Interventions in the House of Commons
 
 
 
RSS feed based on search criteria Export search results - CSV (plain text) Export search results - XML
Add search criteria
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-05-07 16:09 [p.27531]
Mr. Speaker, as always, I am very honoured to rise in the House today. I would like to say hello to the many people of Beauport—Limoilou who are watching. I saw them late last week at the Grand bazar du Vieux-Limoilou, the Patro Roc-Amadour community centre and the 52nd Salon de Mai craft fair, which was held at Promenades Beauport mall. Congratulations to the organizers.
I would also like to say that we are all very sad to hear that our colleague from Langley—Aldergrove is fighting a serious cancer. He just gave a powerful speech that reminded us how fragile life is. I even spoke to my wife and children to tell them that I love them. Our colleague gave a very poignant speech about that. I thank him for his years of service to Canada and to the House of Commons, and for all the future years that he will devote himself to his community.
Before I say anything about the Conservative Party motion now before us, I would like to say a quick word about what U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said yesterday. At a meeting of the Arctic Council in Finland, he had the gall to say that Canada’s claim of sovereignty over the Northwest Passage is illegitimate. He even compared us to Russia and China, referring to their behaviour and their propensity to annex territories, like Russia did in Ukraine. Personally, I find that shameful.
I would like to remind the U.S. government that we have been their allies for a long time. President Reagan and Prime Minister Mulroney reached an agreement, which both parties signed, and which stipulated that Canada indeed has sovereignty over the Northwest Passage. In the 19th century, we launched a number of expeditions and explorations supported by the British Crown, and Canadian sovereignty over the Northwest Passage and in the Arctic Archipelago is entirely legitimate.
Today we are discussing the importance of the oil industry and the importance of climate change. These two issues go hand in hand. They are key issues today and will continue to be in the future. Of course, I believe that the environment is extremely important. It is important for all Conservatives and for all Canadians. I remember collecting all sorts of bottles and cans along the roadside as a boy. I often did that with my father. He is an example for me in that respect. Throughout my life, I have always wanted to be a part of community organizations where people pick up garbage.
I am also very proud of most Canadian governments' environmental record. They have always endeavoured to meet the expectations of Canadians, for whom the environment is extremely important. Most of the time, the Liberals try to paint the Conservatives as anti-environment. I can assure my colleagues that I have never seen anything to support that in the Conservative Party. On the contrary, under Mr. Harper, we took important steps to lower greenhouse gas emissions in Canada by 2.2% between 2006 and 2015. I will come back to that later.
There are two approaches being proposed in the current debate on climate change. This applies to several western countries. I say western countries because those are the countries affected, given that our industrial era has been well established for two centuries. There are some industries that have been polluting rather significantly for a long time. We have reached a point in our history where we realize that greenhouse gas emissions from human activity are playing a very significant role in climate change.
Yes, we must act, but there are two possible approaches. One is the Liberal Party approach of taxing Canadians even more. The Liberals are asking Canadians to bear the burden of reducing greenhouse gas emissions in Canada. The approach the Conservatives prefer is not to create a new tax or to tax the fuel that Canadians put in their cars to go to work every day.
Our approach is rather to help Canadians in their everyday lives and to help the provinces implement their respective environmental plans.
For example, I always like to remind the Canadians listening to us, as well as all environmentalists, that we set up the Canada ecotrust in 2007-08. This $1.3-billion program was meant to allocate funds to the provinces so that they could deal in their own way with the major concerns associated with climate change and reduce their greenhouse gas emissions. That is a fine example of how we want to help people.
Jean Charest was premier of Quebec at the time. We provided $300 million to help Quebec implement its GHG emissions reduction plan. Mr. Harper and Mr. Charest gave a joint press conference, and even Mr. Guilbeault from Greenpeace said that the Canada ecotrust was a significant, important program.
We did the same thing for Ontario, British Columbia and all the other provinces that wanted to join the ecotrust. It is very likely that the program allowed the Government of Ontario to implement its own program and close its coal-fired power plants.
As a result, under the Harper government, GHG emissions in Canada dropped by 2.2%. It bears repeating, since that is the approach we will adopt with our current leader, the hon. member for Regina—Qu'Appelle. In a few weeks, we will announce our environmental plan, which has been keenly anticipated by all Canadians, and especially by the Liberal government. It will be a serious plan. It will include environmental targets that will allow Canada and Canadians to excel in the fight against climate change. In particular, we will maintain our sound approach, which is to help the provinces. By contrast, the government prefers to start constitutional squabbles with them by imposing taxes on Canadians, overstepping its jurisdiction in the process, since environmental matters fall under provincial jurisdiction.
I would like to use Quebec as an example, as my colleague from Louis-Saint-Laurent did this morning. I have here a report on Quebec's inventory of greenhouse gas emissions in 2016 and their evolution since 1990. It was tabled by the new CAQ government last November, and it is very interesting. In 2016, greenhouse gas emissions increased in Quebec, despite the fact that the carbon exchange made its debut in 2013. That is ironic. Despite the implementation of a fuel tax to cut down on fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions, emissions actually went up.
The same report also indicates that between 1990 and 2015, greenhouse gas emissions in Quebec decreased even though the carbon exchange had not been fully implemented. The conclusion explains how this happened:
The decrease in GHG emissions from 1990 to 2016 is mainly due to the industrial sector. The decrease observed in this sector resulted from technical improvements in certain processes, increased energy efficiency and the substitution of certain fuels.
That is exactly what we, the Conservatives, want to do. Instead of imposing a new tax on Canadians, we want to maintain a decentralized federal approach. We want to help the provinces adopt greener energy sources to stimulate even greener economic growth and the deindustrialization of certain sectors, create new technologies and increase innovation in the Canadian economy. That is the objective of a Conservative approach to the environment.
The objective of the Conservative approach to the environment is not to come down hard on the provinces and impose new taxes on Canadians. As we saw with Quebec, that did not have the desired effect. Our objective is to provide assistance while ensuring that our oil industry can grow in a healthy way. That is what Norway did. If I had 10 more minutes, I could talk more about that wonderful country, which has increased its oil production and exports and is one of the fairest and greenest countries in the world.
Monsieur le Président, comme toujours, je suis très honoré de prendre la parole à la Chambre. J'aimerais dire bonjour à tous les citoyens et citoyennes de Beauport—Limoilou qui nous écoutent en grand nombre actuellement. Je les ai rencontrés la fin de semaine dernière, que ce soit au Grand bazar du Vieux-Limoilou, au Patro Roc-Amadour ou au 52e Salon de Mai, qui a eu lieu aux Promenades Beauport. Félicitations aux organisateurs!
J'aimerais également souligner le fait que nous ressentons tous une grande tristesse à l'égard de notre collègue de Langley—Aldergrove, qui combat un cancer très important. Il vient de faire un discours percutant qui nous a rappelé à quel point la vie est fragile. J'ai moi-même contacté ma femme et mes enfants pour leur dire que je les aimais. La mort nous guette tous, un jour ou l'autre. Notre collègue a prononcé un discours très poignant à cet égard. Je le remercie pour toutes ses années de service envers le Canada et la Chambre des communes, et pour toutes les années futures au cours desquelles il pourra s'investir dans sa communauté.
Avant de parler de la motion actuelle, qui a été mise en avant par le Parti conservateur, j'aimerais rapidement revenir sur les propos de Mike Pompeo, le secrétaire d'État américain. Hier, lors d'une réunion du Conseil de l'Arctique en Finlande, il a osé dire que la revendication de la souveraineté canadienne sur le passage du Nord-Ouest était illégitime. Il nous a même comparés à la Russie et à la Chine, en faisant référence à leurs comportements et aux annexions de territoires, comme on a vu la Russie le faire en Ukraine. Personnellement, j'ai trouvé cela honteux.
J'aimerais rappeler à l'administration américaine que nous sommes leurs alliés depuis très longtemps. Une entente a été établie entre le président Reagan et le premier ministre Mulroney. Une convention avait été signée et elle stipulait que le passage du Nord-Ouest était bel et bien sous la souveraineté canadienne. Au XIXe siècle, on a fait plusieurs expéditions et explorations soutenues par la Couronne britannique, ce qui fait que la souveraineté canadienne dans le passage du Nord-Ouest et dans l'archipel Arctique est tout à fait légitime.
Nous discutons aujourd'hui de l'importance de l'industrie pétrolière et de l'importance des changements climatiques. Ce sont deux enjeux qui vont de pair. Ce sont deux choses qui sont structurantes aujourd'hui et qui vont demeurer comme telles. Bien entendu, je crois que l'environnement est extrêmement important, et ce l'est aussi pour tous les conservateurs et pour tous les citoyens du Canada. Je me rappelle avoir participé, dès mon jeune âge, à des ramassages de bouteilles et de cannettes de toutes sortes aux abords des routes et des autoroutes. Je faisais souvent cela avec mon père; il est un exemple pour moi à cet égard. Tout au long de ma vie, j'ai toujours voulu faire partie d'organisations communautaires où les gens ramassent les déchets.
Je suis également très fier du bilan de la majorité des gouvernements canadiens en matière d'environnement. Ils ont toujours voulu répondre aux attentes des Canadiens pour qui l'environnement est important. Les libéraux tentent, la plupart du temps, de dépeindre les conservateurs comme étant un groupe anti-environnement. Je peux assurer à mes collègues que je n'ai jamais perçu cela en côtoyant mes collègues du Parti conservateur. Bien au contraire, sous M. Harper, on a pris des mesures très intéressantes qui nous ont permis de faire baisser les émissions de gaz à effet de serre au Canada de 2,2 % entre 2006 et 2015. J'en reparlerai plus tard.
En fait, il y a deux approches proposées dans le débat actuel sur les changements climatiques. C'est vrai pour plusieurs pays occidentaux. Je parle des pays occidentaux parce que ce sont ces pays qui sont concernés, vu que notre ère industrielle est bien installée depuis deux siècles. Il y a des industries qui polluent de manière assez substantielle depuis longtemps. Nous sommes arrivés à un moment de notre histoire où nous avons pris acte du fait que l'humain, en raison de son apport de gaz à effet de serre dans le monde, a un rôle très important dans les changements climatiques.
Oui, il faut agir, mais il y a deux approches. Une de ces approches provient du Parti libéral. Elle vise à taxer davantage les Canadiens. En fait, les libéraux tentent de mettre sur les épaules des Canadiens le poids d'en arriver à une baisse des émissions de gaz à effet de serre au Canada. L'approche que privilégient les conservateurs n'est pas de créer une nouvelle taxe ou de taxer davantage l'essence que les Canadiens mettent à la pompe tous les jours pour aller au travail en voiture.
Notre approche vise plutôt à aider les Canadiens dans leur vie de tous les jours et à aider les provinces à mettre en oeuvre leurs plans environnementaux respectifs.
À titre d'exemple, j'aime toujours rappeler aux Canadiens et aux Canadiennes qui nous écoutent et à tous les écologistes qu'en 2007-2008, nous avons mis en place l'ÉcoFiducie. Ce programme d'environ 1,3 milliard de dollars visait à envoyer des enveloppes budgétaires à toutes les provinces pour qu'elles puissent répondre, chacune à leur façon, aux grandes préoccupations liées aux changements climatiques et diminuer leurs émissions de gaz à effet de serre. Voilà un bel exemple qui démontre que nous voulons aider les gens.
À l'époque, le premier ministre du Québec était M. Charest. Nous avions octroyé une enveloppe budgétaire de 300 millions de dollars au Québec pour l'aider à mettre en oeuvre son plan de diminution des GES. Il y avait eu une conférence de presse conjointe avec M. Harper et M. Charest, et même M. Guilbeault, de Greenpeace, avait dit que l'ÉcoFiducie était un programme substantiel et important.
Nous avons fait la même chose pour l'Ontario, la Colombie-Britannique et toutes les provinces qui voulaient souscrire à l'ÉcoFiducie. Il est fort probable que ce programme ait permis au gouvernement de l'Ontario de mettre en place son propre programme. Il a d'ailleurs eu la possibilité de fermer des centrales électriques au charbon.
Grâce à tout cela, sous le gouvernement de M. Harper, les GES ont diminué de 2,2 % au Canada. Il faut le répéter, puisque c'est l'approche que nous adopterons avec notre chef, le député de Regina—Qu'Appelle. Dans quelques semaines, nous allons annoncer notre plan environnemental, qui est très attendu par tous les Canadiens et, surtout, par le gouvernement libéral. Notre plan sera très sérieux. Il comprendra des cibles environnementales visant à ce que le Canada et les Canadiens excellent en matière de lutte contre les changements climatiques. Surtout, nous allons maintenir notre approche saine qui consiste à aider les provinces plutôt qu'à commencer des bagarres constitutionnelles avec celles-ci en imposant aux Canadiens des taxes, ce qui va à l'encontre du partage des champs de compétence, puisque les questions environnementales relèvent des provinces.
J'aimerais prendre l'exemple du Québec, comme mon collègue de Louis-Saint-Laurent l'a fait ce matin. J'ai entre les mains un rapport qui s'intitule « Inventaire québécois des émissions de gaz à effet de serre en 2016 et leur évolution depuis 1990 ». Celui-ci a été déposé par le nouveau gouvernement de la CAQ en novembre dernier, et il est fort intéressant. En 2016, les émissions de gaz à effet de serre ont augmenté au Québec. Pourtant, la bourse du carbone a été instaurée en 2013 au Québec. C'est paradoxal. Malgré la mise en place d'une taxe sur l'essence pour réduire la consommation d'essence et les émissions de gaz à effet de serre, celles-ci ont augmenté.
Le même rapport indique aussi qu'entre 1990 et 2015, les émissions de gaz à effet de serre au Québec ont diminué, alors qu'il n'y avait pas de bourse du carbone totalement en vigueur. Dans la conclusion, on nous explique pourquoi:
La diminution des émissions de GES de 1990 à 2016 est principalement attribuable au secteur industriel. La baisse observée dans ce secteur provient de l'amélioration technique de certains procédés, de l'amélioration de l'efficacité énergétique et de la substitution de certains combustibles. 
C'est exactement ce vers quoi nous, les conservateurs, voulons tendre. Au lieu d'imposer une nouvelle taxe aux Canadiens, nous voulons maintenir une approche fédérale décentralisatrice. Nous voulons octroyer de l'aide aux provinces, que ce soit pour aller vers des énergies plus vertes, pour stimuler une croissance économique plus verte, pour stimuler la désindustrialisation de certains secteurs, pour créer de nouvelles technologies ou pour faire croître l'innovation dans l'économie canadienne. Voilà l'objectif d'une approche conservatrice en environnement.
L'objectif d'une approche conservatrice en environnement n'est pas de taper sur les provinces et d'imposer de nouvelles taxes aux Canadiens. Comme on l'a vu dans le cas du Québec, cela n'a pas eu l'effet escompté. Notre objectif est d'apporter de l'aide, tout en faisant en sorte que notre industrie pétrolière puisse croître de manière saine. C'est ce que fait la Norvège, d'ailleurs. Si j'avais eu 10 minutes de plus, j'aurais pu parler davantage de ce merveilleux pays, qui, tout en augmentant sa production et son exportation de pétrole, est l'une des sociétés les plus équitables et les plus vertes au monde.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-05-30 20:43 [p.19956]
Mr. Speaker, here we are in the House, on Wednesday, May 30, at 8:45. I should mention that it is 8:45 p.m., for the many residents of Beauport—Limoilou who I am sure are tuning in. To all my constituents, good evening.
We are debating this evening because the Liberal government tabled very few significant government bills over the winter. Instead, they tabled an astounding number of private members' bills on things like swallows' day and beauty month. Sometimes my colleagues and I can hardly help laughing at this pile of utterly trivial bills. I also think that this process of randomly selecting the members who get to table bills is a bit past its prime. Maybe it should be reviewed. At the same time, I understand that it is up to each member to decide what kind of bill is important to him or her.
The reason we have had to sit until midnight for two days now is that, as my colleague from Perth—Wellington said, the government has been acting like a typical university student over the past three months. That comparison is a bit ridiculous, but it is true. The government is behaving like those students who wait until the last minute to do their assignments and are still working on them at 3 a.m. the day before they are due because they were too busy partying all semester. Members know what I mean, even though that paints a rather stereotypical picture of students; most of them do not do things like that.
In short, we have a government that, at the end of the session, has realized that time is running out and that it only has three weeks left to pass some of its legislative measures, some of which are rather lengthy bills that are key to the government's legislative agenda. One has to wonder about that.
The Liberals believe these bills to be important. However, because of their lack of responsibility over the past three months, we were unable to debate these major bills that will make significant changes to our society. Take for example, Bill C-76, which has to do with the electoral reforms that the Liberals want to make to the voting system, the way we vote, protection of the vote, and identification. There is also Bill C-49 on transportation in Canada, a very lengthy bill that we have not had time to examine properly.
Today we are debating Bill C-57 on sustainable development. This is an important topic, but for the past three years I have been getting sick and tired of seeing the Liberal government act as though it has a monopoly on environmental righteousness. I searched online to get an accurate picture of the record of Mr. Harper's Conservative government from 2006 to 2015, and I came across some fascinating results. I want to share this information very honestly with the House and my Liberal colleagues so that they understand that even though we did not talk incessantly about the environment, we achieved some excellent concrete results.
I want to read a quote from www.mediaterre.org, a perfectly legitimate site:
Stephen Harper's Canadian government released its 2007 budget on March 19. The budget allocated $4.5 billion in new investments to some 20 environmental projects. These measures include a $2,000 rebate for all electronic-vehicle or alternative-fuel purchases, and the creation of a $1.5-billion EcoTrust program to help provinces reduce greenhouse gas emissions.
The Liberals often criticize us for talking about the environment, but we did take action. For example, we set targets. We proposed reducing emissions to 30% below 2005 levels by 2030. The Liberals even retained these same targets as part of the Paris agreement.
They said we had targets, but no plan. That is not true. Not only did we have the $1.5-billion ecotrust program, but we also had a plan that involved federal co-operation.
Allow me to quote the premier of Quebec at the time, Jean Charest, who was praising the plan that was going to help Quebec—his province, my province—meet its greenhouse gas emissions targets. Jean Charest and Mr. Harper issued a joint press release.
Mr. Harper said, “Canada's New Government is investing to protect Canadians from the consequences of climate change, air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions.” He was already recognizing it in 2007.
Mr. Charest said, “In June 2006, our government adopted its plan to combat climate change. This plan has been hailed as one of the finest in North America. With Ottawa contributing financially to this Quebec initiative, we will be able to achieve our objectives.”
It was Mr. Charest who said that in 2007, at a press conference with the prime minister.
I will continue to read the joint press release from the two governments, “As a result of this federal funding, the Government of Quebec has indicated that it will be able to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 13.8 million tonnes of carbon dioxide or equivalent below its anticipated 2012 level.”
What is more, the $1.5-billion ecotrust that was supposed to be allocated and was allocated to every province provided $339 million to Quebec alone. That was going to allow Quebec to engage in the following: investments to improve access to new technologies for the trucking sector; a program to develop renewable energy sources in rural regions; a pilot plant for production of cellulosic ethanol; promotion of geothermal heat pumps in the residential sector; support for technological research and innovation for the reduction and sequestration of greenhouse gases. This is probably one of those programs that is helping us make our oil sands increasingly environmentally friendly by allowing us to capture the carbon that comes from converting the sands to oil. There are also measures for the capture of biogas from landfill sites, for waste treatment and energy recovery, and finally for Canada ecotrust.
I invite our Liberal colleagues to listen to what I am going to say. In 2007, Steven Guilbeault of Greenpeace said the following: “We are pleased to see that after negotiating for more than a year, Quebec has finally obtained the money it needs to move towards meeting the Kyoto targets.”
Who made it possible for Quebec to move towards meeting its Kyoto objectives? It was the Harper government, a Conservative government, which established the $1.5-billion ecotrust fund in 2007 with monies from the budget surplus.
Not only did we have a plan to meet the targets we proposed, but this was also a plan that could only be implemented if the provinces agreed to the targets. It was a plan that was funded through the budget surplus, that did not further tax Canadians, and that provided money directly, without any conditions, other than the fundamental requirement that it had to help reduce climate change, which was philosophically important. Any and all measures taken to reach that goal were left entirely to the discretion of the provinces.
Mr. Harper, like a good Conservative who supported decentralization and like a true federalist leader, said that he was giving $400 million to each province so it could move forward with its plan.
By 2015, after 10 years of Conservative government, the country had not only weathered the worst economic crisis, the worst recession in history since the 1930s, but it had also reduced greenhouse gas emissions by 2% and increased the gross domestic product for all Canadians while lopping three points off the GST and lowering income taxes for families with two children by an average of $2,000 per year.
If that is not co-operative federalism, if those are not real results, if that is not a concrete environmental plan, then I do not know what is. Add to that the fact that we achieved royal assent for no less than 25 to 35 bills every session.
In contrast, during this session, in between being forced to grapple with scandals involving the carbon tax, illegal border crossings, and the Trans Mountain project, this government has barely managed to come up with four genuinely important bills.
By contrast, we expanded parks and protected Canada's wetlands. Our environmental record is exceptional.
Furthermore, we allowed debate. For example, we debated Bill C-23 on electoral reform for four days. The Liberals' electoral reform was debated for two hours.
I am sad, but I am happy to debate until midnight because debating is my passion.
Monsieur le Président, nous voici à la Chambre le mercredi 30 mai à 20 h 45. Je dois préciser que c'est le soir, pour tous les résidants de Beauport—Limoilou qui nous écoutent en grand nombre, j'en suis sûr. Je les salue.
Nous débattons ce soir parce que le gouvernement libéral, tout au long de la session d'hiver, a proposé peu de projets de loi gouvernementaux d'envergure. On a plutôt vu un nombre incroyable de projets de loi d'initiative parlementaire sur le jour des hirondelles ou sur le mois de la beauté. Parfois, mes collègues et moi rigolons presque de cette accumulation de projets de loi presque complètement anodins. D'ailleurs, je trouve un peu moribond ce processus de sélection aléatoire du député qui va pouvoir présenter un projet de loi. Peut-être qu'on devrait le revoir. En même temps, je comprends qu'il revient à chaque député de déterminer quel genre de projet de loi est important pour lui.
Si nous devons siéger jusqu'à minuit depuis maintenant deux jours, c'est parce que, tout comme l'a dit mon collègue de Perth—Wellington, le gouvernement, au cours des trois derniers mois, a agi comme un étudiant universitaire typique. C'est un parallèle un peu loufoque, mais cela tient quand même debout. Il s'est comporté comme un étudiant qui se rend compte que la remise du travail a lieu le lendemain matin et qui commence à le faire à 3 heures du matin parce qu'il a fait la fête tout le long de la session. On voit un peu ce que je veux dire, même si c'est une image un peu tronquée des étudiants, puisque la plupart ne font pas cela.
Bref, on se retrouve avec un gouvernement qui, en fin de session, prend conscience que le temps file et qu'il lui reste à peine trois semaines pour faire adopter certaines de ses mesures législatives qu'on pourrait juger plus volumineuses et importantes pour son programme législatif. Encore là, on pourrait se poser des questions.
Même si certains projets de loi sont importants aux yeux des libéraux, à cause de leur manque de sérieux des trois derniers mois, nous n'avons pas pu débattre des projets de loi majeurs qui vont apporter de grands changements dans notre société, comme le projet de loi C-76. Celui-ci porte sur les réformes électorales que les libéraux veulent appliquer relativement au mode de scrutin, à notre façon de voter, à la protection du vote et à l'identification, par exemple. Mentionnons aussi le projet de loi C-49 sur le transport au Canada, un projet de loi très volumineux que nous n'avons pas eu le temps d'évaluer convenablement.
Aujourd'hui, nous parlons du projet de loi C-57 sur le développement durable. C'est donc très intéressant. Cependant, j'en ai un peu marre d'entendre le gouvernement libéral nous répéter, depuis trois ans, qu'il a le monopole de la vertu en ce qui a trait à l'environnement. J'ai fait quelques recherches sur Internet pour voir le bilan précis et tangible du gouvernement conservateur de M. Harper de 2006 à 2015. J'ai fait des découvertes assez incroyables. J'aimerais en faire part de manière très honnête à la Chambre et à mes collègues libéraux pour qu'ils comprennent que, bien que nous ne nous gargarisions pas d'un discours environnementaliste, nous avons obtenu des résultats tangibles fort intéressants.
Voici donc ce que j'ai trouvé sur www.mediaterre.org, un site Web parfaitement légitime:
Le gouvernement canadien de Stephen Harper a rendu public le 19 mars dernier son budget 2007. Celui-ci prévoit 4,5 milliards de nouveaux investissements liés à une vingtaine de projets environnementaux. Ces mesures impliquent notamment la déduction de 2000$ liée à tout achat de véhicule écoénergétique ou à carburant de remplacement, mais également la mise sur pied d’une Éco-fiducie de 1,5 milliards afin d’aider les provinces à diminuer l’émission de gaz à effet de serre.
Souvent, les libéraux nous accusent d'avoir parlé d'environnement, puisque nous l'avons quand même fait à quelques égards. Nous avons notamment proposé des cibles. Par exemple, nous avons proposé de baisser les émissions de 30 % d'ici 2030 par rapport aux niveaux de 2005. Or les libéraux ont conservé ces mêmes cibles par l'entremise de l'Accord de Paris.
Ils nous disaient que nous avions des cibles, mais pas de plan. Ce n'est pas vrai. Non seulement nous avions l'écoFiducie de 1,5 milliard de dollars, mais c'était aussi un plan qui s'inscrivait dans une collaboration fédérale.
Je vais citer des passages du premier ministre du Québec à l'époque, Jean Charest, qui faisait l'éloge de ce plan qui allait aider le Québec — sa province, ma province — à atteindre ses objectifs de réduction de gaz à effet de serre. Jean Charest et M. Harper ont difusé ensemble un communiqué.
M. Harper a dit: « Le nouveau gouvernement du Canada investit afin de protéger les Canadiennes et les Canadiens des répercussions des changements climatiques, — il le reconnaissait d'emblée en 2007 — de la pollution atmosphérique et des émissions de gaz à effet de serre. »
M. Charest a dit: « En juin 2006, notre gouvernement a adopté son Plan de lutte aux changements climatiques. Ce plan a été salué comme l'un des meilleurs en Amérique du Nord. Avec la contribution financière du gouvernement fédérale à cet effort québécois, nous pourrons atteindre nos objectifs. »
C'est M. Charest qui a dit cela en 2007, lors d'une conférence de presse tenue avec le premier ministre.
Je continue la lecture du communiqué de presse conjoint des deux gouvernements: « Grâce au financement fédéral, le gouvernement du Québec a indiqué qu'il sera en mesure de réduire de 13,8 millions de tonnes de dioxyde de carbone ou de substances équivalentes les émissions de gaz à effet de serre, soit en dessous des niveaux prévus pour 2012. »
En outre, l'écoFiducie de 1,5 milliard de dollars qui devait s'appliquer et qui s'est appliquée à toutes les provinces prévoyait 339 millions de dollars juste pour le Québec. Cela allait permettre au Québec de faire tout ce que je vais énumérer: des investissements destinés à faciliter l'accès à de nouvelles technologies dans le secteur du camionnage; un programme visant à trouver de nouvelles sources d'énergie renouvelable dans les régions rurales; une usine pilote de fabrication d'éthanol à partir de matières cellulosiques; la promotion de pompes géothermiques dans le secteur résidentiel; l'appui à la recherche technologique et à l'innovation pour la réduction et la séquestration des gaz à effet de serre — c'est probablement un de ces programmes qui nous aident à avoir des sables bitumineux de plus en plus proenvironnmentaux parce qu'on capte le carbone qui est issu de la transformation des sables vers le pétrole. Il y a également des mesures destinées à promouvoir le captage de la biomasse provenant des sites d'enfouissement, des mesures destinées à favoriser la récupération des déchets traités et de l'énergie et finalement l'ÉcoFiducie du Canada.
J'invite les collègues libéraux à écouter ce que je vais dire. M. Steven Guilbeault de Greenpeace a dit en 2007: « Nous sommes heureux de constater qu'après plus d'une année de négociation, Québec a finalement obtenu les sommes qui lui permettront de se rapprocher davantage des objectifs de Kyoto. »
Qui a permis au Québec de se rapprocher de ces objectifs de Kyoto? C'est le gouvernement de M. Harper, un gouvernement conservateur qui a créé l'écoFiducie en 2007 de 1,5 milliard de dollars provenant d'un budget basé sur des surplus budgétaires.
Non seulement nous avions un plan pour atteindre les cibles que nous avions mises en avant, mais c'était un plan qui ne s'appliquait pas sans le consentement des provinces. C'était un plan qui prenait des surplus budgétaires, qui ne taxait pas davantage les Canadiens et qui envoyait de l'argent directement, sans aucune condition, mis à part la condition fondamentale de contribuer à réduire les changements climatiques, qui était quand même philosophiquement importante. Toutes les mesures pour y arriver étaient laissées complètement à la discrétion des provinces.
M. Harper, comme un bon conservateur décentralisateur, un vrai leader fédéraliste, a dit qu'il donnait 400 millions de dollars à chaque province pour qu'elle mette en oeuvre son projet.
En 2015, après 10 ans de gouverne conservatrice, on a constaté qu'on avait non seulement passé à travers la pire crise économique, la pire récession de l'histoire depuis les années 1930, mais qu'on avait aussi réduit les émissions de gaz à effet de serre de 2 % et augmenté le produit intérieur brut pour tous les Canadiens, tout en baissant la TPS de trois points et les impôts de 2 000 $ en moyenne, par année, pour une famille ayant deux enfants.
Si cela n'est pas du fédéralisme coopératif, si ce ne sont pas des résultats tangibles, si cela n'est pas un plan environnemental concret, je me demande ce que c'est. C'est sans parler du fait que nous avions un minimum de 25 à 35 projets législatifs qui passaient sous le sceau de la reine à chaque session.
Cette session-ci, à part les scandales de la taxe sur le carbone, les passages illégaux, le projet de Trans Mountain — tous des enjeux qui se présentent au gouvernement contre son propre désir — les libéraux ont à peine mis en avant quatre projets de loi véritablement importants.
Bref, on a agrandi les parcs et on a protégé les terres humides du Canada. On a un bilan exceptionnel en matière d'environnement.
En outre, nous, on permettait les débats. Par exemple, quand on a fait le débat sur le projet de loi C-23, qui concernait les réformes électorales, on a débattu pendant quatre jours. La réforme électorale des libéraux, quant à elle, a été débattue pendant deux heures.
Je suis attristé, mais content de débattre jusqu'à minuit, parce que c'est ma grande passion.
Results: 1 - 2 of 2