Interventions in the House of Commons
 
 
 
RSS feed based on search criteria Export search results - CSV (plain text) Export search results - XML
Add search criteria
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
Mr. Speaker, everyone remembers the huge mistake the Minister of Official Languages made two years ago when she concluded an agreement with Netflix that did not guarantee any French-language cultural production. Quebeckers and francophones across the country were so frustrated that the Prime Minister removed her from that position and she lost the heritage portfolio.
Here is what she is telling us today. She made a plan for tourism two weeks ago. It contains no guarantees, no investments for the francophone minority communities across Canada. She just made an announcement today and, once again, there is nothing for francophones.
Was this an oversight on the part of the minister or does this government just not take official languages seriously?
Monsieur le Président, tout le monde se rappelle de la gaffe énorme que la ministre des Langues officielles a faite, il y a deux ans, lorsqu’elle a fait, avec Netflix, une entente qui ne prévoyait aucune garantie de production culturelle francophone. Les Québécois et les francophones étaient tellement frustrés partout au pays que le premier ministre l’a démise de ses fonctions et qu'elle a perdu le ministère du Patrimoine canadien.
Voyons ce qu’elle nous dit aujourd’hui. Elle a fait un plan de tourisme, il y a deux semaines. Il n’y a aucune garantie, aucun investissement pour les communautés minoritaires francophones partout au pays. Elle vient de faire une annonce aujourd’hui, et, encore une fois, il n’y a rien pour les francophones.
Est-ce que c’est un oubli de la ministre ou est-ce que tout simplement ce gouvernement ne prend pas au sérieux les langues officielles?
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-03-01 11:06 [p.26049]
Mr. Speaker, I am well known for going door to door in my riding, and, honestly, I meet very few constituents who are satisfied with this Liberal government. Fewer still feel they are in a better financial position than they were before the Liberals were elected in 2015.
There is no arguing with that kind of general consensus. Here are just some of the public policies that have made people feel that way.
People have experienced three years of taxes going up, three years of our Canadian Armed Forces being underfunded, three years of deficit and mismanagement of public funds, three years of what might politely be called ethical breaches, three years of an infrastructure program that fails to deliver the goods, three years of multiple failed natural resources and border security policies, and three years of countless other broken promises.
Canadians and the people of Beauport—Limoilou simply cannot afford another four years of Liberal government.
As of October 2019, they will be able to count on the Conservative team and our great leader to change the way this country is run and renew people's hope for the future.
Monsieur le Président, au cours de mon fameux porte-à-porte, je dois dire très sincèrement que je rencontre peu de citoyens qui se disent satisfaits de ce gouvernement libéral, et encore moins qui pensent qu'ils sont dans une meilleure situation financière qu'avant les élections des libéraux en 2015.
La sagesse populaire a toujours raison, et voici quelques exemples de politiques publiques qui la conduisent à ce verdict.
En effet, les citoyens ont constaté: trois ans d'augmentation de leurs impôts et de leurs taxes; trois ans de sous-financement au sein de nos Forces armées canadiennes; trois ans de déficit et de mauvaise gestion de nos finances publiques; trois ans de manquements à l'éthique, et c'est le moins qu'on puisse dire; trois ans d'un programme d'infrastructures qui ne livre pas la marchandise; et enfin, trois ans d'échec sur échec dans le domaine de nos ressources naturelles, dans le domaine de nos frontières et une panoplie d'autres promesses brisées.
Les Canadiens et les citoyens de Beauport—Limoilou ne peuvent tout simplement pas se permettre encore quatre ans de ce gouvernement libéral.
À partir d'octobre 2019, ils pourront compter sur l'équipe conservatrice et notre grand chef pour changer la direction du pays et redonner confiance aux citoyens dans leur avenir.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-05-30 20:43 [p.19956]
Mr. Speaker, here we are in the House, on Wednesday, May 30, at 8:45. I should mention that it is 8:45 p.m., for the many residents of Beauport—Limoilou who I am sure are tuning in. To all my constituents, good evening.
We are debating this evening because the Liberal government tabled very few significant government bills over the winter. Instead, they tabled an astounding number of private members' bills on things like swallows' day and beauty month. Sometimes my colleagues and I can hardly help laughing at this pile of utterly trivial bills. I also think that this process of randomly selecting the members who get to table bills is a bit past its prime. Maybe it should be reviewed. At the same time, I understand that it is up to each member to decide what kind of bill is important to him or her.
The reason we have had to sit until midnight for two days now is that, as my colleague from Perth—Wellington said, the government has been acting like a typical university student over the past three months. That comparison is a bit ridiculous, but it is true. The government is behaving like those students who wait until the last minute to do their assignments and are still working on them at 3 a.m. the day before they are due because they were too busy partying all semester. Members know what I mean, even though that paints a rather stereotypical picture of students; most of them do not do things like that.
In short, we have a government that, at the end of the session, has realized that time is running out and that it only has three weeks left to pass some of its legislative measures, some of which are rather lengthy bills that are key to the government's legislative agenda. One has to wonder about that.
The Liberals believe these bills to be important. However, because of their lack of responsibility over the past three months, we were unable to debate these major bills that will make significant changes to our society. Take for example, Bill C-76, which has to do with the electoral reforms that the Liberals want to make to the voting system, the way we vote, protection of the vote, and identification. There is also Bill C-49 on transportation in Canada, a very lengthy bill that we have not had time to examine properly.
Today we are debating Bill C-57 on sustainable development. This is an important topic, but for the past three years I have been getting sick and tired of seeing the Liberal government act as though it has a monopoly on environmental righteousness. I searched online to get an accurate picture of the record of Mr. Harper's Conservative government from 2006 to 2015, and I came across some fascinating results. I want to share this information very honestly with the House and my Liberal colleagues so that they understand that even though we did not talk incessantly about the environment, we achieved some excellent concrete results.
I want to read a quote from www.mediaterre.org, a perfectly legitimate site:
Stephen Harper's Canadian government released its 2007 budget on March 19. The budget allocated $4.5 billion in new investments to some 20 environmental projects. These measures include a $2,000 rebate for all electronic-vehicle or alternative-fuel purchases, and the creation of a $1.5-billion EcoTrust program to help provinces reduce greenhouse gas emissions.
The Liberals often criticize us for talking about the environment, but we did take action. For example, we set targets. We proposed reducing emissions to 30% below 2005 levels by 2030. The Liberals even retained these same targets as part of the Paris agreement.
They said we had targets, but no plan. That is not true. Not only did we have the $1.5-billion ecotrust program, but we also had a plan that involved federal co-operation.
Allow me to quote the premier of Quebec at the time, Jean Charest, who was praising the plan that was going to help Quebec—his province, my province—meet its greenhouse gas emissions targets. Jean Charest and Mr. Harper issued a joint press release.
Mr. Harper said, “Canada's New Government is investing to protect Canadians from the consequences of climate change, air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions.” He was already recognizing it in 2007.
Mr. Charest said, “In June 2006, our government adopted its plan to combat climate change. This plan has been hailed as one of the finest in North America. With Ottawa contributing financially to this Quebec initiative, we will be able to achieve our objectives.”
It was Mr. Charest who said that in 2007, at a press conference with the prime minister.
I will continue to read the joint press release from the two governments, “As a result of this federal funding, the Government of Quebec has indicated that it will be able to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 13.8 million tonnes of carbon dioxide or equivalent below its anticipated 2012 level.”
What is more, the $1.5-billion ecotrust that was supposed to be allocated and was allocated to every province provided $339 million to Quebec alone. That was going to allow Quebec to engage in the following: investments to improve access to new technologies for the trucking sector; a program to develop renewable energy sources in rural regions; a pilot plant for production of cellulosic ethanol; promotion of geothermal heat pumps in the residential sector; support for technological research and innovation for the reduction and sequestration of greenhouse gases. This is probably one of those programs that is helping us make our oil sands increasingly environmentally friendly by allowing us to capture the carbon that comes from converting the sands to oil. There are also measures for the capture of biogas from landfill sites, for waste treatment and energy recovery, and finally for Canada ecotrust.
I invite our Liberal colleagues to listen to what I am going to say. In 2007, Steven Guilbeault of Greenpeace said the following: “We are pleased to see that after negotiating for more than a year, Quebec has finally obtained the money it needs to move towards meeting the Kyoto targets.”
Who made it possible for Quebec to move towards meeting its Kyoto objectives? It was the Harper government, a Conservative government, which established the $1.5-billion ecotrust fund in 2007 with monies from the budget surplus.
Not only did we have a plan to meet the targets we proposed, but this was also a plan that could only be implemented if the provinces agreed to the targets. It was a plan that was funded through the budget surplus, that did not further tax Canadians, and that provided money directly, without any conditions, other than the fundamental requirement that it had to help reduce climate change, which was philosophically important. Any and all measures taken to reach that goal were left entirely to the discretion of the provinces.
Mr. Harper, like a good Conservative who supported decentralization and like a true federalist leader, said that he was giving $400 million to each province so it could move forward with its plan.
By 2015, after 10 years of Conservative government, the country had not only weathered the worst economic crisis, the worst recession in history since the 1930s, but it had also reduced greenhouse gas emissions by 2% and increased the gross domestic product for all Canadians while lopping three points off the GST and lowering income taxes for families with two children by an average of $2,000 per year.
If that is not co-operative federalism, if those are not real results, if that is not a concrete environmental plan, then I do not know what is. Add to that the fact that we achieved royal assent for no less than 25 to 35 bills every session.
In contrast, during this session, in between being forced to grapple with scandals involving the carbon tax, illegal border crossings, and the Trans Mountain project, this government has barely managed to come up with four genuinely important bills.
By contrast, we expanded parks and protected Canada's wetlands. Our environmental record is exceptional.
Furthermore, we allowed debate. For example, we debated Bill C-23 on electoral reform for four days. The Liberals' electoral reform was debated for two hours.
I am sad, but I am happy to debate until midnight because debating is my passion.
Monsieur le Président, nous voici à la Chambre le mercredi 30 mai à 20 h 45. Je dois préciser que c'est le soir, pour tous les résidants de Beauport—Limoilou qui nous écoutent en grand nombre, j'en suis sûr. Je les salue.
Nous débattons ce soir parce que le gouvernement libéral, tout au long de la session d'hiver, a proposé peu de projets de loi gouvernementaux d'envergure. On a plutôt vu un nombre incroyable de projets de loi d'initiative parlementaire sur le jour des hirondelles ou sur le mois de la beauté. Parfois, mes collègues et moi rigolons presque de cette accumulation de projets de loi presque complètement anodins. D'ailleurs, je trouve un peu moribond ce processus de sélection aléatoire du député qui va pouvoir présenter un projet de loi. Peut-être qu'on devrait le revoir. En même temps, je comprends qu'il revient à chaque député de déterminer quel genre de projet de loi est important pour lui.
Si nous devons siéger jusqu'à minuit depuis maintenant deux jours, c'est parce que, tout comme l'a dit mon collègue de Perth—Wellington, le gouvernement, au cours des trois derniers mois, a agi comme un étudiant universitaire typique. C'est un parallèle un peu loufoque, mais cela tient quand même debout. Il s'est comporté comme un étudiant qui se rend compte que la remise du travail a lieu le lendemain matin et qui commence à le faire à 3 heures du matin parce qu'il a fait la fête tout le long de la session. On voit un peu ce que je veux dire, même si c'est une image un peu tronquée des étudiants, puisque la plupart ne font pas cela.
Bref, on se retrouve avec un gouvernement qui, en fin de session, prend conscience que le temps file et qu'il lui reste à peine trois semaines pour faire adopter certaines de ses mesures législatives qu'on pourrait juger plus volumineuses et importantes pour son programme législatif. Encore là, on pourrait se poser des questions.
Même si certains projets de loi sont importants aux yeux des libéraux, à cause de leur manque de sérieux des trois derniers mois, nous n'avons pas pu débattre des projets de loi majeurs qui vont apporter de grands changements dans notre société, comme le projet de loi C-76. Celui-ci porte sur les réformes électorales que les libéraux veulent appliquer relativement au mode de scrutin, à notre façon de voter, à la protection du vote et à l'identification, par exemple. Mentionnons aussi le projet de loi C-49 sur le transport au Canada, un projet de loi très volumineux que nous n'avons pas eu le temps d'évaluer convenablement.
Aujourd'hui, nous parlons du projet de loi C-57 sur le développement durable. C'est donc très intéressant. Cependant, j'en ai un peu marre d'entendre le gouvernement libéral nous répéter, depuis trois ans, qu'il a le monopole de la vertu en ce qui a trait à l'environnement. J'ai fait quelques recherches sur Internet pour voir le bilan précis et tangible du gouvernement conservateur de M. Harper de 2006 à 2015. J'ai fait des découvertes assez incroyables. J'aimerais en faire part de manière très honnête à la Chambre et à mes collègues libéraux pour qu'ils comprennent que, bien que nous ne nous gargarisions pas d'un discours environnementaliste, nous avons obtenu des résultats tangibles fort intéressants.
Voici donc ce que j'ai trouvé sur www.mediaterre.org, un site Web parfaitement légitime:
Le gouvernement canadien de Stephen Harper a rendu public le 19 mars dernier son budget 2007. Celui-ci prévoit 4,5 milliards de nouveaux investissements liés à une vingtaine de projets environnementaux. Ces mesures impliquent notamment la déduction de 2000$ liée à tout achat de véhicule écoénergétique ou à carburant de remplacement, mais également la mise sur pied d’une Éco-fiducie de 1,5 milliards afin d’aider les provinces à diminuer l’émission de gaz à effet de serre.
Souvent, les libéraux nous accusent d'avoir parlé d'environnement, puisque nous l'avons quand même fait à quelques égards. Nous avons notamment proposé des cibles. Par exemple, nous avons proposé de baisser les émissions de 30 % d'ici 2030 par rapport aux niveaux de 2005. Or les libéraux ont conservé ces mêmes cibles par l'entremise de l'Accord de Paris.
Ils nous disaient que nous avions des cibles, mais pas de plan. Ce n'est pas vrai. Non seulement nous avions l'écoFiducie de 1,5 milliard de dollars, mais c'était aussi un plan qui s'inscrivait dans une collaboration fédérale.
Je vais citer des passages du premier ministre du Québec à l'époque, Jean Charest, qui faisait l'éloge de ce plan qui allait aider le Québec — sa province, ma province — à atteindre ses objectifs de réduction de gaz à effet de serre. Jean Charest et M. Harper ont difusé ensemble un communiqué.
M. Harper a dit: « Le nouveau gouvernement du Canada investit afin de protéger les Canadiennes et les Canadiens des répercussions des changements climatiques, — il le reconnaissait d'emblée en 2007 — de la pollution atmosphérique et des émissions de gaz à effet de serre. »
M. Charest a dit: « En juin 2006, notre gouvernement a adopté son Plan de lutte aux changements climatiques. Ce plan a été salué comme l'un des meilleurs en Amérique du Nord. Avec la contribution financière du gouvernement fédérale à cet effort québécois, nous pourrons atteindre nos objectifs. »
C'est M. Charest qui a dit cela en 2007, lors d'une conférence de presse tenue avec le premier ministre.
Je continue la lecture du communiqué de presse conjoint des deux gouvernements: « Grâce au financement fédéral, le gouvernement du Québec a indiqué qu'il sera en mesure de réduire de 13,8 millions de tonnes de dioxyde de carbone ou de substances équivalentes les émissions de gaz à effet de serre, soit en dessous des niveaux prévus pour 2012. »
En outre, l'écoFiducie de 1,5 milliard de dollars qui devait s'appliquer et qui s'est appliquée à toutes les provinces prévoyait 339 millions de dollars juste pour le Québec. Cela allait permettre au Québec de faire tout ce que je vais énumérer: des investissements destinés à faciliter l'accès à de nouvelles technologies dans le secteur du camionnage; un programme visant à trouver de nouvelles sources d'énergie renouvelable dans les régions rurales; une usine pilote de fabrication d'éthanol à partir de matières cellulosiques; la promotion de pompes géothermiques dans le secteur résidentiel; l'appui à la recherche technologique et à l'innovation pour la réduction et la séquestration des gaz à effet de serre — c'est probablement un de ces programmes qui nous aident à avoir des sables bitumineux de plus en plus proenvironnmentaux parce qu'on capte le carbone qui est issu de la transformation des sables vers le pétrole. Il y a également des mesures destinées à promouvoir le captage de la biomasse provenant des sites d'enfouissement, des mesures destinées à favoriser la récupération des déchets traités et de l'énergie et finalement l'ÉcoFiducie du Canada.
J'invite les collègues libéraux à écouter ce que je vais dire. M. Steven Guilbeault de Greenpeace a dit en 2007: « Nous sommes heureux de constater qu'après plus d'une année de négociation, Québec a finalement obtenu les sommes qui lui permettront de se rapprocher davantage des objectifs de Kyoto. »
Qui a permis au Québec de se rapprocher de ces objectifs de Kyoto? C'est le gouvernement de M. Harper, un gouvernement conservateur qui a créé l'écoFiducie en 2007 de 1,5 milliard de dollars provenant d'un budget basé sur des surplus budgétaires.
Non seulement nous avions un plan pour atteindre les cibles que nous avions mises en avant, mais c'était un plan qui ne s'appliquait pas sans le consentement des provinces. C'était un plan qui prenait des surplus budgétaires, qui ne taxait pas davantage les Canadiens et qui envoyait de l'argent directement, sans aucune condition, mis à part la condition fondamentale de contribuer à réduire les changements climatiques, qui était quand même philosophiquement importante. Toutes les mesures pour y arriver étaient laissées complètement à la discrétion des provinces.
M. Harper, comme un bon conservateur décentralisateur, un vrai leader fédéraliste, a dit qu'il donnait 400 millions de dollars à chaque province pour qu'elle mette en oeuvre son projet.
En 2015, après 10 ans de gouverne conservatrice, on a constaté qu'on avait non seulement passé à travers la pire crise économique, la pire récession de l'histoire depuis les années 1930, mais qu'on avait aussi réduit les émissions de gaz à effet de serre de 2 % et augmenté le produit intérieur brut pour tous les Canadiens, tout en baissant la TPS de trois points et les impôts de 2 000 $ en moyenne, par année, pour une famille ayant deux enfants.
Si cela n'est pas du fédéralisme coopératif, si ce ne sont pas des résultats tangibles, si cela n'est pas un plan environnemental concret, je me demande ce que c'est. C'est sans parler du fait que nous avions un minimum de 25 à 35 projets législatifs qui passaient sous le sceau de la reine à chaque session.
Cette session-ci, à part les scandales de la taxe sur le carbone, les passages illégaux, le projet de Trans Mountain — tous des enjeux qui se présentent au gouvernement contre son propre désir — les libéraux ont à peine mis en avant quatre projets de loi véritablement importants.
Bref, on a agrandi les parcs et on a protégé les terres humides du Canada. On a un bilan exceptionnel en matière d'environnement.
En outre, nous, on permettait les débats. Par exemple, quand on a fait le débat sur le projet de loi C-23, qui concernait les réformes électorales, on a débattu pendant quatre jours. La réforme électorale des libéraux, quant à elle, a été débattue pendant deux heures.
Je suis attristé, mais content de débattre jusqu'à minuit, parce que c'est ma grande passion.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2016-11-28 13:40 [p.7304]
Madam Speaker, I was going to rise to ask a question, but it seems that I will be starting my speech now. I would like to say hello to all those Canadians who are watching us right now, especially my constituents in Beauport—Limoilou.
I am very pleased to speak in the House to Bill C-26, regarding the Canada pension plan.
My Conservative colleague from Moose Jaw—Lake Centre—Lanigan spoke just before me. I admire his exemplary oratory skills and aspire to achieve the same some day. He talked about how this bill is typical of this and every Liberal government since the dawn of Canada. In fact, this is about taxing Canadians even more in order to fill the government's coffers to help carry out the Liberal government's agenda.
My colleague also talked about the Liberals' paternalistic approach to everything. All the while, he was able to illustrate with clear and concise definitions that increasing CPP contributions was in fact a tax from an economic and social policy perspective. He described in detail the Liberals' typically paternalistic approach to raising taxes.
That was encouraging to me as I wanted to explain that this bill is typical of this government, one that, despite its claims, has been increasing Canadians' taxes every month since coming to power one year ago.
It cancelled various tax credits that we introduced, such as those for children's sports activities or books and educational items. It refused to move forward with its promise to lower the small business tax, which represents a tax hike. It cancelled the universal child care benefit and replaced it with a benefit that was poorly implemented and that, by 2020, will incur extraordinary costs that were not anticipated. The government did not think of indexation, for example. That is not revenue neutral.
The Liberals have also proposed the Liberal tax on carbon of 11.5¢ a litre, which will soon be implemented. They are also increasing the CPP contribution by $1,000 a year for every employee and every employer. Furthermore, they did not reduce the small business tax. They are also making it more difficult to obtain a mortgage in order to buy a home.
On this side of the House, we understand full well that the exponential growth in real estate prices in places like Vancouver and Toronto is a problem that needs to be addressed. However, the Liberals decided to draft a bill that makes no distinction with respect to the different regions of Canada in order to resolve a problem that is affecting only certain cities.
Bill C-26 is part of a general plan to raise taxes for Canadians. This bill is proof that the Liberals are saying one thing and doing another. For the past year, we have been hearing the Liberals talk about strengthening the middle class, but what we are seeing is that they are imposing more taxes on the middle class and introducing measures that will prevent the middle class from developing as it should.
We could even go so far as to say that the government is using the middle class to achieve its own ends and improve its electoral fortunes three years down the road. The government promised us a modest deficit of $10 billion a year. However, that deficit has now grown to $30 billion because of the government's poor decisions and bad management. To fill its coffers, the government has to raise taxes in all sorts of areas, and that includes the Canada pension plan.
In a nutshell, because of Bill C-26, workers will take home $1,000 less every year and employers and entrepreneurs, the people who lead the way in job creation in Canada, will have to give up another $1,000 per year.
I heard what my Liberal colleague said about seniors working hard all their lives and being entitled to a good Canada pension plan. He was talking about workers who are seniors right now. I stood up to ask him a question. Nowadays, more and more of our seniors keep working after retirement. My father-in-law retired from the Quebec public service a few years ago and is now working part-time. The higher Canada pension plan premium will be deducted from every one of his biweekly paycheques. Moreover, the changes to the Canada pension plan will not come into effect for another 40 years. Many seniors, including anyone who is currently a senior, will not benefit from the higher premiums, which are supposedly intended to reduce poverty among seniors.
I would also like to reiterate what my colleague from Louis-Saint-Laurent was saying a little earlier when he began the debate on Bill C-26. As he explained, what we are seeing right now are two different and opposing political and philosophical outlooks. My colleague from Moose Jaw—Lake Centre—Lanigan provided a good description of the Liberal Party's vision. The Liberals think they know better than Canadians what they should do with their money and how they should use it at the end of the day. That is so paternalistic. It is in this government's DNA. It always thinks it knows better than Canadians what do to about all kinds of things, including how to invest and prepare for a comfortable retirement, if that is possible.
Conversely, we the Conservatives believe that individuals, Canadians themselves, know best what suits them to meet their own needs. That is why, during the 10 years we were in power, we took action and introduced policies that would help return as much money as possible to taxpayers, to maximize the amount of money that would stay in their pockets at the end of the year, as well as maximize the tools available to enable them, in turn, to maximize everything themselves. For instance, I think that the tax-free savings account is an excellent tool. Many people in my immediate family use that measure, as do my neighbours and constituents.
I also want to say that we should look to our ancestors. For example, my great-grandfather built his own retirement nest egg. I am not saying that we should go back to a time when there was no government plan to support those among us who forget to do our due diligence and prepare for old age. However, we must not implement measures that encourage people to neglect their needs and their responsibility to take care of their own retirement. We must always keep in mind the sage advice that our ancestors lived by. In other words, we must create our own nest eggs and ensure that when we reach old age we are able to take care of ourselves as much as possible for as long as possible.
I also think that Bill C-26 reflects two rather different political approaches. I would go so far as to say that my NDP colleagues share this same vision. Currently, every policy from this government is about short-term political gains with a view to re-election in three years, or so they think and want. How many decisions did we make in the past 10 years that were not at all popular? We still went ahead and made them anyway. We were courageous and proud to make those decisions. I am talking about increasing the age of retirement from 65 to 67. That was an extremely courageous and necessary decision. I am sure that I will likely never retire. I will work until I die, as people did for thousands of years. It is too bad.
I wanted to close by saying that one of my hobbies is to watch political debates. I have watched the debates in France, England, and in Germany, and the majority of the western European countries are saying that the age of retirement needs to increase. We said that, but this government is going in the opposite direction. It is very unfortunate.
Madame la Présidente, j'allais me lever pour poser une question, mais il semble que je vais commencer mon discours maintenant. J'aimerais saluer tous les Canadiens et Canadiennes qui nous écoutent en ce moment, tout particulièrement mes concitoyens de Beauport—Limoilou.
J'ai le grand plaisir aujourd'hui de m'adresser à la Chambre concernant le projet de loi C-26, qui concerne le Régime de pensions du Canada.
Mon collègue conservateur de Moose Jaw—Lake Centre—Lanigan s'est adressé à la Chambre juste avant moi; je le tiens en haute estime pour son art oratoire exemplaire que j'espère bien atteindre un jour. Il parlait du fait que ce projet de loi est une démonstration de l'ADN de ce gouvernement, et de tout gouvernement libéral aussi loin qu'on puisse remonter au Canada. En fait, il s'agit de taxer davantage les Canadiens pour remplir les coffres de l'État à l'avantage du programme du gouvernement libéral.
Mon collègue parlait aussi de cette approche paternaliste qui s'inscrit dans une façon de faire. Tout en faisant cela, mon collègue a également précisé, avec des définitions concises et assez précises, que l'augmentation de la cotisation au Régime de pensions du Canada était en fait une taxe sur le plan économique et de politique sociale. Il analysait toute cette approche paternaliste d'augmentation des taxes selon le concept lié à la façon de faire libérale.
Cela m'a encouragé pour mon discours, puisque je voulais aborder ce projet de loi en expliquant qu'il s'agit bel et bien d'une façon de faire de ce gouvernement qui, malgré son discours, augmente les impôts des Canadiens chaque mois depuis qu'il est en poste, soit un an.
Par exemple, il a mis fin aux crédits d'impôt divers que nous avions mis en avant, que ce soit pour les activités sportives de nos jeunes enfants ou pour les livres et les articles scolaires, par exemple. Il a refusé d'aller de l'avant avec sa promesse de baisser le taux d'imposition des petites et moyennes entreprises, ce qui est en quelque sorte une hausse d'impôt. Il a annulé la Prestation universelle pour la garde d'enfants et l'a remplacée par une allocation qui a été tout à fait mal mise en oeuvre, et qui engendrera d'ici 2020 des coûts extraordinaires qui n'étaient pas prévus. Par exemple, le gouvernement n'avait pas pensé à l'indexation. Ce n'est pas sans incidence sur les recettes.
De plus, les libéraux ont mis en avant la taxe libérale sur le carbone qui correspondra très prochainement à 11,5¢ le litre. Ils augmentent également la cotisation au Régime de pensions du Canada de 1 000 $ par année pour chaque employé et chaque employeur. Cela s'ajoute au fait qu'ils n'ont pas baissé le taux d'imposition pour les petites et moyennes entreprises. De plus, ils rendent l'accès à l'hypothèque plus difficile pour l'achat d'une maison,
De ce côté de la Chambre, nous comprenons très bien qu'il y avait une progression plutôt exponentielle qu'il fallait régler en ce qui a trait à la difficulté du marché immobilier, par exemple à Toronto et à Vancouver. Or les libéraux ont décidé d'élaborer un projet de loi qui ne présente aucune nuance et qui s'applique à toutes les régions du Canada pour régler des situations spécifiques dans des villes particulières.
Le projet de loi C-26 s'inscrit dans un processus d'augmentation des impôts des Canadiens de manière générale. Ce qu'on voit aussi dans ce projet de loi, c'est une contradiction entre le discours et les actions des libéraux. Cela fait un an qu'on les entend parler de renforcer la classe moyenne, alors que ce qu'on voit, c'est qu'elle est davantage imposée et qu'on ajoute des mesures qui vont l'empêcher de s'épanouir comme elle le devrait.
On pourrait même aller jusqu'à dire que le gouvernement instrumentalise en quelque sorte la classe moyenne pour arriver à ses fins et augmenter ses gains électoraux dans trois ans. Le gouvernement nous avait promis un déficit modeste de 10 milliards de dollars par année. Or le déficit s'élève maintenant à 30 milliards de dollars à cause de mauvaises décisions et d'une mauvaise gestion. Pour remplir ses coffres, le gouvernement doit absolument augmenter l'imposition dans toutes sortes de domaines, dont par exemple, le Régime de pensions du Canada.
En ce qui concerne les faits saillants du projet de loi C-26, non seulement il va enlever 1 000 $ par année à la paie de chaque employé, mais également, il va enlever 1 000 $ par année aux employeurs et à nos entrepreneurs, chefs de file dans la création d'emplois au Canada.
Par ailleurs, j'écoutais mon collègue libéral. Il disait que les aînés ont travaillé fort toute leur vie et qu'ils ont le droit d'avoir un bon Régime de pensions du Canada. Il disait cela en parlant de nos travailleurs qui sont aînés actuellement. Je m'étais levé pour lui poser une question. De plus en plus, aujourd'hui, nos aînés continuent à travailler après la retraite. Mon beau-père a pris sa retraite de la fonction publique du Québec il y a quelques années. Il travaille à temps partiel actuellement. À chaque paie qu'il recevra toutes les deux semaines, il va subir cette augmentation de la cotisation au Régime de pensions du Canada. De plus, cette réforme du Régime de pensions du Canada ne s'appliquera seulement que dans 40 ans. Donc de nombreux aînés, voire tous les aînés actuellement, ne bénéficieront pas de cette augmentation de cotisation qui vise à soi-disant réduire la pauvreté chez nos aînés.
J'aimerais également réitérer ce que mon collègue de Louis-Saint-Laurent disait un peu plus tôt aujourd'hui, lorsqu'il a ouvert le débat sur le projet de loi C-26. Il expliquait que, en fait, ce qu'on voit à l'heure actuelle, ce sont deux visions politiques et philosophiques qui s'entrechoquent. La vision du Parti libéral a été bien définie par mon collègue de Moose Jaw—Lake Centre—Lanigan. Les libéraux pensent savoir mieux que les Canadiens ce qu'ils doivent faire de leur argent et à quoi leur argent doit servir au bout du compte. C'est paternaliste. C'est dans l'ADN de ce gouvernement. Il croit constamment qu'il sait mieux que les Canadiens quoi faire pour toutes sortes de choses, y compris pour ce qui est des investissements et de la préparation d'une retraite intéressante, si c'est possible.
A contrario, nous, les conservateurs pensons que les individus, les Canadiens en tant que tels, individuellement, savent très bien ce qu'il convient de faire par eux-mêmes. C'est pourquoi nous avons pris des mesures et fait des politiques, durant les 10 dernières années où nous étions au pouvoir, favorisant le fait de maximiser le retour d'argent pour les contribuables, de maximiser la quantité d'argent qui demeure dans leurs poches à la fin de l'année et de maximiser également les outils qu'on leur permet d'avoir en mains pour maximiser le tout. Par exemple le compte d'épargne libre d'impôt est une mesure fantastique, selon moi. De nombreux membres de ma famille immédiate utilisent cette mesure, tout comme mes voisins et mes concitoyens également.
J'aimerais également spécifier qu'il faut revenir un peu à nos aïeux. Par exemple, mon arrière-grand-père construisait son propre bas de laine. Je ne dis pas qu'il faut revenir à l'époque où il n'y avait aucun régime gouvernemental pour assurer que si certains d'entre nous oubliaient de faire leurs devoirs de préparer leurs vieux jours, la société serait quand même là pour les soutenir. Cependant, il ne faudrait quand même pas instaurer des mesures qui favorisent le laisser-aller et la déresponsabilisation individuelle. Il faut toujours s'assurer de garder en tête les judicieux conseils que nos aïeux avaient et qu'ils mettaient en pratique, c'est-à-dire construire un bas de laine personnel et s'assurer que, lors de nos vieux jours, nous serons en mesure de nous prendre en charge, nous-mêmes, dans la mesure du possible, aussi longtemps que possible.
En fait, je pense aussi que le projet de loi C-26 fait foi de deux approches politiques assez différentes. J'oserais dire que mes collègues du NPD partagent quand même cette vision. En ce moment, toutes les politiques de ce gouvernement visent des gains politiques à court terme, c'est-à-dire la réélection assurée dans trois ans, du moins le pensent-ils et le veulent-ils. Alors que nous, durant les 10 dernières années, oh! combien de décisions avons-nous prises qui n'étaient pas du tout populaires? Malgré cela, nous les prenions. Nous étions courageux et fiers de les prendre. Je parle par exemple d'augmenter l'âge de la retraite de 65 à 67 ans. C'était une décision extrêmement courageuse et nécessaire. Je suis convaincu que je n'aurai probablement jamais de retraite. Je vais travailler jusqu'à ma mort, comme cela a été le cas durant des milliers d'années, cela étant dit. C'est malheureux.
Je voulais terminer en disant que l'un de mes passe-temps, c'est regarder les débats politiques. J'ai regardé des débats en France, en Angleterre et en Allemagne, et la majorité des pays occidentaux d'Europe parlent du fait qu'il faut augmenter l'âge de la retraite. Nous l'avions fait, ce gouvernement va dans l'autre sens. C'est très malheureux.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2016-11-28 13:51 [p.7306]
Madam Speaker, in my opinion, the government has continued on the same path as the Conservatives in that they are increasing the guaranteed income supplement, which is a good thing. We can acknowledge that.
However, the government is preventing seniors who are currently working part-time from thriving. In my riding, most seniors that I meet work part-time. They therefore have to contribute to a retirement plan that they will not benefit from.
Madame la Présidente, à mon avis, le gouvernement a continué dans la même voie que celle empruntée par les conservateurs, c'est-à-dire celle qui permet d'augmenter le Supplément de revenu garanti, ce qui est une bonne chose, nous sommes capables de le reconnaître.
Cependant, il défavorise l'épanouissement actuel des aînés qui travaillent à temps partiel. Dans ma circonscription, la majorité des aînés que je rencontre travaillent à temps partiel. Ils doivent donc cotiser à un plan de retraite dont ils ne bénéficieront pas.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2016-09-22 13:26 [p.4971]
Mr. Speaker, I, too, believe that I am the voice of the people of Atlantic Canada, where I lived between the ages of two and 11. Acadia is still very much a part of me, and that is why I absolutely had to speak about it today.
Right in the middle of summer, the Prime Minister arrogantly and unabashedly announced that he intended to change the historic process for appointing Supreme Court justices that has been in place since 1875.
More than any other, this government announcement has has made me dislike the political party that currently governs our great country. Yes, like many Canadians, I am outraged by such actions and attitudes that show the true arrogance of this government.
I am saddened by this unsettling desire, so brazenly expressed by the Prime Minister, to radically alter our constitutional customs, the very customs that have informed government policy for so long in Canada.
If this Liberal government decides to change the constitutional convention for choosing Supreme Court justices without first obtaining the consent of all parliamentarians in the House, it will be going too far. Therefore, and I am choosing my words carefully, this government's actions in the past few months make me fear the worst for the federal unity of this great country.
The Prime Minister is not just interfering in provincial jurisdictions whenever he feels like it, but also interfering in his own areas of jurisdiction by planning to make sweeping changes without even consulting the opposition parties or the public. This is nothing short of anti-democratic. There are other examples of this.
First, the Prime Minister plans to change Canada's nearly 150-year-old voting system without holding a referendum to do so. It is no secret that he and his acolytes are doing this for partisan reasons and to protect their political interests as well.
Then, this same Prime Minister shamelessly suggested just this morning that he wanted to put an end to a 141-year-old constitutional convention. I am talking about the constitutional convention whereby a Prime Minister selects and appoints a judge to the Supreme Court when a seat becomes vacant while ensuring that the new appointee comes from a region similar to that of the person who occupied the vacant seat.
The purpose of this constitutional convention is to guarantee that the decisions rendered by the highest court in the country reflect the regional differences in our federation. Must I remind the political party before me that Canada has five distinct regions and that those regions are legally recognized?
The fact is that Jean Chrétien's Liberal government passed a law that provides for and gives each of the regions of Canada a quasi-constitutional right of veto. Accordingly, the Atlantic provinces, and their region as a whole, do have a say when it comes to the Constitution Act of 1982.
What is more, the British North America Act guarantees the Atlantic provinces fair and effective representation in the House of Commons. For example, New Brunswick is guaranteed 10 seats. The same is true in the Senate, where it is guaranteed just as many seats. Under the same convention, each of the Atlantic provinces holds at least one seat on the Council of Ministers.
How can our friends opposite justify threatening, out of the blue, to reduce to nil the Atlantic provinces' presence in the highest court of the country? If the government moves forward with this new approach, will it do the same to Quebec, the national stronghold of French Canadians? That does not make any sense.
I invite the government to think about this: can the Supreme Court of Canada really render fair and informed decisions on cases affecting the Atlantic provinces without any representation from that region?
Justice for Atlantic Canadians means treating them as equals. It seems the Liberals could not care less about the regions even though every one of them includes distinct communities that want Supreme Court decisions to reflect their values, goals and ideas about the world.
For the Prime Minister to suggest, if only in passing, we defy the convention whereby one seat on the Supreme Court of Canada's bench is reserved for Atlantic Canada is offensive to many legal experts and associations, including Janet Fuhrer, a past president of the Canadian Bar Association, and Ann Whiteway Brown, president of the New Brunswick branch of the Canadian Bar Association.
Echoing this sentiment are the Law Society of New Brunswick, the Atlantic Provinces Trial Lawyers Association, and the Société nationale de l'Acadie, which advocates on behalf of Acadians worldwide.
Disregarding this constitutional convention is tantamount to stripping four out of ten provinces of their voice in the highest court in the land.
Must I also remind members that the Atlantic provinces have a large pool of extremely qualified legal professionals who come from every region and background and who are perfectly bilingual? More importantly, these are candidates who have a vast knowledge of the Atlantic provinces' legal systems and issues. Is there anyone in this House, or elsewhere, who would dispute that?
Even more importantly, there are a few significant constitutional cases on the horizon that could have major repercussions on the Atlantic provinces. Consider, for example, the case referred to the Nova Scotia Court of Appeal regarding the elimination of protected Acadian ridings. Hearings on this are currently under way.
Is the Prime Minister really thinking about having judges from other regions rule on a case that deals with how Acadians are represented, when Acadians have been fighting for their survival on this continent for generations?
Is that really what our friends across the aisle want? Do the Liberals from Atlantic Canada really want to muzzle New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, two founding provinces of this great country?
The change that the Prime Minister wants to make to how judges are lawfully appointed to the Supreme Court is essentially a total and complete reversal of this country's established constitutional practices. How shameful and how arrogant.
It would seem the son is following in his father's footsteps. Do hon. members not see what is happening? Just like his father before him, the Prime Minister wants to alter the constitutional order of our country.
Fear not, however, because we in the Conservative Party are not buying it. We not only see what this Prime Minister is doing, but we also see know full well that behind this change in convention is a much greater ideological design.
There is an underlying desire to profoundly change Canadian constitutional arrangements and replace them with a post-materialist world view that is a departure from our constitutional traditions.
In this world view, the main objective is to eliminate from our government institutions, in this case the Supreme Court, the historical and traditional community characteristics that have defined Canada since day one by replacing them with individual and associational characteristics.
In other words, the Prime Minister obviously wants to eliminate the political predominance of certain constituencies in the Canadian constitutional order, at the Supreme Court in particular. He wants to promote a new political predominance, that of associational groups that bring together individuals who share individual rights rather than constituent rights.
Although that may be commendable in some ways, it is a major change because the Prime Minister is ensuring that the very essence of political representativeness and the concept of diversity within the judiciary is changed. The Prime Minister wants a representativeness based on a concept of individual diversity and fragmented by idiosyncratic characteristics.
In light of this potential change, Canadians across the country, including those from Atlantic Canada, must protest and call on the Prime Minister to answer for this. The Prime Minister cannot act unilaterally in this case and must involve all the players concerned.
Monsieur le Président, moi aussi, j'ai bien la certitude d'être la voix des gens de l'Atlantique, où j'ai grandi de l'âge de 2 ans à 11 ans. L'Acadie résonne encore en moi, et c'est pourquoi je tenais absolument à en parler aujourd'hui.
Au beau milieu de l'été, le premier ministre a annoncé, de manière arrogante et sans vergogne, qu'il avait l'intention de changer la procédure historique par laquelle sont choisis les juges de la Cour suprême depuis 1875.
Plus que toute autre, cette annonce faite par ce gouvernement engendre chez moi une aversion définitive à l'égard de la formation politique qui gouverne actuellement notre grand pays. Oui, comme de nombreux Canadiens, je suis outré par de telles actions et attitudes qui témoignent d'une arrogance authentique, celle de ce gouvernement.
Je suis attristé par cette volonté déconcertante, exprimée sans timidité, faut-il le dire, par le premier ministre, qui vise à engendrer un changement significatif à nos moeurs constitutionnelles, celles qui, après tout, guident nos actions gouvernementales depuis si longtemps ici, au Canada.
Si ce gouvernement libéral décide de changer la convention constitutionnelle relative à la sélection des juges de la Cour suprême sans d'abord avoir eu l'assentiment de l'ensemble des parlementaires de la Chambre, il va bien trop loin. Suivant ce raisonnement, et je pèse bien mes mots, les actions posées par ce gouvernement dans les derniers mois me font craindre le pire pour l'unité fédérale de ce grand pays.
En effet, le premier ministre s'adonne non seulement à de l'ingérence dans les compétences provinciales quand bon lui semble, mais de plus, dans ses propres compétences, il prévoit y conduire des changements d'envergure sans toutefois consulter les partis de l'opposition ni même la population. Cela n'est ni plus ni moins qu'antidémocratique. D'ailleurs, quelques exemples en témoignent d'ores et déjà.
D'abord, le premier ministre entend changer notre mode de scrutin canadien, vieux de presque 150 ans, sans faire de référendum. C'est un secret de Polichinelle: lui et ses acolytes le font pour des raisons partisanes et pour assurer leur intérêt politique de surcroît.
Ensuite, ce même premier ministre a laissé entendre jusqu'à ce matin, sans honte, qu'il voulait mettre fin à une convention constitutionnelle vieille de 141 années. Je parle ici de la convention constitutionnelle qui veut qu'un premier ministre choisisse et nomme un juge à la Cour suprême, lorsqu'un siège est libéré, tout en s'assurant que la nouvelle nomination est issue d'une région semblable à celle de la personne qui occupait le siège laissé vacant.
Cette convention constitutionnelle a comme objectif de garantir que les décisions rendues par la plus haute institution judiciaire du pays reflètent les particularités régionales qui composent notre fédération. Dois-je rappeler à ce parti politique qui est devant moi que nous avons, au Canada, cinq régions distinctes et que ces mêmes régions ont une reconnaissance légale de fait?
Notons à ce sujet que le gouvernement libéral de l'honorable Jean Chrétien a adopté une loi qui prévoit et alloue un droit de veto quasi-constitutionnel à chacune des régions du Canada. Ainsi, on accorde aux provinces de l'Atlantique et à leur région dans son ensemble un droit de regard en ce qui concerne la Loi constitutionnelle de 1982.
De plus, nonobstant cet état de fait, notons que l'Acte de l'Amérique du Nord britannique garantit aux provinces de l'Atlantique une représentation efficace et équitable à la Chambre des communes. Par exemple, 10 sièges sont garantis au Nouveau-Brunswick, et il en va de même au Sénat, où autant de sièges lui sont garantis. La même convention veut que chacune des provinces de l'Atlantique reçoive au moins un siège au Conseil des ministres.
Alors, comment nos amis d'en face peuvent-ils justifier que, du jour au lendemain, on ait menacé de réduire à néant la présence des provinces de l'Atlantique au plus haut tribunal du pays? Si cette nouvelle façon de faire voit le jour, sera-t-elle répétée dans le cas du Québec également, le bastion national des Canadiens français de ce grand pays? Cela n'a aucun sens.
J'invite ce gouvernement à songer à la chose suivante: la Cour suprême du Canada peut-elle vraiment rendre des jugements justes et éclairés sur des causes qui concernent les provinces de l'Atlantique en l'absence de toute représentation de cette région?
Traiter les Canadiens de l'Atlantique avec justice, c'est les mettre sur un pied d'égalité. Toutefois, peut-être les libéraux veulent-ils tout simplement faire fi de nos régions canadiennes. Pourtant, chacune d'entre elles détient en son sein des communautés constitutives bien distinctes dont chacune espère voir ses valeurs, ses aspirations et ses visions du monde reflétées dans des décisions rendues par la Cour suprême.
Laisser entendre, comme le premier ministre l'a fait, ne serait-ce que quelques secondes, qu'on ne veut pas respecter la convention qui veut qu'on réserve pour la région de l'Atlantique un siège à la Cour suprême du Canada est très grave aux yeux de plusieurs juristes et associations. C'est le cas notamment de Janet Fuhrer, qui fut présidente de l'Association du Barreau canadien, et d'Ann Whiteway Brown, présidente de la division du Nouveau-Brunswick de l'Association du Barreau canadien.
C'est le cas également pour le Barreau du Nouveau Brunswick, pour l'Association des avocats plaideurs de l'Atlantique et pour la Société nationale de l'Acadie, présente dans le monde entier à la défense des Acadiens.
Songer à ne pas respecter cette convention constitutionnelle, c'est songer à priver quatre provinces sur dix de toute voix au chapitre au sein de la plus haute institution judiciaire du pays.
Doit-on aussi rappeler que les provinces de l'Atlantique possèdent un grand bassin de juristes candidats des plus qualifiés, originaires de toutes les communautés de la région et, qui plus est, parfaitement bilingues. Surtout, il s'agit de candidats qui possèdent une connaissance approfondie des systèmes judiciaires et des enjeux de l'Atlantique. Y a-t-il quelqu'un à la Chambre ou ailleurs pour dire le contraire?
Plus important encore, d'importantes causes à caractère constitutionnel ou qui auront des retentissements majeurs dans les provinces de l'Atlantique sont à l'horizon au moment même où on se parle. À titre d'exemple, mentionnons le renvoi de la Cour d'appel de la Nouvelle-Écosse dans la cause portant sur l'abolition des circonscriptions électorales acadiennes. Les audiences sont en cours en ce moment même.
Le premier ministre a-t-il vraiment songé à faire en sorte que des juges d'autres régions déterminent l'issue d'une cause qui porte sur la représentativité des Acadiens, ce peuple qui se bat depuis des générations pour survivre sur ce continent?
Est-ce bien cela que veulent nos amis d'en face, les libéraux des provinces atlantiques, faire taire le Nouveau-Brunswick et la Nouvelle-Écosse, deux provinces fondatrices de ce grand pays?
Le changement que veut apporter le premier ministre à la façon dont il lui est loisible de choisir les juges de la Cour suprême n'est ni plus ni moins qu'un renversement radical des coutumes constitutionnelles du pays. Quelle honte et quelle arrogance!
De toute évidence, le fils suit les traces de son père. Ne voit-on pas ce qui se passe? Tout comme son aïeul, le premier ministre veut aujourd'hui altérer l'ordre constitutionnel de notre pays.
Cependant, que l'on soit sans crainte, car au Parti conservateur du Canada, nous ne sommes pas dupes. Non seulement nous voyons ce à quoi s'adonne ce premier ministre, mais nous savons aussi très bien que derrière cette modification conventionnelle loge un dessein idéologique bien plus grand.
En effet, il y a une volonté sous-jacente qui vise à changer de manière profonde les arrangements constitutionnels canadiens afin de les remplacer par une vision post-matérialiste du monde qui fait route à part avec nos traditions constitutionnelles.
Dans cette vision du monde, l'objectif principal consiste à effacer de nos institutions gouvernementales, en l'occurrence la Cour suprême, les particularités communautaires historiques et traditionnelles dont est composé le Canada depuis sa naissance, et, pour ce faire, à les remplacer par des particularités individuelles et associationnelles.
En d'autres mots, il est évident que le premier ministre veut mettre fin à la prédominance politique des communautés constitutives dans l'ordre constitutionnel canadien, tout particulièrement à la Cour suprême. Il veut ainsi favoriser une nouvelle prédominance politique, celle des groupes associationnels qui regroupent des individus partageant des droits individuels plutôt que des droits constitutifs.
Bien que cela puisse être louable à certains égards, bien entendu, il s'agit d'un changement profond, car ce faisant, le premier ministre fait en sorte que l'essence même de la représentativité politique et du concept de diversité au sein du pouvoir judiciaire soit modifiée. Le premier ministre veut donc voir une représentativité basée sur un concept de diversité individuelle et atomisée basée sur des particularités idiosyncratiques.
Devant un tel changement potentiel, les Canadiens de tout le pays, incluant ceux de l'Atlantique, doivent protester et amener le premier ministre à répondre de ses intentions. Le premier ministre ne peut agir de manière unilatérale dans ce dossier et se doit de faire appel à tous les acteurs concernés.
Results: 1 - 6 of 6