Interventions in the House of Commons
 
 
 
RSS feed based on search criteria Export search results - CSV (plain text) Export search results - XML
Add search criteria
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
Mr. Speaker, this Liberal government is more centralist, paternalistic and, quite simply, arrogant than any other Liberal government in the history of our federation.
For the past four years, the government has repeatedly shown that it is out of touch with the spirit of federalism. It refuses to honour the tradition of appointing a political lieutenant for Quebec and instead made a minister from Toronto responsible for the economic development of our province. It is imposing political conditions on federal transfers. It refuses to give Quebec greater powers in the area of immigration. It refuses to respond favourably to the National Assembly's request for a single tax return, something all Quebeckers want.
I could go on and on. Following in the footsteps of founding fathers Cartier and MacDonald, we the Conservatives will continue to properly honour federalism. In 2008, we recognized that Quebeckers form a nation within a united Canada.
In 2019, when we form the government, we will respond favourably to the demands of Quebeckers and Quebec.
Monsieur le Président, le gouvernement libéral, plus que tout autre dans l'histoire de notre fédération, est centralisateur, paternaliste et tout simplement arrogant.
Depuis quatre ans, le gouvernement a démontré à maintes reprises qu'il n'est pas au diapason de l'esprit du fédéralisme. Il refuse de faire honneur à la tradition en nommant un lieutenant politique pour le Québec, et il a nommé un ministre de Toronto responsable du développement économique de notre province. Il impose des conditions politiques à ses transferts fédéraux. Il refuse de donner plus de pouvoirs au Québec en matière d'immigration. Il refuse de répondre favorablement à la demande de l'Assemblée nationale relativement à la déclaration de revenus unique, une demande de tous les Québécois.
La liste est encore longue. Nous, les conservateurs, dans la lignée des pères fondateurs Cartier et MacDonald, allons continuer d'honorer le fédéralisme en bonne et due forme. En 2008, nous avons reconnu que les Québécois forment une nation au sein du Canada-Uni.
En 2019, lorsque nous formerons le gouvernement, nous allons répondre favorablement aux demandes des Québécois et du Québec.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-04-10 17:21 [p.26995]
Mr. Speaker, I must say that in this case, I also appreciated the speech made by my colleague from Sherbrooke. I agree with him, much to the chagrin of my colleague from Sackville—Preston—Chezzetcook.
As the member for Sherbrooke said, this budget is dragging up broken promises, such as the promise to return to a balanced budget this year, which is rather unbelievable. It does not even include a timeline for balancing the budget. This is a first in our country's history.
The government is budgeting $41 billion to deflect attention from its mistakes, including its bungled foreign and domestic policy. Once again, the budget favours the major interest groups, as the member for Sherbrooke pointed out. We saw more evidence of this today, when the government gave Loblaws $12 million for refrigerators. It is absolutely ridiculous.
Does my colleague from Sherbrooke agree that this budget shows a lack of respect for Quebeckers?
In 2015, the member for Papineau, the Prime Minister, told a New York newspaper that Canada was postnational. This is an outright affront to Quebeckers, whose historical and political reality is very much alive and well.
There are also no measures in this bill to address the Quebec premier's concerns about the cost of the arrival of a huge number of illegal refugees. I know he does not like that term, but Quebec wants to be reimbursed for some of those costs. There is also nothing in the budget about a single tax return or the Quebec Bridge, and there is nothing to address the discriminatory measure wherein larger cities will get more money for sustainable mobility infrastructure than smaller ones like Quebec City.
Does my colleague agree that the 2019 budget implementation bill once again shows the government's lack of respect for all our fellow Quebeckers?
Monsieur le Président, je dois dire dans ce cas-ci que j'ai aussi apprécié le discours de mon collègue de Sherbrooke. Je suis d'accord avec lui, au grand dam de mon collègue de Sackville—Preston—Chezzetcook.
Comme le député de Sherbrooke le disait, c'est un budget qui réitère des promesses brisées, dont celle du retour à l'équilibre budgétaire cette année, ce qui est assez incroyable. Il n'y a même pas d'échéance concernant un retour éventuel à l'équilibre budgétaire. C'est du jamais vu dans l'histoire du pays.
On voit dans ce budget que 41 milliards de dollars sont dépensés pour détourner l'attention des erreurs de ce gouvernement, que ce soit en matière de politique étrangère ou de politique interne. Encore une fois, c'est un budget qui favorise les grands groupes d'intérêt, comme l'a dit le député de Sherbrooke. On l'a vu encore aujourd'hui, alors que 12 millions de dollars ont été octroyés à Loblaws pour des réfrigérateurs. C'est totalement ridicule.
Est-ce que mon collègue de Sherbrooke trouve aussi que ce budget illustre un non-respect envers les Québécois?
En 2015, le député de Papineau, le premier ministre, a dit à un journal de New York que le Canada était postnational. C'est un affront total envers les Québécois, qui se considèrent comme un peuple historico-politique toujours bien vivant.
Par ailleurs, dans ce budget, aucune mesure ne répond aux doléances du premier ministre du Québec concernant les coûts de l'arrivée massive de réfugiés illégaux. Je sais qu'il n'aime pas ce terme, mais il y a des coûts que le Québec veut se faire rembourser. Ensuite, il n'y a rien non plus au sujet de la déclaration d'impôt unique, il n'y a rien pour le pont de Québec et il n'y a rien pour pallier la discrimination en ce qui a trait aux infrastructures de mobilité durable, qui fait que les grandes villes vont recevoir plus d'argent que les petites villes comme Québec.
Mon collègue est-il d'accord avec moi que ce projet de loi de mise en oeuvre du budget de 2019 illustre encore une fois un non-respect envers tous nos compatriotes québécois?
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-02-05 13:22 [p.25306]
Mr. Speaker, the 5,500 federal employees in Shawinigan and Jonquière will keep their jobs. We will ensure that they keep their jobs in the administrative agreements that we will sign as soon as we take office in October.
The member said that she would rather help 5,500 public servants, who are merely being asked to make a bit of a transition, than the 8.3 million Quebeckers who clearly stated during our “Listening to Quebeckers” tour that they want a single tax return. The member is also going against the 125 members of the Quebec National Assembly, who together represent the 8.3 million Quebeckers who said that they want a single tax return. She is going to protect 5,500 individuals at the expense of 8.3 million people.
Is that what the member is trying to tell us right now?
Monsieur le Président, les 5 500 employés fédéraux à Shawinigan ou à Jonquière vont garder leur emploi. Dans les ententes administratives que nous allons conclure dès notre élection au mois d'octobre, nous allons nous assurer qu'ils garderont leur emploi.
La députée nous dit qu'elle préfère favoriser 5 500 fonctionnaires, à qui on demande de ne faire qu'une certaine transition, plutôt que les 8,3 millions de Québécois qui ont exprimé clairement, notamment lors de nos consultations intitulées « À l'écoute des Québécois », qu'ils voulaient la déclaration de revenus unique. La députée va également à l'encontre les 125 députés de l'Assemblée nationale qui représentent l'ensemble des 8,3 millions de Québécois qui ont dit vouloir une déclaration de revenus unique. Elle va protéger 5 500 personnes au détriment de 8 millions d'individus.
Est-ce bien ce que la députée nous dit en ce moment?
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-02-05 13:33 [p.25307]
Mr. Speaker, I find this debate very interesting. What has been happening in the news in recent months or for a little more than a year is also very interesting. We can see that the very root, the core identity, of the Liberal Party has not changed.
Every time that Quebec asks the Liberal government for something, whether it is in the 1970s, 1980s, 1990s or today, the answer is always no.
Mr. Couillard, the former premier, asked if there could be a dialogue on Quebec’s place in the Canadian Constitution. The Prime Minister dismissed it out of hand. He did not even want to have a dialogue.
Recently, Quebec asked for more autonomy in immigration. The Liberals said that they would look into it, but that means no. The National Assembly, the 125 members representing 8.3 million Quebeckers, unanimously called for a single tax return, and the Liberals today are saying no, without any shame.
Why is it that the core identity of the Liberal Party of Canada since 1867 is still to answer no to Quebeckers and the province of Quebec when they ask for more power in their areas of jurisdiction?
Monsieur le Président, je trouve ce débat fort intéressant. Ce qui se passe dans l'actualité des derniers mois ou depuis un an et plus est aussi très intéressant. On voit que la source même ou l'identité profonde du Parti libéral n'a pas changé.
Chaque fois que le Québec demande quelque chose au gouvernement libéral, que ce soit dans les années 1970, 1980, 1990 ou aujourd'hui, la réponse est toujours non.
M. Couillard, l'ex-premier ministre, a demandé si on pouvait avoir un dialogue sur la place du Québec dans la Constitution canadienne. Le premier ministre a rejeté cela du revers de la main. Il ne voulait même pas tenir de dialogue.
Dernièrement, le Québec a demandé plus d'autonomie en immigration. Les libéraux ont répondu qu'ils allaient examiner cela, mais cela veut dire non. L'Assemblée nationale, c'est-à-dire les 125 députés représentant 8,3 millions de Québécois, a demandé à l'unanimité d'avoir une déclaration de revenus unique, et les libéraux aujourd'hui disent non, sans vergogne.
Pourquoi l'identité profonde du Parti libéral du Canada depuis 1867 est-elle toujours de répondre non aux Québécois et à la province du Québec quand ils demandent plus de pouvoir dans leurs champs de compétence?
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-02-05 13:39 [p.25308]
Mr. Speaker, I will be sharing my time with the member for Mégantic—L'Érable, who will certainly build on what I have to say.
It is always an honour to speak in the House. I want to say hello to the people of Beauport—Limoilou who are watching us. Today, we are debating a single tax return for Quebeckers.
The member for Vaudreuil—Soulanges has said some pretty unbelievable things. He asked why the Conservatives raised this topic this year, which is an election year. In reality, we actually talked about this matter in May last year, at our general council meeting in Saint-Hyacinthe. There were 400 Conservatives at this meeting, including members of the Bloc Québécois who were tired of the pointless bickering. The Bloc Québécois will never be in power. At this general council, we adopted the motion calling for a single tax return. The motion received the support of the vast majority, 90%, of attendees. It was quite popular.
That said, introducing this motion at the Saint-Hyacinthe general council was not a casual idea plucked from thin air. Our political lieutenant for Quebec and other Quebec Conservative MPs held public consultations, consultations we called “Listening to Quebecers”.
We held consultations in about 40 municipalities all across Quebec, covering all of Quebec's regional districts. Quebeckers themselves told us they wanted us to simplify their day-to-day lives. Then, a month later, in May 2018, Quebec's National Assembly unanimously adopted a motion calling on the federal government, regardless of the party in power after the October 2019 election, to start working on an administrative agreement that would enable Quebec to collect federal taxes and then transfer that money to the federal government. The ultimate goal was to make Quebeckers' lives easier and give them a much easier way to do things.
I would like to re-read the motion for those watching at home because it may not be written out in full at the bottom of their screen. The motion states:
That, given:
(a) the House has great respect for provincial jurisdiction and trust in provincial institutions;
(b) the people of Quebec are burdened with completing and submitting two tax returns, one federal and one provincial; and
(c) the House believes in cutting red tape and reducing unnecessary paperwork to improve the everyday lives of families; therefore,
the House call on the government to work with the Government of Quebec to implement a single tax return in Quebec, as adopted unanimously in the motion of the National Assembly of Quebec on May 15, 2018.
That is the motion that our political lieutenant, the member for Richmond—Arthabaska, moved this morning.
Why do we want the House to adopt this motion? As I said, over the past few months, we consulted with most Quebeckers as part of our province-wide consultation process. They told us that they needed this to happen because they are fed up. That is what they said. They are fed up with filling out two tax returns.
The Conservative Party of Canada has always had one fundamental goal, which we pursued under the leadership of Mr. Harper when we cut taxes through 163 different measures. Clearly, the most popular measures were the ones that cut the GST from 7% to 6% and then from 6% to 5% and those that sought to cut red tape in half for all federal departments. It just so happens that the Liberals kept this administrative formality because they know how important it is. It is one of the good things they have done so far.
We are also moving forward with that, because it reflects the desire of all elected officials from Quebec. That desire was reiterated a year ago, as I said at the start of my speech.
There is a bit more of a personal reason that residents of Beauport—Limoilou may not be familiar with. I have knocked on 40,000 doors in my riding. I continue to do so. I even did it this Saturday in -20°C weather. I once again thank the volunteer who was with me that day. He was brave to follow me. The member for Louis-Saint-Laurent also went door to door. All the Conservatives in Canada did that.
Saturday, I knocked on the doors of about 50 homes and the topic came up many times. That idea was put forward publicly by the Conservative Party before the Bloc Québécois began talking about it and well before the unanimous motion in Quebec’s National Assembly, because we had heard about it on the ground and we respect Quebeckers. Our fundamental goal in politics is to make life easier for all Canadians, and particularly to avoid them having to pay for the Prime Minister's mistakes in the future.
Today, we have learned something important in the House, and I asked the member for Vaudreuil—Soulanges a question about this, namely, the fact that the true identity of the Liberal Party of Canada is clear for all to see. Perhaps it does not reflect on all of its individual members, although they are part of it, as they are involved in it, but fundamentally, it is a centralist party that does not care about the demands of Quebeckers for greater control. It does not care about the constitutional anguish and anxiety of Quebeckers. In particular, there is no desire to improve the lives of Quebeckers and Canadians through its government policies.
On the contrary, we have never seen a government spend so much money on so few results for individual Canadians. We sometimes get the impression that the government is working for the bureaucracy and government programs instead of working for Quebeckers and Canadians in general. We have seen that identity throughout history. In 1867, George Brown and the Red Party did not want a large federation like Canada created by two founding peoples working hand in hand
From 1867 to today, we Conservatives have maintained our constitutional and political openness to the grievances of both founding peoples and the legal grievances of the Province of Quebec. Remember the total affront by the Liberals in 1982 when they repatriated the Constitution without the consent of Quebec’s National Assembly. We see history repeating itself.
In 1982, Quebec’s National Assembly did not sign the Constitution. As the bastion of the Francophonie in North America, Quebec certainly had a prominent place at the table. Even political conventions and jurisprudence clearly reflected Quebec's crucial role in the matter of the repatriation of the Constitution, but the Liberals, in their arrogance, brazenly repatriated the Constitution without Quebec’s signature, just as they are now brazenly and shamelessly dismissing the unanimous request by the National Assembly regarding a single income tax return.
Under Mr. Mulroney, we resumed an honourable and enthusiastic dialogue. We made every possible effort, despite the extreme pressure on all sides from the elder Mr. Trudeau. We reached the Charlottetown and Meech Lake accords; we tried to bring Quebec into the fold. Later, Mr. Harper entered into administrative agreements, because the time was not right. People did not want a constitutional debate. Just as our leader, the member for Regina—Qu'Appelle, would like to do, Mr. Harper entered into administrative agreements that helped Quebeckers in their everyday lives, while waiting for the time when we might see a constitutional debate. Later, he got a seat for Quebec at UNESCO, the last thing the Liberals would have done, and the Bloc Québécois would never have had the power to do, as they will never be in power.
Not only did we get a seat for Quebec at UNESCO, but we also acknowledged the existence of the Quebec nation in this assembly, in this Westminster Parliament, on North American soil. We acknowledged that the Quebec people formed a nation within a united Canada. Mr. Harper did that. It was not the Liberals or the Bloc Québécois, who could never do it, as they will never be in power.
What party increased its number of seats in Quebec in the last election? It was not the Bloc Québécois, it was the Conservative Party, which won 12 seats. Unfortunately, due to their many promises, the Liberals were able to win many seats. However, that will change, as they are unable to keep their promises. As the deficit will not be eliminated this year, they will raise taxes over the coming days, months and years if they are re-elected.
By all appearances, this is the same party as it was back in the day. By its very identity, the Liberal Party of Canada has no respect for Quebeckers or for areas of jurisdiction.
A few days after being elected, the Prime Minister and member for Papineau went to New York and told a newspaper that Canada had no national identity. Really? Canada has no national identity? That is not what Quebeckers think. Quebeckers will never be well served by the Liberal Party of Canada. With our leader, the member for Regina—Qu’Appelle, we will give them more independence in their areas of jurisdiction when they seek it.
Monsieur le Président, je veux vous dire que je vais partager mon temps de parole avec le député de Mégantic—L'Érable, qui pourra certainement ajouter à ce que je vais dire.
C'est toujours un honneur de prendre la parole à la Chambre. J'aimerais saluer tous les citoyens et toutes les citoyennes de Beauport—Limoilou qui nous écoutent. Aujourd'hui, nous discutons de la déclaration de revenus unique pour les Québécois et les Québécoises.
Ce que dit le député de Vaudreuil—Soulanges est assez incroyable. Il demande pourquoi les conservateurs abordent ce sujet cette année, alors qu'il s'agit d'une année électorale. Ce n'est pas vrai, nous en avons parlé l'année passée, au mois de mai, lorsque nous avons tenu notre conseil général à Saint-Hyacinthe. D'ailleurs, 400 conservateurs s'y sont présentés, incluant des membres du Bloc québécois qui étaient tannés des chicanes qui ne mènent nulle part. Le Bloc québécois ne sera jamais au pouvoir. Lors dudit conseil, nous avons adopté la motion demandant une déclaration de revenus unique. La motion a reçu l'appui d'une grande majorité de personnes, soit de 90 % des gens. Ce fut donc un grand succès.
Cela étant dit, la raison pour laquelle nous avons voulu présenter cette motion lors du conseil général tenu à Saint-Hyacinthe n'était pas issue d'une idée anodine qui a jailli de nulle part. Notre lieutenant politique du Québec ainsi que les députés conservateurs québécois ont tenu des consultations publiques. Ces consultations étaient intitulées « À l'écoute des Québécois ».
Nous avons tenu ces consultations d'un bout à l'autre du Québec, dans environ 40 municipalités, c'est-à-dire dans tous les districts régionaux du Québec. Ce sont les Québécois eux-mêmes qui nous ont dit qu'ils voulaient qu'on simplifie leur vie de tous les jours. En plus de cela, un mois plus tard, soit au mois de mai 2018, l'Assemblée nationale du Québec a adopté de façon unanime une motion qui demandait au gouvernement fédéral, peu importe quel parti serait au pouvoir après les élections d'octobre 2019, de démarrer le processus pour en arriver à une entente administrative qui permettrait au Québec de percevoir l'impôt fédéral et de le renvoyer au fédéral par la suite. L'objectif fondamental était de rendre la vie des Québécois et des Québécoises plus facile, et de leur donner une façon de faire beaucoup plus facile.
Au bénéfice des gens qui nous écoutent à la maison, j'aimerais relire la motion, parce qu'elle n'est peut-être pas écrite au complet au bas de leur écran. Elle se lit comme suit:
Que, attendu que:
a) la Chambre éprouve un profond respect pour les compétences provinciales et une grande confiance à l’égard des institutions provinciales; [comme c'est le cas pour nous, les conservateurs]
b) les Québécois sont tenus de remplir et de soumettre deux déclarations d’impôt, l’une fédérale et l’autre provinciale;
c) la Chambre souscrit à la réduction des formalités administratives et de la paperasse inutile pour améliorer la qualité de vie des familles;
la Chambre demande au gouvernement de travailler de concert avec le gouvernement du Québec pour mettre en place une déclaration d’impôt unique au Québec, conformément à la motion adoptée à l’unanimité par l’Assemblée nationale du Québec le 15 mai 2018.
Voilà la motion que notre lieutenant politique et député de Richmond—Arthabaska a déposée ce matin.
Pourquoi voulons-nous que la Chambre adopte cette motion? Comme je l'ai dit, au cours des derniers mois, nous avons consulté la majorité des Québécois dans le cadre de consultations panquébécoises. Ces derniers nous ont dit que c'était un besoin pour eux, parce qu'ils en ont marre. C'est le mot qu'ils ont utilisé. Ils en ont marre de devoir remplir deux formulaires de déclaration de revenus.
Depuis toujours, le Parti conservateur du Canada a un objectif fondamental. C'est ce que nous avons fait sous M. Harper, alors que nous avons réduit les impôts au moyen de 163 mesures différentes. Bien entendu, les mesures les plus populaires étaient celles qui visaient la réduction de la TPS de 7 % à 6 % et de 6 % à 5 % et les mesures visant à réduire la paperasse de moitié dans l'ensemble des ministères fédéraux. D'ailleurs, c'est une formalité administrative que les libéraux ont gardée, parce qu'ils savent à quel point c'est important. D'ailleurs, c'est une des bonnes choses qu'ils ont faites jusqu'à maintenant.
De plus, nous allons de l'avant avec cela, parce que cela reflète la volonté de l'ensemble des élus du Québec. Cette volonté a été réitérée il y a un an, comme je l'ai dit au début de mon allocution.
Il y a une raison un peu plus personnelle, que les citoyens de Beauport—Limoilou connaissent peut-être. J'ai cogné à 40 000 portes dans ma circonscription. Je continue de le faire. Je l'ai fait notamment ce samedi à -20 degrés Celsius. Je remercie encore une fois le bénévole qui était avec moi ce jour-là. Il a été courageux de me suivre. Le député de Louis-Saint-Laurent a également fait du porte-à-porte. Tous les conservateurs du Canada en ont fait.
Samedi, j'ai cogné à la porte d'une cinquantaine de maisons et c'est un sujet qui est revenu à maintes reprises. Cette idée, le Parti conservateur l'a mise en avant publiquement bien avant que le Bloc québécois ne commence à en parler et bien avant la motion unanime de l'Assemblée nationale du Québec, parce que nous en avions entendu parler sur le terrain et que nous respectons les Québécois. Notre objectif fondamental en politique est de faciliter la vie à tous les Canadiens et les Canadiennes, et surtout d'éviter que ceux-ci aient à payer pour les erreurs du premier ministre dans l'avenir.
Aujourd'hui, on fait un constat très important à la Chambre, et j'ai posé une question au député de Vaudreuil—Soulanges à ce sujet: on voit l'identité fondamentale du Parti libéral du Canada. Il ne s'agit peut-être pas de ses députés individuels, bien qu'ils en fassent partie, puisqu'ils y participent, mais fondamentalement, c'est un parti centralisateur qui n’en a rien à cirer des demandes des Québécois pour obtenir plus de pouvoirs. Il n'en a rien à cirer des angoisses et des anxiétés constitutionnelles des Québécois. Surtout, il n'a aucun désir d'améliorer la vie des Québécois et des Canadiens par l'entremise de ses politiques gouvernementales.
Au contraire, on n'a jamais vu un gouvernement dépenser autant d'argent et produire aussi peu de résultats pour les Canadiens sur une base individuelle. On a parfois l'impression que le gouvernement travaille pour la bureaucratie et les programmes gouvernementaux au lien de travailler pour les Québécois et les Canadiens en général. Cette identité, on l'a vue au cours de l'histoire. En 1867, George Brown et le Parti rouge ne voulaient pas d'une grande fédération comme le Canada créée par deux peuples fondateurs qui travaillent main dans la main.
De 1867 à aujourd'hui, nous, les conservateurs, avons maintenu notre ouverture constitutionnelle et politique à l'égard des doléances des deux peuples fondateurs et des doléances juridiques de la province du Québec. Rappelons l'affront total des libéraux en 1982, lorsqu'ils ont rapatrié la Constitution sans le consentement de l'Assemblée nationale du Québec. On voit que cela se répète.
L'Assemblée nationale du Québec, en 1982, n'a pas signé la Constitution. Le Québec, en tant que bastion de la Francophonie en Amérique du Nord, avait plus que son mot à dire. Même les conventions politiques et la jurisprudence disaient clairement que le Québec avait une prépondérance importante dans toute cette histoire du rapatriement de la Constitution. Pourtant, les libéraux, sans aucune vergogne et avec arrogance, ont rapatrié la Constitution sans la signature du Québec, tout comme ils rejettent aujourd'hui du revers de la main, sans aucune vergogne et sans aucune gêne, la demande unanime de l'Assemblée nationale concernant la déclaration d'impôt unique.
Avec M. Mulroney, à l'époque, nous avons repris le dialogue avec honneur et enthousiasme. Nous avons fait tous les efforts possibles, malgré les pressions extrêmes exercées un peu partout par M. Trudeau, le père. Nous avons conclu les accords de Charlottetown et du lac Meech; nous avons tout tenté pour intégrer le Québec. Ensuite, M. Harper a conclu des ententes administratives, parce que le fruit n'était pas mûr. Les gens ne voulaient pas de débats constitutionnels. Comme notre de chef le député de Regina—Qu'Appelle veut le faire, M. Harper a conclu des ententes administratives qui vont aider les Québécois dans leur vie de tous les jours, en attendant le jour où nous verrons peut-être un débat constitutionnel. Ensuite, il a donné un siège au Québec à l'UNESCO, la dernière chose que les libéraux auraient faite et ce que le Bloc québécois n'aura jamais le pouvoir de faire, puisqu'il ne prendra jamais le pouvoir.
Non seulement nous avons donné un siège au Québec à l'UNESCO, mais nous avons également reconnu la nation québécoise en cette assemblée, dans ce Parlement westminstérien, sur les terres de l'Amérique du Nord. Nous avons reconnu que le peuple québécois formait une nation au sein d'un Canada uni. C'est M. Harper qui l'a fait. Ce n'étaient pas les libéraux ni le Bloc québécois, qui ne pourraient jamais le faire, puisqu'ils n'auront jamais le pouvoir.
Quel parti a augmenté son nombre de sièges au Québec lors des dernières élections? Ce n'est pas le Bloc québécois, c'est le Parti conservateur, qui a gagné 12 sièges. Les libéraux, malheureusement, en raison de leurs nombreuses promesses, ont réussi à gagner plusieurs sièges. Toutefois, cela va changer, puisqu'ils seront incapables de remplir leurs promesses. Comme le déficit ne sera pas épongé cette année, ils vont augmenter les impôts et les taxes au cours des jours, des mois et des années à venir s'ils sont reportés au pouvoir.
Comme on peut le constater, c'est le même parti qu'à l'époque. Le Parti libéral du Canada, dans son identité propre, n'a aucun respect pour les Québécois ou les champs de compétence.
Le premier ministre et député de Papineau, quelques jours après avoir été élu, est allé à New York et a dit à unjournal qu’il n’y avait pas d’identité nationale au Canada. Vraiment? Il n’y a pas d’identité nationale au Canada? Ce n’est pas ce que pensent les Québécois. Les Québécois ne seront jamais bien servis par le Parti libéral du Canada. Nous, avec notre chef de Regina—Qu’Appelle, nous allons leur donner plus d’autonomie dans leurs champs de compétence lorsqu’ils le demanderont.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-02-05 13:50 [p.25310]
Mr. Speaker, I know the member and respect him. We were on the OGGO committee together. He spoke to me in French so I will speak to him in English.
Do members know why the Liberals speak about the technicalities of the matter? It is because they do not want to talk about the matter at hand, which is whether they are for or against our ideas. They are against them. Every time the government talks about complexities and technicalities, it is because it does not want to face reality.
This is a good idea. It does not come from them. It comes from us. More than that, as I said during my speech, it is not possible for Liberal MPs in this land to do differently from what they are doing today, because this is part of their core identity.
They do not want to respect decentralization. They do not believe in federalism. They do not believe in this country. They believe that everything should be centralized in Ottawa. First and foremost, they do not believe in French Canada.
Monsieur le Président, je connais le député et je le respecte. Nous siégeons tous deux au comité des opérations gouvernementales et des prévisions budgétaires. Il m'a parlé en français, alors je vais lui parler en anglais.
Les députés savent-ils ce qui explique que les libéraux s'attardent aux détails de la question? C'est parce qu'ils ne veulent pas se mouiller sur le fond de la question, soit de savoir s'ils appuient nos idées ou non. Ils ne les appuient pas. Quand le gouvernement s'attarde aux détails et aux points techniques, c'est qu'il cherche à éviter de faire face à la réalité.
Il s'agit d'une bonne idée, mais elle ne vient pas d'eux. Elle vient de nous. En outre, comme je l'ai souligné pendant mon discours, il est absolument impossible pour les députés libéraux au pays d'agir différemment de ce qu'ils font présentement; cela fait partie de leur ADN.
Ils ne veulent pas de la décentralisation. Ils ne croient pas au fédéralisme. Ils ne croient pas au Canada. Ils considèrent que tout devrait se décider depuis Ottawa. Surtout, ils ne croient pas au Canada francophone.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-02-05 13:52 [p.25310]
Mr. Speaker, how typical of Canadian socialists. It is the opinion of the majority, because Quebec's National Assembly voted unanimously for a motion asking the federal government to begin administrative-level talks on a single tax return. It is always the same thing: every time the majority goes against what they believe in, Canadian socialists say that the majority's opinion is hogwash.
I am not the one pitting Quebeckers against each other; the Liberals are. I am not the one disrespecting Quebeckers; the Liberals are. The Liberals are not the ones who will increase Quebec's jurisdictional powers; the Conservatives will be, after October 21, 2019.
Monsieur le Président, cela est typique des socialistes au Canada. C'est l’opinion de la majorité, puisque c'est l’Assemblée nationale du Québec qui a voté à l’unanimité une motion demandant au fédéral d’entamer des discussions administratives par rapport à la déclaration de revenus unique. C'est typique, chaque fois que l’opinion de la majorité va à l’encontre de leur croyance, les socialistes canadiens disent que c’est basé sur des balivernes.
Ce n’est pas moi qui oppose les Québécois les uns aux autres, ce sont les libéraux. Ce n’est pas moi qui ne respecte pas les Québécois, ce sont les libéraux. Ce ne sont pas les libéraux qui vont pouvoir augmenter le pouvoir des champs de compétence des Québécois, ce seront les conservateurs, le 21 octobre 2019.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-02-05 13:54 [p.25311]
Mr. Speaker, it is this party which has repatriated the Constitution without the Quebec National Assembly. It is the Trudeau father who put huge pressure on Newfoundland not to open on the day of the Meech Lake vote. This is the reality of history.
Monsieur le Président, on parle du parti qui a rapatrié la Constitution sans l'aval de l'Assemblée nationale du Québec. C'est Trudeau père qui avait fait pression sur Terre-Neuve pour qu'elle se ravise au moment du vote sur l'accord du lac Meech. C'est ce qui s'est réellement passé.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-11-06 16:04 [p.23385]
Mr. Speaker, I am very pleased to rise. As usual, I would like to say hello to the many people of Beauport—Limoilou who are watching us live on CPAC or on platforms such as Facebook and Twitter later.
I would like to comment on the speech by the Minister of Status of Women. I found it somewhat hypocritical when she said that she hopes her opposition colleagues will support the bill and the budget's feminist measures, which she presented, when the Liberals actually and strategically included all these measures in an omnibus bill, the 2018 budget implementation bill. Clearly, we, the Conservatives, will not vote in favour of Bill C-86 because it once again presents a deficit budget that is devastating for Canada's economy and for Canadian taxpayers. It is somewhat hypocritical for the minister to tell us that she hopes we will support the measures to give women more power when she herself was involved in hiding these measures in an omnibus bill.
I would like say, as I often say, that it is a privilege for me to speak today, but not for the same reason this time. I might have been denied the opportunity to speak to Bill C-86 because this morning, the Liberal government imposed closure on the House. It imposed time allocation on the speeches on the budget. This is the first time in three years that I am seeing this in the House. Since 2015, we have had three budget presentations. This is the sixth time we are debating a budget since 2015 during this 42nd Parliament. This is the first time I have seen the majority of my Conservative colleagues and the majority of my NDP colleagues being denied speaking time to discuss something as important as Bill C-86 to implement budgetary measures. The budget implementation legislation is what formalizes the budget the government brought down in February. Implementation is done in two phases. This is the second phase and it implements the Liberal government's budget.
By chance, I have the opportunity to speak about the budget today and I want to do so because I would like to remind those listening about some key elements of this budget which, in our view, are going in the wrong direction. First, the Liberals are continuing with their habit, which has become ingrained in their psyches. They are continuing with their deficit approach. It appears that they are in a financial bind. That is why they are creating new taxes like the carbon tax. They also lack the personal ability to govern. You might say that it is not in their genes to balance a budget. The Liberals' budget measures are bad and their economic plan is bad. They are so incapable of balancing the budget that they cannot even give us a timeline. They cannot even tell us when they think they will balance the budget.
This is the first time that we have seen this in the history of our great Canadian parliamentary democracy, established in 1867, and probably before that, in the parliaments of the United Canadas. This is the first time since 1867 that a government has not been able to say when they will balance the budget. I am not one for political rhetoric, but this is not rhetoric, this is a fact.
The Liberals made big promises to us in that regard during the 2015 election. Unfortunately, the Liberals put off keeping those promises. They promised to balance the budget by 2019. Now, they have put that off indefinitely, or until 2045, according to the Parliamentary Budget Officer, a position that, let us not forget, was created by Mr. Harper. That great democrat wanted to ensure that there was budgetary accountability in Parliament. The Liberals also promised that they would run small deficits of $10 billion for the first three years and then balance the budget. The first year, they ran a deficit of $30 billion. The second year, they ran a deficit of $20 billion. The third year, they ran a deficit of $19 billion. Just a week or two ago, we found out from the Parliamentary Budget Officer that the Liberals miscalculated and another $4 billion in debt has been added to that amount. The Liberals have racked up a deficit of $22 billion. That is 6.5 times more than what they set out in their plan to balance the budget.
The other key budget promise the Liberals made was that the small deficits of $10 billion would be used to build new infrastructure as part of a $187-billion program.
To date, only $9 billion has flowed from the coffers to pay for infrastructure projects. Where is the other $170 billion? The Prime Minister is so acutely aware of the problem that he shuffled his cabinet this summer. He appointed the former international trade minister to the infrastructure portfolio, and the new infrastructure minister's mandate letter says he absolutely has to get on this troublesome issue of money not being used to fund infrastructure projects.
There is a reason the Liberals do not want to give us more than two or three days to discuss the budget. They do not want the Conservatives and the NDP to say quite as much about the budget as they would like to say because we have a lot of bad things to tell them and Canadians.
Fortunately, we live in a democracy, and we can express ourselves in the media, so all Canadians can hear what I have to say. However, it is important for us to express our ideas in the House too because listening to what we say here is how Canadians learn what happened in history.
Things are not as rosy as the Liberals claim when it comes to the economy and their plan. For instance, in terms of exports, they have not been able to export Canadian oil as they should. We have one of the largest reserves in the world, but the Liberals tightened rules surrounding the National Energy Board in recent years. As a result, several projects have died, such as the northern gateway project and energy east, and the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain project, which the Liberals managed to save in the end using $4.5 billion of taxpayers money. In short, our exports are not doing very well.
As for investments, from 2015 to 2017, Canadian investments in the U.S. increased by 65%, while American investments in Canada dropped by 52%.
On top of that, one thing that affects the daily lives of Canadians even more is the massive debt, which could jeopardize all our future projects for our glorious federation. In 2018, the total accumulated debt is $670 billion. That comes out to $47,000 per family. Not counting any student debt, car payments or mortgage, every family already has a debt of $47,000, and a good percentage of that has increased over the past three years because of the Liberals' fiscal mismanagement.
That is not to mention the interest on the debt. I am sure that Canadians watching at home are outraged by this. In 2020, the interest on the debt will be $39 billion a year. That is $3 billion more than we invest every year in health.
The government boasts about how it came up with a wonderful plan for federal health transfers with the provinces, but that plan does not respect provincial jurisdictions. What is more, it imposes conditions on the provinces that they must meet in order to be able to access those transfers. We did not do that in the Harper era. We are investing $36 billion per year in health care and spending $39 billion servicing debt. Imagine what we could have done with that money.
I will close by talking about the labour shortage. I would have liked to have 20 minutes so I could say more, but we cannot take the time we want because of the gag order. It is sad that I cannot keep going.
Quebec needs approximately 150,000 more workers. I am appalled that the minister would make a mockery of my questions on three occasions. Meanwhile, the member for Louis-Hébert had the nerve to say that the Conservatives oppose immigration. That has nothing to do with it. We support immigration, but that represents only 25% of the solution to the labour shortage. This is a serious crisis in Quebec.
There are many things under federal jurisdiction that the government could do and that, in combination with immigration, would help fill labour shortages. However, all the Liberals can do is make fun of me, simply because I am a member of the opposition. I hosted economic round tables in Quebec City with my colleagues, and all business owners were telling us that this is a serious crisis. The Liberals should act like a good government and stop making fun of us every time we speak. Actually, it is even worse; they want to prevent us from speaking.
Monsieur le Président, je suis très heureux de prendre la parole. J'aimerais, comme d'habitude, saluer tous les citoyens et les citoyennes de Beauport—Limoilou qui nous écoutent en grand nombre sur CPAC ou sur les plateformes comme Facebook et Twitter plus tard.
J'aimerais faire un commentaire sur le discours de la ministre de la Condition féminine. Je trouve un peu hypocrite qu'elle dise espérer que ses collègues de l'opposition appuieront le projet de loi et les mesures féministes de son budget, qu'elle nous a présentées, alors que les libéraux ont justement et stratégiquement inclus toutes ces mesures dans un projet de loi omnibus, le projet de loi d'exécution du budget de 2018. De toute évidence, nous, les conservateurs, ne voterons pas pour le projet de loi C-86, car il présente encore une fois un budget déficitaire et dévastateur pour l'économie canadienne, pour les payeurs de taxes canadiens. C'est un peu hypocrite que la ministre nous dise qu'elles espère que nous appuierons les mesures pour donner plus de pouvoir aux femmes, alors qu'elle a elle-même participé à cette stratégie de camouflage au sein d'un projet de loi omnibus.
Je voudrais dire aux citoyens que c'est un privilège pour moi de prendre la parole aujourd'hui, comme je le dis souvent, mais pas pour la même raison cette fois. J'aurais pu ne pas pouvoir parler du projet de loi C-86, puisque, ce matin, le gouvernement libéral a imposé un bâillon à la Chambre, comme on dit en bon québécois. Il a imposé une attribution de temps aux discours relatifs au budget. C'est la première fois en trois ans que je vois cela à la Chambre. Depuis 2015, nous avons eu trois présentations de budget. C'est la sixième fois que nous débattons d'un budget depuis 2015, en cette 42e législature. C'est la première fois que je constate que la majorité des mes collègues conservateurs et la majorité des mes collègues du NPD ne pourront pas prendre la parole pour s'exprimer sur une chose aussi importante que le projet de loi C-86, qui porte sur l'exécution des mesures budgétaires. La loi d'exécution du budget, en fait, c'est ce qui rend réel le budget présenté par le gouvernement en février. L'exécution se fait en deux temps. Nous sommes dans la deuxième partie, qui met en oeuvre le budget du gouvernement libéral.
Par hasard, j'ai la chance de parler du budget aujourd'hui et je veux en profiter, parce que je voudrais rappeler aux gens qui nous écoutent actuellement certains des attributs phares de ce projet de loi sur le budget qui, selon nous, vont dans la mauvaise direction. D'abord, les libéraux perpétuent leur habitude, qui est carrément rendue psychologique chez eux. Ils poursuivent cette approche déficitaire. Il apparaît qu'ils sont dans une incapacité financière. C'est pourquoi ils créent de nouvelles taxes comme la taxe sur le carbone. Ils ont aussi une incapacité gouvernementale qui semble personnelle. On dirait que ce n'est pas dans leurs gènes de pouvoir équilibrer un budget. Les mesures des budgétaires des libéraux sont mauvaises et leur plan économique est mauvais. Ils sont tellement incapables d'équilibrer le budget qu'ils ne peuvent même pas nous donner une date d'échéance. Ils ne peuvent même pas nous dire quand ils pensent arriver à un équilibre.
C'est la première fois qu'on voit cela dans l'histoire de notre belle démocratie parlementaire canadienne, depuis 1867, et probablement avant, dans les Parlements qui ont siégé avant cette date dans le Canada-Uni. Depuis 1867, c'est la première fois qu'un gouvernement ne peut pas donner une date de retour à l'équilibre budgétaire. Je n'aime pas faire de la rhétorique politique, mais ce n'est pas de la rhétorique, c'est un fait.
Les libéraux nous avaient fait de grandes promesses à cet égard en 2015 lors de l'élection. Malheureusement, les libéraux les ont reportées. Ils nous avaient promis un retour à l'équilibre budgétaire pour 2019. Maintenant, c'est remis aux calendes grecques, c'est-à-dire, à 2045, si l'on se fie au directeur parlementaire du budget, une institution créée par M. Harper, il faut le rappeler. Ce grand démocrate voulait qu'il y ait de la responsabilité budgétaire au Parlement. Également, les libéraux nous avaient promis qu'ils feraient des petits déficits de 10 milliards de dollars pour les trois premières années, avant d'atteindre l'équilibre budgétaire. La première année, ils ont fait un déficit de 30 milliards de dollars. La deuxième année, ils ont fait un déficit de 20 milliards de dollars. La troisième année, ils ont fait un déficit de 19 milliards de dollars. Or, le directeur parlementaire du budget nous annonce que, finalement, un montant de 4 milliards de dollars qui a été mal calculé par le gouvernement libéral se rajoute à la dette. On l'a su il y a une ou deux semaines. On est rendu à 22 milliards de dollars. C'est 6,5 fois plus que ce que les libéraux avaient prévu dans leur plan de retour à l'équilibre budgétaire.
L'autre promesse budgétaire phare des libéraux, c'était que les petits déficits de 10 milliards de dollars allaient être au service de la construction de nouveaux projets d'infrastructure, dans un programme de 187 milliards de dollars.
À ce jour, seulement 9 milliards de dollars sont sortis des coffres pour subvenir à des projets d'infrastructure. Il manque encore 170 milliards de dollars. Où sont-ils? Le premier ministre est tellement conscient du problème qu'il a lui-même fait un remaniement de son Cabinet l'été dernier. Il a nommé l'ancien ministre du Commerce international au poste de ministre de l'Infrastructure, et la lettre de mandat de ce dernier dit qu'il doit absolument se pencher sur cette fâcheuse situation de l'argent qui ne sort pas des coffres pour financer les projets d'infrastructure.
Ce n'est pas pour rien que les libéraux ne veulent pas que nous ayons plus que deux ou trois jours pour discuter du budget. Ils ne veulent pas que les conservateurs et le NPD s'expriment sur le budget autant qu'ils le pourraient, parce que nous aurions beaucoup de mauvaises choses à leur dire et à dire aux Canadiens.
Heureusement, nous sommes dans une démocratie et nous pouvons nous exprimer par l'entremise des médias, alors les Canadiens peuvent savoir ce que je vais dire. Toutefois, il est important que nous puissions nous exprimer à la Chambre également, car c'est en écoutant ce que nous disons ici que les Canadiens apprennent ce qui est arrivé dans l'histoire.
Les choses ne sont pas aussi roses que le prétendent les libéraux en ce qui a trait à l'économie et à leur plan. Par exemple, sur le plan des exportations, on est incapable d'exporter le pétrole canadien comme on le devrait. Nous possédons l'une des plus grandes réserves au monde, mais les libéraux ont resserré les règles à l'Office national de l'énergie au cours des dernières années. Cela a fait en sorte que de nombreux projets sont tombés à l'eau, comme le projet Trans Mountain de Kinder Morgan, que les libéraux ont finalement sauvé avec 4,5 milliards de dollars des contribuables, le projet Northern Gateway et le corridor de l'Est. Bref, en matière d'exportation, cela ne va pas très bien.
En ce qui a trait aux investissements, de 2015 à 2017, les investissements canadiens aux États-Unis ont augmenté de 65 %, alors que les investissements américains au Canada ont baissé de 52 %.
Par ailleurs, une chose qui touche davantage la vie quotidienne de nos concitoyens et nos concitoyennes, c'est la dette massive qui pourrait mettre à mal tous nos futurs projets pour notre glorieuse fédération. En 2018, la dette totale accumulée est de 670 milliards de dollars. Cela équivaut à 47 000 $ par famille. Alors, avant même de penser aux dettes étudiantes, aux paiements de voiture et à l'hypothèque, chaque famille a aussi une dette de 47 000 $, dont un bon pourcentage a augmenté au cours des trois dernières années à cause de la mauvaise gestion budgétaire des libéraux.
D'ailleurs, c'est sans parler des frais d'intérêt sur la dette. Je suis certain que cela enrage les citoyens qui nous écoutent. En 2020, les frais d'intérêt sur la dette seront de 39 milliards de dollars par année. C'est 3 milliards de dollars de plus que ce que nous investissons chaque année en santé.
Le gouvernement se targue d'avoir fait avec les provinces un merveilleux plan de transferts fédéraux en santé, mais ce plan ne respectait pas les champs de compétence provinciaux. De plus, il a imposé des conditions aux provinces pour avoir accès à l'argent des transferts fédéraux, ce que nous n'avions pas fait à l'époque du gouvernement Harper. Nous investissons 36 milliards de dollars par année en santé et notre service de la dette est de 39 milliards de dollars. Imaginons tout ce que nous pourrions faire avec cela.
Je terminerai sur la pénurie de main-d'oeuvre. J'aurais aimé avoir 20 minutes afin d'en dire plus, mais à cause du bâillon, il nous est impossible de parler autant que nous le voulons. C'est triste que je ne puisse pas continuer.
À Québec, on a besoin d'environ 150 000 travailleurs de plus. J'ai trouvé cela ahurissant que la ministre tourne mes questions en dérision à trois reprises. Le député de Louis-Hébert, quant à lui, a osé dire que nous, les conservateurs, n'aimions pas l'immigration. Cela n'a aucun rapport. Nous sommes pour l'immigration, mais cela représente seulement 25 % de la solution à la pénurie de main d'oeuvre. À Québec, la crise est grave.
Il y a plusieurs choses que le gouvernement fédéral peut faire qui relèvent de son champ de compétence et qui, combinées à l'immigration, aideront à pallier les pénuries de main-d'oeuvre. Toutefois, tout ce que les libéraux sont capables de faire, c'est se moquer de moi, seulement parce que je suis un député de l'opposition. J'ai pourtant organisé des tables rondes économiques à Québec avec mes collègues, et tous les entrepreneurs disaient que la crise est grave. Les libéraux devraient se comporter en bon gouvernement et arrêter de se moquer de nous chaque fois que nous prenons la parole. En fait, c'est encore pire; ils veulent nous empêcher de parler.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-11-06 16:15 [p.23387]
Mr. Speaker, that is such a dishonourable question. He is doing exactly what I just criticized his colleague from Louis-Hébert for doing. That is fearmongering. The Liberals are doing exactly what they are accusing us of doing. They are making a mockery of what we are saying and the work we are doing as Her Majesty's opposition.
When we were in power, over 300,000 immigrants entered Canada every year, and there were no crises at our borders because we made sure that the our immigration system was orderly, fair and peaceful.
At an economic round table, the executive director of the Association des économistes du Québec told us that immigration was only 25% of the solution to the labour shortage. Even if we welcomed 500,000 immigrants a year, that would still not completely solve the labour shortage.
We need to help seniors who want to return to the workforce. We need to allow foreign students in our universities to stay longer. We need to make sure that fewer young men in Quebec drop out of high school. All kinds of action could be taken, but all the Liberals are capable of doing is launching completely false insinuations and hyper-partisan attacks on us.
Monsieur le Président, c'est tellement déshonorant comme question. Il fait exactement ce que je viens de reprocher à son collègue de Louis-Hébert. C'est du fearmongering, pour employer le terme anglais. Les libéraux font exactement ce qu'ils nous accusent de faire. Ils tournent en dérision ce que nous disons et le travail que nous faisons ici en tant qu'opposition de Sa Majesté.
Lorsque nous étions au pouvoir, plus de 300 000 immigrants entraient chaque année au Canada et il n'y avait aucune crise à nos frontières, puisque nous, nous faisions en sorte que notre système d'immigration soit ordonné, juste et paisible.
Le directeur général de l'Association des économistes du Québec nous a dit, lors d'une table ronde économique, que l'immigration était seulement 25 % de la solution à la pénurie de main-d'oeuvre. Même si on faisait entrer 500 000 immigrants par année, cela ne réglerait pas complètement la pénurie de main-d'oeuvre.
Il faut aider les aînés qui veulent revenir sur le marché du travail. Il faut permettre aux étudiants étrangers dans nos universités de rester plus longtemps. Il faut faire en sorte que moins de jeunes hommes au Québec abandonnent l'école secondaire. Il y a toutes sortes de mesures à prendre, mais tout ce que les libéraux sont capables de faire, c'est de nous envoyer des insinuations complètement erronées et des attaques hyper partisanes.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-10-23 14:58 [p.22781]
Mr. Speaker, unlike the Liberal members from Quebec, the Canadian Federation of Independent Business believes that there is indeed a labour shortage in Quebec.
Ms. Hébert, vice-president of the CFIB, noted that some businesses have had to scale back their operations or even shut down temporarily.
In other words, in Quebec City and around the province, the labour shortage is definitely having an impact on the ground. A wide range of possible solutions are within the purview of the federal government.
Why, then, is the Liberal government not taking immediate concrete action to come up with a concrete solution to this serious problem?
Monsieur le Président, contrairement aux députés libéraux du Québec, la Fédération canadienne de l'entreprise indépendante estime qu'il y a bel et bien une pénurie de main-d'oeuvre à Québec.
La vice-présidente de la FCEI, Mme Hébert, précise que certaines entreprises « doivent réduire leurs activités, voire même fermer temporairement. »
En d'autres mots, à Québec et dans la province, la pénurie de main-d'oeuvre a bel et bien des contrecoups sur le terrain. Il y a une panoplie de solutions qui sont du ressort du champ de compétence fédéral.
Alors, pourquoi le gouvernement libéral ne prend-il pas des mesures concrètes dès maintenant pour trouver une solution concrète à cette grave situation?
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-05-31 16:35 [p.20032]
Mr. Speaker, I thank my colleague for his questions. Questions like these are why I have been urging him to join the Conservatives for three years, along with the member for Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, though I am not too sure about him, since his socialism is a little too intense. I think he may be too deeply entrenched in socialism.
About Davie, it takes political leadership. In 2015, one month before the election, we awarded the contract for the Asterix. It was the crowning achievement of Canada's largest shipyard, which is located in Lévis. Social transfers are also very important. The Conservative government provided health and education transfers with no strings attached. We fixed the fiscal imbalance by giving $800 million to Quebec. Charest acknowledged that in no uncertain terms.
First and foremost, as we have been proving since 1867, and as the history books will surely show, we are a Conservative political government when we form government. We support decentralization and respect the spirit and the letter of the Constitution, the British North America Act, our greatest constitutional document. We respect provincial and federal areas of jurisdiction. That is what is so great about the Conservatives.
Monsieur le Président, je remercie mon collègue de ses questions. C'est pour cette raison que je l'invite depuis trois ans à se joindre aux conservateurs, de même que le député de Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, bien que je ne suis pas sûr par contre, car son socialisme est un peu trop intense. Je pense qu'il est trop ancré dans le socialisme.
Pour la Davie, cela prend un leadership politique. En 2015, un mois avant les élections, nous avons octroyé le contrat pour l'Asterix. C'est la grande réussite du plus grand chantier naval du Canada, à Lévis. Les transferts sociaux sont très importants. Sous le gouvernement conservateur, nous avons fait des transferts en matière de santé et d'éducation, sans aucune condition. Nous avons réglé le déséquilibre fiscal en accordant une enveloppe budgétaire de 800 millions de dollars au Québec. Charest l'avait reconnu sans détour.
D'abord et avant tout, et depuis 1867, nous le prouvons, et je crois que les annales historiques en sont garantes. Nous sommes un gouvernement conservateur et politique lorsque nous formons un gouvernement qui est décentralisateur, qui respecte l'esprit et la lettre de la Constitution, l'Acte de l'Amérique du Nord britannique, notre plus beau document constitutif. Nous respectons les champs de compétence provinciale et fédérale. C'est ce qui est beau avec les conservateurs.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-05-30 20:43 [p.19956]
Mr. Speaker, here we are in the House, on Wednesday, May 30, at 8:45. I should mention that it is 8:45 p.m., for the many residents of Beauport—Limoilou who I am sure are tuning in. To all my constituents, good evening.
We are debating this evening because the Liberal government tabled very few significant government bills over the winter. Instead, they tabled an astounding number of private members' bills on things like swallows' day and beauty month. Sometimes my colleagues and I can hardly help laughing at this pile of utterly trivial bills. I also think that this process of randomly selecting the members who get to table bills is a bit past its prime. Maybe it should be reviewed. At the same time, I understand that it is up to each member to decide what kind of bill is important to him or her.
The reason we have had to sit until midnight for two days now is that, as my colleague from Perth—Wellington said, the government has been acting like a typical university student over the past three months. That comparison is a bit ridiculous, but it is true. The government is behaving like those students who wait until the last minute to do their assignments and are still working on them at 3 a.m. the day before they are due because they were too busy partying all semester. Members know what I mean, even though that paints a rather stereotypical picture of students; most of them do not do things like that.
In short, we have a government that, at the end of the session, has realized that time is running out and that it only has three weeks left to pass some of its legislative measures, some of which are rather lengthy bills that are key to the government's legislative agenda. One has to wonder about that.
The Liberals believe these bills to be important. However, because of their lack of responsibility over the past three months, we were unable to debate these major bills that will make significant changes to our society. Take for example, Bill C-76, which has to do with the electoral reforms that the Liberals want to make to the voting system, the way we vote, protection of the vote, and identification. There is also Bill C-49 on transportation in Canada, a very lengthy bill that we have not had time to examine properly.
Today we are debating Bill C-57 on sustainable development. This is an important topic, but for the past three years I have been getting sick and tired of seeing the Liberal government act as though it has a monopoly on environmental righteousness. I searched online to get an accurate picture of the record of Mr. Harper's Conservative government from 2006 to 2015, and I came across some fascinating results. I want to share this information very honestly with the House and my Liberal colleagues so that they understand that even though we did not talk incessantly about the environment, we achieved some excellent concrete results.
I want to read a quote from www.mediaterre.org, a perfectly legitimate site:
Stephen Harper's Canadian government released its 2007 budget on March 19. The budget allocated $4.5 billion in new investments to some 20 environmental projects. These measures include a $2,000 rebate for all electronic-vehicle or alternative-fuel purchases, and the creation of a $1.5-billion EcoTrust program to help provinces reduce greenhouse gas emissions.
The Liberals often criticize us for talking about the environment, but we did take action. For example, we set targets. We proposed reducing emissions to 30% below 2005 levels by 2030. The Liberals even retained these same targets as part of the Paris agreement.
They said we had targets, but no plan. That is not true. Not only did we have the $1.5-billion ecotrust program, but we also had a plan that involved federal co-operation.
Allow me to quote the premier of Quebec at the time, Jean Charest, who was praising the plan that was going to help Quebec—his province, my province—meet its greenhouse gas emissions targets. Jean Charest and Mr. Harper issued a joint press release.
Mr. Harper said, “Canada's New Government is investing to protect Canadians from the consequences of climate change, air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions.” He was already recognizing it in 2007.
Mr. Charest said, “In June 2006, our government adopted its plan to combat climate change. This plan has been hailed as one of the finest in North America. With Ottawa contributing financially to this Quebec initiative, we will be able to achieve our objectives.”
It was Mr. Charest who said that in 2007, at a press conference with the prime minister.
I will continue to read the joint press release from the two governments, “As a result of this federal funding, the Government of Quebec has indicated that it will be able to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 13.8 million tonnes of carbon dioxide or equivalent below its anticipated 2012 level.”
What is more, the $1.5-billion ecotrust that was supposed to be allocated and was allocated to every province provided $339 million to Quebec alone. That was going to allow Quebec to engage in the following: investments to improve access to new technologies for the trucking sector; a program to develop renewable energy sources in rural regions; a pilot plant for production of cellulosic ethanol; promotion of geothermal heat pumps in the residential sector; support for technological research and innovation for the reduction and sequestration of greenhouse gases. This is probably one of those programs that is helping us make our oil sands increasingly environmentally friendly by allowing us to capture the carbon that comes from converting the sands to oil. There are also measures for the capture of biogas from landfill sites, for waste treatment and energy recovery, and finally for Canada ecotrust.
I invite our Liberal colleagues to listen to what I am going to say. In 2007, Steven Guilbeault of Greenpeace said the following: “We are pleased to see that after negotiating for more than a year, Quebec has finally obtained the money it needs to move towards meeting the Kyoto targets.”
Who made it possible for Quebec to move towards meeting its Kyoto objectives? It was the Harper government, a Conservative government, which established the $1.5-billion ecotrust fund in 2007 with monies from the budget surplus.
Not only did we have a plan to meet the targets we proposed, but this was also a plan that could only be implemented if the provinces agreed to the targets. It was a plan that was funded through the budget surplus, that did not further tax Canadians, and that provided money directly, without any conditions, other than the fundamental requirement that it had to help reduce climate change, which was philosophically important. Any and all measures taken to reach that goal were left entirely to the discretion of the provinces.
Mr. Harper, like a good Conservative who supported decentralization and like a true federalist leader, said that he was giving $400 million to each province so it could move forward with its plan.
By 2015, after 10 years of Conservative government, the country had not only weathered the worst economic crisis, the worst recession in history since the 1930s, but it had also reduced greenhouse gas emissions by 2% and increased the gross domestic product for all Canadians while lopping three points off the GST and lowering income taxes for families with two children by an average of $2,000 per year.
If that is not co-operative federalism, if those are not real results, if that is not a concrete environmental plan, then I do not know what is. Add to that the fact that we achieved royal assent for no less than 25 to 35 bills every session.
In contrast, during this session, in between being forced to grapple with scandals involving the carbon tax, illegal border crossings, and the Trans Mountain project, this government has barely managed to come up with four genuinely important bills.
By contrast, we expanded parks and protected Canada's wetlands. Our environmental record is exceptional.
Furthermore, we allowed debate. For example, we debated Bill C-23 on electoral reform for four days. The Liberals' electoral reform was debated for two hours.
I am sad, but I am happy to debate until midnight because debating is my passion.
Monsieur le Président, nous voici à la Chambre le mercredi 30 mai à 20 h 45. Je dois préciser que c'est le soir, pour tous les résidants de Beauport—Limoilou qui nous écoutent en grand nombre, j'en suis sûr. Je les salue.
Nous débattons ce soir parce que le gouvernement libéral, tout au long de la session d'hiver, a proposé peu de projets de loi gouvernementaux d'envergure. On a plutôt vu un nombre incroyable de projets de loi d'initiative parlementaire sur le jour des hirondelles ou sur le mois de la beauté. Parfois, mes collègues et moi rigolons presque de cette accumulation de projets de loi presque complètement anodins. D'ailleurs, je trouve un peu moribond ce processus de sélection aléatoire du député qui va pouvoir présenter un projet de loi. Peut-être qu'on devrait le revoir. En même temps, je comprends qu'il revient à chaque député de déterminer quel genre de projet de loi est important pour lui.
Si nous devons siéger jusqu'à minuit depuis maintenant deux jours, c'est parce que, tout comme l'a dit mon collègue de Perth—Wellington, le gouvernement, au cours des trois derniers mois, a agi comme un étudiant universitaire typique. C'est un parallèle un peu loufoque, mais cela tient quand même debout. Il s'est comporté comme un étudiant qui se rend compte que la remise du travail a lieu le lendemain matin et qui commence à le faire à 3 heures du matin parce qu'il a fait la fête tout le long de la session. On voit un peu ce que je veux dire, même si c'est une image un peu tronquée des étudiants, puisque la plupart ne font pas cela.
Bref, on se retrouve avec un gouvernement qui, en fin de session, prend conscience que le temps file et qu'il lui reste à peine trois semaines pour faire adopter certaines de ses mesures législatives qu'on pourrait juger plus volumineuses et importantes pour son programme législatif. Encore là, on pourrait se poser des questions.
Même si certains projets de loi sont importants aux yeux des libéraux, à cause de leur manque de sérieux des trois derniers mois, nous n'avons pas pu débattre des projets de loi majeurs qui vont apporter de grands changements dans notre société, comme le projet de loi C-76. Celui-ci porte sur les réformes électorales que les libéraux veulent appliquer relativement au mode de scrutin, à notre façon de voter, à la protection du vote et à l'identification, par exemple. Mentionnons aussi le projet de loi C-49 sur le transport au Canada, un projet de loi très volumineux que nous n'avons pas eu le temps d'évaluer convenablement.
Aujourd'hui, nous parlons du projet de loi C-57 sur le développement durable. C'est donc très intéressant. Cependant, j'en ai un peu marre d'entendre le gouvernement libéral nous répéter, depuis trois ans, qu'il a le monopole de la vertu en ce qui a trait à l'environnement. J'ai fait quelques recherches sur Internet pour voir le bilan précis et tangible du gouvernement conservateur de M. Harper de 2006 à 2015. J'ai fait des découvertes assez incroyables. J'aimerais en faire part de manière très honnête à la Chambre et à mes collègues libéraux pour qu'ils comprennent que, bien que nous ne nous gargarisions pas d'un discours environnementaliste, nous avons obtenu des résultats tangibles fort intéressants.
Voici donc ce que j'ai trouvé sur www.mediaterre.org, un site Web parfaitement légitime:
Le gouvernement canadien de Stephen Harper a rendu public le 19 mars dernier son budget 2007. Celui-ci prévoit 4,5 milliards de nouveaux investissements liés à une vingtaine de projets environnementaux. Ces mesures impliquent notamment la déduction de 2000$ liée à tout achat de véhicule écoénergétique ou à carburant de remplacement, mais également la mise sur pied d’une Éco-fiducie de 1,5 milliards afin d’aider les provinces à diminuer l’émission de gaz à effet de serre.
Souvent, les libéraux nous accusent d'avoir parlé d'environnement, puisque nous l'avons quand même fait à quelques égards. Nous avons notamment proposé des cibles. Par exemple, nous avons proposé de baisser les émissions de 30 % d'ici 2030 par rapport aux niveaux de 2005. Or les libéraux ont conservé ces mêmes cibles par l'entremise de l'Accord de Paris.
Ils nous disaient que nous avions des cibles, mais pas de plan. Ce n'est pas vrai. Non seulement nous avions l'écoFiducie de 1,5 milliard de dollars, mais c'était aussi un plan qui s'inscrivait dans une collaboration fédérale.
Je vais citer des passages du premier ministre du Québec à l'époque, Jean Charest, qui faisait l'éloge de ce plan qui allait aider le Québec — sa province, ma province — à atteindre ses objectifs de réduction de gaz à effet de serre. Jean Charest et M. Harper ont difusé ensemble un communiqué.
M. Harper a dit: « Le nouveau gouvernement du Canada investit afin de protéger les Canadiennes et les Canadiens des répercussions des changements climatiques, — il le reconnaissait d'emblée en 2007 — de la pollution atmosphérique et des émissions de gaz à effet de serre. »
M. Charest a dit: « En juin 2006, notre gouvernement a adopté son Plan de lutte aux changements climatiques. Ce plan a été salué comme l'un des meilleurs en Amérique du Nord. Avec la contribution financière du gouvernement fédérale à cet effort québécois, nous pourrons atteindre nos objectifs. »
C'est M. Charest qui a dit cela en 2007, lors d'une conférence de presse tenue avec le premier ministre.
Je continue la lecture du communiqué de presse conjoint des deux gouvernements: « Grâce au financement fédéral, le gouvernement du Québec a indiqué qu'il sera en mesure de réduire de 13,8 millions de tonnes de dioxyde de carbone ou de substances équivalentes les émissions de gaz à effet de serre, soit en dessous des niveaux prévus pour 2012. »
En outre, l'écoFiducie de 1,5 milliard de dollars qui devait s'appliquer et qui s'est appliquée à toutes les provinces prévoyait 339 millions de dollars juste pour le Québec. Cela allait permettre au Québec de faire tout ce que je vais énumérer: des investissements destinés à faciliter l'accès à de nouvelles technologies dans le secteur du camionnage; un programme visant à trouver de nouvelles sources d'énergie renouvelable dans les régions rurales; une usine pilote de fabrication d'éthanol à partir de matières cellulosiques; la promotion de pompes géothermiques dans le secteur résidentiel; l'appui à la recherche technologique et à l'innovation pour la réduction et la séquestration des gaz à effet de serre — c'est probablement un de ces programmes qui nous aident à avoir des sables bitumineux de plus en plus proenvironnmentaux parce qu'on capte le carbone qui est issu de la transformation des sables vers le pétrole. Il y a également des mesures destinées à promouvoir le captage de la biomasse provenant des sites d'enfouissement, des mesures destinées à favoriser la récupération des déchets traités et de l'énergie et finalement l'ÉcoFiducie du Canada.
J'invite les collègues libéraux à écouter ce que je vais dire. M. Steven Guilbeault de Greenpeace a dit en 2007: « Nous sommes heureux de constater qu'après plus d'une année de négociation, Québec a finalement obtenu les sommes qui lui permettront de se rapprocher davantage des objectifs de Kyoto. »
Qui a permis au Québec de se rapprocher de ces objectifs de Kyoto? C'est le gouvernement de M. Harper, un gouvernement conservateur qui a créé l'écoFiducie en 2007 de 1,5 milliard de dollars provenant d'un budget basé sur des surplus budgétaires.
Non seulement nous avions un plan pour atteindre les cibles que nous avions mises en avant, mais c'était un plan qui ne s'appliquait pas sans le consentement des provinces. C'était un plan qui prenait des surplus budgétaires, qui ne taxait pas davantage les Canadiens et qui envoyait de l'argent directement, sans aucune condition, mis à part la condition fondamentale de contribuer à réduire les changements climatiques, qui était quand même philosophiquement importante. Toutes les mesures pour y arriver étaient laissées complètement à la discrétion des provinces.
M. Harper, comme un bon conservateur décentralisateur, un vrai leader fédéraliste, a dit qu'il donnait 400 millions de dollars à chaque province pour qu'elle mette en oeuvre son projet.
En 2015, après 10 ans de gouverne conservatrice, on a constaté qu'on avait non seulement passé à travers la pire crise économique, la pire récession de l'histoire depuis les années 1930, mais qu'on avait aussi réduit les émissions de gaz à effet de serre de 2 % et augmenté le produit intérieur brut pour tous les Canadiens, tout en baissant la TPS de trois points et les impôts de 2 000 $ en moyenne, par année, pour une famille ayant deux enfants.
Si cela n'est pas du fédéralisme coopératif, si ce ne sont pas des résultats tangibles, si cela n'est pas un plan environnemental concret, je me demande ce que c'est. C'est sans parler du fait que nous avions un minimum de 25 à 35 projets législatifs qui passaient sous le sceau de la reine à chaque session.
Cette session-ci, à part les scandales de la taxe sur le carbone, les passages illégaux, le projet de Trans Mountain — tous des enjeux qui se présentent au gouvernement contre son propre désir — les libéraux ont à peine mis en avant quatre projets de loi véritablement importants.
Bref, on a agrandi les parcs et on a protégé les terres humides du Canada. On a un bilan exceptionnel en matière d'environnement.
En outre, nous, on permettait les débats. Par exemple, quand on a fait le débat sur le projet de loi C-23, qui concernait les réformes électorales, on a débattu pendant quatre jours. La réforme électorale des libéraux, quant à elle, a été débattue pendant deux heures.
Je suis attristé, mais content de débattre jusqu'à minuit, parce que c'est ma grande passion.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2016-09-22 13:26 [p.4971]
Mr. Speaker, I, too, believe that I am the voice of the people of Atlantic Canada, where I lived between the ages of two and 11. Acadia is still very much a part of me, and that is why I absolutely had to speak about it today.
Right in the middle of summer, the Prime Minister arrogantly and unabashedly announced that he intended to change the historic process for appointing Supreme Court justices that has been in place since 1875.
More than any other, this government announcement has has made me dislike the political party that currently governs our great country. Yes, like many Canadians, I am outraged by such actions and attitudes that show the true arrogance of this government.
I am saddened by this unsettling desire, so brazenly expressed by the Prime Minister, to radically alter our constitutional customs, the very customs that have informed government policy for so long in Canada.
If this Liberal government decides to change the constitutional convention for choosing Supreme Court justices without first obtaining the consent of all parliamentarians in the House, it will be going too far. Therefore, and I am choosing my words carefully, this government's actions in the past few months make me fear the worst for the federal unity of this great country.
The Prime Minister is not just interfering in provincial jurisdictions whenever he feels like it, but also interfering in his own areas of jurisdiction by planning to make sweeping changes without even consulting the opposition parties or the public. This is nothing short of anti-democratic. There are other examples of this.
First, the Prime Minister plans to change Canada's nearly 150-year-old voting system without holding a referendum to do so. It is no secret that he and his acolytes are doing this for partisan reasons and to protect their political interests as well.
Then, this same Prime Minister shamelessly suggested just this morning that he wanted to put an end to a 141-year-old constitutional convention. I am talking about the constitutional convention whereby a Prime Minister selects and appoints a judge to the Supreme Court when a seat becomes vacant while ensuring that the new appointee comes from a region similar to that of the person who occupied the vacant seat.
The purpose of this constitutional convention is to guarantee that the decisions rendered by the highest court in the country reflect the regional differences in our federation. Must I remind the political party before me that Canada has five distinct regions and that those regions are legally recognized?
The fact is that Jean Chrétien's Liberal government passed a law that provides for and gives each of the regions of Canada a quasi-constitutional right of veto. Accordingly, the Atlantic provinces, and their region as a whole, do have a say when it comes to the Constitution Act of 1982.
What is more, the British North America Act guarantees the Atlantic provinces fair and effective representation in the House of Commons. For example, New Brunswick is guaranteed 10 seats. The same is true in the Senate, where it is guaranteed just as many seats. Under the same convention, each of the Atlantic provinces holds at least one seat on the Council of Ministers.
How can our friends opposite justify threatening, out of the blue, to reduce to nil the Atlantic provinces' presence in the highest court of the country? If the government moves forward with this new approach, will it do the same to Quebec, the national stronghold of French Canadians? That does not make any sense.
I invite the government to think about this: can the Supreme Court of Canada really render fair and informed decisions on cases affecting the Atlantic provinces without any representation from that region?
Justice for Atlantic Canadians means treating them as equals. It seems the Liberals could not care less about the regions even though every one of them includes distinct communities that want Supreme Court decisions to reflect their values, goals and ideas about the world.
For the Prime Minister to suggest, if only in passing, we defy the convention whereby one seat on the Supreme Court of Canada's bench is reserved for Atlantic Canada is offensive to many legal experts and associations, including Janet Fuhrer, a past president of the Canadian Bar Association, and Ann Whiteway Brown, president of the New Brunswick branch of the Canadian Bar Association.
Echoing this sentiment are the Law Society of New Brunswick, the Atlantic Provinces Trial Lawyers Association, and the Société nationale de l'Acadie, which advocates on behalf of Acadians worldwide.
Disregarding this constitutional convention is tantamount to stripping four out of ten provinces of their voice in the highest court in the land.
Must I also remind members that the Atlantic provinces have a large pool of extremely qualified legal professionals who come from every region and background and who are perfectly bilingual? More importantly, these are candidates who have a vast knowledge of the Atlantic provinces' legal systems and issues. Is there anyone in this House, or elsewhere, who would dispute that?
Even more importantly, there are a few significant constitutional cases on the horizon that could have major repercussions on the Atlantic provinces. Consider, for example, the case referred to the Nova Scotia Court of Appeal regarding the elimination of protected Acadian ridings. Hearings on this are currently under way.
Is the Prime Minister really thinking about having judges from other regions rule on a case that deals with how Acadians are represented, when Acadians have been fighting for their survival on this continent for generations?
Is that really what our friends across the aisle want? Do the Liberals from Atlantic Canada really want to muzzle New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, two founding provinces of this great country?
The change that the Prime Minister wants to make to how judges are lawfully appointed to the Supreme Court is essentially a total and complete reversal of this country's established constitutional practices. How shameful and how arrogant.
It would seem the son is following in his father's footsteps. Do hon. members not see what is happening? Just like his father before him, the Prime Minister wants to alter the constitutional order of our country.
Fear not, however, because we in the Conservative Party are not buying it. We not only see what this Prime Minister is doing, but we also see know full well that behind this change in convention is a much greater ideological design.
There is an underlying desire to profoundly change Canadian constitutional arrangements and replace them with a post-materialist world view that is a departure from our constitutional traditions.
In this world view, the main objective is to eliminate from our government institutions, in this case the Supreme Court, the historical and traditional community characteristics that have defined Canada since day one by replacing them with individual and associational characteristics.
In other words, the Prime Minister obviously wants to eliminate the political predominance of certain constituencies in the Canadian constitutional order, at the Supreme Court in particular. He wants to promote a new political predominance, that of associational groups that bring together individuals who share individual rights rather than constituent rights.
Although that may be commendable in some ways, it is a major change because the Prime Minister is ensuring that the very essence of political representativeness and the concept of diversity within the judiciary is changed. The Prime Minister wants a representativeness based on a concept of individual diversity and fragmented by idiosyncratic characteristics.
In light of this potential change, Canadians across the country, including those from Atlantic Canada, must protest and call on the Prime Minister to answer for this. The Prime Minister cannot act unilaterally in this case and must involve all the players concerned.
Monsieur le Président, moi aussi, j'ai bien la certitude d'être la voix des gens de l'Atlantique, où j'ai grandi de l'âge de 2 ans à 11 ans. L'Acadie résonne encore en moi, et c'est pourquoi je tenais absolument à en parler aujourd'hui.
Au beau milieu de l'été, le premier ministre a annoncé, de manière arrogante et sans vergogne, qu'il avait l'intention de changer la procédure historique par laquelle sont choisis les juges de la Cour suprême depuis 1875.
Plus que toute autre, cette annonce faite par ce gouvernement engendre chez moi une aversion définitive à l'égard de la formation politique qui gouverne actuellement notre grand pays. Oui, comme de nombreux Canadiens, je suis outré par de telles actions et attitudes qui témoignent d'une arrogance authentique, celle de ce gouvernement.
Je suis attristé par cette volonté déconcertante, exprimée sans timidité, faut-il le dire, par le premier ministre, qui vise à engendrer un changement significatif à nos moeurs constitutionnelles, celles qui, après tout, guident nos actions gouvernementales depuis si longtemps ici, au Canada.
Si ce gouvernement libéral décide de changer la convention constitutionnelle relative à la sélection des juges de la Cour suprême sans d'abord avoir eu l'assentiment de l'ensemble des parlementaires de la Chambre, il va bien trop loin. Suivant ce raisonnement, et je pèse bien mes mots, les actions posées par ce gouvernement dans les derniers mois me font craindre le pire pour l'unité fédérale de ce grand pays.
En effet, le premier ministre s'adonne non seulement à de l'ingérence dans les compétences provinciales quand bon lui semble, mais de plus, dans ses propres compétences, il prévoit y conduire des changements d'envergure sans toutefois consulter les partis de l'opposition ni même la population. Cela n'est ni plus ni moins qu'antidémocratique. D'ailleurs, quelques exemples en témoignent d'ores et déjà.
D'abord, le premier ministre entend changer notre mode de scrutin canadien, vieux de presque 150 ans, sans faire de référendum. C'est un secret de Polichinelle: lui et ses acolytes le font pour des raisons partisanes et pour assurer leur intérêt politique de surcroît.
Ensuite, ce même premier ministre a laissé entendre jusqu'à ce matin, sans honte, qu'il voulait mettre fin à une convention constitutionnelle vieille de 141 années. Je parle ici de la convention constitutionnelle qui veut qu'un premier ministre choisisse et nomme un juge à la Cour suprême, lorsqu'un siège est libéré, tout en s'assurant que la nouvelle nomination est issue d'une région semblable à celle de la personne qui occupait le siège laissé vacant.
Cette convention constitutionnelle a comme objectif de garantir que les décisions rendues par la plus haute institution judiciaire du pays reflètent les particularités régionales qui composent notre fédération. Dois-je rappeler à ce parti politique qui est devant moi que nous avons, au Canada, cinq régions distinctes et que ces mêmes régions ont une reconnaissance légale de fait?
Notons à ce sujet que le gouvernement libéral de l'honorable Jean Chrétien a adopté une loi qui prévoit et alloue un droit de veto quasi-constitutionnel à chacune des régions du Canada. Ainsi, on accorde aux provinces de l'Atlantique et à leur région dans son ensemble un droit de regard en ce qui concerne la Loi constitutionnelle de 1982.
De plus, nonobstant cet état de fait, notons que l'Acte de l'Amérique du Nord britannique garantit aux provinces de l'Atlantique une représentation efficace et équitable à la Chambre des communes. Par exemple, 10 sièges sont garantis au Nouveau-Brunswick, et il en va de même au Sénat, où autant de sièges lui sont garantis. La même convention veut que chacune des provinces de l'Atlantique reçoive au moins un siège au Conseil des ministres.
Alors, comment nos amis d'en face peuvent-ils justifier que, du jour au lendemain, on ait menacé de réduire à néant la présence des provinces de l'Atlantique au plus haut tribunal du pays? Si cette nouvelle façon de faire voit le jour, sera-t-elle répétée dans le cas du Québec également, le bastion national des Canadiens français de ce grand pays? Cela n'a aucun sens.
J'invite ce gouvernement à songer à la chose suivante: la Cour suprême du Canada peut-elle vraiment rendre des jugements justes et éclairés sur des causes qui concernent les provinces de l'Atlantique en l'absence de toute représentation de cette région?
Traiter les Canadiens de l'Atlantique avec justice, c'est les mettre sur un pied d'égalité. Toutefois, peut-être les libéraux veulent-ils tout simplement faire fi de nos régions canadiennes. Pourtant, chacune d'entre elles détient en son sein des communautés constitutives bien distinctes dont chacune espère voir ses valeurs, ses aspirations et ses visions du monde reflétées dans des décisions rendues par la Cour suprême.
Laisser entendre, comme le premier ministre l'a fait, ne serait-ce que quelques secondes, qu'on ne veut pas respecter la convention qui veut qu'on réserve pour la région de l'Atlantique un siège à la Cour suprême du Canada est très grave aux yeux de plusieurs juristes et associations. C'est le cas notamment de Janet Fuhrer, qui fut présidente de l'Association du Barreau canadien, et d'Ann Whiteway Brown, présidente de la division du Nouveau-Brunswick de l'Association du Barreau canadien.
C'est le cas également pour le Barreau du Nouveau Brunswick, pour l'Association des avocats plaideurs de l'Atlantique et pour la Société nationale de l'Acadie, présente dans le monde entier à la défense des Acadiens.
Songer à ne pas respecter cette convention constitutionnelle, c'est songer à priver quatre provinces sur dix de toute voix au chapitre au sein de la plus haute institution judiciaire du pays.
Doit-on aussi rappeler que les provinces de l'Atlantique possèdent un grand bassin de juristes candidats des plus qualifiés, originaires de toutes les communautés de la région et, qui plus est, parfaitement bilingues. Surtout, il s'agit de candidats qui possèdent une connaissance approfondie des systèmes judiciaires et des enjeux de l'Atlantique. Y a-t-il quelqu'un à la Chambre ou ailleurs pour dire le contraire?
Plus important encore, d'importantes causes à caractère constitutionnel ou qui auront des retentissements majeurs dans les provinces de l'Atlantique sont à l'horizon au moment même où on se parle. À titre d'exemple, mentionnons le renvoi de la Cour d'appel de la Nouvelle-Écosse dans la cause portant sur l'abolition des circonscriptions électorales acadiennes. Les audiences sont en cours en ce moment même.
Le premier ministre a-t-il vraiment songé à faire en sorte que des juges d'autres régions déterminent l'issue d'une cause qui porte sur la représentativité des Acadiens, ce peuple qui se bat depuis des générations pour survivre sur ce continent?
Est-ce bien cela que veulent nos amis d'en face, les libéraux des provinces atlantiques, faire taire le Nouveau-Brunswick et la Nouvelle-Écosse, deux provinces fondatrices de ce grand pays?
Le changement que veut apporter le premier ministre à la façon dont il lui est loisible de choisir les juges de la Cour suprême n'est ni plus ni moins qu'un renversement radical des coutumes constitutionnelles du pays. Quelle honte et quelle arrogance!
De toute évidence, le fils suit les traces de son père. Ne voit-on pas ce qui se passe? Tout comme son aïeul, le premier ministre veut aujourd'hui altérer l'ordre constitutionnel de notre pays.
Cependant, que l'on soit sans crainte, car au Parti conservateur du Canada, nous ne sommes pas dupes. Non seulement nous voyons ce à quoi s'adonne ce premier ministre, mais nous savons aussi très bien que derrière cette modification conventionnelle loge un dessein idéologique bien plus grand.
En effet, il y a une volonté sous-jacente qui vise à changer de manière profonde les arrangements constitutionnels canadiens afin de les remplacer par une vision post-matérialiste du monde qui fait route à part avec nos traditions constitutionnelles.
Dans cette vision du monde, l'objectif principal consiste à effacer de nos institutions gouvernementales, en l'occurrence la Cour suprême, les particularités communautaires historiques et traditionnelles dont est composé le Canada depuis sa naissance, et, pour ce faire, à les remplacer par des particularités individuelles et associationnelles.
En d'autres mots, il est évident que le premier ministre veut mettre fin à la prédominance politique des communautés constitutives dans l'ordre constitutionnel canadien, tout particulièrement à la Cour suprême. Il veut ainsi favoriser une nouvelle prédominance politique, celle des groupes associationnels qui regroupent des individus partageant des droits individuels plutôt que des droits constitutifs.
Bien que cela puisse être louable à certains égards, bien entendu, il s'agit d'un changement profond, car ce faisant, le premier ministre fait en sorte que l'essence même de la représentativité politique et du concept de diversité au sein du pouvoir judiciaire soit modifiée. Le premier ministre veut donc voir une représentativité basée sur un concept de diversité individuelle et atomisée basée sur des particularités idiosyncratiques.
Devant un tel changement potentiel, les Canadiens de tout le pays, incluant ceux de l'Atlantique, doivent protester et amener le premier ministre à répondre de ses intentions. Le premier ministre ne peut agir de manière unilatérale dans ce dossier et se doit de faire appel à tous les acteurs concernés.
Results: 1 - 14 of 14