecting the members who get to table bills is a bit past its prime. Maybe it should be reviewed. At the same time, I understand that it is up to each member to decide what kind of bill is important to him or her.
The reason we have had to sit until midnight for two days now is that, as my colleague from Perth—Wellington said, the government has been acting like a typical university student over the past three months. That comparison is a bit ridiculous, but it is true. The government is behaving like those students who wait until the last minute to do their assignments and are still working on them at 3 a.m. the day before they are due because they were too busy partying all semester. Members know what I mean, even though that paints a rather stereotypical picture of students; most of them do not do things like that.
In short, we have a government that, at the end of the session, has realized that time is running out and that it only has three weeks left to pass some of its legislative measures, some of which are rather lengthy bills that are key to the government's legislative agenda. One has to wonder about that.
The Liberals believe these bills to be important. However, because of their lack of responsibility over the past three months, we were unable to debate these major bills that will make significant changes to our society. Take for example, Bill C-76, which has to do with the electoral reforms that the Liberals want to make to the voting system, the way we vote, protection of the vote, and identification. There is also Bill C-49 on transportation in Canada, a very lengthy bill that we have not had time to examine properly.
Today we are debating Bill C-57 on sustainable development. This is an important topic, but for the past three years I have been getting sick and tired of seeing the Liberal government act as though it has a monopoly on environmental righteousness. I searched online to get an accurate picture of the record of Mr. Harper's Conservative government from 2006 to 2015, and I came across some fascinating results. I want to share this information very honestly with the House and my Liberal colleagues so that they understand that even though we did not talk incessantly about the environment, we achieved some excellent concrete results.
I want to read a quote from www.mediaterre.org, a perfectly legitimate site:
Stephen Harper's Canadian government released its 2007 budget on March 19. The budget allocated $4.5 billion in new investments to some 20 environmental projects. These measures include a $2,000 rebate for all electronic-vehicle or alternative-fuel purchases, and the creation of a $1.5-billion EcoTrust program to help provinces reduce greenhouse gas emissions.
The Liberals often criticize us for talking about the environment, but we did take action. For example, we set targets. We proposed reducing emissions to 30% below 2005 levels by 2030. The Liberals even retained these same targets as part of the Paris agreement.
They said we had targets, but no plan. That is not true. Not only did we have the $1.5-billion ecotrust program, but we also had a plan that involved federal co-operation.
Allow me to quote the premier of Quebec at the time, Jean Charest, who was praising the plan that was going to help Quebec—his province, my province—meet its greenhouse gas emissions targets. Jean Charest and Mr. Harper issued a joint press release.
Mr. Harper said, “Canada's New Government is investing to protect Canadians from the consequences of climate change, air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions.” He was already recognizing it in 2007.
Mr. Charest said, “In June 2006, our government adopted its plan to combat climate change. This plan has been hailed as one of the finest in North America. With Ottawa contributing financially to this Quebec initiative, we will be able to achieve our objectives.”
It was Mr. Charest who said that in 2007, at a press conference with the prime minister.
I will continue to read the joint press release from the two governments, “As a result of this federal funding, the Government of Quebec has indicated that it will be able to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 13.8 million tonnes of carbon dioxide or equivalent below its anticipated 2012 level.”
What is more, the $1.5-billion ecotrust that was supposed to be allocated and was allocated to every province provided $339 million to Quebec alone. That was going to allow Quebec to engage in the following: investments to improve access to new technologies for the trucking sector; a program to develop renewable energy sources in rural regions; a pilot plant for production of cellulosic ethanol; promotion of geothermal heat pumps in the residential sector; support for technological research and innovation for the reduction and sequestration of greenhouse gases. This is probably one of those programs that is helping us make our oil sands increasingly environmentally friendly by allowing us to capture the carbon that comes from converting the sands to oil. There are also measures for the capture of biogas from landfill sites, for waste treatment and energy recovery, and finally for Canada ecotrust.
I invite our Liberal colleagues to listen to what I am going to say. In 2007, Steven Guilbeault of Greenpeace said the following: “We are pleased to see that after negotiating for more than a year, Quebec has finally obtained the money it needs to move towards meeting the Kyoto targets.”
Who made it possible for Quebec to move towards meeting its Kyoto objectives? It was the Harper government, a Conservative government, which established the $1.5-billion ecotrust fund in 2007 with monies from the budget surplus.
Not only did we have a plan to meet the targets we proposed, but this was also a plan that could only be implemented if the provinces agreed to the targets. It was a plan that was funded through the budget surplus, that did not further tax Canadians, and that provided money directly, without any conditions, other than the fundamental requirement that it had to help reduce climate change, which was philosophically important. Any and all measures taken to reach that goal were left entirely to the discretion of the provinces.
Mr. Harper, like a good Conservative who supported decentralization and like a true federalist leader, said that he was giving $400 million to each province so it could move forward with its plan.
By 2015, after 10 years of Conservative government, the country had not only weathered the worst economic crisis, the worst recession in history since the 1930s, but it had also reduced greenhouse gas emissions by 2% and increased the gross domestic product for all Canadians while lopping three points off the GST and lowering income taxes for families with two children by an average of $2,000 per year.
If that is not co-operative federalism, if those are not real results, if that is not a concrete environmental plan, then I do not know what is. Add to that the fact that we achieved royal assent for no less than 25 to 35 bills every session.
In contrast, during this session, in between being forced to grapple with scandals involving the carbon tax, illegal border crossings, and the Trans Mountain project, this government has barely managed to come up with four genuinely important bills.
By contrast, we expanded parks and protected Canada's wetlands. Our environmental record is exceptional.
Furthermore, we allowed debate. For example, we debated Bill C-23 on electoral reform for four days. The Liberals' electoral reform was debated for two hours.
I am sad, but I am happy to debate until midnight because debating is my passion.
Monsieur le Président, nous voici à la Chambre le mercredi 30 mai à 20 h 45. Je dois préciser que c'est le soir, pour tous les résidants de Beauport—Limoilou qui nous écoutent en grand nombre, j'en suis sûr. Je les salue.
Nous débattons ce soir parce que le gouvernement libéral, tout au long de la session d'hiver, a proposé peu de projets de loi gouvernementaux d'envergure. On a plutôt vu un nombre incroyable de projets de loi d'initiative parlementaire sur le jour des hirondelles ou sur le mois de la beauté. Parfois, mes collègues et moi rigolons presque de cette accumulation de projets de loi presque complètement anodins. D'ailleurs, je trouve un peu moribond ce processus de sélection aléatoire du député qui va pouvoir présenter un projet de loi. Peut-être qu'on devrait le revoir. En même temps, je comprends qu'il revient à chaque député de déterminer quel genre de projet de loi est important pour lui.
Si nous devons siéger jusqu'à minuit depuis maintenant deux jours, c'est parce que, tout comme l'a dit mon collègue de Perth—Wellington, le gouvernement, au cours des trois derniers mois, a agi comme un étudiant universitaire typique. C'est un parallèle un peu loufoque, mais cela tient quand même debout. Il s'est comporté comme un étudiant qui se rend compte que la remise du travail a lieu le lendemain matin et qui commence à le faire à 3 heures du matin parce qu'il a fait la fête tout le long de la session. On voit un peu ce que je veux dire, même si c'est une image un peu tronquée des étudiants, puisque la plupart ne font pas cela.
Bref, on se retrouve avec un gouvernement qui, en fin de session, prend conscience que le temps file et qu'il lui reste à peine trois semaines pour faire adopter certaines de ses mesures législatives qu'on pourrait juger plus volumineuses et importantes pour son programme législatif. Encore là, on pourrait se poser des questions.
Même si certains projets de loi sont importants aux yeux des libéraux, à cause de leur manque de sérieux des trois derniers mois, nous n'avons pas pu débattre des projets de loi majeurs qui vont apporter de grands changements dans notre société, comme le projet de loi C-76. Celui-ci porte sur les réformes électorales que les libéraux veulent appliquer relativement au mode de scrutin, à notre façon de voter, à la protection du vote et à l'identification, par exemple. Mentionnons aussi le projet de loi C-49 sur le transport au Canada, un projet de loi très volumineux que nous n'avons pas eu le temps d'évaluer convenablement.
Aujourd'hui, nous parlons du projet de loi C-57 sur le développement durable. C'est donc très intéressant. Cependant, j'en ai un peu marre d'entendre le gouvernement libéral nous répéter, depuis trois ans, qu'il a le monopole de la vertu en ce qui a trait à l'environnement. J'ai fait quelques recherches sur Internet pour voir le bilan précis et tangible du gouvernement conservateur de M. Harper de 2006 à 2015. J'ai fait des découvertes assez incroyables. J'aimerais en faire part de manière très honnête à la Chambre et à mes collègues libéraux pour qu'ils comprennent que, bien que nous ne nous gargarisions pas d'un discours environnementaliste, nous avons obtenu des résultats tangibles fort intéressants.
Voici donc ce que j'ai trouvé sur www.mediaterre.org, un site Web parfaitement légitime:
Le gouvernement canadien de Stephen Harper a rendu public le 19 mars dernier son budget 2007. Celui-ci prévoit 4,5 milliards de nouveaux investissements liés à une vingtaine de projets environnementaux. Ces mesures impliquent notamment la déduction de 2000$ liée à tout achat de véhicule écoénergétique ou à carburant de remplacement, mais également la mise sur pied d’une Éco-fiducie de 1,5 milliards afin d’aider les provinces à diminuer l’émission de gaz à effet de serre.
Souvent, les libéraux nous accusent d'avoir parlé d'environnement, puisque nous l'avons quand même fait à quelques égards. Nous avons notamment proposé des cibles. Par exemple, nous avons proposé de baisser les émissions de 30 % d'ici 2030 par rapport aux niveaux de 2005. Or les libéraux ont conservé ces mêmes cibles par l'entremise de l'Accord de Paris.
Ils nous disaient que nous avions des cibles, mais pas de plan. Ce n'est pas vrai. Non seulement nous avions l'écoFiducie de 1,5 milliard de dollars, mais c'était aussi un plan qui s'inscrivait dans une collaboration fédérale.
Je vais citer des passages du premier ministre du Québec à l'époque, Jean Charest, qui faisait l'éloge de ce plan qui allait aider le Québec — sa province, ma province — à atteindre ses objectifs de réduction de gaz à effet de serre. Jean Charest et M. Harper ont difusé ensemble un communiqué.
M. Harper a dit: « Le nouveau gouvernement du Canada investit afin de protéger les Canadiennes et les Canadiens des répercussions des changements climatiques, — il le reconnaissait d'emblée en 2007 — de la pollution atmosphérique et des émissions de gaz à effet de serre. »
M. Charest a dit: « En juin 2006, notre gouvernement a adopté son Plan de lutte aux changements climatiques. Ce plan a été salué comme l'un des meilleurs en Amérique du Nord. Avec la contribution financière du gouvernement fédérale à cet effort québécois, nous pourrons atteindre nos objectifs. »
C'est M. Charest qui a dit cela en 2007, lors d'une conférence de presse tenue avec le premier ministre.
Je continue la lecture du communiqué de presse conjoint des deux gouvernements: « Grâce au financement fédéral, le gouvernement du Québec a indiqué qu'il sera en mesure de réduire de 13,8 millions de tonnes de dioxyde de carbone ou de substances équivalentes les émissions de gaz à effet de serre, soit en dessous des niveaux prévus pour 2012. »
En outre, l'écoFiducie de 1,5 milliard de dollars qui devait s'appliquer et qui s'est appliquée à toutes les provinces prévoyait 339 millions de dollars juste pour le Québec. Cela allait permettre au Québec de faire tout ce que je vais énumérer: des investissements destinés à faciliter l'accès à de nouvelles technologies dans le secteur du camionnage; un programme visant à trouver de nouvelles sources d'énergie renouvelable dans les régions rurales; une usine pilote de fabrication d'éthanol à partir de matières cellulosiques; la promotion de pompes géothermiques dans le secteur résidentiel; l'appui à la recherche technologique et à l'innovation pour la réduction et la séquestration des gaz à effet de serre — c'est probablement un de ces programmes qui nous aident à avoir des sables bitumineux de plus en plus proenvironnmentaux parce qu'on capte le carbone qui est issu de la transformation des sables vers le pétrole. Il y a également des mesures destinées à promouvoir le captage de la biomasse provenant des sites d'enfouissement, des mesures destinées à favoriser la récupération des déchets traités et de l'énergie et finalement l'ÉcoFiducie du Canada.
J'invite les collègues libéraux à écouter ce que je vais dire. M. Steven Guilbeault de Greenpeace a dit en 2007: « Nous sommes heureux de constater qu'après plus d'une année de négociation, Québec a finalement obtenu les sommes qui lui permettront de se rapprocher davantage des objectifs de Kyoto. »
Qui a permis au Québec de se rapprocher de ces objectifs de Kyoto? C'est le gouvernement de M. Harper, un gouvernement conservateur qui a créé l'écoFiducie en 2007 de 1,5 milliard de dollars provenant d'un budget basé sur des surplus budgétaires.
Non seulement nous avions un plan pour atteindre les cibles que nous avions mises en avant, mais c'était un plan qui ne s'appliquait pas sans le consentement des provinces. C'était un plan qui prenait des surplus budgétaires, qui ne taxait pas davantage les Canadiens et qui envoyait de l'argent directement, sans aucune condition, mis à part la condition fondamentale de contribuer à réduire les changements climatiques, qui était quand même philosophiquement importante. Toutes les mesures pour y arriver étaient laissées complètement à la discrétion des provinces.
M. Harper, comme un bon conservateur décentralisateur, un vrai leader fédéraliste, a dit qu'il donnait 400 millions de dollars à chaque province pour qu'elle mette en oeuvre son projet.
En 2015, après 10 ans de gouverne conservatrice, on a constaté qu'on avait non seulement passé à travers la pire crise économique, la pire récession de l'histoire depuis les années 1930, mais qu'on avait aussi réduit les émissions de gaz à effet de serre de 2 % et augmenté le produit intérieur brut pour tous les Canadiens, tout en baissant la TPS de trois points et les impôts de 2 000 $ en moyenne, par année, pour une famille ayant deux enfants.
Si cela n'est pas du fédéralisme coopératif, si ce ne sont pas des résultats tangibles, si cela n'est pas un plan environnemental concret, je me demande ce que c'est. C'est sans parler du fait que nous avions un minimum de 25 à 35 projets législatifs qui passaient sous le sceau de la reine à chaque session.
Cette session-ci, à part les scandales de la taxe sur le carbone, les passages illégaux, le projet de Trans Mountain — tous des enjeux qui se présentent au gouvernement contre son propre désir — les libéraux ont à peine mis en avant quatre projets de loi véritablement importants.
Bref, on a agrandi les parcs et on a protégé les terres humides du Canada. On a un bilan exceptionnel en matière d'environnement.
En outre, nous, on permettait les débats. Par exemple, quand on a fait le débat sur le projet de loi C-23, qui concernait les réformes électorales, on a débattu pendant quatre jours. La réforme électorale des libéraux, quant à elle, a été débattue pendant deux heures.
Je suis attristé, mais content de débattre jusqu'à minuit, parce que c'est ma grande passion.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-03-20 13:16 [p.17726]
Madam Speaker, I thank my colleague for his speech in defence of Quebec's interests. In mine, I will defend the interests of all Canadians, but I understand his objective.
In his opinion, are we now more than ever dealing with an excessively centralizing Liberal government that has no respect for provincial jurisdictions? It almost seems as if the government sees the country as its own unitary regime. For the Liberals, it is as if there is no federation, only a great leader who revels in his duties and who gives orders to the provinces.
Is that how my colleague reads the situation as well?
Madame la Présidente, je remercie mon collègue de son discours qui se portait à la défense des intérêts du Québec. Dans le mien, je défendrai les intérêts de tous les Canadiens, mais je comprends son objectif.
Selon son propre constat, est-ce qu'on fait face plus que jamais à un gouvernement libéral centralisateur au maximum et qui n'a aucun respect pour les compétences des provinces? On croirait presque que le gouvernement voit le pays comme son régime unitaire. Pour les libéraux, c'est comme s'il n'y avait pas de fédération, il y a un grand leader qui se complaît dans sa fonction et qui donne des directives aux provinces.
Est-ce que mon collègue a lui aussi une telle lecture de la situation?
Results: 1 - 4 of 4