Interventions in the House of Commons
 
 
 
RSS feed based on search criteria Export search results - CSV (plain text) Export search results - XML
Add search criteria
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-05-15 17:17 [p.27900]
Mr. Speaker, I would like to say hello to the many constituents of Beauport—Limoilou who are watching. Today, it is my pleasure to debate Motion No. 170, which reads as follows:
That, in the opinion of the House, a special committee, chaired by the Speaker of the House, should be established at the beginning of each new Parliament, in order to select all Officers of Parliament.
Before I begin, I would like to recognize with all due respect that the motion was moved by the member for Hamilton Centre, who is with the NDP and has been in Parliament for quite a while, but will not seek re-election. If he is listening right now, I would like to acknowledge him and thank him for his work and decades of public service. The member for Hamilton Centre was once an MPP in Ontario, as well, and worked hard on all sorts of causes that were important to his constituents. I would like to congratulate him on his service.
Moreover, he is more than just a good parliamentarian. I remember hearing one of his speeches at the Standing Committee on Government Operations and Estimates, if I remember correctly. I took note of his delivery, because he is a fine public speaker with good rhetorical skills. I have always had a great deal of respect for my colleagues with vast parliamentary experience. I try to learn from the best.
I am sure the member for Hamilton Centre wants to leave his mark on Canadian democracy. I too want to improve Canada's Westminster-style parliamentary democracy. Our role as MPs is the cornerstone of parliamentary democracy. It is fundamental. MPs must play a leading role in the workings of Canadian democracy, which includes the selection and appointment of officers of Parliament. That is what this motion is about.
Officers of Parliament are individuals jointly appointed by the House of Commons and the Senate to look into matters on our behalf and help us carry out our duties and responsibilities. For example, Canada has a Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner, a position created by Mr. Harper and the Conservative Party.
There is also the Information Commissioner, who ensures that Canadians are able to have access to all government information so that they can get to the bottom of things. Then, there is the Commissioner of Lobbying. We heard a lot about her because of the Prime Minister's trip to the Aga Khan's island. Then there is the Commissioner of Official Languages. I am the official languages critic and I worked on the appointment of the new commissioner, Mr. Théberge. There is also the Auditor General. That position is currently vacant because the former auditor general passed away just a few months ago. God rest his soul. I send my best wishes to his family. Finally, there is the Chief Electoral Officer and the Public Sector Integrity Commissioner.
There are other officers of Parliament, but the ones I mentioned are the main commissioners who have been mandated by Parliament to conduct investigations in order to ensure proper accountability in the Canadian democratic process.
The member for Hamilton Centre wants to improve and strengthen parliamentary democracy with respect to the process for appointing commissioners and other officers of Parliament. Here is why.
During the last election campaign, the Prime Minister made some promises that he mostly did not keep. He promised to make the process for appointing commissioners more democratic. Under the Conservative government, from 2006 to 2015, the process for appointing commissioners was much more democratic from the perspective of a Westminster-style parliamentary system. It was also much more transparent than what we have seen over the past few years with the Prime Minister and the Liberal government.
When the Prime Minister chose the Official Languages Commissioner a year and a half ago, I am sure that the member for Hamilton Centre noticed, as we all did, that the process for appointing officers of Parliament was anything but open and transparent. Note that I am not in any way trying to target the individual who was selected and who currently holds that position.
This was done differently before 2015. For example, the Standing Committee on Official Languages used to send the Prime Minister of Canada a list of potential candidates for the position of Commissioner of Official Languages. The Prime Minister, with help from his advisors and cabinet, selected one of the candidates suggested. That is far more transparent and democratic than what the Prime Minister and member for Papineau is doing.
What has the Prime Minister done these past few years? Instead of having committees with oversight and the necessary skills for selecting commissioners, such as the Standing Committee on Access to Information, Privacy and Ethics or the Standing Committee on Official Languages, the Prime Minister is no longer relying on committees to send him a list of names of people or experts in the field. They are no longer able to send a list to the Prime Minister. He said to trust him, that he had set up a system involving people in his own office who send him lists of candidates with absolutely no partisan connections or any connections whatsoever to the Liberal list, candidates who were found by virtue of their expertise.
What actually happened? We saw one clearly terrible case with Ms. Meilleur. Far be it from me to badmouth her, but unfortunately, she was part of this undemocratic process. Ms. Meilleur had been a Liberal MPP in Ontario. She donated money to the Liberal Party of Canada, and less than a year later, she was nominated for the position of official languages commissioner. The Prime Minister did not send a list of candidates' names to the opposition parties. He did not start a discussion with the other party leaders to ask who they thought the best candidate was. He sent a single name to the leader of the official opposition and to the then NDP leader, saying that this was his pick and asking if they agreed.
Not only did the committees have no input under the current Liberal Prime Minister, but the Prime Minister actually only sent one name to the opposition leader.
What the member for Hamilton Centre wants to do is set up a process whereby candidates are selected by a committee, which would be chaired by you, Mr. Speaker, amazingly enough. First off, the idea suggested by my colleague, the member for Hamilton Centre, could not be implemented before the session ends. We have only a few weeks left, and I gather that an NDP member will be proposing an amendment to the motion in a few minutes. We will see what happens then.
Personally, I would say we need to go even further than the motion moved by the member for Hamilton Centre. I will speak to my colleagues about this once we are in government, as of October.
Why not be even bolder and give parliamentary committees not just the power to refer candidates to the Prime Minister for him to decide, but also the power to appoint officers of Parliament? I want to point out that I am speaking only for myself here. I began reflecting on this a year and a half ago, after what happened with Ms. Meilleur and the current commissioner.
I have been a member of the Standing Committee on Official Languages for two years now, and I humbly believe that I have learned a lot about official languages issues. I am familiar with the key players on the ground and I am beginning to understand who the real experts are, who the stakeholders are and who might make a good commissioner. I have to wonder why we would not go even further than what my colleague from Hamilton Centre is proposing, and perhaps even give the real power to the committees.
Imagine the legitimacy the process would have if parliamentary committees could one day choose officers of Parliament. These appointments should still be confirmed by both chambers, as is always the case.
Careful reflection is still needed. What is certain is that we are too close to the end of the current parliamentary session for the motion moved by the member for Hamilton Centre to become a reality. This is even less likely to happen under the current Liberal government, which made many promises to please the Canadian left, including a promise for democratic emancipation. All those promises have been broken.
I wish the hon. member for Hamilton Centre continued success.
Monsieur le Président, comme d'habitude, j'aimerais saluer tous les citoyens et les citoyennes de Beauport—Limoilou qui nous écoutent en grand nombre. J'ai le plaisir de débattre aujourd'hui de la motion M-170, qui se lit comme suit:
Que, de l'avis de la Chambre, un comité spécial présidé par le Président de la Chambre devrait être constitué au début de chaque législature afin de sélectionner tous les agents du Parlement.
Avant de commencer, j'aimerais reconnaître, avec honneur et justesse, que la motion a été déposée par le député d'Hamilton-Centre, un député du NPD qui siège ici depuis assez longtemps. Il a mentionné qu'il ne se représenterait pas aux prochaines élections, alors s'il nous écoute, j'aimerais le saluer et le remercier pour son travail et ses décennies de service public. Le député d'Hamilton-Centre a également été député provincial de l'Ontario et il a œuvré pour toutes sortes de causes importantes pour ses concitoyens. J'aimerais donc le féliciter.
D'ailleurs, il n'est pas seulement un bon parlementaire. Je l'ai déjà vu faire un discours au Comité permanent des opérations gouvernementales et des prévisions budgétaires, si je me rappelle bien, et j'ai noté sa façon de faire, car il est un bon orateur qui a une bonne rhétorique. J'ai toujours beaucoup d'estime pour mes collègues qui ont une très grande expérience parlementaire, et j'essaie d'en tirer les meilleures leçons.
Le député d'Hamilton-Centre veut certainement laisser sa marque sur la démocratie canadienne. Je partage sa volonté d'améliorer la démocratie parlementaire de type Westminster, soit celle que nous avons ici, au Canada. Effectivement, le rôle des députés est à la base même de la démocratie parlementaire. Il est fondamental. Les députés doivent avoir un rôle prépondérant dans l'exercice de la démocratie canadienne, notamment en ce qui a trait à la sélection et à la nomination des agents du Parlement. C'est ce dont il est question dans la motion.
Les agents du Parlement sont des individus que la Chambre des communes et le Sénat nomment conjointement pour qu'ils fassent des vérifications à notre place dans le but de nous aider dans le cadre de nos fonctions et de nos responsabilités. Par exemple, au Canada, nous avons un commissaire aux conflits d'intérêts et à l'éthique. D'ailleurs, ce commissariat a été mis en branle par M. Harper et le Parti conservateur.
Il y a aussi le commissaire à l'information, qui s'assure que les Canadiens peuvent avoir accès à toutes les informations du gouvernement pour aller au fond des choses. Ensuite, il y a le commissaire au lobbying. On a souvent entendu parler de lui en raison du voyage du premier ministre à l'île de l'Aga Khan. Puis, il y a le commissaire aux langues officielles. Je suis d'ailleurs porte-parole en matière de langues officielles. J'ai moi-même travaillé sur le dossier de la nomination du nouveau commissaire, M. Théberge. En outre, il y a le vérificateur général. Ce poste est actuellement vacant, puisque l'ancien vérificateur général — que Dieu ait son âme — est décédé il y a quelques mois. Je tiens à saluer toute sa famille. Finalement, mentionnons le commissaire aux élections et le commissaire à l'intégrité du secteur public.
Il y a d'autres agents du Parlement, mais ceux que j'ai nommés sont les commissaires principaux que le Parlement a chargés de mener des enquêtes dans le but d'assurer une reddition de comptes adéquate dans le cadre de l'exercice de la démocratie canadienne.
Le député d'Hamilton-Centre veut améliorer et renforcer la démocratie parlementaire en ce qui a trait au processus de nomination des commissaires et des autres agents du Parlement. Voici pourquoi il veut faire cela.
Lors de la dernière campagne électorale, le premier ministre a fait quelques promesses, qu'il n'a pas tenues pour la plupart. Il avait notamment promis de rendre le processus de sélection des commissaires plus démocratique. Sous le gouvernement conservateur, de 2006 à 2015, le processus de nomination des commissaires était beaucoup plus démocratique du point de vue du système parlementaire de type Westminster, et beaucoup plus transparent que ce qu'on a vu au cours des dernières années avec le premier ministre et le gouvernement libéral.
Lorsque le commissaire aux langues officielles a été choisi par le premier ministre, il y a de cela un an et demi, je suis certain que le député d'Hamilton-Centre a constaté, comme nous tous, que le processus de nomination des agents du Parlement était tout le contraire d'un processus ouvert et transparent. Ici, je ne vise pas du tout l'individu qui a été choisi et qui occupe le poste actuellement.
Avant 2015, cela fonctionnait différemment. Par exemple, c'était le Comité permanent des langues officielles qui envoyait au premier ministre du Canada une liste de candidats potentiels au poste de commissaire aux langues officielles. Le premier ministre, avec l'aide de ses conseillers et de son Cabinet, choisissait une candidature parmi celles qui avaient été suggérées. On voit déjà que c'était beaucoup plus transparent et démocratique que ce que fait le premier ministre et député de Papineau.
Qu'a fait le premier ministre au cours des dernières années? Au lieu d'avoir des comités qui ont un droit de regard et des compétences certaines quant à la sélection de commissaires, par exemple le Comité permanent de l'accès à l'information, de la protection des renseignements personnels et de l'éthique ou le Comité permanent des langues officielles, les comités ne peuvent plus aujourd'hui envoyer au premier ministre une liste de noms de gens ou d'experts dans le domaine. Ils n'ont plus la possibilité d'envoyer une liste au premier ministre. Ce dernier a dit de lui faire confiance, qu'il avait installé, dans son propre bureau, un système où les gens lui envoient des listes de candidats qui ne sont aucunement reliés à la partisanerie, qui ne sont aucunement reliés à la liste libérale et qui sont des gens qui ont été découverts grâce à leur expertise.
Or qu'est-ce qu'on a vu? On a assisté à un cas patent terrible: celui de Mme Meilleur. Je n'ai pas du tout envie de parler contre cette personne, mais, malheureusement, elle a fait partie de cet exercice non démocratique. Mme Meilleur avait été députée libérale en Ontario. Elle était une donatrice du Parti libéral du Canada, et ce, moins d'un an avant d'avoir été choisie pour être commissaire aux langues officielles. Le premier ministre n'a pas envoyé de liste aux partis d'opposition. Il n'a pas ouvert une discussion avec les autres chefs de parti pour connaître leur opinion concernant la meilleure candidature. Il a envoyé un seul nom au chef de l'opposition officielle, au chef du NPD de l'époque, et lui a dit que c'était la candidature qu'il avait retenue. Puis, il lui a demandé s'il était d'accord.
Non seulement les comités n'avaient pas de droit de regard, sous le premier ministre libéral actuel, mais, en plus, ce dernier envoyait une seule candidature au chef de l'opposition.
Ce que veut faire le député d'Hamilton-Centre, c'est faire en sorte qu'il y ait un comité — présidé par vous-même, monsieur le Président, n'est-ce pas incroyable? — qui choisirait des candidatures. Premièrement, l'idée de mon collègue le député d'Hamilton-Centre ne pourra pas être achevée avant la fin des travaux parlementaires. Il ne nous reste que quelques semaines, et je crois avoir compris qu'un député du NPD va proposer un amendement à la motion dans les minutes qui vont suivre. On verra alors ce qui arrivera.
Personnellement, je dirais qu'il faut aller encore plus loin que la motion présentée par le député d'Hamilton-Centre. Je vais en parler à mes collègues lorsque nous allons former le gouvernement, en octobre prochain.
Pourquoi ne redonnerions-nous pas non seulement le pouvoir aux comités parlementaires d'envoyer des candidatures au premier ministre pour qu'il choisisse, mais également — soyons encore plus audacieux — le pouvoir de nomination des agents parlementaires? Je tiens à dire que je parle ici en mon nom. J'ai entamé cette réflexion personnelle il y a un an et demi, à la suite de ce qui s'est passé avec Mme Meilleur et le commissaire actuel.
Cela fait deux ans que je siège au Comité permanent des langues officielles, et je pense humblement que j'ai acquis une certaine connaissance des questions touchant les langues officielles. Je connais les acteurs présents sur place et je commence à avoir une bonne idée de qui sont les experts, de qui sont les personnes intéressées et de qui pourraient être de bons commissaires. Je me demande pourquoi nous n'irions pas encore plus loin que ce que mon collègue d'Hamilton-Centre dit et peut-être même donner le vrai pouvoir aux comités.
Imaginons la légitimité que cela donnerait si, un jour, les comités parlementaires pouvaient choisir les agents du Parlement. Cette nomination devrait quand même être confirmée par les deux Chambres, comme c'est toujours le cas.
Plusieurs réflexions doivent avoir lieu. Chose certaine, nous sommes trop près de la fin de l'actuelle session parlementaire pour que le projet du député d'Hamilton-Centre soit réalisable. C'est encore moins possible que ce soit réalisable sous le gouvernement libéral actuel, qui a fait une multitude de promesses pour plaire à la gauche canadienne, dont des promesses d'émancipation démocratique. Ces promesses ont toutes été rompues.
Je souhaite une bonne continuation au très cher député d'Hamilton-Centre.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-10-26 10:49 [p.22914]
Madam Speaker, it is always an honour to rise to speak in the House.
I would like to say hello to the people of Beauport—Limoilou who are watching us now on CPAC or watching a rebroadcast on Facebook or Twitter.
Without further delay, I would like to address the previous speaker's comments. I find it interesting that he said their objective was to prevent foreign influence from third parties.
The bill will pass, since the Liberals have a majority. However, one problem I have with the bill is that it will allow more than 1.5 million Canadians who have been living outside of Canada for more than five years to vote in general elections, even if they have been outside Canada for 10 or 15 years.
These people have a privilege that even Canadians who have never left the country do not even have. The Liberals will let them randomly choose which riding they want to vote in. This is a massive privilege.
If I were living in the United States for 10 years and saw that the vote was really close in a certain riding, thanks to the new amendments made to the bill, I could decide to vote for the Liberal Party in order to ensure that a Liberal member gets elected. That seems like a very dangerous measure to me. It will give a lot of power to people who have been living abroad for a very long time. That still does not make them foreigners, since they are Canadian citizens.
For those watching us, I want to note that we are talking about Bill C-76 to modernize the Canada Elections Act.
This is an extremely important issue because it is the Canada Elections Act that sets the guidelines for our elections in our democracy. These elections determine the party that will form the next government of Canada.
I am sure that the people of Beauport—Limoilou watching us right now can hardly believe the Liberal government when it says that it wants to improve democracy or Canada's electoral system or allow a lot of people to exercise their right to vote. The Liberals' record on different elements of democracy has been deplorable the past three years.
Two years ago when the House was debating the issue, I was a member of the Standing Committee on Government Operations and Estimates. The Liberals introduced a parliamentary reform that included some rather surprising elements. They wanted to weaken the opposition, thereby weakening roughly 10 million Canadians who voted for the opposition parties, including the Conservative Party, the New Democratic Party, and the Green Party.
They wanted to cut speaking times in the House, which is completely ridiculous. I have said it many times before and I will say it again. An MP currently has the right to speak for 20 minutes. Most of the time, each MP speaks for 10 minutes. Through the reform, the Liberals wanted to cut speaking times from 20 minutes to 10 minutes at all times. The 20-minute speaking slot would no longer exist.
I have a book at home that I love called The Confederation Debates. It features speeches by Papineau, Doyon, George-Étienne Cartier, John A. MacDonald, Louis-Hippolyte La Fontaine, among many others that I could name. These great MPs would speak for four, five, six, seven or eight hours without stopping, long into the night.
With their parliamentary reforms, the Liberals wanted to reduce MPs' speaking time to 10 minutes. They wanted to take away our right to speak for 20 minutes. All this was intended to minimize the opposition's speaking time, to stifle debate on various issues.
What they did yesterday was even worse. It was a clear-cut example of their attitude towards parliamentary democracy. They imposed time allocation. In layman's terms, they placed a gag order on a debate on the modernization of the Canada Elections Act. No example could more blatantly demonstrate their ultimate intent, which is to ram the bill through as fast as possible. It is really a shame. They want to ram this down our throats.
There is also what they did in 2015 and 2016 with their practice of cash for access.
When big-time lobbyists want to meet with a minister or the Prime Minister to discuss an issue, they just have to register and pay $1,500, or $1,575 now, for the opportunity to influence them.
These are not get-togethers with ordinary constituents. These are get-togethers arranged for the express purpose of giving prominent lobbyists access to top government officials and enabling them to influence decisions.
Here is a great example. The Minister of Finance attended a get-together with Port of Halifax officials and people closely connected to the Port of Halifax. No other Liberal Party MP was there. That is a blatant conflict of interest and cash for access.
If Canadians have a hard time trusting the Liberals when they say they introduced this bill because they want to enfranchise people or improve democracy and civic engagement, it is also because of all of the promises the Liberals have broken since their election in 2015.
Elections and electoral platforms form the foundations of Canadian democracy. Each party's political platform contains election promises. Personally, I prefer to call them commitments. The Liberals made some big promises. They said they would run small $10-billion deficits for the first two years and then reduce the deficits. Year after year, however, as they are in their third year of a four-year mandate, they have been running deficits that are much worse: $30 billion, $20 billion and, this year, $19 billion, although their plan projected a $6-billion deficit.
They broke that promise, but worse still, they broke their promise to return to a balanced budget. As my colleague from Louis-Saint-Laurent has put it so well often enough, this is the first time we are seeing structural deficits outside wartime or a major recession. What is worse, this is the first time a government has had no plan to return to a balanced budget. It defies reason. The Parliamentary Budget Officer, an institution created by the Right Hon. Stephen Harper, said again recently that it is unbelievable to see a government not taking affairs of the state more seriously.
Meanwhile, with respect to infrastructure, the Liberals said they were introducing the largest infrastructure program in Canadian history—everything is always historic with them—worth $187 billion. What is the total amount spent to date? They have spent, at most, $7 billion on a few projects here and there, although this was supposed to be a pan-Canadian, structured and large-scale program.
The Liberals also broke their promise to reform the electoral system. They wanted a preferential balloting system because, according to analyses, surveys and their strategists, it would have benefited them. I did not support that promise, but it is probably why so many Canadians voted for the Liberals.
There is then a string of broken promises, but electoral reform was a fundamental promise and the Liberals reneged on it. It would have made changes to the Election Act and to how Canadians choose their government. That clearly shows once again that Canadians cannot trust the Liberals when they say they will reform the Election Act in order to strengthen democracy in Canada.
Let us now get back to the matter at hand, Bill C-76, which makes major fundamental changes that I find deplorable.
First, Bill C-76 would allow the Chief Electoral Officer to authorize the use of the voter information card as a piece of identification for voting. As one of my Conservative colleagues said recently, whether we like it or not, voter cards show up all over, even in recycling boxes. Sometimes voter cards are found sticking out of community mailboxes.
There are all kinds of ways that an individual can get hold of a voter card and go to the polling station with it. It is not that difficult. This Liberal bill enables that individual to vote, although there is no way of knowing if they are that person, unless they are asked to provide identification—and that is not even the biggest problem.
It does not happen often, thank goodness, but when I go to the CHUL in Quebec City—which is the hospital where I am registered—not only do I have to provide the doctor's requisition for blood work, but I also have to show a piece of ID and my hospital card.
Madame la Présidente, je suis toujours honoré de prendre la parole à la Chambre.
J'aimerais saluer tous les citoyens de Beauport—Limoilou qui nous écoutent en ce moment, par l'intermédiaire de CPAC, ou qui nous écouteront plus tard en rediffusion sur Facebook ou Twitter.
Sans plus tarder, j'aimerais répondre au commentaire qu'a fait le député qui vient de terminer son discours. C'est intéressant parce qu'il a précisé que leur objectif était de réduire l'influence et l'impact des tierces parties venant de l'extérieur, donc des gens venant de l'étranger.
Le projet de loi sera adopté, puisque les libéraux forment la majorité. Cependant, une des choses qui me titille le plus dans le projet de loi, c'est qu'il va dorénavant permettre à plus de 1,5 million de Canadiens vivant à l'extérieur du Canada depuis plus de 5 ans de voter lors des élections générales, même si cela fait 10 ou 15 ans qu'ils sont à l'extérieur du pays.
Ces personnes ont un privilège que même un Canadien qui vit ici et qui n'est jamais parti n'a pas. Les libéraux vont leur permettre de choisir aléatoirement une circonscription où voter. C'est un privilège complètement incommensurable.
Si j'étais aux États-Unis depuis 10 ans et que je voyais que le vote est très serré dans une circonscription, je pourrais, grâce aux amendements apportés au projet de loi, décider d'aller voter pour le Parti libéral, afin de m'assurer qu'un député libéral est élu. Cela m'apparaît être une mesure très dangereuse. Elle va justement donner du pouvoir à des gens qui vivent à l'étranger depuis fort longtemps. Ce ne sont tout de même pas des étrangers, puisqu'il s'agit de Canadiens.
À l'intention des citoyens qui nous écoutent, je précise que nous parlons du projet de loi C-76, qui vise à moderniser la Loi électorale du Canada.
Il s'agit d'un enjeu extrêmement important, parce que c'est la Loi électorale du Canada qui fixe les balises et les barèmes applicables à nos élections, dans notre démocratie. Ces élections déterminent le parti qui va former le prochain gouvernement du Canada.
Je suis sûr que les citoyens de Beauport—Limoilou qui nous écoutent en ce moment ont peine à croire le gouvernement libéral lorsqu'il dit vouloir améliorer la démocratie ou le système électoral du Canada ou permettre à de nombreuses personnes d'exercer leur droit de vote. L'historique libéral des trois dernières années, en ce qui a trait à différents attributs de la démocratie, est déplorable.
Il y a deux ans, alors que ce débat avait cours à la Chambre, je siégeais au Comité permanent des opérations gouvernementales et des prévisions budgétaires. Les libéraux ont mis en avant une réforme parlementaire dans laquelle il y avait certains éléments assez surprenants. Ils voulaient amoindrir le pouvoir de l'opposition, donc amoindrir le pouvoir d'environ 10 millions de Canadiens qui ont voté pour des partis de l'opposition, ce qui comprend le Parti conservateur, le Nouveau Parti démocratique et le Parti vert.
Ils voulaient réduire le temps de parole à la Chambre, ce qui est complètement ridicule. Je l'ai souvent dit à la Chambre, mais je veux le redire. En ce moment, un député a le droit de parler pendant 20 minutes. La plupart du temps, chaque député parle pendant 10 minutes. Au moyen de la réforme, les libéraux voulaient faire passer le droit de parole de 20 minutes à 10 minutes, à n'importe quel moment. Le droit de parole de 20 minutes n'aurait même plus existé.
Chez moi, j'ai un livre que j'adore, qui s'intitule Les Débats de la Confédération. On peut y lire Papineau, Doyon, George-Étienne Cartier, John A. MacDonald et Louis-Hippolyte La Fontaine. Je pourrais en nommer plusieurs autres. Ces grands députés parlaient quatre, cinq, six, sept ou huit heures d'affilée, sans arrêt, toute la nuit.
Au moyen de leur réforme parlementaire, les libéraux voulaient réduire le temps de parole des députés à 10 minutes. Ils voulaient annuler le droit de parole de 20 minutes. Tout cela pour empêcher le plus possible l'opposition de s'exprimer, pour empêcher des débats qui portent sur toutes sortes d'enjeux.
Ce qu'ils ont fait hier est encore pire que cela. C'est un exemple patent de leur attitude envers la démocratie parlementaire. Ils ont imposé une attribution de temps. En jargon populaire ou comme on dit au Québec, ils ont imposé un bâillon sur un débat qui porte sur la modernisation de la Loi électorale du Canada. Il n'y a pas d'exemple plus flagrant que cela de leur intention. Cette dernière est justement de faire adopter le projet de loi à toute vitesse. Cela est vraiment dommage. Ils veulent nous faire passer cela dans la gorge.
Il y a aussi ce qu'ils ont fait en 2015 et en 2016 avec leur pratique du cash for access.
Quand de grands lobbyistes voulaient rencontrer un ministre ou le premier ministre pour parler d'une question particulière, ils n'avaient qu'à s'inscrire sur une liste et à payer 1 500 $ — c'est 1 575 $ aujourd'hui — pour pouvoir les influencer.
On ne parle pas d'un cinq à sept avec des citoyens de tous les jours d'une circonscription. On parle de cinq à sept mis en place exclusivement pour permettre à de grands lobbyistes d'atteindre les plus hauts sommets de l'État et d'influencer les prises de décisions.
Voici un exemple important. Le ministre des Finances a pris part à un cinq à sept avec les autorités portuaires du Port d'Halifax et des gens qui avaient seulement un intérêt pour le port d'Halifax. Il n'y avait aucun député du Parti libéral. C'est un exemple flagrant de conflit d'intérêts et d'accès au comptant.
Par ailleurs, s'il est très difficile pour les Canadiens de faire confiance aux libéraux quand ils disent qu'avec ce projet de loi, ils veulent agrandir le suffrage ou améliorer la démocratie et la participation citoyenne, c'est aussi à cause de toutes les promesses qu'ils ont brisées depuis qu'ils ont été élus en 2015.
Les élections et les plateformes sont des fondements de la démocratie canadienne. Dans la plateforme politique de chaque parti, il y a des promesses électorales. Moi, je préfère appeler cela des engagements. Les libéraux avaient fait de grandes promesses. Ils ont dit qu'ils allaient faire des petits déficits de 10 milliards de dollars pour les deux premières années et qu'ils diminueraient par la suite. Or, année après année, puisqu'ils en sont à la troisième année de leur mandat de quatre ans, ils nous ont servi des déficits bien pires: 30 milliards de dollars, 20 milliards de dollars et, cette année, 19 milliards de dollars, alors que leur plan prévoyait un déficit de 6 milliards de dollars.
Ils ont brisé cette promesse, mais pire encore, ils ont brisé leur promesse du retour à l'équilibre budgétaire. Comme mon collègue de Louis-Saint-Laurent le dit si bien assez souvent, c'est la première fois de l'histoire qu'on voit des déficits structurels hors d'une récession économique importante ou d'une période de guerre. Le pire, c'est que c'est la première fois qu'un gouvernement ne prévoit aucun retour à l'équilibre budgétaire. C'est un non-sens. Le directeur parlementaire du budget, une institution créée par le très honorable M. Harper, a dit encore récemment qu'il était incroyable de voir un gouvernement qui ne prend pas les affaires de l'État plus au sérieux que cela.
D'autre part, en ce qui concerne les infrastructures, les libéraux disaient qu'ils avaient le plus grand programme d'infrastructure de l'histoire du Canada — avec eux, c'est toujours historique —, totalisant 187 milliards de dollars. Toutefois, de cette somme, qu'ont-ils dépensé à ce jour? Ce n'est pas plus que 7 milliards de dollars pour quelques projets ici et là, alors que ce programme était censé être pancanadien, structuré et de grande envergure.
Les libéraux ont aussi brisé leur promesse de réformer le mode de scrutin. Ils voulaient un mode de scrutin préférentiel, car selon les analyses, les sondages et leurs stratèges, cela les aurait avantagés. Je n'appuyais pas cette promesse, mais c'est probablement en raison de celle-ci qu'un grand pan de l'électorat canadien a voté pour les libéraux.
Ce sont donc des promesses brisées les unes après les autres, mais la réforme du mode de scrutin était une promesse fondamentale, et les libéraux l'ont reniée. Cela aurait touché la loi électorale et la façon dont les Canadiens sont appelés à choisir leur gouvernement. C'est un autre exemple patent qui démontre que les Canadiens ne peuvent pas faire confiance aux libéraux lorsqu'ils disent qu'ils vont réformer la loi sur les élections pour agrandir la démocratie au Canada.
Revenons maintenant au sujet qui nous intéresse plus particulièrement, c'est-à-dire le projet de loi C-76, qui apporte deux grands changements fondamentaux qui, selon moi, sont déplorables.
Premièrement, le projet de loi C-76 permettrait au directeur général des élections d'autoriser la carte d'électeur comme pièce d'identité pour voter. Comme l'a dit un de mes collègues conservateurs récemment, les cartes d'électeur peuvent, qu'on le veuille ou non, se retrouver un peu partout, comme dans les boîtes de recyclage. Parfois, il y a des cartes qui dépassent des boîtes postales communautaires.
Il y a donc toutes sortes de façons dont un citoyen peut trouver une carte d'électeur et se présenter au bureau de vote avec celle-ci. C'est même assez facile. Or, selon ce projet de loi libéral, cette personne-là pourrait voter, alors qu'il n'y aurait aucune façon de savoir si c'est la même personne, sauf en lui demandant de présenter une carte d'identité. Ce serait donc la moindre des choses.
Cela ne m'arrive pas souvent, Dieu merci, mais quand je vais au CHUL de Québec — c'est là que je suis inscrit —, je dois non seulement présenter la prescription du médecin pour une prise de sang, mais je dois aussi présenter une carte d'identité ainsi que la carte d'hôpital.
Results: 1 - 2 of 2