Hansard
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 4 of 4
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-10-17 16:32 [p.22510]
Madam Speaker, I will be sharing my time with my very hon. colleague from Cariboo—Prince George, in northern B.C.
As usual, I want to say hello to the people of Beauport—Limoilou who are watching us live on CPAC. I know that many of them do watch us, because they tell me so when I go door to door. They tell me that they watched me the week before. I want to say hello to all of them.
Today's debate is a very important one, since we are talking about harassment and discrimination in the workplace. Some may be surprised to hear me say this, and I am no expert, but it seems to me that the Canada Labour Code does not apply to employees who work in MPs' offices on Parliament Hill. This means that the code would not apply to me or my employees. This is rather surprising, in 2018.
I want to quickly touch on last week, which I spent in my riding. You will see why. I hosted two economic round tables. The first round table was for the Beauport business network, which I created a year and a half ago. There are some 50 business owners in this network, who get together once a month to talk about business-related issues and priorities in the riding. On Friday morning, I also held a round table called “Conservatives are listening to Quebecers”. This round table was attended by social, community and business stakeholders, among others.
Yesterday I asked the Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour a question. After all, we are talking about workplaces here, with Bill C-65. I asked her if she was aware that we are in a crisis at the moment, especially in Quebec City, but all over Canada, because of the labour shortage. She made a mockery of it, saying that it was proof that the government has created so many jobs in Canada that businesses can no longer find workers. While that may be true from an objective, Socratic and rational standpoint, she is ignoring a real crisis situation that we are in.
I want to say one last thing before I get to the bill. At the two round tables I hosted, every time I visit businesses in my riding, in all my discussions with constituents and in all the correspondence I receive every day, to which I reply in writing every time, people mention the labour shortage. Some businesses have had to shut down in Beauport—Limoilou and others are scaling back operations, so I think it is very sad and upsetting that the Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour would make a mockery of my question. The people of Quebec City were not happy to see that on Twitter and Facebook.
Today we are talking about an important bill, the act to amend the Canada Labour Code regarding harassment and violence, the Parliamentary Employment and Staff Relations Act and the Budget Implementation Act, 2017, No. 1. It is clear that Conservatives, New Democrats, Liberals and all Canadians in general support the Liberal government's recently introduced bill. That is certainly not something I say every day, but when it is true, it must be acknowledged. With this important bill, even employees on Parliament Hill will benefit from guidelines and protection to keep them safe from sexual harassment, psychological harassment and every kind of discriminatory behaviour in the workplace.
I can say that this affects us all. It could also affect our family, a cousin, a brother or sister and, in my case, it affects my children. My daughter Victoria is four years old and my son Winston is a year and a half. My daughter started kindergarten a few months ago. It is the first time she has attended school. We definitely do not want her to experience discrimination or harassment. It will inevitably happen because good and evil are part of life, and harassment and discrimination will always exist. That is why it is important to have laws that govern, try to control, eliminate or at least reduce this as much as possible in our society.
I would like to tell you that I have directly experienced discrimination and psychological harassment, but not sexual harassment, thank God. When I was in grade six, I moved from New Brunswick to Quebec. I can see my colleague laughing because he knows that I grew up in New Brunswick. I am from Quebec, but I grew up in New Brunswick. I moved to Quebec when I was in grade six. Children can be very brutal because they lack empathy and an understanding of the context in which they find themselves.
Kids are often oblivious to the harm they inflict on others. I got beaten up at recess every day for a year, so this is a subject I am not unfamiliar with. In my case, the situation made me stronger. Unfortunately, in other cases, it has ruined lives. What we want to avoid is situations where harassment and discrimination destroy lives. It is terrible to see a life completely destroyed after such an incident.
I want to reiterate that, setting politics aside and speaking from a human perspective, all members and all Canadians should support this bill. However, that does not mean there is no need to propose certain amendments, which I will discuss shortly.
The bill is meant to strengthen the workplace safety framework on Parliament Hill. When I think of all the young Canadians who work on the Hill, it makes me even more motivated to support this bill. The people working on the Hill are often young Canadians in their twenties who are full of hope, ambition and energy. They love politics, and they love Canada. They are proud to work for a minister, the Prime Minister, a shadow cabinet member or an MP. These young people arrive in Parliament full of energy and enthusiasm.
There is no denying that, throughout our country's history, members and ministers have behaved inappropriately or committed inappropriate acts, including sexual harassment, psychological harassment and discrimination.
Many of the young victims were surely brilliant, highly motivated and ambitious individuals. Perhaps they were even future Liberal, Conservative or NDP prime ministers, although unfortunately for them, that will never happen now. These were young people who were here for the right reasons, who were not cynical. A lot of young people in Canada are saying they have no use for politics, and that is unfortunate. Those young people should read books on Canadian history to understand what we are doing here today. Some young people have had the courage to get over their cynicism and come to this place, only to become victims of sexual or psychological harassment or discrimination. Careers have been destroyed in some cases, along with their hope and love for Canada. I find that appalling and very upsetting.
This bill sets out to fill a legal void. I would like to remind everyone that Parliament Hill was the only place where Canada Labour Code provisions on harassment and discrimination did not apply. There was a legal void, and it is important to acknowledge that that void played a part in destroying young Canadians who came here full of energy to help build a strong and thriving country on both national and international stages. Everyone wants a workplace that contributes to their quality of life, one where safety is important. Employees perform better in such workplaces.
Most of the Conservatives' amendments were accepted. We successfully introduced an amendment to prevent political interference during harassment investigations. The Conservatives played an active role in bringing the bill to this stage. We successfully introduced an amendment to ensure strict timelines for investigations into incidents of harassment. We proposed mandatory sexual harassment training, training that all MPs received. We proposed a mandatory review of the bill after five years because it needs to be reviewed at regular intervals, as my colleague said.
In closing, since this is Small Business Week, I want to say three cheers for business people. I thank the people of Beauport—Limoilou for the work they do every day. I think they are wonderful, and I look forward to seeing them when I go door to door.
Madame la Présidente, je tiens à dire que je partagerai mon temps de parole avec mon très honorable collègue de Cariboo—Prince George, dans le Nord de la Colombie-Britannique.
Comme d'habitude, j'aimerais d'emblée saluer tous les citoyens et les citoyennes de Beauport—Limoilou qui nous écoutent actuellement en direct sur CPAC. Je sais que plusieurs d'entre eux le font, parce que lorsque je fais du porte-à-porte, souvent, ils m'en font part. Ils m'informent du fait qu'ils m'ont écouté la semaine d'avant, notamment. Je les salue tous.
Le débat d'aujourd'hui est fort important, puisque nous parlons de harcèlement et de discrimination en milieu de travail. Peut-être que certains seront fort surpris de ce que je vais dire — et je ne suis pas un expert —, mais semble-t-il que le Code canadien du travail ne s'appliquait pas aux employés qui travaillent dans les bureaux de députés sur la Colline parlementaire. Donc, il ne s'appliquait pas à moi ni à mes employés. En 2018, on peut être assez surpris de cela.
J'aimerais revenir rapidement sur la semaine dernière, que j'ai passée dans ma circonscription. On comprendra pourquoi. J'ai tenu deux tables rondes économiques. La première était une table ronde économique du réseau des gens d'affaires de Beauport, un réseau que j'ai créé il y a un an et demi. Nous sommes une cinquantaine d'entrepreneurs et nous nous regroupons une fois par mois pour discuter des enjeux et des priorités entrepreneuriales dans la circonscription. Également, j'ai tenu vendredi matin une table ronde intitulée « Les conservateurs à l'écoute des Québécois ». Encore une fois, cela regroupe des acteurs de différentes communautés, des acteurs sociaux, communautaires, entrepreneuriaux, etc.
Hier, j'ai posé une question à la ministre de l’Emploi, du Développement de la main-d'œuvre et du Travail. Justement, on parle de lieux de travail dans le projet de loi C-65. Je lui ai demandé si elle savait qu'il y a une crise en ce moment, tout particulièrement dans la ville de Québec, mais partout au Canada, à cause de la pénurie de main-d'oeuvre. Elle a tourné cela à la dérision en disant que c'était la preuve que le gouvernement avait créé tellement d'emplois au Canada que les entreprises ne pouvaient plus trouver d'employés. Même si d'un point de vue objectif, socratique et rationnel, c'est vrai de dire cela, elle fait fi d'une vraie crise qui sévit actuellement.
Je vais dire une dernière une chose avant d'en arriver au projet de loi. Dans les deux tables rondes que j'ai tenues, dans toutes les visites d'entreprises que je fais dans ma circonscription, dans toutes mes discussions avec les citoyens et dans toutes les correspondances que je reçois chaque jour, et auxquelles je réponds par écrit chaque fois, les gens me parlent de pénurie de main-d'oeuvre. Des entreprises ferment leurs portes déjà à Beauport—Limoilou, et d'autres ralentissent leurs activités. Je suis donc très désolé et attristé que la ministre de l’Emploi, du Développement de la main-d'œuvre et du Travail ait tourné ma question en dérision. Les gens de Québec ne sont pas contents de voir cela sur Twitter et Facebook.
Nous discutons aujourd'hui d'un projet de loi important, la Loi modifiant le Code canadien du travail relativement au harcèlement et à la violence, la Loi sur les relations de travail au Parlement et la Loi no 1 d'exécution du budget de 2017. Il ne fait aucun doute que les conservateurs, les néo-démocrates, les libéraux et tous les Canadiens en général appuient ce projet de loi quand même juste présenté par le gouvernement libéral. C'est rare que je dis cela, mais quand c'est le cas, il faut le reconnaître. Ce projet de loi important vise à faire que même les employés de la Colline parlementaire bénéficient de balises et de protections qui les sécurisent dans leur environnement de travail en ce qui a trait au harcèlement sexuel, au harcèlement psychologique et à des comportements de discriminations de toutes sortes.
Je peux dire que cela nous touche tous. Cela peut aussi toucher notre famille, un cousin ou une cousine, un frère ou une soeur, et, dans mon cas, cela touche mes enfants. Ma fille Victoria a quatre ans et mon fils Winston a un an et demi. Ma fille est à la pré-maternelle déjà depuis quelques mois. C'est la première fois que ma fille vit un contexte scolaire. C'est sûr que nous ne voulons pas qu'elle vive un contexte de discrimination et de harcèlement. Cela va sûrement arriver tout de même, parce que, comme le mal et le bien font partie intégrante de la vie sur terre, le harcèlement et la discrimination existeront toujours. Voilà pourquoi c'est important d'avoir des lois qui régissent, qui tentent d'encadrer, de faire disparaître ou, du moins, de diminuer cela le plus possible dans notre société.
J'aimerais dire que moi-même, j'ai expérimenté de très proche la discrimination et le harcèlement psychologique, mais pas le harcèlement sexuel, Dieu merci. En sixième année, j'ai déménagé du Nouveau-Brunswick au Québec. Je vois mon collègue qui rigole, parce qu'il sait que j'ai grandi au Nouveau-Brunswick. Je viens du Québec, mais j'ai grandi au Nouveau-Brunswick, et je suis arrivé au Québec en sixième année. Les enfants peuvent être très violents, parce qu'ils manquent d'empathie et de compréhension du contexte dans lequel ils se situent.
Les enfants n'ont souvent pas conscience du mal qu'ils font à autrui. Pendant un an, j'ai été battu tous les jours dans la cour de récréation. Ce n'est donc pas quelque chose qui m'est inconnu. Dans mon cas, la situation m'a rendu plus fort. Malheureusement, dans d'autres cas, cela a détruit des vies. Ce que l'on veut éviter, c'est que le harcèlement et la discrimination détruisent des vies. C'est terrible de voir qu'une vie est complètement détruite à la suite d'un tel événement.
Je tiens à réitérer le fait que, d'un point de vue humain et au-delà de la politique, tous les députés et tous les Canadiens devraient appuyer le projet de loi. Par contre, cela ne veut pas dire qu'on ne voit pas la nécessité de proposer certains amendements. Je vais en parler bientôt.
Le projet de loi vise à renforcer les balises de la sécurité au travail sur la Colline du Parlement. Quand je pense à tous les jeunes Canadiens qui travaillent sur la Colline, j'ai encore plus envie d'appuyer ce projet de loi. Les gens qui travaillent sur la Colline sont souvent des jeunes Canadiens âgés d'une vingtaine d'années qui sont pleins d'espoir, d'ambition et d'énergie, qui aiment la politique et qui aiment le Canada. Ils sont fiers de travailler pour un ministre, pour le premier ministre, pour un membre du cabinet fantôme ou pour un député. Ces jeunes arrivent au Parlement pleins de vigueur et d'énergie.
Il ne faut pas nier que, dans l'histoire de notre pays, des députés et des ministres ont eu des comportements inappropriés ou ont posé des gestes inappropriés, qu'il s'agisse de harcèlement sexuel, de harcèlement psychologique ou de discrimination.
Parmi les jeunes qui ont vécu cela, plusieurs étaient brillants, extrêmement motivés et ambitieux. Ils étaient peut-être des futurs premiers ministres libéral, conservateur ou néo-démocrate — bien que cela ne soit jamais arrivé, malheureusement pour eux. Ce sont des jeunes qui étaient ici pour les bonnes raisons, et ils n'étaient pas cyniques. Au Canada, il y a beaucoup de jeunes qui disent que la politique ne sert à rien, et cela est dommage. Ces jeunes devraient lire des livres sur l'histoire du Canada pour comprendre ce que nous faisons ici aujourd'hui. Certains jeunes ont eu le courage de ne pas être cyniques et de venir ici, mais ils ont été victimes de harcèlement sexuel ou psychologique et de discrimination. Dans certains cas, on a détruit leur carrière, leur espoir et leur amour envers le pays. Cela est épouvantable et m'attriste énormément.
Ce projet de loi vise à rectifier un vide juridique. J'aimerais rappeler que la Colline du Parlement était le seul endroit où les dispositions du Code canadien du travail concernant le harcèlement et la discrimination ne s'appliquaient pas. Il y avait donc un vide juridique. Il est d'autant plus important de constater que ce vide juridique contribuait à détruire des jeunes Canadiens qui arrivaient ici pleins d'énergie afin de continuer à construire un pays fort et épanoui, à la fois au niveau national et international. Bien entendu, chacun veut un milieu de travail qui permet d'avoir une qualité de vie et où la sécurité est importante, puisque cela permet d'être plus performant.
La plupart des amendements proposés par les conservateurs ont été acceptés. Nous avons présenté avec succès un amendement visant à éviter l'ingérence politique pendant les enquêtes sur les incidences du harcèlement. Les conservateurs ont donc participé activement à la mise en oeuvre du projet de loi. Nous avons présenté avec succès un amendement pour nous assurer que les délais imposés pour les enquêtes sur les incidences du harcèlement sont stricts. Nous avons proposé une formation obligatoire sur le harcèlement sexuel, une formation que tous les députés ont suivie. Nous avons proposé l'examen obligatoire du projet de loi après cinq ans, puisqu'il doit constamment être revu, comme ma collègue l'a spécifié.
En terminant, vive les entrepreneurs, puisque c'est la semaine de la PME. Je remercie les citoyens et les citoyennes de Beauport—Limoilou du travail qu'ils font tous les jours. Je les adore, et on se verra lors du porte-à-porte.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-05-04 12:42 [p.19136]
Mr. Speaker, it is always an honour to speak in the House of Commons.
On a more serious note, I would like to take a moment to talk about my colleague from Leeds—Grenville—Thousand Islands and Rideau Lakes, who passed away very suddenly this week. I never imagined this could happen. I share his family's sorrow, though of course mine could never equal theirs. His young children will not get to share amazing moments in their lives with their father, and that is staggeringly sad. I would therefore like to publicly state that I encourage them to hang in there. One day, they will surely find joy in living again, and we are here for them.
As usual, I want to say acknowledge all of the residents of Beauport—Limoilou who are tuning in. I would like to let them know that there will be a press conference Monday morning at my office. I will be announcing a very important initiative for our riding. I urge them to watch the news or read the paper when the time comes.
Bill C-48 would essentially enact a moratorium on the entire Pacific coast. It would apply from Prince Rupert, a fascinating city that I visited in 2004 at the age of 18, to Port Hardy, at the northern tip of Vancouver Island. This moratorium is designed to prevent oil tankers, including Canadian ones, that transport more than 12,500 tons of oil from accessing Canada's inland waters, and therefore our ports.
This moratorium will prohibit the construction of any pipeline project or maritime port beyond Port Hardy, on the northern tip of Vancouver Island, to export our products to the west. In the past three weeks, the Liberal government has slowly but surely been trying to put an end to Canada's natural resources, and oil in particular. Northern Gateway is just one example.
The first thing the Liberals did when they came to power was to amend the environmental assessment process managed by the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency; they even brag about it. Northern Gateway was in the process of being accepted, but as a result of these amendments, the project was cancelled, even though the amendments were based on the cabinet's political agenda and not on scientific facts, as the Liberal government claims.
When I look at Bill C-48, which would enact a moratorium on oil tankers in western Canada, it seems clear to me that the Liberals had surely been planning to block the Northern Gateway project for a while. Their argument that the project did not clear the environmental assessment is invalid, since they are now imposing a moratorium that would have prevented this project from moving forward regardless.
The Prime Minister and member for Papineau has said Canada needs to phase out the oil sands. Not only did he say that during the campaign, but he said it again in Paris, before the French National Assembly, in front of about 300 members of the Macron government, who were all happy to hear it. I can guarantee my colleagues that Canadians were not happy to hear that, especially people living in Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta who benefit economically from this natural resource. Through their hard work, all Canadians benefit from the incredible revenues and spinoffs generated by that industry.
My colleague from Prince Albert gave an exceptional speech this morning. He compassionately explained how hard it has been for families in Saskatchewan to accept and understand the decisions being made one after the other by this Liberal government. The government seems to be sending a message that is crystal clear: it does not support western Canada's natural resources, namely oil and natural gas. What is important to understand, however, is that this sector represents roughly 60% the economy of the western provinces and 40% of Canada's entire economy.
I can see why the Minister of Environment and Climate Change says we need to tackle climate change first. The way she talks to us every day is so arrogant. We believe in climate change. That is not the issue. Climate change and natural resources are complex issues, and we must not forget the backdrop to this whole debate. People are suffering because they need to put food on the table. Nothing has changed since the days of Cro-Magnon man. People have to eat every day. People have to find ways to survive.
When the Liberals go on about how to save the planet and the polar bears, that is their post-modern, post-materialist ideology talking. Conservatives, in contrast, talk about how to help families get through the day. That is what the Canadian government's true priority should be.
Is it not completely absurd that even now, in 2018, most of the gas people buy in the Atlantic provinces, Quebec, and Ontario comes from Venezuela and Saudi Arabia even though we have one of the largest oil reserves in the world? Canada has the third-largest oil reserve in the world, in fact. That is not even counting the Arctic Ocean, of which we own a sizeable chunk and which has not yet been explored. Canada has tremendous potential in this sector.
As I have often told many of my Marxist-Leninist, leftist, and other colleagues, the price of oil is going to continue to rise dramatically until 2065 because of China's and India's fuel consumption. Should Canada say no to $1 trillion in economic spinoffs until then? Absolutely not.
How will we afford to pay for our hospitals, our schools, and our social services that are so dear to the left-wing advocates of the welfare state in Canada? As I said, the priority is to meet the needs of Canadians and Canada, a middle power that I adore.
To get back to the point I was making, as my colleague from Prince Albert said, the decision regarding Bill C-48 and the moratorium was made by cabinet, without any consultation or any study by a parliamentary committee. Day after day, the Liberals brag about being the government that has consulted more with Canadians over the past three years than any government in history. It is always about history with them.
The moratorium will have serious consequences for Canada's prosperity and the economic development of the western provinces, which represent a growing segment of the population. How can the Liberals justify the fact that they failed to conduct any environmental or scientific impact assessments, hold any Canada-wide consultations, or have a committee examine this issue? They did not even consult with the nine indigenous nations that live on the land covered by the moratorium. The NDP ought to be alarmed about that. That is the point I really want to talk about.
I have here a legal complaint filed with the B.C. Supreme Court by the Lax Kw'alaams first nation—I am sorry if I pronounced that wrong—represented by John Helin. The plaintiffs are the indigenous peoples living in the region covered by the moratorium. Only nine indigenous nations from that region are among the plaintiffs. The defendant is the Government of British Columbia.
The lawyer's argument is very interesting from a historical perspective.
The claim area includes and is adjacent to an open and safe deepwater shipping corridor and contains lands suitable for development as an energy corridor and protected deepwater ports for the development and operation of a maritime installation, as defined in Bill C-48, the oil tanker moratorium act.
“The plaintiffs' aboriginal title encompasses the right to choose to what uses the land can be put, including use as a marine installation subject only to justifiable environmental assessment and approval legislation.”
He continues:
The said action by Canada “discriminates against the plaintiffs by prohibiting the development of land...in an area that has one of the best deepwater ports and safest waterways in Canada, while permitting such development elsewhere”, such as in the St. Lawrence Gulf, the St. Lawrence River, and the Atlantic Ocean.
My point is quite simple. We have a legal argument here that shows that not only does the territory belong to the indigenous people and the indigenous people were not consulted, but that the indigenous people, whom the Liberals are said to love, are suing the Government of British Columbia. This will likely go all the way to the Supreme Court because this moratorium goes against their ancestral rights on their territory, which they want to develop for future oil exports. This government is doing a very poor job of this.
Monsieur le Président, c'est toujours un honneur de prendre la parole à la Chambre.
Sur un ton plus serein, j'aimerais prendre le temps de parler de mon collègue de Leeds—Grenville—Thousand Islands et Rideau Lakes, qui est mort cette semaine d'une façon extrêmement subite. Jamais je n'aurais cru que cela pourrait arriver. Je partage la tristesse de sa famille, même si la mienne ne peut être aussi profonde, bien sûr. Ses jeunes enfants ne pourront pas partager des moments incroyables de leur vie avec leur père, et c'est d'une tristesse ahurissante. Je voudrais donc dire publiquement que je les encourage à persévérer. Un jour, ils vont sûrement retrouver le goût de vivre, et nous sommes là pour les soutenir.
Comme d'habitude, j'aimerais saluer tous les citoyens de Beauport—Limoilou qui nous écoutent en grand nombre. Je voudrais leur dire que, lundi matin, il y aura une conférence de presse à mon bureau. J'y annoncerai une initiative très importante pour la circonscription. Je les invite donc à écouter la télévision et à lire les journaux au moment opportun.
Le projet de loi C-48 vise à appliquer un moratoire, ni plus ni moins, sur l'ensemble de la côte pacifique. Il s'appliquera de Prince Rupert, une ville intéressante que j'ai visitée en 2004, quand j'avais 18 ans, jusqu'à Port Hardy, au nord de l'île de Vancouver. Ce moratoire vise à empêcher tous les pétroliers de ce monde, y compris les pétroliers canadiens qui transportent au-delà de 12 500 tonnes de pétrole, d'accéder aux eaux intérieures et donc aux ports du Canada.
Ce moratoire empêchera la construction, au-delà de la ville de Port Hardy, au nord de l'île de Vancouver, de tout projet d'oléoduc ou de port maritime pour exporter nos produits vers l'Ouest. Depuis les trois dernières années, le gouvernement libéral tente de mettre fin, lentement mais sûrement, aux ressources naturelles canadiennes, s'agissant particulièrement du pétrole. On n'a qu'à penser au projet Northern Gateway.
La première chose que les libéraux ont faite lorsqu'ils sont arrivés au pouvoir — et ils s'en vantent — a été de modifier les processus d'évaluation environnementale régis par l'Agence canadienne d'évaluation environnementale, qui se penche sur les projets énergétiques au Canada. Northern Gateway était en voie d'être accepté, mais à cause de ces modifications, qui n'étaient pas basées sur des faits scientifiques, comme le gouvernement libéral le dit toujours, mais plutôt sur des visées politiques du Cabinet, il a été annulé.
Quand je regarde le projet de loi C-48, qui vise à établir un moratoire sur les pétroliers dans l'Ouest canadien, je me dis que les libéraux songeaient assurément depuis longtemps à barrer la route au projet Northern Gateway. Leur argument selon lequel celui-ci n'a pas passé le test de l'évaluation environnementale est caduc, puisqu'ils imposent maintenant un moratoire qui aurait empêché ce projet de voir le jour de toute manière.
Le premier ministre et député de Papineau a dit qu'il fallait éliminer progressivement les sables bitumineux. Non seulement il l'a dit lors des élections, mais il l'a redit à Paris, à l'Assemblée nationale française, devant environ 300 membres de la députation du président Macron, qui étaient bien contents de l'entendre. Je peux garantir à mes collègues que les Canadiens n'étaient pas contents de l'entendre, encore moins ceux qui vivent au Manitoba, en Saskatchewan et en Alberta et qui bénéficient des retombées des ressources naturelles du pétrole. Grâce à leur travail, tous les Canadiens bénéficient des redevances et des retombées incroyables liées à cette industrie.
Mon collègue de la circonscription de Prince Albert a fait un discours remarquable, ce matin. Il a expliqué avec compassion combien il était difficile pour les familles de la Saskatchewan d'accepter et de comprendre les décisions prises l'une après l'autre par le gouvernement libéral. Ce dernier semble envoyer un message clair comme de l'eau de roche: il est contre les ressources naturelles du pétrole et du gaz naturel dans l'Ouest canadien. Toutefois, ce qu'il faut comprendre, c'est que cela correspond à environ 60 % de l'économie des provinces de l'Ouest et à 40 % de l'économie du Canada dans son entièreté.
Je peux bien comprendre que la ministre de l'Environnement et du Changement climatique dit qu'il faut d'abord s'attaquer aux changements climatiques. D'ailleurs, jour après jour, la manière dont elle nous parle est tellement arrogante, parce que nous croyons aux changements climatiques, là n'est pas la question. Les changements climatiques et les ressources naturelles sont des enjeux complexes, et il ne faut jamais oublier qu'au coeur de ce litige des individus souffrent, car ils doivent mettre de la nourriture sur la table. Rien n'a changé depuis le temps de l'homme de Cro-Magnon: il faut manger tous les jours. C'est vrai, il faut vivre.
Les libéraux sont toujours dans une idéologie postmoderne, postmatérialiste où ils nous parlent de comment sauver la planète et les ours polaires. Cependant, nous, les conservateurs, parlons de comment faire en sorte qu'une famille puisse vivre sa journée. C'est cela qui est la vraie priorité d'un gouvernement canadien.
En outre, n'est-ce pas une absurdité totale de penser qu'encore aujourd'hui, en 2018, la majorité du pétrole consommé dans les provinces de l'Atlantique, ainsi qu'au Québec et en Ontario, provient du Venezuela et de l'Arabie saoudite, alors que nous avons parmi les plus grandes réserves de pétrole au monde? En effet, le Canada possède la troisième plus grande réserve de pétrole du monde. Et cela, c'est sans compter l'océan Arctique, dont nous possédons une bonne partie, et qui n'a pas encore été exploré. Le Canada a donc un énorme potentiel dans ce domaine.
Comme je le dis souvent à plusieurs de mes collègues marxistes-léninistes, gauchistes et autres, le prix du pétrole va continuer à augmenter de façon spectaculaire à cause de la consommation chinoise et indienne, jusqu'en 2065. Est-ce que le Canada devrait dire non à 1 000 milliards de dollars en retombées économiques d'ici 2065? Absolument pas.
Comment allons-nous payer nos hôpitaux, nos écoles et nos services sociaux qui sont si chers aux pourfendeurs de l'État providence de la gauche canadienne? Comme je l'ai dit, la priorité est de subvenir aux besoins des Canadiens et du Canada, en tant que puissance moyenne que j'adore.
Je dois absolument arriver au point dont je veux parler. Comme mon collègue de Prince Albert l'a dit, la décision concernant le projet de loi C-48 et le moratoire a été prise au Cabinet, sans consultation et sans étude par un comité parlementaire. Jour après jour, les libéraux se targuent d'être le gouvernement qui, dans l'histoire du Canada — c'est toujours historique avec eux —, a consulté le plus les Canadiens au cours des trois dernières années.
Le moratoire aura des conséquences draconiennes sur la prospérité du Canada et sur l'évolution économique des provinces de l'Ouest qui représentent de plus en plus une partie importante de la population canadienne. Comment les libéraux peuvent-ils justifier n'avoir fait aucune étude environnementale ou sur l'impact scientifique possible, aucune consultation pancanadienne et aucune étude par un comité? Ils n'ont même pas consulté les neuf nations autochtones qui vivent sur les territoires visés par le moratoire. Le NPD devrait s'alarmer de cela. C'est justement à cela que je veux arriver.
J'ai entre les mains une plainte légale déposée à la Cour suprême de la Colombie-Britannique par la Première Nation Lax Kw'alaams —  je m'excuse de la prononciation —, représentée par John Helin. Les plaintifs sont les Autochtones de la région où le moratoire s'applique. Seulement neuf des nations autochtones de cette région font partie des plaintifs. Le défendeur est le gouvernement de la Colombie-Britannique.
Ce que l'avocat démontre est fort intéressant d'un point de vue historique:
« La zone revendiquée comprend un couloir de navigation en eaux profondes ouvert et sûr et y est adjacente, et couvre des terres convenant à la mise en valeur d'un couloir de transport de l'énergie, ainsi que de ports en eaux profondes protégés pour la mise en valeur et l'exploitation d'une installation maritime telle que définie dans le projet de loi C-48, Loi sur le moratoire relatif aux pétroliers. »
« Le titre ancestral du plaignant comprend le droit de déterminer l'utilisation des terres, y compris pour y construire une installation maritime sujette à une évaluation environnementale justifiable et aux lois sur l'approbation. »
Il continue:
Ladite action intentée par le Canada « est discriminatoire à l'égard des plaignants en interdisant la mise en valeur des terres [...] dans une région où se trouvent l'un des meilleurs ports en eaux profondes et l'une des routes maritimes les plus sûres au Canada, tout en permettant la même mise en valeur ailleurs », comme dans le golfe du Saint-Laurent, le fleuve Saint-Laurent et l'océan Atlantique.
Mon argument est très simple. On a ici un argument légal: non seulement le territoire appartient au peuple autochtone et celui-ci n'a pas été consulté, mais les Autochtones, que les libéraux sont censés adorer, vont poursuivre le gouvernement de la Colombie-Britannique. Cela ira certainement jusqu'en Cour suprême, car le moratoire va à l'encontre de leurs droits ancestraux sur le territoire, alors qu'ils veulent exploiter celui-ci pour d'éventuelles exportations pétrolières. C'est un très mauvais travail de la part de ce gouvernement.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2017-09-20 15:57 [p.13285]
Madam Speaker, it is a beautiful contrast, because it is absurd.
My constituents are extremely unhappy. Just this morning, many of them contacted my office, saying that I had to ask questions about this, that I had to put pressure on the government, and that I had to ensure it changed on its mind on the issue of tax reform. They said that it was extremely bad for the economic well-being of their small and medium-sized enterprises. This party will do everything it has to do to stop the changes.
Madame la Présidente, c'est une très belle comparaison, car le contraste est absurde.
Les gens de ma circonscription sont très mécontents. Ce matin même, un grand nombre d'entre eux ont communiqué avec mon bureau pour demander que je pose des questions à ce sujet et que j'exerce des pressions sur le gouvernement pour qu'il se ravise sur la question de la réforme fiscale. Ils disent que cette mesure est extrêmement néfaste pour le bien-être économique de leurs petites et moyennes entreprises. Notre parti fera tout ce qu'il doit pour empêcher ces changements.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2016-12-06 13:40 [p.7714]
Mr. Speaker, I would like to congratulate my colleague for his great electoral victory. I have great confidence that he will serve his constituents with all his strength.
Our colleague was on the electoral trail just a few weeks ago. He had the chance to knock on doors, go to many events and organizations, and hear from his constituents. We all did that during the election. Now we might do it a bit less because we are always here.
As the member was there a few weeks ago, I would like him to tell us what was the most common criticism that always came back again and again against the current government from his constituents.
Monsieur le Président, je tiens à féliciter mon collègue pour sa grande victoire électorale. Je suis convaincu qu'il fera profiter les électeurs de sa circonscription de son dynamisme.
Notre collègue faisait encore campagne il y a quelques semaines à peine. Il a eu la chance de faire du porte-à-porte, d'assister à diverses activités, de se rendre dans les locaux de toutes sortes d'organismes et de prendre le pouls de l'électorat, comme nous l'avons tous fait pendant la campagne électorale, mais que nous faisons un peu moins souvent dorénavant, puisque nous sommes toujours ici.
Comme c'est encore tout frais à la mémoire du député, j'aimerais qu'il nous indique quelles critiques à l'endroit du gouvernement revenaient le plus souvent dans ses conversations avec les électeurs de sa circonscription.
Results: 1 - 4 of 4

Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data