Interventions in the House of Commons
 
 
 
RSS feed based on search criteria Export search results - CSV (plain text) Export search results - XML
Add search criteria
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-04-29 13:17 [p.27091]
Mr. Speaker, I am very pleased to rise today to speak to the NDP motion. I would first like to say hello to the many people of Beauport—Limoilou who are watching us live or who will watch later on social media.
I just spent two weeks in my riding, where I met thousands of my constituents at events and activities organized by different organizations. Last Thursday, the Corporation de développement communautaire de Beauport, or CDCB, held a unique and innovative event. For the first time, all elected municipal, provincial and federal officials in the riding attended a breakfast meet and greet for constituents and representatives of organizations. It was a type of round table with elected members from all levels of government. It was an exemplary exercise in good democratic practices for our country. We had some great conversations. I would like to congratulate the CDCB for this very interesting event, which I hope will become an annual tradition.
I also want to mention that my beautiful Quebec is experiencing serious flooding across the province. When I left Quebec City this morning around six  o'clock I could see damage all along the road between Trois-Rivières and Montreal and in the Maskinongé area. There is always a little water there in the spring, but there is a lot of water this year. When I got to the Gatineau-Ottawa area I saw houses flooded. Nearly 8,000 people, men, women and families, have been displaced. These are tough times, and I want them to know that my heart is with them. I wish them much strength. I am pleased to see that the Government of Quebec has announced assistance, as has the federal government, of course.
The NDP's motion is an interesting one. It addresses the fact that the current Prime Minister of Canada tried to influence the course of justice a couple of ways, in particular with the SNC-Lavalin matter, which has had a lot of media coverage in the past three months.
The NDP also raised the issue of drug prices. Conservatives know that, in NAFTA 2.0, which has not yet been ratified by any of the countries involved, the Liberals sadly gave in to pressure from President Trump to extend drug patents. If the agreement is ratified, Canadians will pay more for prescription drugs. People are also wondering when the Liberals will initiate serious talks about the steel and aluminum tariffs and when they will bring NAFTA ratification to the House for debate.
The NDP motion also mentions Loblaws' lobbying activities. People thought it was some kind of joke. They could not believe their eyes or their ears. The government gave Loblaws, a super-rich company, $12 million to replace its fridges. The mind boggles.
The NDP also talks about banking practices in Canada. Conservatives know that banks are important, but we think some of them, especially those run by the government, are unnecessary. As NDP members often point out, for good reason, the Canada Infrastructure Bank is designed to help big interest groups, but Canadians should not have to finance private infrastructure projects.
We could also talk about the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank, which is totally ridiculous. Canada sends nearly $250 million offshore to finance infrastructure projects, when right here at home, the federal government's $187-billion infrastructure plan is barely functioning. Over the past three years, only $14 billion of that $187 billion has been spent. It is deplorable, considering how great the needs are in that area. The issue of banking practices mentioned in the NDP's motion is therefore interesting to me.
Another thing that really bothers me as a citizen is tax evasion. Combatting tax evasion should really begin with education in our schools. Unfortunately, that is more of a provincial responsibility. We need to put patriotism back on the agenda. Many wealthy Canadians shamelessly and unscrupulously evade taxes because they have no sense of patriotism. They have no love for their country.
Schools and people in positions of authority should have instilled this notion at a very young age by teaching them that patriotism includes making sure that Canadian money stays in Canada for Canadians, for our social programs, our companies, our roads and our communities.
In my opinion, a lack of love for one's country is one of the main causes of tax evasion. Young people must be taught that they should not be complaining about our democratic system, but rather participating in it. They should be taught to love Canada.
That is my opinion piece for today.
It is difficult for us to support the NDP's fine motion, however, because, as usual, it includes a direct attack against the Canadian oil industry and all oil-related jobs.
Canadian oil is the most ethical oil in the world. Of course, in the past, there were some concerns about how the oil sands were processed, but I think a lot of effort has been made in recent years to find amazing technologies to capture the carbon released in the oil sands production process.
Since the government's mandate is almost at an end, I would like to take this opportunity to mention that this motion reminded me of some of the rather troubling ethical problems that the Liberal government has had over the past few years.
First the Prime Minister, the member for Papineau took a trip to a private island that belongs to our beloved and popular Aga Khan. The trip was not permissible under Canadian law, under our justice system. For the first time in Canadian history, a prime minister of Canada was found guilty of several charges under federal law because he took a private family vacation that had nothing to do with state interests and was largely paid by the Aga Khan. It was all very questionable, because at the very same time he was making this trip to the Aga Khan's private island, the Prime Minister was involved in dealings with the Aga Khan's office regarding certain investments.
Next we have the fascinating tale of the Minister of Finance, who brought forward a reform aimed at small and medium-sized businesses, a reform that was supposed to be robust and rigorous, when all the while he was hiding shares of his former family business, Morneau Shepell, in numbered companies in Alberta. On top of that, he forgot to tell the Ethics Commissioner about a villa he owned in France.
The young people watching us must find it rather unbelievable that someone could forget to tell the Ethics Commissioner about a wonderful villa on the Mediterranean in France, on some kind of lake or the sea, I assume.
Then there is the clam scandal as well. The former minister of fisheries and oceans is in my thoughts since he is now fighting cancer. It is sad, but that does not excuse his deplorable ethics behaviour two years ago when he tried to influence a bidding process for clam harvesters in order to award a clam fishing quota to a company with ties to his family.
SNC-Lavalin is another case. It seems clear that there were several ethics problems all along. What I find rather unbelievable is that the Liberals are still trying to claim that there was absolutely nothing fishy going on. I am sorry, but when two ministers resign, when the Prime Minister's principal secretary resigns, and when the Clerk of the Privy Council resigns, something fishy is going on.
I want to close with a word on ethics and recent media reports about judicial appointments. There is something called the “Liberalist”, a word I find a bit strange. It is a list of everyone who has donated to the Liberal Party of Canada. Of course, all political parties have lists of their members, but the Liberals use their list to vet candidates and identify potential judicial appointees.
In other words, those who want the Prime Minister and member for Papineau to give them a seat on the bench would be well advised to donate to the Liberal Party of Canada so their name appears on the Liberalist. If not, they can forget about it because actual legal skills are not a factor in gaining access to the highest court in the land and other superior federal courts.
When it comes to lobbying, I just cannot believe how often the Liberals have bowed down to constant pressure from big business, like they did with Loblaws. It is a shame. Unfortunately, the NDP motion is once again attacking the people who work in our oil industry.
Monsieur le Président, je suis très heureux de prendre la parole aujourd'hui au sujet de la motion du NPD. J'aimerais d'abord saluer tous les citoyens et les citoyennes de Beauport—Limoilou qui nous écoutent en grand nombre et ceux qui le feront plus tard en regardant la rediffusion sur les médias sociaux.
Je viens de passer deux semaines dans ma circonscription et j'ai rencontré plusieurs milliers de mes concitoyens lors de divers événements et activités organisés par différents organismes. Jeudi dernier, la Corporation de développement communautaire de Beauport, la CDCB, a tenu un événement tout à fait audacieux et unique en son genre. Pour la première fois, tous les élus de la circonscription, soit les élus municipal, provincial et fédéral, étaient réunis lors d'un déjeuner afin de rencontrer des citoyens et des représentants d'organismes. C'était une sorte de table ronde qui réunissait l'ensemble des élus des différents ordres de gouvernement. C'était un exercice exemplaire en ce qui a trait à la bonne conduite démocratique de notre pays. Nous avons eu de belles conversations. Je voudrais féliciter la Corporation de développement communautaire de Beauport pour cet exercice fort intéressant qui, je l'espère, deviendra une tradition dans les années à venir.
Je voudrais également souligner que dans ma belle province, le Québec, il y a actuellement de très importantes inondations un peu partout. Ce matin, lorsque j'ai quitté la ville de Québec, vers six heures, j'ai constaté moi-même les dégâts tout le long de la route entre Trois-Rivières et Montréal et dans la région de Maskinongé. Il y a toujours un peu d'eau là-bas au printemps, mais cette fois-ci, il y en a énormément. Ensuite, quand je suis arrivé dans la région de Gatineau-Ottawa, j'ai vu des maisons inondées. Ce sont presque 8 000 personnes, des femmes, des hommes et des familles, qui ne sont pas chez elles en ce moment. Ce sont des moments très difficiles. Je tiens donc à leur dire que je suis avec eux de tout coeur. Je leur souhaite toute la force qu'ils peuvent avoir et trouver en eux. Je suis content de voir que le gouvernement du Québec a déjà annoncé son aide, de même que le gouvernement fédéral, bien entendu.
La motion présentée par le NPD aujourd'hui est quand même intéressante. On y retrouve des questions concernant le fait que l'actuel premier ministre du Canada a tenté d'influencer le cours de la justice à quelques égards, notamment dans l'affaire SNC-Lavalin, qui a été très médiatisée au cours des trois derniers mois.
Le NPD aborde également la question du coût des médicaments. Nous, les conservateurs, avons constaté que dans l'ALENA 2.0, qui n'a toujours été ratifié par aucun pays, les libéraux ont malheureusement cédé aux pressions de M. Trump, le président américain, qui leur demandait de prolonger la durée des brevets sur les médicaments. Si le traité était ratifié, cela ferait en sorte que les Canadiens paieraient plus cher pour leurs médicaments. D'ailleurs, on se demande quand les libéraux vont commencer à engager des discussions sérieuses au sujet des tarifs sur l'acier et l'aluminium et quand ils vont présenter à la Chambre le débat sur la ratification de l'ALENA.
La motion du NPD parle également du lobbying de la part de Loblaws. Cette histoire était presque une blague. Les citoyens n'en croyaient pas leurs yeux ni leurs oreilles: on a versé 12 millions de dollars à Loblaws, une compagnie extrêmement riche qui voulait remplacer ses réfrigérateurs. C'est hallucinant.
D'autre part, le NPD nous parle aussi des pratiques bancaires au Canada. À cet égard, nous, les conservateurs, pensons que les banques sont importantes, mais que certaines d'entre elles n'ont pas nécessairement lieu d'être, surtout celles qui émanent du gouvernement. La Banque de l'infrastructure du Canada, comme les néo-démocrates le disent souvent à juste titre, est une manière de favoriser les grands groupes d'intérêt, et les Canadiens ne devraient pas avoir à financer des projets d'infrastructure privés.
On pourrait aussi mentionner la Banque asiatique d'investissement dans les infrastructures, qui est totalement ridicule. On envoie presque 250 millions de dollars outre-mer pour financer des projets d'infrastructure, alors qu'ici même, le plan d'infrastructure du fédéral de 187 milliards de dollars peine à fonctionner. Au cours des trois dernières années, on n'a dépensé que 14 milliards de ces 187 milliards de dollars. C'est déplorable, car les besoins étaient grands à cet égard. Alors, en ce qui a trait aux pratiques bancaires, je trouve la motion du NPD intéressante.
Par ailleurs, l'une des choses qui me dérangent le plus en tant que citoyen, c'est l'évasion fiscale. La lutte contre l'évasion fiscale devrait notamment passer par l'éducation dans nos écoles. Malheureusement, cela relève davantage des gouvernements provinciaux. Il faudrait remettre le patriotisme à l'ordre du jour. Si beaucoup de riches Canadiens font de l'évasion fiscale sans aucune vergogne et de manière tout à fait honteuse, c'est parce qu'ils n'ont aucun esprit patriotique. Ils n'ont aucun amour pour leur pays.
L’école et les autorités auraient dû inculquer cette notion, dès leur jeune âge, en leur disant qu’être patriotique, c’est faire en sorte que l’argent canadien reste au Canada pour les Canadiens, pour nos programmes sociaux, pour nos entreprises, pour nos rues et pour nos communautés.
À mon avis, l’évasion fiscale est d’abord et avant tout causée par un manque d’amour pour son pays. Il faudrait inculquer aux jeunes qu’il ne faut pas se plaindre du système démocratique, mais qu’il faut y participer et aimer le Canada.
C'était mon éditorial de la journée.
Par contre, là où il sera difficile d’appuyer la motion du NPD, c’est que, comme d’habitude, ils ont inséré dans leur belle motion une attaque frontale contre le marché pétrolier canadien et contre tous les emplois liés au pétrole au Canada.
Le pétrole canadien est le pétrole le plus éthique au monde. Certes, auparavant, il y a eu des questions sur la façon de traiter les sables bitumineux, mais je pense qu’on a fait beaucoup d’efforts, au cours des dernières années, pour trouver d’incroyables technologies pour capter le carbone, lorsqu’on nettoie la terre pour en faire sortir du pétrole.
Comme on arrive à la fin du mandat très rapidement, j’aimerais quand même saisir la balle au bond. Cette motion m’a permis de me remémorer certains problèmes d’éthique assez troublants qu'a connus le gouvernement libéral au cours des dernières années.
D’abord, le premier ministre et député de Papineau a fait un voyage sur une île privée de notre très cher et populaire Aga Khan. Ce voyage a été sanctionné par le droit canadien, par la justice canadienne. C’est la première fois de l’histoire du Canada qu’un premier ministre du Canada est reconnu coupable, en vertu d’une loi fédérale, de plusieurs chefs, parce qu’il a fait un voyage privé familial qui n’avait rien à voir avec les intérêts étatiques, en grande partie aux frais de l’Aga Khan. On peut se questionner, parce qu’au moment même où il effectuait ce voyage sur une île privée de l’Aga Khan, il y avait des tractations entre le bureau de l’Aga Khan et lui-même au sujet de certains investissements.
Ensuite, il y a eu une belle chronique sur l’histoire du ministre des Finances, lequel nous avait présenté une réforme pour les petites et moyennes entreprises qui était censée être robuste et faite avec rigueur, alors qu'au même moment, il cachait des actions de son ancienne compagnie familiale Morneau Shepell dans des compagnies à numéro, en Alberta. De plus, il avait omis de dire à la commissaire à l’éthique qu’il avait une villa en France.
Aux chers jeunes qui nous écoutent, je dirai que c’est quand même incroyable d’oublier de dire à la commissaire à l’éthique qu’on a une superbe villa en France sur le bord de la Méditerranée, j’imagine. Ce devait être sur le bord d’un lac ou de la mer.
Il y a également le scandale des palourdes. Je suis de tout coeur avec le ministre des Pêches et des Océans de l’époque, parce qu’il a un cancer actuellement. C’est triste, mais cela n’empêche pas qu’il a agi de façon déplorable sur le plan de l'éthique, il y a deux ans, lorsqu’il a tenté d’influencer le processus d’appel d’offres pour des compagnies de pêche à la palourde, afin d’octroyer le contrat à quelqu’un qui avait un lien familial avec lui.
Il y a aussi le cas de SNC-Lavalin. De toute évidence, il y a eu plusieurs problèmes d’éthique dans toute cette histoire. Ce qui est quand même incroyable, c’est qu’encore aujourd’hui les libéraux tentent de nous faire croire qu’il n’y avait absolument pas anguille sous roche. Je suis désolé, mais quand deux ministres démissionnent, quand le secrétaire personnel du premier ministre démissionne, quand le greffier du Conseil privé démissionne, il y a anguille sous roche.
En ce qui concerne l’éthique, je terminerai en parlant du cas vu récemment dans les médias, celui de la nomination des juges. Il y a ce qu’ils appellent « Libéraliste ». C’est un mot que je trouve un peu étrange. C’est une liste sur laquelle on retrouve les noms de tous ceux qui ont déjà fait un don au Parti libéral du Canada. Tous les partis politiques ont évidemment des listes de leurs membres, mais eux, ils utilisent carrément cette liste pour faire du triage. Ils filtrent, à partir de cette liste, les noms des juges en vue de nominations.
Cela veut dire que, si on veut devenir juge sous le premier ministre et député de Papineau, il vaut mieux faire un don au Parti libéral du Canada pour avoir son nom sur « Libéraliste », sinon, on peut oublier cela, puisque les compétences judiciaires n’auront aucun rôle à jouer dans l'accès à la plus haute cour du pays ou aux autres cours supérieures du fédéral.
En ce qui concerne le lobbying, je dois dire que c'est incroyable de voir à quel point les libéraux s'agenouillent devant la pression constante des grandes compagnies, comme on l'a vu avec Loblaws. C'est dommage. Malheureusement, la motion du NPD s'attaque encore une fois aux gens qui travaillent dans notre industrie pétrolière.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-04-29 13:31 [p.27093]
Mr. Speaker, I believe in a free market with safeguards to protect everyone's rights. However, we must never ignore the fierce global competition.
Contrary to popular belief, Mr. Harper's government eliminated many subsidies for big oil.
An article published by CBC this morning indicated:
The total volume of Canadian imports from Saudi Arabia has increased by 66 per cent since 2014...
Saudi oil accounted for roughly 10 per cent of Canadian consumption, up from about eight per cent in 2017...
Saudi Arabia is the second-largest source of foreign oil for Canada, after the U.S.
Even human rights groups are saying that we need to stop importing oil from Saudi Arabia.
One of the reasons why I believe we need to support the Canadian oil industry is the great Canadian paradox. The article goes on to say:
Canada is the fourth-largest producer and fourth-largest exporter of oil in the world...and 99 per cent of Canadian oil exports go to the U.S.
Canada is also an oil importer, which is rare for an exporting country.
The paradox is that we have one of the world's largest energy resources. Importing oil for our country is ridiculous. We need to put an end to that.
Under the leadership of the Conservative leader, the member for Regina—Qu'Appelle, Canada would become self-sufficient. That is a commendable goal that everyone in the country should support.
Monsieur le Président, je crois au libre marché accompagné de balises pour respecter les droits de tout le monde. Par contre, il ne faut jamais faire fi de la concurrence mondiale extrême d'autres pays.
Sous M. Harper, contrairement à la croyance populaire, nous avons éliminé de nombreuses subventions accordées aux grandes compagnies pétrolières.
Un article publié par Radio-Canada, ce matin, mentionne ceci:
Depuis 2014, les importations de pétrole venant de l'Arabie saoudite ont augmenté de 66 %. [...]
Le pétrole arabe répond désormais à environ 10 % des besoins canadiens, contre 8 % en 2017.
L'Arabie saoudite est ainsi devenue la deuxième source de pétrole étranger, après les États-Unis, pour le Canada.
Même les groupes de défense des droits de la personne disent qu'il faut absolument arrêter d'importer du pétrole de l'Arabie Saoudite.
L'une des raisons pour lesquelles je crois qu'il faut soutenir l'industrie pétrolière canadienne est justement le grand paradoxe canadien. Voici ce que mentionne le même article:
D'une part, [le Canada] est le 4e producteur mondial de pétrole, et le 4e plus important exportateur, dont 99 % de la production est exporté aux États-Unis.
D'autre part, le Canada est aussi un importateur de pétrole, ce qui est rare pour un pays exportateur.
Le paradoxe qui consiste à avoir une des plus grandes ressources énergétiques au monde et d'en importer pour notre population est ridicule, et il faut mettre fin à cela.
Sous le leadership de notre chef de Regina—Qu'Appelle, le Canada deviendra autosuffisant. Il s'agit d'un objectif louable qui devrait être soutenu par tout le monde au pays.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-11-06 16:04 [p.23347]
Mr. Speaker, I am very pleased to rise. As usual, I would like to say hello to the many people of Beauport—Limoilou who are watching us live on CPAC or on platforms such as Facebook and Twitter later.
I would like to comment on the speech by the Minister of Status of Women. I found it somewhat hypocritical when she said that she hopes her opposition colleagues will support the bill and the budget's feminist measures, which she presented, when the Liberals actually and strategically included all these measures in an omnibus bill, the 2018 budget implementation bill. Clearly, we, the Conservatives, will not vote in favour of Bill C-86 because it once again presents a deficit budget that is devastating for Canada's economy and for Canadian taxpayers. It is somewhat hypocritical for the minister to tell us that she hopes we will support the measures to give women more power when she herself was involved in hiding these measures in an omnibus bill.
I would like say, as I often say, that it is a privilege for me to speak today, but not for the same reason this time. I might have been denied the opportunity to speak to Bill C-86 because this morning, the Liberal government imposed closure on the House. It imposed time allocation on the speeches on the budget. This is the first time in three years that I am seeing this in the House. Since 2015, we have had three budget presentations. This is the sixth time we are debating a budget since 2015 during this 42nd Parliament. This is the first time I have seen the majority of my Conservative colleagues and the majority of my NDP colleagues being denied speaking time to discuss something as important as Bill C-86 to implement budgetary measures. The budget implementation legislation is what formalizes the budget the government brought down in February. Implementation is done in two phases. This is the second phase and it implements the Liberal government's budget.
By chance, I have the opportunity to speak about the budget today and I want to do so because I would like to remind those listening about some key elements of this budget which, in our view, are going in the wrong direction. First, the Liberals are continuing with their habit, which has become ingrained in their psyches. They are continuing with their deficit approach. It appears that they are in a financial bind. That is why they are creating new taxes like the carbon tax. They also lack the personal ability to govern. You might say that it is not in their genes to balance a budget. The Liberals' budget measures are bad and their economic plan is bad. They are so incapable of balancing the budget that they cannot even give us a timeline. They cannot even tell us when they think they will balance the budget.
This is the first time that we have seen this in the history of our great Canadian parliamentary democracy, established in 1867, and probably before that, in the parliaments of the United Canadas. This is the first time since 1867 that a government has not been able to say when they will balance the budget. I am not one for political rhetoric, but this is not rhetoric, this is a fact.
The Liberals made big promises to us in that regard during the 2015 election. Unfortunately, the Liberals put off keeping those promises. They promised to balance the budget by 2019. Now, they have put that off indefinitely, or until 2045, according to the Parliamentary Budget Officer, a position that, let us not forget, was created by Mr. Harper. That great democrat wanted to ensure that there was budgetary accountability in Parliament. The Liberals also promised that they would run small deficits of $10 billion for the first three years and then balance the budget. The first year, they ran a deficit of $30 billion. The second year, they ran a deficit of $20 billion. The third year, they ran a deficit of $19 billion. Just a week or two ago, we found out from the Parliamentary Budget Officer that the Liberals miscalculated and another $4 billion in debt has been added to that amount. The Liberals have racked up a deficit of $22 billion. That is 6.5 times more than what they set out in their plan to balance the budget.
The other key budget promise the Liberals made was that the small deficits of $10 billion would be used to build new infrastructure as part of a $187-billion program.
To date, only $9 billion has flowed from the coffers to pay for infrastructure projects. Where is the other $170 billion? The Prime Minister is so acutely aware of the problem that he shuffled his cabinet this summer. He appointed the former international trade minister to the infrastructure portfolio, and the new infrastructure minister's mandate letter says he absolutely has to get on this troublesome issue of money not being used to fund infrastructure projects.
There is a reason the Liberals do not want to give us more than two or three days to discuss the budget. They do not want the Conservatives and the NDP to say quite as much about the budget as they would like to say because we have a lot of bad things to tell them and Canadians.
Fortunately, we live in a democracy, and we can express ourselves in the media, so all Canadians can hear what I have to say. However, it is important for us to express our ideas in the House too because listening to what we say here is how Canadians learn what happened in history.
Things are not as rosy as the Liberals claim when it comes to the economy and their plan. For instance, in terms of exports, they have not been able to export Canadian oil as they should. We have one of the largest reserves in the world, but the Liberals tightened rules surrounding the National Energy Board in recent years. As a result, several projects have died, such as the northern gateway project and energy east, and the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain project, which the Liberals managed to save in the end using $4.5 billion of taxpayers money. In short, our exports are not doing very well.
As for investments, from 2015 to 2017, Canadian investments in the U.S. increased by 65%, while American investments in Canada dropped by 52%.
On top of that, one thing that affects the daily lives of Canadians even more is the massive debt, which could jeopardize all our future projects for our glorious federation. In 2018, the total accumulated debt is $670 billion. That comes out to $47,000 per family. Not counting any student debt, car payments or mortgage, every family already has a debt of $47,000, and a good percentage of that has increased over the past three years because of the Liberals' fiscal mismanagement.
That is not to mention the interest on the debt. I am sure that Canadians watching at home are outraged by this. In 2020, the interest on the debt will be $39 billion a year. That is $3 billion more than we invest every year in health.
The government boasts about how it came up with a wonderful plan for federal health transfers with the provinces, but that plan does not respect provincial jurisdictions. What is more, it imposes conditions on the provinces that they must meet in order to be able to access those transfers. We did not do that in the Harper era. We are investing $36 billion per year in health care and spending $39 billion servicing debt. Imagine what we could have done with that money.
I will close by talking about the labour shortage. I would have liked to have 20 minutes so I could say more, but we cannot take the time we want because of the gag order. It is sad that I cannot keep going.
Quebec needs approximately 150,000 more workers. I am appalled that the minister would make a mockery of my questions on three occasions. Meanwhile, the member for Louis-Hébert had the nerve to say that the Conservatives oppose immigration. That has nothing to do with it. We support immigration, but that represents only 25% of the solution to the labour shortage. This is a serious crisis in Quebec.
There are many things under federal jurisdiction that the government could do and that, in combination with immigration, would help fill labour shortages. However, all the Liberals can do is make fun of me, simply because I am a member of the opposition. I hosted economic round tables in Quebec City with my colleagues, and all business owners were telling us that this is a serious crisis. The Liberals should act like a good government and stop making fun of us every time we speak. Actually, it is even worse; they want to prevent us from speaking.
Monsieur le Président, je suis très heureux de prendre la parole. J'aimerais, comme d'habitude, saluer tous les citoyens et les citoyennes de Beauport—Limoilou qui nous écoutent en grand nombre sur CPAC ou sur les plateformes comme Facebook et Twitter plus tard.
J'aimerais faire un commentaire sur le discours de la ministre de la Condition féminine. Je trouve un peu hypocrite qu'elle dise espérer que ses collègues de l'opposition appuieront le projet de loi et les mesures féministes de son budget, qu'elle nous a présentées, alors que les libéraux ont justement et stratégiquement inclus toutes ces mesures dans un projet de loi omnibus, le projet de loi d'exécution du budget de 2018. De toute évidence, nous, les conservateurs, ne voterons pas pour le projet de loi C-86, car il présente encore une fois un budget déficitaire et dévastateur pour l'économie canadienne, pour les payeurs de taxes canadiens. C'est un peu hypocrite que la ministre nous dise qu'elles espère que nous appuierons les mesures pour donner plus de pouvoir aux femmes, alors qu'elle a elle-même participé à cette stratégie de camouflage au sein d'un projet de loi omnibus.
Je voudrais dire aux citoyens que c'est un privilège pour moi de prendre la parole aujourd'hui, comme je le dis souvent, mais pas pour la même raison cette fois. J'aurais pu ne pas pouvoir parler du projet de loi C-86, puisque, ce matin, le gouvernement libéral a imposé un bâillon à la Chambre, comme on dit en bon québécois. Il a imposé une attribution de temps aux discours relatifs au budget. C'est la première fois en trois ans que je vois cela à la Chambre. Depuis 2015, nous avons eu trois présentations de budget. C'est la sixième fois que nous débattons d'un budget depuis 2015, en cette 42e législature. C'est la première fois que je constate que la majorité des mes collègues conservateurs et la majorité des mes collègues du NPD ne pourront pas prendre la parole pour s'exprimer sur une chose aussi importante que le projet de loi C-86, qui porte sur l'exécution des mesures budgétaires. La loi d'exécution du budget, en fait, c'est ce qui rend réel le budget présenté par le gouvernement en février. L'exécution se fait en deux temps. Nous sommes dans la deuxième partie, qui met en oeuvre le budget du gouvernement libéral.
Par hasard, j'ai la chance de parler du budget aujourd'hui et je veux en profiter, parce que je voudrais rappeler aux gens qui nous écoutent actuellement certains des attributs phares de ce projet de loi sur le budget qui, selon nous, vont dans la mauvaise direction. D'abord, les libéraux perpétuent leur habitude, qui est carrément rendue psychologique chez eux. Ils poursuivent cette approche déficitaire. Il apparaît qu'ils sont dans une incapacité financière. C'est pourquoi ils créent de nouvelles taxes comme la taxe sur le carbone. Ils ont aussi une incapacité gouvernementale qui semble personnelle. On dirait que ce n'est pas dans leurs gènes de pouvoir équilibrer un budget. Les mesures des budgétaires des libéraux sont mauvaises et leur plan économique est mauvais. Ils sont tellement incapables d'équilibrer le budget qu'ils ne peuvent même pas nous donner une date d'échéance. Ils ne peuvent même pas nous dire quand ils pensent arriver à un équilibre.
C'est la première fois qu'on voit cela dans l'histoire de notre belle démocratie parlementaire canadienne, depuis 1867, et probablement avant, dans les Parlements qui ont siégé avant cette date dans le Canada-Uni. Depuis 1867, c'est la première fois qu'un gouvernement ne peut pas donner une date de retour à l'équilibre budgétaire. Je n'aime pas faire de la rhétorique politique, mais ce n'est pas de la rhétorique, c'est un fait.
Les libéraux nous avaient fait de grandes promesses à cet égard en 2015 lors de l'élection. Malheureusement, les libéraux les ont reportées. Ils nous avaient promis un retour à l'équilibre budgétaire pour 2019. Maintenant, c'est remis aux calendes grecques, c'est-à-dire, à 2045, si l'on se fie au directeur parlementaire du budget, une institution créée par M. Harper, il faut le rappeler. Ce grand démocrate voulait qu'il y ait de la responsabilité budgétaire au Parlement. Également, les libéraux nous avaient promis qu'ils feraient des petits déficits de 10 milliards de dollars pour les trois premières années, avant d'atteindre l'équilibre budgétaire. La première année, ils ont fait un déficit de 30 milliards de dollars. La deuxième année, ils ont fait un déficit de 20 milliards de dollars. La troisième année, ils ont fait un déficit de 19 milliards de dollars. Or, le directeur parlementaire du budget nous annonce que, finalement, un montant de 4 milliards de dollars qui a été mal calculé par le gouvernement libéral se rajoute à la dette. On l'a su il y a une ou deux semaines. On est rendu à 22 milliards de dollars. C'est 6,5 fois plus que ce que les libéraux avaient prévu dans leur plan de retour à l'équilibre budgétaire.
L'autre promesse budgétaire phare des libéraux, c'était que les petits déficits de 10 milliards de dollars allaient être au service de la construction de nouveaux projets d'infrastructure, dans un programme de 187 milliards de dollars.
À ce jour, seulement 9 milliards de dollars sont sortis des coffres pour subvenir à des projets d'infrastructure. Il manque encore 170 milliards de dollars. Où sont-ils? Le premier ministre est tellement conscient du problème qu'il a lui-même fait un remaniement de son Cabinet l'été dernier. Il a nommé l'ancien ministre du Commerce international au poste de ministre de l'Infrastructure, et la lettre de mandat de ce dernier dit qu'il doit absolument se pencher sur cette fâcheuse situation de l'argent qui ne sort pas des coffres pour financer les projets d'infrastructure.
Ce n'est pas pour rien que les libéraux ne veulent pas que nous ayons plus que deux ou trois jours pour discuter du budget. Ils ne veulent pas que les conservateurs et le NPD s'expriment sur le budget autant qu'ils le pourraient, parce que nous aurions beaucoup de mauvaises choses à leur dire et à dire aux Canadiens.
Heureusement, nous sommes dans une démocratie et nous pouvons nous exprimer par l'entremise des médias, alors les Canadiens peuvent savoir ce que je vais dire. Toutefois, il est important que nous puissions nous exprimer à la Chambre également, car c'est en écoutant ce que nous disons ici que les Canadiens apprennent ce qui est arrivé dans l'histoire.
Les choses ne sont pas aussi roses que le prétendent les libéraux en ce qui a trait à l'économie et à leur plan. Par exemple, sur le plan des exportations, on est incapable d'exporter le pétrole canadien comme on le devrait. Nous possédons l'une des plus grandes réserves au monde, mais les libéraux ont resserré les règles à l'Office national de l'énergie au cours des dernières années. Cela a fait en sorte que de nombreux projets sont tombés à l'eau, comme le projet Trans Mountain de Kinder Morgan, que les libéraux ont finalement sauvé avec 4,5 milliards de dollars des contribuables, le projet Northern Gateway et le corridor de l'Est. Bref, en matière d'exportation, cela ne va pas très bien.
En ce qui a trait aux investissements, de 2015 à 2017, les investissements canadiens aux États-Unis ont augmenté de 65 %, alors que les investissements américains au Canada ont baissé de 52 %.
Par ailleurs, une chose qui touche davantage la vie quotidienne de nos concitoyens et nos concitoyennes, c'est la dette massive qui pourrait mettre à mal tous nos futurs projets pour notre glorieuse fédération. En 2018, la dette totale accumulée est de 670 milliards de dollars. Cela équivaut à 47 000 $ par famille. Alors, avant même de penser aux dettes étudiantes, aux paiements de voiture et à l'hypothèque, chaque famille a aussi une dette de 47 000 $, dont un bon pourcentage a augmenté au cours des trois dernières années à cause de la mauvaise gestion budgétaire des libéraux.
D'ailleurs, c'est sans parler des frais d'intérêt sur la dette. Je suis certain que cela enrage les citoyens qui nous écoutent. En 2020, les frais d'intérêt sur la dette seront de 39 milliards de dollars par année. C'est 3 milliards de dollars de plus que ce que nous investissons chaque année en santé.
Le gouvernement se targue d'avoir fait avec les provinces un merveilleux plan de transferts fédéraux en santé, mais ce plan ne respectait pas les champs de compétence provinciaux. De plus, il a imposé des conditions aux provinces pour avoir accès à l'argent des transferts fédéraux, ce que nous n'avions pas fait à l'époque du gouvernement Harper. Nous investissons 36 milliards de dollars par année en santé et notre service de la dette est de 39 milliards de dollars. Imaginons tout ce que nous pourrions faire avec cela.
Je terminerai sur la pénurie de main-d'oeuvre. J'aurais aimé avoir 20 minutes afin d'en dire plus, mais à cause du bâillon, il nous est impossible de parler autant que nous le voulons. C'est triste que je ne puisse pas continuer.
À Québec, on a besoin d'environ 150 000 travailleurs de plus. J'ai trouvé cela ahurissant que la ministre tourne mes questions en dérision à trois reprises. Le député de Louis-Hébert, quant à lui, a osé dire que nous, les conservateurs, n'aimions pas l'immigration. Cela n'a aucun rapport. Nous sommes pour l'immigration, mais cela représente seulement 25 % de la solution à la pénurie de main d'oeuvre. À Québec, la crise est grave.
Il y a plusieurs choses que le gouvernement fédéral peut faire qui relèvent de son champ de compétence et qui, combinées à l'immigration, aideront à pallier les pénuries de main-d'oeuvre. Toutefois, tout ce que les libéraux sont capables de faire, c'est se moquer de moi, seulement parce que je suis un député de l'opposition. J'ai pourtant organisé des tables rondes économiques à Québec avec mes collègues, et tous les entrepreneurs disaient que la crise est grave. Les libéraux devraient se comporter en bon gouvernement et arrêter de se moquer de nous chaque fois que nous prenons la parole. En fait, c'est encore pire; ils veulent nous empêcher de parler.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-05-31 16:21 [p.20002]
Mr. Speaker, thank you for recognizing me. First of all, I would like to say hello to all the people of Beauport—Limoilou, many of whom are listening today, and to thank them for all their work. They are definitely listening. When I go door to door, many of them tell me that they watch CPAC.
I would like to say something about what the hon. Liberal member for Hamilton West—Ancaster—Dundas said in response to the speech of my colleague from Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan. She engaged in the usual Liberal demagoguery. She asked if we believed in climate change. I really would like my constituents to listen closely, because I want to make this clear to them and to all Canadians: we, the Conservatives, believe so strongly in climate change that, in 2007, Mr. Harper held a joint press conference with Mr. Charest to announce the implementation of the new Canada ecotrust program, supported by a total investment of $1.5 billion. The aim of the program was to give each province hundreds of millions of dollars to help with their respective climate change plans. It is easy to look this up on Google by entering “ecoTrust,” “2007,” “Harper,” “Charest.” Not only did Mr. Charest commend the Conservative government’s initiative, but even Steven Guilbeault from Greenpeace at the time—and I am certain that my colleague from Mégantic—L’Érable will find this hard to believe—saluted the initiative as something unheard of.
There is a reason why greenhouse gas emissions decreased by 2% under the decade-long Conservative reign. We had a plan, a plan with bold targets that the Liberals made their own.
Now let us talk a bit about the 2018-19 budget, which continues in the same vein as the other two budgets presented so far by the hon. member for Papineau's Liberal government. I would like to begin by saying that the government has been in reaction mode for the past three years and almost never in action mode.
It is in reaction mode when it comes to the softwood lumber crisis, although we do not hear much about it because the softwood lumber rates are still pretty attractive. However, the fact remains that this is a crisis and that, right now, industrial producers in the U.S. are collecting billions of dollars that they will eventually recover, as they do in every softwood lumber crisis.
The Liberal government is in reaction mode when it comes to NAFTA. They will say that they are not the ones who put Mr. Trump in office, but this is yet another major issue that has been taking up their time in the past year, and they are still in reaction mode. They are also in reaction mode when it comes to the imminent tariffs on aluminum and steel.
The Liberals are in reaction mode when it comes to almost every major issue in Canada. They are in reaction mode when it comes to natural resources development, for example with regard to Kinder Morgan’s Trans Mountain pipeline. Once again they were in reaction mode, because Kinder Morgan said that it would walk if the government could not assume responsibility and tell British Columbia in no uncertain terms that this was a matter of federal jurisdiction.
All of this shows that the Prime Minister is not the great diplomat he pretends to be across the globe, and in celebrity news and other media. He is such a poor diplomat that he was unable to avoid the softwood lumber crisis with Obama. He is such a poor diplomat that he has supposedly had a wonderful relationship with Mr. Trump for the past year and a half. He speaks to him on the telephone I do not know how many times a month, but that did not prevent Mr. Trump from taking deliberate action against Canada, as we saw today with the tariffs on steel and aluminum.
I would like to make a comparison. We, the Conservatives, were a government of action. We negotiated 46 free-trade agreements. We sent Canadian troops to Kandahar to demonstrate our willingness to co-operate with NATO and the G7 and to make a show of military force. We invested hugely in national defence, increasing our investments from 0.8% to almost 1.2% of the GDP following the dark days of Jean Chrétien’s Liberal government. We settled the softwood lumber issue in 2007, during the last crisis. We implemented the national shipbuilding strategy, investing more than $30 billion to renew our military fleet, to renew the Canadian Coast Guard’s exploration fleet in the Canadian Arctic, and to renew the fleet of icebreakers. The first of these icebreakers, the majestic Diefenbaker, will soon be under construction.
Let us not forget that we also told Mr. Putin to get out of Ukraine. There is no doubt that we were a government of action.
When the budget was tabled, several journalists said that it was more of a political platform than a budget. I find that interesting. In their opinion, the political platform contained no concrete fiscal measures to prepare Canada for tomorrow, for the next 10 years, or for the next century, as our founding fathers intended in 1867. Rather, it contained proposals, in particular concerning social housing. The NDP must be very happy. The Liberals promised billions of dollars if the provinces gave their assent. That was a promise.
The Liberals also made proposals concerning pharmacare. Once again, they were conditional on studies demonstrating the usefulness of such a plan. That, too, was a promise. The promises go on page after page in the budget, and it is obvious that it is a political platform. That is why the Liberals used the word “woman” more than 400 times, 30 times on each page. That is just demagoguery and totally abusive.
I would like to quote a very interesting CBC journalist, Chris Hall. Since he works at the CBC, the Liberals will surely believe him. He said that the government recently spent $233,000 to organize round table discussions to find out whether Canadians understood the message, and not the content, of their budget. I will quote Mr. Hall:
In particular, the report said the findings suggest middle-class Canadians—the very demographic the Liberals have been courting since their election with both policy initiatives and political messaging—don't feel their lives are getting better.
They are correct in thinking that their lives are not getting better. Even Chris Hall concluded, in light of these studies, that the 2018-19 budget is not a document that provides guidelines, includes concrete measures, or outlines actual achievements in progress. It is a political document that proposes ideologies.
The budget also contains a number of disappointments and shortcomings, precisely because it does not contain any actions. It does not respond to the fiscal reforms enacted by U.S. President Trump that give American companies an undue competitive advantage.
The 2018-19 federal budget does not address the tariffs on aluminum and steel either, although we all saw them coming. It does not specify what measures will be taken to implement carbon pricing. Most of all, it does not say how much it will cost every single Canadian. You would think it would at least do that. Some analysts say that it will cost approximately $2,500 per Canadian per year.
This budget is full of proposals but has no concrete measures, and it perpetuates broken promises. Instead of $10-billion deficits for two consecutive years, we have $19-billion deficits accumulating year over year until 2045. This year, we were supposed to have a deficit of $6 billion, but it has reached almost $20 billion. The Liberals also broke their promise to balance the budget. This is the first time that the federal government has not had a concrete plan to balance the budget.
We were supposed to run up deficits in order to invest in the largest infrastructure program in history, because with the Liberals everything is historic. Only $7 billion of the $180 billion of this program has been injected into the Canadian economy.
This is a very disappointing budget and, unfortunately, dear people of Beauport—Limoilou, taxes keep going up and the Liberal carbon tax is just the start.
Monsieur le Président, je vous remercie de m'accorder la parole. D'entrée de jeu, je voudrais dire un gros bonjour à tous les citoyens de Beauport—Limoilou qui nous écoutent en grand nombre, et les remercier pour tout leur travail. C'est vrai qu'ils sont bien à l'écoute. Souvent, quand je fais du porte-à-porte, ils m'en parlent et disent qu'ils regardent CPAC.
Je voudrais juste revenir sur ce qu'a dit la députée libérale d'Hamilton-Ouest—Ancaster—Dundas en réponse au discours de mon collègue de Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan. Elle faisait encore de la démagogie propre aux libéraux. Elle demandait si on croyait aux changements climatiques. Je voudrais vraiment que mes citoyens m'entendent bien, car je veux mettre cela au clair pour eux epour tous les Canadiens: nous, les conservateurs, croyons tellement aux changements climatiques qu'en 2007, M. Harper a fait une conférence de presse conjointe avec M. Charest où il a annoncé la mise en oeuvre du nouveau programme Éco-Fiducie Canada, doté d'un investissement total de 1,5 milliard de dollars. Le programme avait pour objectif de fournir des centaines de millions de dollars à chaque province, afin de contribuer à leurs plans respectifs pour répondre aux changements climatiques. Cela peut se vérifier dans Google en inscrivant « Éco-Fiducie », « 2007 », « Harper », « Charest ». Charest a non seulement fait l'éloge de cette approche du gouvernement fédéral sous les conservateurs, mais même Steven Guilbeault, de Greenpeace à l'époque — et je suis sûr que mon collègue de Mégantic—L'Érable va trouver cela incroyable —, a salué cette initiative comme étant quelque chose d'incroyable.
Ce n'est pas pour rien que sous le règne conservateur qui a duré 10 ans, on a réduit de 2 % les gaz à effet de serre au Canada, parce qu'il y avait un plan. Notre plan contenait d'ailleurs des cibles audacieuses que les libéraux ont gardées.
Discutons maintenant quelque peu du budget de 2018-2019, qui continue dans la même lignée que les deux autres budgets présentés jusqu'à ce jour par le gouvernement libéral du député de Papineau. J'aimerais dire au préalable que depuis trois ans, ce gouvernement est en mode réaction et presque jamais en mode action.
Il est en mode réaction par rapport à la crise du bois d'oeuvre, bien qu'on n'en entende pas trop parler, parce qu'en ce moment les taux sur le bois d'oeuvre demeurent substantiellement intéressants. Toutefois, il n'en demeure pas moins que c'est une crise et qu'actuellement, les producteurs industriels américains ramassent des milliards de dollars qu'ils vont recouvrir par la suite, comme ils le font à chaque crise du bois d'oeuvre.
Le gouvernement libéral est en mode réaction face à l'ALENA. Les libéraux vont nous dire que ce n'est pas eux qui ont élu le gouvernement de M. Trump, mais c'est quand même un autre gros dossier qui les accapare jour après jour depuis un an et dans lequel ils sont en mode réaction. Ils sont aussi en mode réaction depuis hier par rapport aux tarifs douaniers éminents sur l'aluminium et l'acier.
Les libéraux sont en mode réaction concernant presque tous les grands enjeux du Canada. Ils sont en mode réaction par rapport au développement économique des ressources naturelles, par exemple pour l'oléoduc Trans Mountain de Kinder Morgan. Ils étaient encore une fois en mode réaction, parce que Kinder Morgan a dit qu'il allait partir si le gouvernement était incapable de prendre ses responsabilités et de dire clairement à la Colombie-Britannique que c'était de compétence fédérale.
Tout cela démontre en fait que le premier ministre n'est pas le grand diplomate comme on aime le faire croire partout sur la planète, dans tous les médias de stars et dans les autres médias. Il n'est tellement pas diplomate qu'avec Obama, il a été incapable de faire éviter la crise du bois d'oeuvre. Il n'est tellement pas diplomate qu'il entretient supposément depuis un an et demi une belle relation avec M. Trump. Il lui parle au téléphone je ne sais pas combien de fois par mois, mais cela n'empêche pas M. Trump d'agir de manière délibérée contre le Canada comme on le voit aujourd'hui avec les tarifs douaniers sur l'acier et l'aluminium.
J'aimerais faire une comparaison: nous, les conservateurs, sommes un gouvernement d'action. Nous avons conclu 46 traités de libre-échange. Nous avons envoyé les troupes canadiennes à Kandahar pour démontrer notre bonne volonté aux pays de l'OTAN et du G7, et la force militaire des Canadiens. Nous avons investi massivement dans la défense nationale, faisant passer les investissements de 0,8 à presque 1,2 % du PIB, à la suite de la période de noirceur des libéraux de Jean Chrétien. Nous avons réglé le dossier du bois d'oeuvre en 2007, soit lors de la crise précédente. Nous avons mis en place la Stratégie nationale de construction navale, en investissant plus de 30 milliards de dollars pour renouveler les flottes militaires, pour renouveler les flottes d'exploration de la Garde côtière canadienne dans l'Arctique canadien, et pour renouveler les flottes de brise-glaces, dont la construction du premier commencera bientôt, soit le majestueux Diefenbaker.
N'oublions pas non plus que nous avons dit à M. Poutine de sortir de l'Ukraine. Nous étions un gouvernement d'action, sans aucun doute.
Quand le budget a été déposé, plusieurs journalistes ont dit qu'il s'agissait d'une plateforme politique et non d'un budget à proprement parler. J'ai trouvé cela intéressant. Selon eux, cette plateforme politique n'énonçait pas de mesures concrètes budgétaires visant à faire avancer le pays pour demain, pour les 10 prochaines années ou pour le prochain siècle, comme le faisaient nos pères fondateurs en 1867. Elle contenait plutôt des propositions, notamment sur les logements sociaux. Cela fait sans doute plaisir au NPD. On promettait des milliards de dollars à condition que les provinces donnent leur accord. C'était donc une promesse.
Les libéraux ont également fait des propositions concernant une assurance médicaments. Encore une fois, c'était conditionnel à des études démontrant la pertinence d'un tel régime. C'est encore une promesse. Cela se poursuit ainsi de page en page dans le budget, et on constate que c'est une plateforme politique. C'est notamment pour cette raison que les libéraux ont utilisé le mot « femme » plus de 400 fois. On le relève 30 fois par page. C'est démagogique et totalement abusif.
J'aimerais citer un journaliste très intéressant de CBC, Chris Hall. Puisqu'il est de CBC, les libéraux vont sans doute le croire. Il nous dit que le gouvernement a dépensé 233 000 $ dernièrement pour organiser des tables rondes afin de savoir si les Canadiens comprenaient le message, et non le contenu, de leur budget. Je cite M. Hall en anglais:
En particulier, le rapport révèle que, selon les conclusions, les Canadiens de la classe moyenne — le groupe démographique que les libéraux courtisent depuis leur élection au moyen d'initiatives stratégiques et de messages politiques — n'ont pas l'impression que leur vie s'améliore.
Ils ont raison de penser que leur vie ne va pas mieux. Même ce journaliste conclut, à la lumière de ces études, que le budget de 2018-2019 n'est pas un document qui donne des directives, qui prévoit des mesures concrètes ou qui met sur la table de vraies réalisations en cours. C'est un document politique qui propose des idéologies.
Le budget contient aussi beaucoup de déceptions et de lacunes, puisqu'il est justement dépourvu d'action. Il ne répond pas aux réformes fiscales perpétrées par le président Trump aux États-Unis et qui donnent un avantage compétitif indûment immense aux compagnies américaines.
Le budget fédéral de 2018-2019 ne répondait pas non plus aux tarifs sur l'aluminium et l'acier. Il était pourtant évident que cela allait arriver. Il ne nous dit pas non plus quelles mesures seront prises pour mettre en oeuvre la tarification du carbone. Surtout, il ne nous dit pas combien cela va coûter à chaque habitant du Canada. Ce serait pourtant la moindre des choses. Certains analystes nous disent qu'elle va coûter environ 2 500 $ par année par habitant.
C'est un budget qui n'a que des propositions et aucune mesure concrète, et il perpétue des promesses brisées. Au lieu d'avoir des déficits de 10 milliards de dollars pour deux années consécutives, on a des déficits de 19 milliards qui s'accumulent d'année en année, et ce, jusqu'en 2045. Cette année, on devait avoir un déficit de 6 milliards de dollars, or il atteint presque 20 milliards de dollars. Par ailleurs, les libéraux ont également rompu leur promesse d'équilibrer le budget. C'est la première fois que le gouvernement fédéral n'a aucun plan concret pour équilibrer le budget.
Tous ces déficits étaient censés servir à investir dans le plus grand programme d'infrastructure de l'histoire, puisque avec les libéraux, tout est toujours historique. Or seulement 7 milliards des 180 milliards de dollars de ce programme ont été injectés dans l'économie canadienne.
C'est un budget fort décevant et malheureusement, chers concitoyens de Beauport—Limoilou, les taxes et les impôts augmentent, et cela ne fait que commencer avec la taxe libérale sur le carbone.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-05-04 12:40 [p.19135]
Mr. Speaker, I want to congratulate my colleague on her maiden speech after her recent election in her beautiful riding. I know my colleague and all Conservative colleagues here, and probably all party MPs, go to their ridings each weekend. We work hard. We have activities in the communities, such as spaghetti dinners, etc.
The member will be able to share with us everything she hears from her constituents about the need to ensure Canadian oil can be exported outside the country. It is a major issue.
How can we still, today in 2018, be importing petroleum from dictatorship countries when we have all these resources here? Could my colleague share with us some of the comments she has heard from her constituents?
Monsieur le Président, je tiens à féliciter ma collègue de sa toute première intervention après sa récente élection dans sa magnifique circonscription. Je sais qu'elle et tous mes collègues conservateurs — et les députés de tous les partis, j'imagine — se rendent dans leur circonscription la fin de semaine. Nous y travaillons fort. Nous y participons à des activités communautaires, comme des soupers de spaghetti, et ainsi de suite.
La députée pourra nous faire part de tout ce que ses concitoyens lui disent sur la nécessité de garantir l'exportation du pétrole canadien. C'est une question importante.
Comment se fait-il qu'aujourd'hui, en 2018, nous importions le pétrole de pays dictateurs, alors que nous avons ces ressources ici même? Ma collègue pourrait-elle nous résumer certains des commentaires faits par les électeurs de sa circonscription?
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-05-04 12:42 [p.19136]
Mr. Speaker, it is always an honour to speak in the House of Commons.
On a more serious note, I would like to take a moment to talk about my colleague from Leeds—Grenville—Thousand Islands and Rideau Lakes, who passed away very suddenly this week. I never imagined this could happen. I share his family's sorrow, though of course mine could never equal theirs. His young children will not get to share amazing moments in their lives with their father, and that is staggeringly sad. I would therefore like to publicly state that I encourage them to hang in there. One day, they will surely find joy in living again, and we are here for them.
As usual, I want to say acknowledge all of the residents of Beauport—Limoilou who are tuning in. I would like to let them know that there will be a press conference Monday morning at my office. I will be announcing a very important initiative for our riding. I urge them to watch the news or read the paper when the time comes.
Bill C-48 would essentially enact a moratorium on the entire Pacific coast. It would apply from Prince Rupert, a fascinating city that I visited in 2004 at the age of 18, to Port Hardy, at the northern tip of Vancouver Island. This moratorium is designed to prevent oil tankers, including Canadian ones, that transport more than 12,500 tons of oil from accessing Canada's inland waters, and therefore our ports.
This moratorium will prohibit the construction of any pipeline project or maritime port beyond Port Hardy, on the northern tip of Vancouver Island, to export our products to the west. In the past three weeks, the Liberal government has slowly but surely been trying to put an end to Canada's natural resources, and oil in particular. Northern Gateway is just one example.
The first thing the Liberals did when they came to power was to amend the environmental assessment process managed by the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency; they even brag about it. Northern Gateway was in the process of being accepted, but as a result of these amendments, the project was cancelled, even though the amendments were based on the cabinet's political agenda and not on scientific facts, as the Liberal government claims.
When I look at Bill C-48, which would enact a moratorium on oil tankers in western Canada, it seems clear to me that the Liberals had surely been planning to block the Northern Gateway project for a while. Their argument that the project did not clear the environmental assessment is invalid, since they are now imposing a moratorium that would have prevented this project from moving forward regardless.
The Prime Minister and member for Papineau has said Canada needs to phase out the oil sands. Not only did he say that during the campaign, but he said it again in Paris, before the French National Assembly, in front of about 300 members of the Macron government, who were all happy to hear it. I can guarantee my colleagues that Canadians were not happy to hear that, especially people living in Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta who benefit economically from this natural resource. Through their hard work, all Canadians benefit from the incredible revenues and spinoffs generated by that industry.
My colleague from Prince Albert gave an exceptional speech this morning. He compassionately explained how hard it has been for families in Saskatchewan to accept and understand the decisions being made one after the other by this Liberal government. The government seems to be sending a message that is crystal clear: it does not support western Canada's natural resources, namely oil and natural gas. What is important to understand, however, is that this sector represents roughly 60% the economy of the western provinces and 40% of Canada's entire economy.
I can see why the Minister of Environment and Climate Change says we need to tackle climate change first. The way she talks to us every day is so arrogant. We believe in climate change. That is not the issue. Climate change and natural resources are complex issues, and we must not forget the backdrop to this whole debate. People are suffering because they need to put food on the table. Nothing has changed since the days of Cro-Magnon man. People have to eat every day. People have to find ways to survive.
When the Liberals go on about how to save the planet and the polar bears, that is their post-modern, post-materialist ideology talking. Conservatives, in contrast, talk about how to help families get through the day. That is what the Canadian government's true priority should be.
Is it not completely absurd that even now, in 2018, most of the gas people buy in the Atlantic provinces, Quebec, and Ontario comes from Venezuela and Saudi Arabia even though we have one of the largest oil reserves in the world? Canada has the third-largest oil reserve in the world, in fact. That is not even counting the Arctic Ocean, of which we own a sizeable chunk and which has not yet been explored. Canada has tremendous potential in this sector.
As I have often told many of my Marxist-Leninist, leftist, and other colleagues, the price of oil is going to continue to rise dramatically until 2065 because of China's and India's fuel consumption. Should Canada say no to $1 trillion in economic spinoffs until then? Absolutely not.
How will we afford to pay for our hospitals, our schools, and our social services that are so dear to the left-wing advocates of the welfare state in Canada? As I said, the priority is to meet the needs of Canadians and Canada, a middle power that I adore.
To get back to the point I was making, as my colleague from Prince Albert said, the decision regarding Bill C-48 and the moratorium was made by cabinet, without any consultation or any study by a parliamentary committee. Day after day, the Liberals brag about being the government that has consulted more with Canadians over the past three years than any government in history. It is always about history with them.
The moratorium will have serious consequences for Canada's prosperity and the economic development of the western provinces, which represent a growing segment of the population. How can the Liberals justify the fact that they failed to conduct any environmental or scientific impact assessments, hold any Canada-wide consultations, or have a committee examine this issue? They did not even consult with the nine indigenous nations that live on the land covered by the moratorium. The NDP ought to be alarmed about that. That is the point I really want to talk about.
I have here a legal complaint filed with the B.C. Supreme Court by the Lax Kw'alaams first nation—I am sorry if I pronounced that wrong—represented by John Helin. The plaintiffs are the indigenous peoples living in the region covered by the moratorium. Only nine indigenous nations from that region are among the plaintiffs. The defendant is the Government of British Columbia.
The lawyer's argument is very interesting from a historical perspective.
The claim area includes and is adjacent to an open and safe deepwater shipping corridor and contains lands suitable for development as an energy corridor and protected deepwater ports for the development and operation of a maritime installation, as defined in Bill C-48, the oil tanker moratorium act.
“The plaintiffs' aboriginal title encompasses the right to choose to what uses the land can be put, including use as a marine installation subject only to justifiable environmental assessment and approval legislation.”
He continues:
The said action by Canada “discriminates against the plaintiffs by prohibiting the development of land...in an area that has one of the best deepwater ports and safest waterways in Canada, while permitting such development elsewhere”, such as in the St. Lawrence Gulf, the St. Lawrence River, and the Atlantic Ocean.
My point is quite simple. We have a legal argument here that shows that not only does the territory belong to the indigenous people and the indigenous people were not consulted, but that the indigenous people, whom the Liberals are said to love, are suing the Government of British Columbia. This will likely go all the way to the Supreme Court because this moratorium goes against their ancestral rights on their territory, which they want to develop for future oil exports. This government is doing a very poor job of this.
Monsieur le Président, c'est toujours un honneur de prendre la parole à la Chambre.
Sur un ton plus serein, j'aimerais prendre le temps de parler de mon collègue de Leeds—Grenville—Thousand Islands et Rideau Lakes, qui est mort cette semaine d'une façon extrêmement subite. Jamais je n'aurais cru que cela pourrait arriver. Je partage la tristesse de sa famille, même si la mienne ne peut être aussi profonde, bien sûr. Ses jeunes enfants ne pourront pas partager des moments incroyables de leur vie avec leur père, et c'est d'une tristesse ahurissante. Je voudrais donc dire publiquement que je les encourage à persévérer. Un jour, ils vont sûrement retrouver le goût de vivre, et nous sommes là pour les soutenir.
Comme d'habitude, j'aimerais saluer tous les citoyens de Beauport—Limoilou qui nous écoutent en grand nombre. Je voudrais leur dire que, lundi matin, il y aura une conférence de presse à mon bureau. J'y annoncerai une initiative très importante pour la circonscription. Je les invite donc à écouter la télévision et à lire les journaux au moment opportun.
Le projet de loi C-48 vise à appliquer un moratoire, ni plus ni moins, sur l'ensemble de la côte pacifique. Il s'appliquera de Prince Rupert, une ville intéressante que j'ai visitée en 2004, quand j'avais 18 ans, jusqu'à Port Hardy, au nord de l'île de Vancouver. Ce moratoire vise à empêcher tous les pétroliers de ce monde, y compris les pétroliers canadiens qui transportent au-delà de 12 500 tonnes de pétrole, d'accéder aux eaux intérieures et donc aux ports du Canada.
Ce moratoire empêchera la construction, au-delà de la ville de Port Hardy, au nord de l'île de Vancouver, de tout projet d'oléoduc ou de port maritime pour exporter nos produits vers l'Ouest. Depuis les trois dernières années, le gouvernement libéral tente de mettre fin, lentement mais sûrement, aux ressources naturelles canadiennes, s'agissant particulièrement du pétrole. On n'a qu'à penser au projet Northern Gateway.
La première chose que les libéraux ont faite lorsqu'ils sont arrivés au pouvoir — et ils s'en vantent — a été de modifier les processus d'évaluation environnementale régis par l'Agence canadienne d'évaluation environnementale, qui se penche sur les projets énergétiques au Canada. Northern Gateway était en voie d'être accepté, mais à cause de ces modifications, qui n'étaient pas basées sur des faits scientifiques, comme le gouvernement libéral le dit toujours, mais plutôt sur des visées politiques du Cabinet, il a été annulé.
Quand je regarde le projet de loi C-48, qui vise à établir un moratoire sur les pétroliers dans l'Ouest canadien, je me dis que les libéraux songeaient assurément depuis longtemps à barrer la route au projet Northern Gateway. Leur argument selon lequel celui-ci n'a pas passé le test de l'évaluation environnementale est caduc, puisqu'ils imposent maintenant un moratoire qui aurait empêché ce projet de voir le jour de toute manière.
Le premier ministre et député de Papineau a dit qu'il fallait éliminer progressivement les sables bitumineux. Non seulement il l'a dit lors des élections, mais il l'a redit à Paris, à l'Assemblée nationale française, devant environ 300 membres de la députation du président Macron, qui étaient bien contents de l'entendre. Je peux garantir à mes collègues que les Canadiens n'étaient pas contents de l'entendre, encore moins ceux qui vivent au Manitoba, en Saskatchewan et en Alberta et qui bénéficient des retombées des ressources naturelles du pétrole. Grâce à leur travail, tous les Canadiens bénéficient des redevances et des retombées incroyables liées à cette industrie.
Mon collègue de la circonscription de Prince Albert a fait un discours remarquable, ce matin. Il a expliqué avec compassion combien il était difficile pour les familles de la Saskatchewan d'accepter et de comprendre les décisions prises l'une après l'autre par le gouvernement libéral. Ce dernier semble envoyer un message clair comme de l'eau de roche: il est contre les ressources naturelles du pétrole et du gaz naturel dans l'Ouest canadien. Toutefois, ce qu'il faut comprendre, c'est que cela correspond à environ 60 % de l'économie des provinces de l'Ouest et à 40 % de l'économie du Canada dans son entièreté.
Je peux bien comprendre que la ministre de l'Environnement et du Changement climatique dit qu'il faut d'abord s'attaquer aux changements climatiques. D'ailleurs, jour après jour, la manière dont elle nous parle est tellement arrogante, parce que nous croyons aux changements climatiques, là n'est pas la question. Les changements climatiques et les ressources naturelles sont des enjeux complexes, et il ne faut jamais oublier qu'au coeur de ce litige des individus souffrent, car ils doivent mettre de la nourriture sur la table. Rien n'a changé depuis le temps de l'homme de Cro-Magnon: il faut manger tous les jours. C'est vrai, il faut vivre.
Les libéraux sont toujours dans une idéologie postmoderne, postmatérialiste où ils nous parlent de comment sauver la planète et les ours polaires. Cependant, nous, les conservateurs, parlons de comment faire en sorte qu'une famille puisse vivre sa journée. C'est cela qui est la vraie priorité d'un gouvernement canadien.
En outre, n'est-ce pas une absurdité totale de penser qu'encore aujourd'hui, en 2018, la majorité du pétrole consommé dans les provinces de l'Atlantique, ainsi qu'au Québec et en Ontario, provient du Venezuela et de l'Arabie saoudite, alors que nous avons parmi les plus grandes réserves de pétrole au monde? En effet, le Canada possède la troisième plus grande réserve de pétrole du monde. Et cela, c'est sans compter l'océan Arctique, dont nous possédons une bonne partie, et qui n'a pas encore été exploré. Le Canada a donc un énorme potentiel dans ce domaine.
Comme je le dis souvent à plusieurs de mes collègues marxistes-léninistes, gauchistes et autres, le prix du pétrole va continuer à augmenter de façon spectaculaire à cause de la consommation chinoise et indienne, jusqu'en 2065. Est-ce que le Canada devrait dire non à 1 000 milliards de dollars en retombées économiques d'ici 2065? Absolument pas.
Comment allons-nous payer nos hôpitaux, nos écoles et nos services sociaux qui sont si chers aux pourfendeurs de l'État providence de la gauche canadienne? Comme je l'ai dit, la priorité est de subvenir aux besoins des Canadiens et du Canada, en tant que puissance moyenne que j'adore.
Je dois absolument arriver au point dont je veux parler. Comme mon collègue de Prince Albert l'a dit, la décision concernant le projet de loi C-48 et le moratoire a été prise au Cabinet, sans consultation et sans étude par un comité parlementaire. Jour après jour, les libéraux se targuent d'être le gouvernement qui, dans l'histoire du Canada — c'est toujours historique avec eux —, a consulté le plus les Canadiens au cours des trois dernières années.
Le moratoire aura des conséquences draconiennes sur la prospérité du Canada et sur l'évolution économique des provinces de l'Ouest qui représentent de plus en plus une partie importante de la population canadienne. Comment les libéraux peuvent-ils justifier n'avoir fait aucune étude environnementale ou sur l'impact scientifique possible, aucune consultation pancanadienne et aucune étude par un comité? Ils n'ont même pas consulté les neuf nations autochtones qui vivent sur les territoires visés par le moratoire. Le NPD devrait s'alarmer de cela. C'est justement à cela que je veux arriver.
J'ai entre les mains une plainte légale déposée à la Cour suprême de la Colombie-Britannique par la Première Nation Lax Kw'alaams —  je m'excuse de la prononciation —, représentée par John Helin. Les plaintifs sont les Autochtones de la région où le moratoire s'applique. Seulement neuf des nations autochtones de cette région font partie des plaintifs. Le défendeur est le gouvernement de la Colombie-Britannique.
Ce que l'avocat démontre est fort intéressant d'un point de vue historique:
« La zone revendiquée comprend un couloir de navigation en eaux profondes ouvert et sûr et y est adjacente, et couvre des terres convenant à la mise en valeur d'un couloir de transport de l'énergie, ainsi que de ports en eaux profondes protégés pour la mise en valeur et l'exploitation d'une installation maritime telle que définie dans le projet de loi C-48, Loi sur le moratoire relatif aux pétroliers. »
« Le titre ancestral du plaignant comprend le droit de déterminer l'utilisation des terres, y compris pour y construire une installation maritime sujette à une évaluation environnementale justifiable et aux lois sur l'approbation. »
Il continue:
Ladite action intentée par le Canada « est discriminatoire à l'égard des plaignants en interdisant la mise en valeur des terres [...] dans une région où se trouvent l'un des meilleurs ports en eaux profondes et l'une des routes maritimes les plus sûres au Canada, tout en permettant la même mise en valeur ailleurs », comme dans le golfe du Saint-Laurent, le fleuve Saint-Laurent et l'océan Atlantique.
Mon argument est très simple. On a ici un argument légal: non seulement le territoire appartient au peuple autochtone et celui-ci n'a pas été consulté, mais les Autochtones, que les libéraux sont censés adorer, vont poursuivre le gouvernement de la Colombie-Britannique. Cela ira certainement jusqu'en Cour suprême, car le moratoire va à l'encontre de leurs droits ancestraux sur le territoire, alors qu'ils veulent exploiter celui-ci pour d'éventuelles exportations pétrolières. C'est un très mauvais travail de la part de ce gouvernement.
Results: 1 - 6 of 6