Interventions in the House of Commons
 
 
 
RSS feed based on search criteria Export search results - CSV (plain text) Export search results - XML
Add search criteria
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-06-12 18:20 [p.29026]
Madam Speaker, it gives me great pleasure to rise in the House. As usual, I want to say hello to all the residents of Beauport—Limoilou who are watching right now. I had the honour of meeting thousands of them last weekend at the Grand bazar du Vieux-Limoilou, where I had a booth, as the local member of Parliament. It was a fantastic outdoor party, and the weather co-operated beautifully.
Before I discuss the motion, I just want the people of Beauport—Limoilou to know that we will have plenty of opportunities to meet this summer at all the events and festivals being held in Beauport and Limoilou. As usual, I will be holding my annual summer party in August, where thousands of people come to meet me. We often eat hot dogs, chips and popcorn from Île d'Orléans together. It is a chance for me to get to know my constituents, talk about the issues affecting the riding, and share information about the services that my office can provide to Canadians dealing with the federal government.
I also want to say that this may be the last speech I give in the House during the 42nd Parliament. It was a huge honour to be here, and I hope to again have that honour after election day, October 21.
I plan to run in the upcoming election and I hope to represent my constituents for a long time to come. I am extremely proud of the work I have done over the past four years, including the work I did in my riding, on my portfolio, Canada's official languages, and during debates.
I am asking my constituents to do me a favour and put their trust in me for another four years. I will be here every day to serve them.
Today we are debating Motion No. 227, a Liberal motion to conduct a study in committee. It is commendable to do a study at the Standing Committee on Human Resources, Skills and Social Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities. This is a very important House of Commons committee. A Liberal Party MP is proposing to conduct a study on labour shortages in the skilled trades in Canada.
As soon as I saw that I wanted to say a few words about this motion. Whether it be in Quebec City, Regina, Nanaimo, or elsewhere in Canada, there is a crisis right now. The labour shortage will affect us quite quickly.
We have heard that, a few years from now, the greater Quebec City area will need an additional 150,000 workers. This remarkable shortage will be the result of baby boomers retiring. Baby boomers, including my parents, will enjoy a well-deserved retirement. This is a very important issue, and we must address it.
I would like to remind the House that, in January, February and March, I asked the Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour about the serious labour shortage problem in Canada. Each time, she made a mockery of my question by saying that the Liberals had created 600,000 new jobs. Today, they say one million.
I am glad that this motion was moved, but it is more or less an exercise in virtue signalling. Actually, it is more of an exercise in public communications, although I am not questioning my colleague's sincere wish to look into the issue. In six or seven days, the 42nd Parliament will be dissolved. Well, the House will adjourn. Parliament will be dissolved in a few months, before the election.
My colleague's committee will not be able to study the motion. My colleagues and I on the Standing Committee on Official Languages are finishing our study of the modernization of the Official Languages Act. We decided that we would finalize our recommendations tomorrow at noon, to ensure that we are able to table the report from the Standing Committee on Official Languages in the House.
In essence, this is a public communications exercise, since the committee will not be able to study the issue. However, I think it would be good to talk about the labour shortages in the skilled trades with the Canadians who are watching us. What are skilled trades? We are talking about hairdressers, landscapers, cabinetmakers, electricians, machinists, mechanics, and crane or other equipment operators. Skilled trades also include painters, plumbers, welders and technicians.
I will explain why the labour shortage in the skilled trades is worrisome. When people take a good look around they soon realize that these trades are very important. Skilled tradespeople build everything around us, such as highways, overpasses, waterworks, subways, transportation systems like the future Quebec streetcar line that we have talked about a lot lately, the railroads that cross the country, skyscrapers in major cities like Montreal, Toronto and Vancouver, factories in rural areas, tractors, equipment and the canals of the St. Lawrence Seaway, which were built in the 1950s.
China, India and the United States are making huge investments in infrastructure. For example, in recent years, the U.S. government did not flinch at investing $5 billion to improve the infrastructure of the Port of New York and New Jersey, which was built by men and women in the trades. In Quebec, we are still waiting for the Liberals to approve a small $60-million envelope for the Beauport 2020 project, now called the Laurentia project, which will ensure the shipping competitiveness of the St. Lawrence for years to come.
There has been a lack of infrastructure investment in Canada. The Liberals like to say that their infrastructure Canada plan is historic, but only $14 billion of the $190 billion announced have actually been allocated. That is not all. Even if the Liberals were releasing the funds and making massive investments to surpass other G20 and G7 countries, the world's largest economies, they would not be able to deliver on their incredible projects without skilled labour. Consider this: even Nigeria, with a population of 200 million, is catching up with us when it comes to infrastructure investments.
It is about time that we, as legislators, dealt with this issue, but clearly that is not what the Liberals have been doing over the past few years, although I have heard some members talk about a few initiatives here and there in some provinces. The announcement of this study is late in coming.
I would also remind the House that this is a provincial jurisdiction, given that provincial regulations govern the training of skilled workers. That said, the federal government can still be helpful by implementing various measures through federal transfers, such as apprenticeship grants and loans, tax credits and job training programs. This all requires a smooth, harmonious relationship between the provinces and the federal government. Not only do the political players have to get along well, but so do the politicians themselves.
If, God forbid, the Liberals get another four-year term in office, taxes will increase dramatically, since they will want to make up for the huge deficits they racked up over the past four years. In 2016, they imposed conditions on health transfers. Then, they rushed ahead with the legalization of marijuana even though the provinces wanted more time. Then, they imposed the carbon tax on provinces like New Brunswick, which had already closed a number of coal-fired plants and significantly reduced its greenhouse gas emissions. The Liberals said that they still considered the province to be an offender and imposed the Liberal carbon tax. Finally, today, they are rushing through the study of Bill C-69, which seeks to implement regulations that are far too rigid and that will interfere with the development of natural resources in various provinces, even though six premiers have stated that this bill will stifle their local economies.
How can we hope that this government will collaborate to come to an agreement seeking to address skilled trades shortages when it has such a poor track record on intergovernmental relations?
Madame la Présidente, je suis très heureux de prendre la parole à la Chambre. Comme d’habitude, j’aimerais saluer tous les citoyens et les citoyennes de Beauport—Limoilou qui nous écoutent présentement. Nous avons eu l’honneur de nous rencontrer, par milliers, en fin de semaine, au Grand bazar du Vieux-Limoilou, où j'avais un kiosque, en tant que député. C’était une très belle fête à l’extérieur, et le beau temps était présent.
Avant de discuter de la motion, j’aimerais dire aux citoyens de Beauport—Limoilou que nous pourrons nous rencontrer tout au long de l'été, lors des activités ou des festivals qui se tiendront à Beauport ou à Limoilou. Comme chaque année, je vais tenir, au mois d’août, la Fête de l’été du député, où plusieurs milliers de personnes viennent me rencontrer. Souvent, nous dégustons ensemble des hot dogs, des croustilles et du blé d’Inde de l’île d’Orléans. C’est pour nous une chance de nous rencontrer, de discuter des enjeux de la circonscription et de faire part des services que mon bureau peut donner en ce qui a trait au gouvernement fédéral.
J’aimerais dire qu'il s'agit peut-être du dernier discours que je prononcerai à la Chambre lors de la 42e législature. Ce fut un honneur incroyable d'être ici, et je voudrais voir cet honneur renouvelé le 21 octobre prochain, le jour de l'élection.
J’ai l’intention de présenter ma candidature lors des prochaines élections, et j'espère représenter mes concitoyens encore très longtemps. Je suis extrêmement fier du travail que j’ai fait au cours des quatre dernières années, que ce soit le travail que j'ai fait dans ma circonscription, le travail relatif à mon portefeuille, les langues officielles du Canada, ou le travail que j'ai fait lors des débats.
Je demande donc à mes concitoyens de me faire une faveur, soit celle de me faire confiance pour quatre autres années. Je serai présent tous les jours pour les servir.
Aujourd’hui, nous débattons de la motion M-227, une tentative libérale visant à faire une étude en comité. C’est quand même louable de faire une étude au Comité permanent des ressources humaines, du développement des compétences, du développement social et de la condition des personnes handicapées. Il s'agit d'un comité fort important de la Chambre des communes. Un député du Parti libéral propose de mener une étude sur la pénurie de main-d’œuvre relative aux métiers spécialisés au Canada.
Dès que j’ai vu cela, j’ai voulu parler un peu de cette motion. Que ce soit à Québec, à Regina, à Nanaimo ou ailleurs au Canada, il y a une crise en ce moment. La pénurie de main-d’œuvre nous touchera assez rapidement.
On dit que, d’ici quelques années, il manquera 150 000 travailleurs dans la grande région de Québec. Cela est dû à un phénomène assez incroyable: les baby-boomers ont pris leur retraite. En effet, les baby-boomers, y compris mes parents, partent à la retraite, une retraite bien méritée. C’est donc un enjeu très important, et il faut s’y attarder.
D’ailleurs, j’aimerais rappeler que, en janvier, en février et en mars, j’ai posé quelques questions à la ministre de l’Emploi, du Développement de la main-d’œuvre et du Travail. Je lui disais qu’il y avait un grave problème de pénurie de main-d’œuvre au Canada. Chaque fois, elle tournait ma question en dérision en disant que les libéraux avaient créé 600 000 emplois. Aujourd’hui, ils disent en avoir créé 1 million.
Je suis content que la motion ait été déposée, mais il s'agit davantage d'un geste vertueux que d’autre chose. En fait, il s'agit davantage d'un exercice public de communication, bien que je ne remette pas en question le fait que mon collègue souhaite vraiment aborder le problème. Dans six ou sept jours, la 42e législature sera dissoute. En fait, la Chambre va s'ajourner. Pour ce qui est de la dissolution, elle aura lieu dans quelques mois, lors des élections.
Le comité auquel siège mon collègue ne pourra pas faire l'étude de la motion. Nous, les députés qui siégeons au Comité permanent des langues officielles, terminons notre étude sur la modernisation de la Loi sur les langues officielles. Nous nous sommes dit que nous terminerions nos recommandations demain, à midi, pour nous assurer de pouvoir déposer à la Chambre le rapport du Comité permanent des langues officielles.
Bref, il s'agit d'un exercice de communication publique, car le comité ne pourra pas se pencher sur la question. Toutefois, je trouve que ce serait bien de parler de la pénurie de main-d’œuvre relative aux métiers spécialisés aux Canadiens qui nous écoutent. Que sont les métiers spécialisés? Il s’agit du coiffeur, du paysagiste, de l’ébéniste, de l’électricien, du machiniste, du mécanicien, de l’opérateur d’équipement, comme les grues. Ce dernier est un emploi incroyable. Ce n’est pas facile d'obtenir un emploi d’opérateur de grue. Il s'agit aussi du peintre, du plombier, du soudeur et du technicien.
Je vais expliquer pourquoi la pénurie de main-d’œuvre dans les métiers spécialisés est inquiétante. Si les citoyens regardent autour d'eux, ils réaliseront que ces métiers sont essentiels. Ce sont ces travailleurs qui font tout ce qui nous entoure: les autoroutes, les viaducs, les aqueducs, les métros, les réseaux de transport structurants, comme le futur tramway de Québec, dont nous parlons beaucoup dernièrement, les chemins de fer qui traversent le pays, les gratte-ciels dans les grandes villes comme Montréal, Toronto et Vancouver, les usines en région rurale, les tracteurs, les machines, les canaux de la voie maritime du Saint-Laurent, qui ont été construits dans les années 1950, etc.
En Chine, en Inde et aux États-Unis, les investissements en infrastructure sont énormes. Par exemple, dans les dernières années, le gouvernement américain n'a pas rechigné une seconde à investir 5 milliards de dollars pour améliorer les infrastructures du port de New York et du New Jersey, qui a été construit par des hommes et des femmes des corps de métiers spécialisés. De notre côté, à Québec, nous attendons toujours que les libéraux confirment une petite enveloppe de 60 millions de dollars pour le projet Beauport 2020, qui s'appelle aujourd'hui le projet Laurentia et qui vise à assurer la compétitivité maritime du fleuve Saint-Laurent dans les années à venir.
Il y a donc un manque d'investissement dans les infrastructures canadiennes. Les libéraux aiment dire que le projet d'Infrastructure Canada est historique, mais seulement 14 milliards des 190 milliards de dollars annoncés ont été dégagés. Cependant, ce n'est pas tout. Même si les libéraux débloquaient l'argent et faisaient des investissements massifs pour dépasser les autres pays du G20 et du G7, les grandes économies mondiales, ils ne pourraient pas concrétiser leurs projets incroyables sans main-d’œuvre spécialisée. D'ailleurs, au chapitre des investissements en infrastructure, même le Nigeria, qui a 200 millions d'habitants, est en train de nous rattraper.
Il est donc temps que nous, les législateurs, nous attardions à cette question, mais de toute évidence, ce n'est pas ce que les libéraux ont fait au cours des dernières années, même si j'ai entendu parler de certaines mesures saupoudrées d'une province à l'autre. L'annonce de cette étude est tardive.
Par ailleurs, rappelons que cette question relève de la compétence provinciale, puisque c'est la réglementation provinciale qui encadre la formation de la main-d’œuvre spécialisée. Cela dit, le gouvernement fédéral peut quand même être utile en mettant en place différentes mesures par l'entremise des transferts fédéraux, comme des subventions et des prêts aux apprentis, des crédits d'impôt et des programmes de formation de la main-d’œuvre. Tout cela nécessite une relation harmonieuse entre les provinces et le gouvernement fédéral. Non seulement les acteurs politiques doivent bien s'entendre, mais les politiciens eux-mêmes aussi.
Si, par grand malheur, les libéraux obtiennent un autre mandat de quatre ans, les impôts et les taxes vont augmenter considérablement, puisqu'ils voudront combler les grands déficits qu'ils ont accumulés depuis quatre ans. En 2016, ils ont imposé des conditions concernant les transferts en santé. Ensuite, ils ont précipité la légalisation de la marijuana, alors que les provinces voulaient plus de temps. Puis, ils ont imposé la taxe sur le carbone à des provinces comme le Nouveau-Brunswick, qui avait fermé plusieurs centrales au charbon et qui avait réduit ses émissions de gaz à effet de serre substantiellement. Les libéraux lui ont dit qu'ils le considéraient toujours comme un délinquant et qu'il lui imposait la taxe libérale sur le carbone. Finalement, aujourd'hui, ils précipitent l'étude du projet de loi C-69, qui vise à mettre en œuvre une réglementation beaucoup trop rigide qui empêchera l'exploitation des ressources naturelles dans différentes provinces, alors que six premiers ministres ont affirmé que cela suffoquerait leur économie locale.
Comment peut-on espérer que ce gouvernement collabore pour arriver à une entente afin de pallier la pénurie de main-d'œuvre dans les métiers spécialisés, lorsqu'on constate que son bilan en matière de relations intergouvernementales est complètement médiocre?
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-11-06 16:04 [p.23347]
Mr. Speaker, I am very pleased to rise. As usual, I would like to say hello to the many people of Beauport—Limoilou who are watching us live on CPAC or on platforms such as Facebook and Twitter later.
I would like to comment on the speech by the Minister of Status of Women. I found it somewhat hypocritical when she said that she hopes her opposition colleagues will support the bill and the budget's feminist measures, which she presented, when the Liberals actually and strategically included all these measures in an omnibus bill, the 2018 budget implementation bill. Clearly, we, the Conservatives, will not vote in favour of Bill C-86 because it once again presents a deficit budget that is devastating for Canada's economy and for Canadian taxpayers. It is somewhat hypocritical for the minister to tell us that she hopes we will support the measures to give women more power when she herself was involved in hiding these measures in an omnibus bill.
I would like say, as I often say, that it is a privilege for me to speak today, but not for the same reason this time. I might have been denied the opportunity to speak to Bill C-86 because this morning, the Liberal government imposed closure on the House. It imposed time allocation on the speeches on the budget. This is the first time in three years that I am seeing this in the House. Since 2015, we have had three budget presentations. This is the sixth time we are debating a budget since 2015 during this 42nd Parliament. This is the first time I have seen the majority of my Conservative colleagues and the majority of my NDP colleagues being denied speaking time to discuss something as important as Bill C-86 to implement budgetary measures. The budget implementation legislation is what formalizes the budget the government brought down in February. Implementation is done in two phases. This is the second phase and it implements the Liberal government's budget.
By chance, I have the opportunity to speak about the budget today and I want to do so because I would like to remind those listening about some key elements of this budget which, in our view, are going in the wrong direction. First, the Liberals are continuing with their habit, which has become ingrained in their psyches. They are continuing with their deficit approach. It appears that they are in a financial bind. That is why they are creating new taxes like the carbon tax. They also lack the personal ability to govern. You might say that it is not in their genes to balance a budget. The Liberals' budget measures are bad and their economic plan is bad. They are so incapable of balancing the budget that they cannot even give us a timeline. They cannot even tell us when they think they will balance the budget.
This is the first time that we have seen this in the history of our great Canadian parliamentary democracy, established in 1867, and probably before that, in the parliaments of the United Canadas. This is the first time since 1867 that a government has not been able to say when they will balance the budget. I am not one for political rhetoric, but this is not rhetoric, this is a fact.
The Liberals made big promises to us in that regard during the 2015 election. Unfortunately, the Liberals put off keeping those promises. They promised to balance the budget by 2019. Now, they have put that off indefinitely, or until 2045, according to the Parliamentary Budget Officer, a position that, let us not forget, was created by Mr. Harper. That great democrat wanted to ensure that there was budgetary accountability in Parliament. The Liberals also promised that they would run small deficits of $10 billion for the first three years and then balance the budget. The first year, they ran a deficit of $30 billion. The second year, they ran a deficit of $20 billion. The third year, they ran a deficit of $19 billion. Just a week or two ago, we found out from the Parliamentary Budget Officer that the Liberals miscalculated and another $4 billion in debt has been added to that amount. The Liberals have racked up a deficit of $22 billion. That is 6.5 times more than what they set out in their plan to balance the budget.
The other key budget promise the Liberals made was that the small deficits of $10 billion would be used to build new infrastructure as part of a $187-billion program.
To date, only $9 billion has flowed from the coffers to pay for infrastructure projects. Where is the other $170 billion? The Prime Minister is so acutely aware of the problem that he shuffled his cabinet this summer. He appointed the former international trade minister to the infrastructure portfolio, and the new infrastructure minister's mandate letter says he absolutely has to get on this troublesome issue of money not being used to fund infrastructure projects.
There is a reason the Liberals do not want to give us more than two or three days to discuss the budget. They do not want the Conservatives and the NDP to say quite as much about the budget as they would like to say because we have a lot of bad things to tell them and Canadians.
Fortunately, we live in a democracy, and we can express ourselves in the media, so all Canadians can hear what I have to say. However, it is important for us to express our ideas in the House too because listening to what we say here is how Canadians learn what happened in history.
Things are not as rosy as the Liberals claim when it comes to the economy and their plan. For instance, in terms of exports, they have not been able to export Canadian oil as they should. We have one of the largest reserves in the world, but the Liberals tightened rules surrounding the National Energy Board in recent years. As a result, several projects have died, such as the northern gateway project and energy east, and the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain project, which the Liberals managed to save in the end using $4.5 billion of taxpayers money. In short, our exports are not doing very well.
As for investments, from 2015 to 2017, Canadian investments in the U.S. increased by 65%, while American investments in Canada dropped by 52%.
On top of that, one thing that affects the daily lives of Canadians even more is the massive debt, which could jeopardize all our future projects for our glorious federation. In 2018, the total accumulated debt is $670 billion. That comes out to $47,000 per family. Not counting any student debt, car payments or mortgage, every family already has a debt of $47,000, and a good percentage of that has increased over the past three years because of the Liberals' fiscal mismanagement.
That is not to mention the interest on the debt. I am sure that Canadians watching at home are outraged by this. In 2020, the interest on the debt will be $39 billion a year. That is $3 billion more than we invest every year in health.
The government boasts about how it came up with a wonderful plan for federal health transfers with the provinces, but that plan does not respect provincial jurisdictions. What is more, it imposes conditions on the provinces that they must meet in order to be able to access those transfers. We did not do that in the Harper era. We are investing $36 billion per year in health care and spending $39 billion servicing debt. Imagine what we could have done with that money.
I will close by talking about the labour shortage. I would have liked to have 20 minutes so I could say more, but we cannot take the time we want because of the gag order. It is sad that I cannot keep going.
Quebec needs approximately 150,000 more workers. I am appalled that the minister would make a mockery of my questions on three occasions. Meanwhile, the member for Louis-Hébert had the nerve to say that the Conservatives oppose immigration. That has nothing to do with it. We support immigration, but that represents only 25% of the solution to the labour shortage. This is a serious crisis in Quebec.
There are many things under federal jurisdiction that the government could do and that, in combination with immigration, would help fill labour shortages. However, all the Liberals can do is make fun of me, simply because I am a member of the opposition. I hosted economic round tables in Quebec City with my colleagues, and all business owners were telling us that this is a serious crisis. The Liberals should act like a good government and stop making fun of us every time we speak. Actually, it is even worse; they want to prevent us from speaking.
Monsieur le Président, je suis très heureux de prendre la parole. J'aimerais, comme d'habitude, saluer tous les citoyens et les citoyennes de Beauport—Limoilou qui nous écoutent en grand nombre sur CPAC ou sur les plateformes comme Facebook et Twitter plus tard.
J'aimerais faire un commentaire sur le discours de la ministre de la Condition féminine. Je trouve un peu hypocrite qu'elle dise espérer que ses collègues de l'opposition appuieront le projet de loi et les mesures féministes de son budget, qu'elle nous a présentées, alors que les libéraux ont justement et stratégiquement inclus toutes ces mesures dans un projet de loi omnibus, le projet de loi d'exécution du budget de 2018. De toute évidence, nous, les conservateurs, ne voterons pas pour le projet de loi C-86, car il présente encore une fois un budget déficitaire et dévastateur pour l'économie canadienne, pour les payeurs de taxes canadiens. C'est un peu hypocrite que la ministre nous dise qu'elles espère que nous appuierons les mesures pour donner plus de pouvoir aux femmes, alors qu'elle a elle-même participé à cette stratégie de camouflage au sein d'un projet de loi omnibus.
Je voudrais dire aux citoyens que c'est un privilège pour moi de prendre la parole aujourd'hui, comme je le dis souvent, mais pas pour la même raison cette fois. J'aurais pu ne pas pouvoir parler du projet de loi C-86, puisque, ce matin, le gouvernement libéral a imposé un bâillon à la Chambre, comme on dit en bon québécois. Il a imposé une attribution de temps aux discours relatifs au budget. C'est la première fois en trois ans que je vois cela à la Chambre. Depuis 2015, nous avons eu trois présentations de budget. C'est la sixième fois que nous débattons d'un budget depuis 2015, en cette 42e législature. C'est la première fois que je constate que la majorité des mes collègues conservateurs et la majorité des mes collègues du NPD ne pourront pas prendre la parole pour s'exprimer sur une chose aussi importante que le projet de loi C-86, qui porte sur l'exécution des mesures budgétaires. La loi d'exécution du budget, en fait, c'est ce qui rend réel le budget présenté par le gouvernement en février. L'exécution se fait en deux temps. Nous sommes dans la deuxième partie, qui met en oeuvre le budget du gouvernement libéral.
Par hasard, j'ai la chance de parler du budget aujourd'hui et je veux en profiter, parce que je voudrais rappeler aux gens qui nous écoutent actuellement certains des attributs phares de ce projet de loi sur le budget qui, selon nous, vont dans la mauvaise direction. D'abord, les libéraux perpétuent leur habitude, qui est carrément rendue psychologique chez eux. Ils poursuivent cette approche déficitaire. Il apparaît qu'ils sont dans une incapacité financière. C'est pourquoi ils créent de nouvelles taxes comme la taxe sur le carbone. Ils ont aussi une incapacité gouvernementale qui semble personnelle. On dirait que ce n'est pas dans leurs gènes de pouvoir équilibrer un budget. Les mesures des budgétaires des libéraux sont mauvaises et leur plan économique est mauvais. Ils sont tellement incapables d'équilibrer le budget qu'ils ne peuvent même pas nous donner une date d'échéance. Ils ne peuvent même pas nous dire quand ils pensent arriver à un équilibre.
C'est la première fois qu'on voit cela dans l'histoire de notre belle démocratie parlementaire canadienne, depuis 1867, et probablement avant, dans les Parlements qui ont siégé avant cette date dans le Canada-Uni. Depuis 1867, c'est la première fois qu'un gouvernement ne peut pas donner une date de retour à l'équilibre budgétaire. Je n'aime pas faire de la rhétorique politique, mais ce n'est pas de la rhétorique, c'est un fait.
Les libéraux nous avaient fait de grandes promesses à cet égard en 2015 lors de l'élection. Malheureusement, les libéraux les ont reportées. Ils nous avaient promis un retour à l'équilibre budgétaire pour 2019. Maintenant, c'est remis aux calendes grecques, c'est-à-dire, à 2045, si l'on se fie au directeur parlementaire du budget, une institution créée par M. Harper, il faut le rappeler. Ce grand démocrate voulait qu'il y ait de la responsabilité budgétaire au Parlement. Également, les libéraux nous avaient promis qu'ils feraient des petits déficits de 10 milliards de dollars pour les trois premières années, avant d'atteindre l'équilibre budgétaire. La première année, ils ont fait un déficit de 30 milliards de dollars. La deuxième année, ils ont fait un déficit de 20 milliards de dollars. La troisième année, ils ont fait un déficit de 19 milliards de dollars. Or, le directeur parlementaire du budget nous annonce que, finalement, un montant de 4 milliards de dollars qui a été mal calculé par le gouvernement libéral se rajoute à la dette. On l'a su il y a une ou deux semaines. On est rendu à 22 milliards de dollars. C'est 6,5 fois plus que ce que les libéraux avaient prévu dans leur plan de retour à l'équilibre budgétaire.
L'autre promesse budgétaire phare des libéraux, c'était que les petits déficits de 10 milliards de dollars allaient être au service de la construction de nouveaux projets d'infrastructure, dans un programme de 187 milliards de dollars.
À ce jour, seulement 9 milliards de dollars sont sortis des coffres pour subvenir à des projets d'infrastructure. Il manque encore 170 milliards de dollars. Où sont-ils? Le premier ministre est tellement conscient du problème qu'il a lui-même fait un remaniement de son Cabinet l'été dernier. Il a nommé l'ancien ministre du Commerce international au poste de ministre de l'Infrastructure, et la lettre de mandat de ce dernier dit qu'il doit absolument se pencher sur cette fâcheuse situation de l'argent qui ne sort pas des coffres pour financer les projets d'infrastructure.
Ce n'est pas pour rien que les libéraux ne veulent pas que nous ayons plus que deux ou trois jours pour discuter du budget. Ils ne veulent pas que les conservateurs et le NPD s'expriment sur le budget autant qu'ils le pourraient, parce que nous aurions beaucoup de mauvaises choses à leur dire et à dire aux Canadiens.
Heureusement, nous sommes dans une démocratie et nous pouvons nous exprimer par l'entremise des médias, alors les Canadiens peuvent savoir ce que je vais dire. Toutefois, il est important que nous puissions nous exprimer à la Chambre également, car c'est en écoutant ce que nous disons ici que les Canadiens apprennent ce qui est arrivé dans l'histoire.
Les choses ne sont pas aussi roses que le prétendent les libéraux en ce qui a trait à l'économie et à leur plan. Par exemple, sur le plan des exportations, on est incapable d'exporter le pétrole canadien comme on le devrait. Nous possédons l'une des plus grandes réserves au monde, mais les libéraux ont resserré les règles à l'Office national de l'énergie au cours des dernières années. Cela a fait en sorte que de nombreux projets sont tombés à l'eau, comme le projet Trans Mountain de Kinder Morgan, que les libéraux ont finalement sauvé avec 4,5 milliards de dollars des contribuables, le projet Northern Gateway et le corridor de l'Est. Bref, en matière d'exportation, cela ne va pas très bien.
En ce qui a trait aux investissements, de 2015 à 2017, les investissements canadiens aux États-Unis ont augmenté de 65 %, alors que les investissements américains au Canada ont baissé de 52 %.
Par ailleurs, une chose qui touche davantage la vie quotidienne de nos concitoyens et nos concitoyennes, c'est la dette massive qui pourrait mettre à mal tous nos futurs projets pour notre glorieuse fédération. En 2018, la dette totale accumulée est de 670 milliards de dollars. Cela équivaut à 47 000 $ par famille. Alors, avant même de penser aux dettes étudiantes, aux paiements de voiture et à l'hypothèque, chaque famille a aussi une dette de 47 000 $, dont un bon pourcentage a augmenté au cours des trois dernières années à cause de la mauvaise gestion budgétaire des libéraux.
D'ailleurs, c'est sans parler des frais d'intérêt sur la dette. Je suis certain que cela enrage les citoyens qui nous écoutent. En 2020, les frais d'intérêt sur la dette seront de 39 milliards de dollars par année. C'est 3 milliards de dollars de plus que ce que nous investissons chaque année en santé.
Le gouvernement se targue d'avoir fait avec les provinces un merveilleux plan de transferts fédéraux en santé, mais ce plan ne respectait pas les champs de compétence provinciaux. De plus, il a imposé des conditions aux provinces pour avoir accès à l'argent des transferts fédéraux, ce que nous n'avions pas fait à l'époque du gouvernement Harper. Nous investissons 36 milliards de dollars par année en santé et notre service de la dette est de 39 milliards de dollars. Imaginons tout ce que nous pourrions faire avec cela.
Je terminerai sur la pénurie de main-d'oeuvre. J'aurais aimé avoir 20 minutes afin d'en dire plus, mais à cause du bâillon, il nous est impossible de parler autant que nous le voulons. C'est triste que je ne puisse pas continuer.
À Québec, on a besoin d'environ 150 000 travailleurs de plus. J'ai trouvé cela ahurissant que la ministre tourne mes questions en dérision à trois reprises. Le député de Louis-Hébert, quant à lui, a osé dire que nous, les conservateurs, n'aimions pas l'immigration. Cela n'a aucun rapport. Nous sommes pour l'immigration, mais cela représente seulement 25 % de la solution à la pénurie de main d'oeuvre. À Québec, la crise est grave.
Il y a plusieurs choses que le gouvernement fédéral peut faire qui relèvent de son champ de compétence et qui, combinées à l'immigration, aideront à pallier les pénuries de main-d'oeuvre. Toutefois, tout ce que les libéraux sont capables de faire, c'est se moquer de moi, seulement parce que je suis un député de l'opposition. J'ai pourtant organisé des tables rondes économiques à Québec avec mes collègues, et tous les entrepreneurs disaient que la crise est grave. Les libéraux devraient se comporter en bon gouvernement et arrêter de se moquer de nous chaque fois que nous prenons la parole. En fait, c'est encore pire; ils veulent nous empêcher de parler.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-11-06 16:15 [p.23349]
Mr. Speaker, that is such a dishonourable question. He is doing exactly what I just criticized his colleague from Louis-Hébert for doing. That is fearmongering. The Liberals are doing exactly what they are accusing us of doing. They are making a mockery of what we are saying and the work we are doing as Her Majesty's opposition.
When we were in power, over 300,000 immigrants entered Canada every year, and there were no crises at our borders because we made sure that the our immigration system was orderly, fair and peaceful.
At an economic round table, the executive director of the Association des économistes du Québec told us that immigration was only 25% of the solution to the labour shortage. Even if we welcomed 500,000 immigrants a year, that would still not completely solve the labour shortage.
We need to help seniors who want to return to the workforce. We need to allow foreign students in our universities to stay longer. We need to make sure that fewer young men in Quebec drop out of high school. All kinds of action could be taken, but all the Liberals are capable of doing is launching completely false insinuations and hyper-partisan attacks on us.
Monsieur le Président, c'est tellement déshonorant comme question. Il fait exactement ce que je viens de reprocher à son collègue de Louis-Hébert. C'est du fearmongering, pour employer le terme anglais. Les libéraux font exactement ce qu'ils nous accusent de faire. Ils tournent en dérision ce que nous disons et le travail que nous faisons ici en tant qu'opposition de Sa Majesté.
Lorsque nous étions au pouvoir, plus de 300 000 immigrants entraient chaque année au Canada et il n'y avait aucune crise à nos frontières, puisque nous, nous faisions en sorte que notre système d'immigration soit ordonné, juste et paisible.
Le directeur général de l'Association des économistes du Québec nous a dit, lors d'une table ronde économique, que l'immigration était seulement 25 % de la solution à la pénurie de main-d'oeuvre. Même si on faisait entrer 500 000 immigrants par année, cela ne réglerait pas complètement la pénurie de main-d'oeuvre.
Il faut aider les aînés qui veulent revenir sur le marché du travail. Il faut permettre aux étudiants étrangers dans nos universités de rester plus longtemps. Il faut faire en sorte que moins de jeunes hommes au Québec abandonnent l'école secondaire. Il y a toutes sortes de mesures à prendre, mais tout ce que les libéraux sont capables de faire, c'est de nous envoyer des insinuations complètement erronées et des attaques hyper partisanes.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-10-23 14:58 [p.22743]
Mr. Speaker, unlike the Liberal members from Quebec, the Canadian Federation of Independent Business believes that there is indeed a labour shortage in Quebec.
Ms. Hébert, vice-president of the CFIB, noted that some businesses have had to scale back their operations or even shut down temporarily.
In other words, in Quebec City and around the province, the labour shortage is definitely having an impact on the ground. A wide range of possible solutions are within the purview of the federal government.
Why, then, is the Liberal government not taking immediate concrete action to come up with a concrete solution to this serious problem?
Monsieur le Président, contrairement aux députés libéraux du Québec, la Fédération canadienne de l'entreprise indépendante estime qu'il y a bel et bien une pénurie de main-d'oeuvre à Québec.
La vice-présidente de la FCEI, Mme Hébert, précise que certaines entreprises « doivent réduire leurs activités, voire même fermer temporairement. »
En d'autres mots, à Québec et dans la province, la pénurie de main-d'oeuvre a bel et bien des contrecoups sur le terrain. Il y a une panoplie de solutions qui sont du ressort du champ de compétence fédéral.
Alors, pourquoi le gouvernement libéral ne prend-il pas des mesures concrètes dès maintenant pour trouver une solution concrète à cette grave situation?
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-10-18 14:50 [p.22569]
Mr. Speaker, the minister of labour seems to have no idea how much she upset entrepreneurs, elected officials in Quebec City and Canadians when she made a mockery of my question on the labour shortage and the crisis we are in.
Throughout Beauport—Limoilou, Quebec and Canada, SMEs, economists and other stakeholders are pointing out that the labour shortage is a serious crisis. No one thinks this is good news. No one is laughing; quite the contrary. It is time for action.
Does the Prime Minister plan to laugh about the labour shortage, or does he plan to do something about it?
Monsieur le Président, la ministre du Travail n'a certainement pas conscience de la grogne qu'elle a créée auprès des entrepreneurs, des élus de la Ville de Québec et des citoyens, lorsqu'elle a tourné la question sur la pénurie de main-d'oeuvre et cette crise en dérision.
Partout à Beauport—Limoilou, au Québec et au Canada, les PME, les économistes et les autres intervenants de cet enjeu mentionnent que la pénurie de main-d'oeuvre est une crise grave. Personne ne pense qu'il s'agit d'une bonne nouvelle. Personne n'en a ri, bien au contraire. On est à l'heure des actions.
Que compte faire le premier ministre, rire de la pénurie de la main-d'oeuvre ou agir?
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-10-17 16:32 [p.22510]
Madam Speaker, I will be sharing my time with my very hon. colleague from Cariboo—Prince George, in northern B.C.
As usual, I want to say hello to the people of Beauport—Limoilou who are watching us live on CPAC. I know that many of them do watch us, because they tell me so when I go door to door. They tell me that they watched me the week before. I want to say hello to all of them.
Today's debate is a very important one, since we are talking about harassment and discrimination in the workplace. Some may be surprised to hear me say this, and I am no expert, but it seems to me that the Canada Labour Code does not apply to employees who work in MPs' offices on Parliament Hill. This means that the code would not apply to me or my employees. This is rather surprising, in 2018.
I want to quickly touch on last week, which I spent in my riding. You will see why. I hosted two economic round tables. The first round table was for the Beauport business network, which I created a year and a half ago. There are some 50 business owners in this network, who get together once a month to talk about business-related issues and priorities in the riding. On Friday morning, I also held a round table called “Conservatives are listening to Quebecers”. This round table was attended by social, community and business stakeholders, among others.
Yesterday I asked the Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour a question. After all, we are talking about workplaces here, with Bill C-65. I asked her if she was aware that we are in a crisis at the moment, especially in Quebec City, but all over Canada, because of the labour shortage. She made a mockery of it, saying that it was proof that the government has created so many jobs in Canada that businesses can no longer find workers. While that may be true from an objective, Socratic and rational standpoint, she is ignoring a real crisis situation that we are in.
I want to say one last thing before I get to the bill. At the two round tables I hosted, every time I visit businesses in my riding, in all my discussions with constituents and in all the correspondence I receive every day, to which I reply in writing every time, people mention the labour shortage. Some businesses have had to shut down in Beauport—Limoilou and others are scaling back operations, so I think it is very sad and upsetting that the Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour would make a mockery of my question. The people of Quebec City were not happy to see that on Twitter and Facebook.
Today we are talking about an important bill, the act to amend the Canada Labour Code regarding harassment and violence, the Parliamentary Employment and Staff Relations Act and the Budget Implementation Act, 2017, No. 1. It is clear that Conservatives, New Democrats, Liberals and all Canadians in general support the Liberal government's recently introduced bill. That is certainly not something I say every day, but when it is true, it must be acknowledged. With this important bill, even employees on Parliament Hill will benefit from guidelines and protection to keep them safe from sexual harassment, psychological harassment and every kind of discriminatory behaviour in the workplace.
I can say that this affects us all. It could also affect our family, a cousin, a brother or sister and, in my case, it affects my children. My daughter Victoria is four years old and my son Winston is a year and a half. My daughter started kindergarten a few months ago. It is the first time she has attended school. We definitely do not want her to experience discrimination or harassment. It will inevitably happen because good and evil are part of life, and harassment and discrimination will always exist. That is why it is important to have laws that govern, try to control, eliminate or at least reduce this as much as possible in our society.
I would like to tell you that I have directly experienced discrimination and psychological harassment, but not sexual harassment, thank God. When I was in grade six, I moved from New Brunswick to Quebec. I can see my colleague laughing because he knows that I grew up in New Brunswick. I am from Quebec, but I grew up in New Brunswick. I moved to Quebec when I was in grade six. Children can be very brutal because they lack empathy and an understanding of the context in which they find themselves.
Kids are often oblivious to the harm they inflict on others. I got beaten up at recess every day for a year, so this is a subject I am not unfamiliar with. In my case, the situation made me stronger. Unfortunately, in other cases, it has ruined lives. What we want to avoid is situations where harassment and discrimination destroy lives. It is terrible to see a life completely destroyed after such an incident.
I want to reiterate that, setting politics aside and speaking from a human perspective, all members and all Canadians should support this bill. However, that does not mean there is no need to propose certain amendments, which I will discuss shortly.
The bill is meant to strengthen the workplace safety framework on Parliament Hill. When I think of all the young Canadians who work on the Hill, it makes me even more motivated to support this bill. The people working on the Hill are often young Canadians in their twenties who are full of hope, ambition and energy. They love politics, and they love Canada. They are proud to work for a minister, the Prime Minister, a shadow cabinet member or an MP. These young people arrive in Parliament full of energy and enthusiasm.
There is no denying that, throughout our country's history, members and ministers have behaved inappropriately or committed inappropriate acts, including sexual harassment, psychological harassment and discrimination.
Many of the young victims were surely brilliant, highly motivated and ambitious individuals. Perhaps they were even future Liberal, Conservative or NDP prime ministers, although unfortunately for them, that will never happen now. These were young people who were here for the right reasons, who were not cynical. A lot of young people in Canada are saying they have no use for politics, and that is unfortunate. Those young people should read books on Canadian history to understand what we are doing here today. Some young people have had the courage to get over their cynicism and come to this place, only to become victims of sexual or psychological harassment or discrimination. Careers have been destroyed in some cases, along with their hope and love for Canada. I find that appalling and very upsetting.
This bill sets out to fill a legal void. I would like to remind everyone that Parliament Hill was the only place where Canada Labour Code provisions on harassment and discrimination did not apply. There was a legal void, and it is important to acknowledge that that void played a part in destroying young Canadians who came here full of energy to help build a strong and thriving country on both national and international stages. Everyone wants a workplace that contributes to their quality of life, one where safety is important. Employees perform better in such workplaces.
Most of the Conservatives' amendments were accepted. We successfully introduced an amendment to prevent political interference during harassment investigations. The Conservatives played an active role in bringing the bill to this stage. We successfully introduced an amendment to ensure strict timelines for investigations into incidents of harassment. We proposed mandatory sexual harassment training, training that all MPs received. We proposed a mandatory review of the bill after five years because it needs to be reviewed at regular intervals, as my colleague said.
In closing, since this is Small Business Week, I want to say three cheers for business people. I thank the people of Beauport—Limoilou for the work they do every day. I think they are wonderful, and I look forward to seeing them when I go door to door.
Madame la Présidente, je tiens à dire que je partagerai mon temps de parole avec mon très honorable collègue de Cariboo—Prince George, dans le Nord de la Colombie-Britannique.
Comme d'habitude, j'aimerais d'emblée saluer tous les citoyens et les citoyennes de Beauport—Limoilou qui nous écoutent actuellement en direct sur CPAC. Je sais que plusieurs d'entre eux le font, parce que lorsque je fais du porte-à-porte, souvent, ils m'en font part. Ils m'informent du fait qu'ils m'ont écouté la semaine d'avant, notamment. Je les salue tous.
Le débat d'aujourd'hui est fort important, puisque nous parlons de harcèlement et de discrimination en milieu de travail. Peut-être que certains seront fort surpris de ce que je vais dire — et je ne suis pas un expert —, mais semble-t-il que le Code canadien du travail ne s'appliquait pas aux employés qui travaillent dans les bureaux de députés sur la Colline parlementaire. Donc, il ne s'appliquait pas à moi ni à mes employés. En 2018, on peut être assez surpris de cela.
J'aimerais revenir rapidement sur la semaine dernière, que j'ai passée dans ma circonscription. On comprendra pourquoi. J'ai tenu deux tables rondes économiques. La première était une table ronde économique du réseau des gens d'affaires de Beauport, un réseau que j'ai créé il y a un an et demi. Nous sommes une cinquantaine d'entrepreneurs et nous nous regroupons une fois par mois pour discuter des enjeux et des priorités entrepreneuriales dans la circonscription. Également, j'ai tenu vendredi matin une table ronde intitulée « Les conservateurs à l'écoute des Québécois ». Encore une fois, cela regroupe des acteurs de différentes communautés, des acteurs sociaux, communautaires, entrepreneuriaux, etc.
Hier, j'ai posé une question à la ministre de l’Emploi, du Développement de la main-d'œuvre et du Travail. Justement, on parle de lieux de travail dans le projet de loi C-65. Je lui ai demandé si elle savait qu'il y a une crise en ce moment, tout particulièrement dans la ville de Québec, mais partout au Canada, à cause de la pénurie de main-d'oeuvre. Elle a tourné cela à la dérision en disant que c'était la preuve que le gouvernement avait créé tellement d'emplois au Canada que les entreprises ne pouvaient plus trouver d'employés. Même si d'un point de vue objectif, socratique et rationnel, c'est vrai de dire cela, elle fait fi d'une vraie crise qui sévit actuellement.
Je vais dire une dernière une chose avant d'en arriver au projet de loi. Dans les deux tables rondes que j'ai tenues, dans toutes les visites d'entreprises que je fais dans ma circonscription, dans toutes mes discussions avec les citoyens et dans toutes les correspondances que je reçois chaque jour, et auxquelles je réponds par écrit chaque fois, les gens me parlent de pénurie de main-d'oeuvre. Des entreprises ferment leurs portes déjà à Beauport—Limoilou, et d'autres ralentissent leurs activités. Je suis donc très désolé et attristé que la ministre de l’Emploi, du Développement de la main-d'œuvre et du Travail ait tourné ma question en dérision. Les gens de Québec ne sont pas contents de voir cela sur Twitter et Facebook.
Nous discutons aujourd'hui d'un projet de loi important, la Loi modifiant le Code canadien du travail relativement au harcèlement et à la violence, la Loi sur les relations de travail au Parlement et la Loi no 1 d'exécution du budget de 2017. Il ne fait aucun doute que les conservateurs, les néo-démocrates, les libéraux et tous les Canadiens en général appuient ce projet de loi quand même juste présenté par le gouvernement libéral. C'est rare que je dis cela, mais quand c'est le cas, il faut le reconnaître. Ce projet de loi important vise à faire que même les employés de la Colline parlementaire bénéficient de balises et de protections qui les sécurisent dans leur environnement de travail en ce qui a trait au harcèlement sexuel, au harcèlement psychologique et à des comportements de discriminations de toutes sortes.
Je peux dire que cela nous touche tous. Cela peut aussi toucher notre famille, un cousin ou une cousine, un frère ou une soeur, et, dans mon cas, cela touche mes enfants. Ma fille Victoria a quatre ans et mon fils Winston a un an et demi. Ma fille est à la pré-maternelle déjà depuis quelques mois. C'est la première fois que ma fille vit un contexte scolaire. C'est sûr que nous ne voulons pas qu'elle vive un contexte de discrimination et de harcèlement. Cela va sûrement arriver tout de même, parce que, comme le mal et le bien font partie intégrante de la vie sur terre, le harcèlement et la discrimination existeront toujours. Voilà pourquoi c'est important d'avoir des lois qui régissent, qui tentent d'encadrer, de faire disparaître ou, du moins, de diminuer cela le plus possible dans notre société.
J'aimerais dire que moi-même, j'ai expérimenté de très proche la discrimination et le harcèlement psychologique, mais pas le harcèlement sexuel, Dieu merci. En sixième année, j'ai déménagé du Nouveau-Brunswick au Québec. Je vois mon collègue qui rigole, parce qu'il sait que j'ai grandi au Nouveau-Brunswick. Je viens du Québec, mais j'ai grandi au Nouveau-Brunswick, et je suis arrivé au Québec en sixième année. Les enfants peuvent être très violents, parce qu'ils manquent d'empathie et de compréhension du contexte dans lequel ils se situent.
Les enfants n'ont souvent pas conscience du mal qu'ils font à autrui. Pendant un an, j'ai été battu tous les jours dans la cour de récréation. Ce n'est donc pas quelque chose qui m'est inconnu. Dans mon cas, la situation m'a rendu plus fort. Malheureusement, dans d'autres cas, cela a détruit des vies. Ce que l'on veut éviter, c'est que le harcèlement et la discrimination détruisent des vies. C'est terrible de voir qu'une vie est complètement détruite à la suite d'un tel événement.
Je tiens à réitérer le fait que, d'un point de vue humain et au-delà de la politique, tous les députés et tous les Canadiens devraient appuyer le projet de loi. Par contre, cela ne veut pas dire qu'on ne voit pas la nécessité de proposer certains amendements. Je vais en parler bientôt.
Le projet de loi vise à renforcer les balises de la sécurité au travail sur la Colline du Parlement. Quand je pense à tous les jeunes Canadiens qui travaillent sur la Colline, j'ai encore plus envie d'appuyer ce projet de loi. Les gens qui travaillent sur la Colline sont souvent des jeunes Canadiens âgés d'une vingtaine d'années qui sont pleins d'espoir, d'ambition et d'énergie, qui aiment la politique et qui aiment le Canada. Ils sont fiers de travailler pour un ministre, pour le premier ministre, pour un membre du cabinet fantôme ou pour un député. Ces jeunes arrivent au Parlement pleins de vigueur et d'énergie.
Il ne faut pas nier que, dans l'histoire de notre pays, des députés et des ministres ont eu des comportements inappropriés ou ont posé des gestes inappropriés, qu'il s'agisse de harcèlement sexuel, de harcèlement psychologique ou de discrimination.
Parmi les jeunes qui ont vécu cela, plusieurs étaient brillants, extrêmement motivés et ambitieux. Ils étaient peut-être des futurs premiers ministres libéral, conservateur ou néo-démocrate — bien que cela ne soit jamais arrivé, malheureusement pour eux. Ce sont des jeunes qui étaient ici pour les bonnes raisons, et ils n'étaient pas cyniques. Au Canada, il y a beaucoup de jeunes qui disent que la politique ne sert à rien, et cela est dommage. Ces jeunes devraient lire des livres sur l'histoire du Canada pour comprendre ce que nous faisons ici aujourd'hui. Certains jeunes ont eu le courage de ne pas être cyniques et de venir ici, mais ils ont été victimes de harcèlement sexuel ou psychologique et de discrimination. Dans certains cas, on a détruit leur carrière, leur espoir et leur amour envers le pays. Cela est épouvantable et m'attriste énormément.
Ce projet de loi vise à rectifier un vide juridique. J'aimerais rappeler que la Colline du Parlement était le seul endroit où les dispositions du Code canadien du travail concernant le harcèlement et la discrimination ne s'appliquaient pas. Il y avait donc un vide juridique. Il est d'autant plus important de constater que ce vide juridique contribuait à détruire des jeunes Canadiens qui arrivaient ici pleins d'énergie afin de continuer à construire un pays fort et épanoui, à la fois au niveau national et international. Bien entendu, chacun veut un milieu de travail qui permet d'avoir une qualité de vie et où la sécurité est importante, puisque cela permet d'être plus performant.
La plupart des amendements proposés par les conservateurs ont été acceptés. Nous avons présenté avec succès un amendement visant à éviter l'ingérence politique pendant les enquêtes sur les incidences du harcèlement. Les conservateurs ont donc participé activement à la mise en oeuvre du projet de loi. Nous avons présenté avec succès un amendement pour nous assurer que les délais imposés pour les enquêtes sur les incidences du harcèlement sont stricts. Nous avons proposé une formation obligatoire sur le harcèlement sexuel, une formation que tous les députés ont suivie. Nous avons proposé l'examen obligatoire du projet de loi après cinq ans, puisqu'il doit constamment être revu, comme ma collègue l'a spécifié.
En terminant, vive les entrepreneurs, puisque c'est la semaine de la PME. Je remercie les citoyens et les citoyennes de Beauport—Limoilou du travail qu'ils font tous les jours. Je les adore, et on se verra lors du porte-à-porte.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-10-16 14:53 [p.22456]
Mr. Speaker, where I come from, small businesses drive job creation, and I thank them for their work.
Every month I organize and chair meetings of Beauport's business network. Last week, we held an economic round table, and it will come as no surprise to anyone that the main issues we discussed had to do with the labour shortage.
The labour shortage could have a serious impact on our GDP. Every MP has seen businesses in their riding scale back their activities. Some are even closing their doors. This is a very worrisome situation.
I would like to know if the Liberal government wants to make this issue its top priority. When will the government take action, and how will it address this situation?
Monsieur le Président, les entrepreneurs sont au coeur de la création d'emplois chez nous, et je les remercie de leur travail.
Chaque mois, je préside et j'organise les rencontres du réseau des gens d'affaires de Beauport. La semaine dernière, nous avons tenu une table ronde économique, et cela ne surprendra personne d'apprendre que les enjeux principaux de la discussion portaient sur la pénurie de main-d'oeuvre.
La pénurie de main-d'oeuvre peut avoir des conséquences très graves sur notre PIB. Chacun de nous, dans nos circonscriptions, voyons déjà des entreprises ralentir leurs activités et d'autres fermer carrément leurs portes. C'est une situation extrêmement inquiétante.
J'aimerais savoir si le gouvernement libéral veut faire en sorte que cette crise soit son enjeu principal. Quand va-t-il agir et quel enjeu va-t-il mettre en place pour régler cela?
Results: 1 - 7 of 7