Interventions in the House of Commons
 
 
 
RSS feed based on search criteria Export search results - CSV (plain text) Export search results - XML
Add search criteria
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-05-07 16:09 [p.27531]
Mr. Speaker, as always, I am very honoured to rise in the House today. I would like to say hello to the many people of Beauport—Limoilou who are watching. I saw them late last week at the Grand bazar du Vieux-Limoilou, the Patro Roc-Amadour community centre and the 52nd Salon de Mai craft fair, which was held at Promenades Beauport mall. Congratulations to the organizers.
I would also like to say that we are all very sad to hear that our colleague from Langley—Aldergrove is fighting a serious cancer. He just gave a powerful speech that reminded us how fragile life is. I even spoke to my wife and children to tell them that I love them. Our colleague gave a very poignant speech about that. I thank him for his years of service to Canada and to the House of Commons, and for all the future years that he will devote himself to his community.
Before I say anything about the Conservative Party motion now before us, I would like to say a quick word about what U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said yesterday. At a meeting of the Arctic Council in Finland, he had the gall to say that Canada’s claim of sovereignty over the Northwest Passage is illegitimate. He even compared us to Russia and China, referring to their behaviour and their propensity to annex territories, like Russia did in Ukraine. Personally, I find that shameful.
I would like to remind the U.S. government that we have been their allies for a long time. President Reagan and Prime Minister Mulroney reached an agreement, which both parties signed, and which stipulated that Canada indeed has sovereignty over the Northwest Passage. In the 19th century, we launched a number of expeditions and explorations supported by the British Crown, and Canadian sovereignty over the Northwest Passage and in the Arctic Archipelago is entirely legitimate.
Today we are discussing the importance of the oil industry and the importance of climate change. These two issues go hand in hand. They are key issues today and will continue to be in the future. Of course, I believe that the environment is extremely important. It is important for all Conservatives and for all Canadians. I remember collecting all sorts of bottles and cans along the roadside as a boy. I often did that with my father. He is an example for me in that respect. Throughout my life, I have always wanted to be a part of community organizations where people pick up garbage.
I am also very proud of most Canadian governments' environmental record. They have always endeavoured to meet the expectations of Canadians, for whom the environment is extremely important. Most of the time, the Liberals try to paint the Conservatives as anti-environment. I can assure my colleagues that I have never seen anything to support that in the Conservative Party. On the contrary, under Mr. Harper, we took important steps to lower greenhouse gas emissions in Canada by 2.2% between 2006 and 2015. I will come back to that later.
There are two approaches being proposed in the current debate on climate change. This applies to several western countries. I say western countries because those are the countries affected, given that our industrial era has been well established for two centuries. There are some industries that have been polluting rather significantly for a long time. We have reached a point in our history where we realize that greenhouse gas emissions from human activity are playing a very significant role in climate change.
Yes, we must act, but there are two possible approaches. One is the Liberal Party approach of taxing Canadians even more. The Liberals are asking Canadians to bear the burden of reducing greenhouse gas emissions in Canada. The approach the Conservatives prefer is not to create a new tax or to tax the fuel that Canadians put in their cars to go to work every day.
Our approach is rather to help Canadians in their everyday lives and to help the provinces implement their respective environmental plans.
For example, I always like to remind the Canadians listening to us, as well as all environmentalists, that we set up the Canada ecotrust in 2007-08. This $1.3-billion program was meant to allocate funds to the provinces so that they could deal in their own way with the major concerns associated with climate change and reduce their greenhouse gas emissions. That is a fine example of how we want to help people.
Jean Charest was premier of Quebec at the time. We provided $300 million to help Quebec implement its GHG emissions reduction plan. Mr. Harper and Mr. Charest gave a joint press conference, and even Mr. Guilbeault from Greenpeace said that the Canada ecotrust was a significant, important program.
We did the same thing for Ontario, British Columbia and all the other provinces that wanted to join the ecotrust. It is very likely that the program allowed the Government of Ontario to implement its own program and close its coal-fired power plants.
As a result, under the Harper government, GHG emissions in Canada dropped by 2.2%. It bears repeating, since that is the approach we will adopt with our current leader, the hon. member for Regina—Qu'Appelle. In a few weeks, we will announce our environmental plan, which has been keenly anticipated by all Canadians, and especially by the Liberal government. It will be a serious plan. It will include environmental targets that will allow Canada and Canadians to excel in the fight against climate change. In particular, we will maintain our sound approach, which is to help the provinces. By contrast, the government prefers to start constitutional squabbles with them by imposing taxes on Canadians, overstepping its jurisdiction in the process, since environmental matters fall under provincial jurisdiction.
I would like to use Quebec as an example, as my colleague from Louis-Saint-Laurent did this morning. I have here a report on Quebec's inventory of greenhouse gas emissions in 2016 and their evolution since 1990. It was tabled by the new CAQ government last November, and it is very interesting. In 2016, greenhouse gas emissions increased in Quebec, despite the fact that the carbon exchange made its debut in 2013. That is ironic. Despite the implementation of a fuel tax to cut down on fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions, emissions actually went up.
The same report also indicates that between 1990 and 2015, greenhouse gas emissions in Quebec decreased even though the carbon exchange had not been fully implemented. The conclusion explains how this happened:
The decrease in GHG emissions from 1990 to 2016 is mainly due to the industrial sector. The decrease observed in this sector resulted from technical improvements in certain processes, increased energy efficiency and the substitution of certain fuels.
That is exactly what we, the Conservatives, want to do. Instead of imposing a new tax on Canadians, we want to maintain a decentralized federal approach. We want to help the provinces adopt greener energy sources to stimulate even greener economic growth and the deindustrialization of certain sectors, create new technologies and increase innovation in the Canadian economy. That is the objective of a Conservative approach to the environment.
The objective of the Conservative approach to the environment is not to come down hard on the provinces and impose new taxes on Canadians. As we saw with Quebec, that did not have the desired effect. Our objective is to provide assistance while ensuring that our oil industry can grow in a healthy way. That is what Norway did. If I had 10 more minutes, I could talk more about that wonderful country, which has increased its oil production and exports and is one of the fairest and greenest countries in the world.
Monsieur le Président, comme toujours, je suis très honoré de prendre la parole à la Chambre. J'aimerais dire bonjour à tous les citoyens et citoyennes de Beauport—Limoilou qui nous écoutent en grand nombre actuellement. Je les ai rencontrés la fin de semaine dernière, que ce soit au Grand bazar du Vieux-Limoilou, au Patro Roc-Amadour ou au 52e Salon de Mai, qui a eu lieu aux Promenades Beauport. Félicitations aux organisateurs!
J'aimerais également souligner le fait que nous ressentons tous une grande tristesse à l'égard de notre collègue de Langley—Aldergrove, qui combat un cancer très important. Il vient de faire un discours percutant qui nous a rappelé à quel point la vie est fragile. J'ai moi-même contacté ma femme et mes enfants pour leur dire que je les aimais. La mort nous guette tous, un jour ou l'autre. Notre collègue a prononcé un discours très poignant à cet égard. Je le remercie pour toutes ses années de service envers le Canada et la Chambre des communes, et pour toutes les années futures au cours desquelles il pourra s'investir dans sa communauté.
Avant de parler de la motion actuelle, qui a été mise en avant par le Parti conservateur, j'aimerais rapidement revenir sur les propos de Mike Pompeo, le secrétaire d'État américain. Hier, lors d'une réunion du Conseil de l'Arctique en Finlande, il a osé dire que la revendication de la souveraineté canadienne sur le passage du Nord-Ouest était illégitime. Il nous a même comparés à la Russie et à la Chine, en faisant référence à leurs comportements et aux annexions de territoires, comme on a vu la Russie le faire en Ukraine. Personnellement, j'ai trouvé cela honteux.
J'aimerais rappeler à l'administration américaine que nous sommes leurs alliés depuis très longtemps. Une entente a été établie entre le président Reagan et le premier ministre Mulroney. Une convention avait été signée et elle stipulait que le passage du Nord-Ouest était bel et bien sous la souveraineté canadienne. Au XIXe siècle, on a fait plusieurs expéditions et explorations soutenues par la Couronne britannique, ce qui fait que la souveraineté canadienne dans le passage du Nord-Ouest et dans l'archipel Arctique est tout à fait légitime.
Nous discutons aujourd'hui de l'importance de l'industrie pétrolière et de l'importance des changements climatiques. Ce sont deux enjeux qui vont de pair. Ce sont deux choses qui sont structurantes aujourd'hui et qui vont demeurer comme telles. Bien entendu, je crois que l'environnement est extrêmement important, et ce l'est aussi pour tous les conservateurs et pour tous les citoyens du Canada. Je me rappelle avoir participé, dès mon jeune âge, à des ramassages de bouteilles et de cannettes de toutes sortes aux abords des routes et des autoroutes. Je faisais souvent cela avec mon père; il est un exemple pour moi à cet égard. Tout au long de ma vie, j'ai toujours voulu faire partie d'organisations communautaires où les gens ramassent les déchets.
Je suis également très fier du bilan de la majorité des gouvernements canadiens en matière d'environnement. Ils ont toujours voulu répondre aux attentes des Canadiens pour qui l'environnement est important. Les libéraux tentent, la plupart du temps, de dépeindre les conservateurs comme étant un groupe anti-environnement. Je peux assurer à mes collègues que je n'ai jamais perçu cela en côtoyant mes collègues du Parti conservateur. Bien au contraire, sous M. Harper, on a pris des mesures très intéressantes qui nous ont permis de faire baisser les émissions de gaz à effet de serre au Canada de 2,2 % entre 2006 et 2015. J'en reparlerai plus tard.
En fait, il y a deux approches proposées dans le débat actuel sur les changements climatiques. C'est vrai pour plusieurs pays occidentaux. Je parle des pays occidentaux parce que ce sont ces pays qui sont concernés, vu que notre ère industrielle est bien installée depuis deux siècles. Il y a des industries qui polluent de manière assez substantielle depuis longtemps. Nous sommes arrivés à un moment de notre histoire où nous avons pris acte du fait que l'humain, en raison de son apport de gaz à effet de serre dans le monde, a un rôle très important dans les changements climatiques.
Oui, il faut agir, mais il y a deux approches. Une de ces approches provient du Parti libéral. Elle vise à taxer davantage les Canadiens. En fait, les libéraux tentent de mettre sur les épaules des Canadiens le poids d'en arriver à une baisse des émissions de gaz à effet de serre au Canada. L'approche que privilégient les conservateurs n'est pas de créer une nouvelle taxe ou de taxer davantage l'essence que les Canadiens mettent à la pompe tous les jours pour aller au travail en voiture.
Notre approche vise plutôt à aider les Canadiens dans leur vie de tous les jours et à aider les provinces à mettre en oeuvre leurs plans environnementaux respectifs.
À titre d'exemple, j'aime toujours rappeler aux Canadiens et aux Canadiennes qui nous écoutent et à tous les écologistes qu'en 2007-2008, nous avons mis en place l'ÉcoFiducie. Ce programme d'environ 1,3 milliard de dollars visait à envoyer des enveloppes budgétaires à toutes les provinces pour qu'elles puissent répondre, chacune à leur façon, aux grandes préoccupations liées aux changements climatiques et diminuer leurs émissions de gaz à effet de serre. Voilà un bel exemple qui démontre que nous voulons aider les gens.
À l'époque, le premier ministre du Québec était M. Charest. Nous avions octroyé une enveloppe budgétaire de 300 millions de dollars au Québec pour l'aider à mettre en oeuvre son plan de diminution des GES. Il y avait eu une conférence de presse conjointe avec M. Harper et M. Charest, et même M. Guilbeault, de Greenpeace, avait dit que l'ÉcoFiducie était un programme substantiel et important.
Nous avons fait la même chose pour l'Ontario, la Colombie-Britannique et toutes les provinces qui voulaient souscrire à l'ÉcoFiducie. Il est fort probable que ce programme ait permis au gouvernement de l'Ontario de mettre en place son propre programme. Il a d'ailleurs eu la possibilité de fermer des centrales électriques au charbon.
Grâce à tout cela, sous le gouvernement de M. Harper, les GES ont diminué de 2,2 % au Canada. Il faut le répéter, puisque c'est l'approche que nous adopterons avec notre chef, le député de Regina—Qu'Appelle. Dans quelques semaines, nous allons annoncer notre plan environnemental, qui est très attendu par tous les Canadiens et, surtout, par le gouvernement libéral. Notre plan sera très sérieux. Il comprendra des cibles environnementales visant à ce que le Canada et les Canadiens excellent en matière de lutte contre les changements climatiques. Surtout, nous allons maintenir notre approche saine qui consiste à aider les provinces plutôt qu'à commencer des bagarres constitutionnelles avec celles-ci en imposant aux Canadiens des taxes, ce qui va à l'encontre du partage des champs de compétence, puisque les questions environnementales relèvent des provinces.
J'aimerais prendre l'exemple du Québec, comme mon collègue de Louis-Saint-Laurent l'a fait ce matin. J'ai entre les mains un rapport qui s'intitule « Inventaire québécois des émissions de gaz à effet de serre en 2016 et leur évolution depuis 1990 ». Celui-ci a été déposé par le nouveau gouvernement de la CAQ en novembre dernier, et il est fort intéressant. En 2016, les émissions de gaz à effet de serre ont augmenté au Québec. Pourtant, la bourse du carbone a été instaurée en 2013 au Québec. C'est paradoxal. Malgré la mise en place d'une taxe sur l'essence pour réduire la consommation d'essence et les émissions de gaz à effet de serre, celles-ci ont augmenté.
Le même rapport indique aussi qu'entre 1990 et 2015, les émissions de gaz à effet de serre au Québec ont diminué, alors qu'il n'y avait pas de bourse du carbone totalement en vigueur. Dans la conclusion, on nous explique pourquoi:
La diminution des émissions de GES de 1990 à 2016 est principalement attribuable au secteur industriel. La baisse observée dans ce secteur provient de l'amélioration technique de certains procédés, de l'amélioration de l'efficacité énergétique et de la substitution de certains combustibles. 
C'est exactement ce vers quoi nous, les conservateurs, voulons tendre. Au lieu d'imposer une nouvelle taxe aux Canadiens, nous voulons maintenir une approche fédérale décentralisatrice. Nous voulons octroyer de l'aide aux provinces, que ce soit pour aller vers des énergies plus vertes, pour stimuler une croissance économique plus verte, pour stimuler la désindustrialisation de certains secteurs, pour créer de nouvelles technologies ou pour faire croître l'innovation dans l'économie canadienne. Voilà l'objectif d'une approche conservatrice en environnement.
L'objectif d'une approche conservatrice en environnement n'est pas de taper sur les provinces et d'imposer de nouvelles taxes aux Canadiens. Comme on l'a vu dans le cas du Québec, cela n'a pas eu l'effet escompté. Notre objectif est d'apporter de l'aide, tout en faisant en sorte que notre industrie pétrolière puisse croître de manière saine. C'est ce que fait la Norvège, d'ailleurs. Si j'avais eu 10 minutes de plus, j'aurais pu parler davantage de ce merveilleux pays, qui, tout en augmentant sa production et son exportation de pétrole, est l'une des sociétés les plus équitables et les plus vertes au monde.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-05-07 16:21 [p.27532]
Mr. Speaker, I thank my colleague from Châteauguay—Lacolle for her question. I sat with her on the Standing Committee on Government Operations and Estimates. I have a great deal of respect for her.
Yes, the carbon exchange is a market-based approach. However, as we have seen, Quebec has not achieved the desired results. The purpose of the Canada ecotrust program created under Mr. Harper was to give the provinces a budget and allow them to come up with their own plans to tackle climate change. Canada's greenhouse gas emissions then dropped by 2.2%, a concrete and historic reduction.
What I find unfortunate is that the carbon tax is currently priced at $20 a tonne. It will go up to $50 a tonne by 2020. It seems likely that the Liberals will want to raise it even further if they stay in power in a few months.
What is even more unfortunate is that this tax will not apply to Canada's major emitters, big industries like cement, concrete and coal. They will pay only 8% of the total revenue from the carbon tax, while families and small businesses will have to pay the remaining 92%.
It has been said that it will not apply in Quebec because Quebec already has a carbon tax. However, as we have seen in recent weeks, the price of gas has gone up across Canada, including in Quebec and British Columbia, which already have carbon exchanges.
Monsieur le Président, je remercie de sa question ma collègue de Châteauguay—Lacolle, avec qui j'ai siégé au Comité permanent des opérations gouvernementales et des prévisions budgétaires. J'ai beaucoup de respect pour elle.
Effectivement, la bourse du carbone est une approche du marché. Par contre, on a vu que, au Québec, cela n'a pas donné le résultat escompté, justement. Le programme Éco-Fiducie Canada, créé sous M. Harper, avait pour objectif de permettre aux provinces d'avoir des enveloppes budgétaires et de mettre en avant elles-mêmes leurs propres plans pour répondre aux changements climatiques. On a alors remarqué au Canada une baisse réelle et historique des GES de 2,2 %.
Ce que je trouve dommage, c'est que, actuellement, la taxe sur le carbone est de 20 $ la tonne. Elle va atteindre 50 $ la tonne d'ici 2022. On peut penser que les libéraux voudront fort probablement l'augmenter encore une fois s'ils gardent le pouvoir dans quelques mois.
Ce qui est encore plus malheureux, c'est que les grands émetteurs, les grandes industries de ciment, de béton et de charbon au Canada ne seront pas touchées par cette taxe. Elles ne paieront que 8 % des revenus totaux découlant de la taxe sur le carbone, alors que les familles et les petites entreprises devront payer 92 % de l'augmentation relative à cette taxe.
On disait que cela ne s'appliquerait pas au Québec parce qu'il a déjà une taxe sur le carbone. Or on a vu, au cours des dernières semaines, que les prix de l'essence ont augmenté dans tout le Canada, incluant le Québec et la Colombie-Britannique, qui ont déjà des bourses sur le carbone.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-05-07 16:24 [p.27533]
Mr. Speaker, what my colleague said about energy east is totally false. Energy east is dead and buried. However, he did say that the commissioner of the environment suggested the results might be due to the provinces' efforts. That is exactly how the Conservatives want to approach this. We think the provinces are in the best position to set standards for their industrial sectors and make appropriate changes based on their population, their industries and the environment.
That is exactly what we did. Under the ecotrust program, we transferred funds to the provinces so they could finance certain portions of their climate change programs. My colleague was right when he said the provinces did the work, but it is important to acknowledge that the federal government helped by doing exactly what the founding fathers intended back in 1867.
Monsieur le Président, ce que mon collègue a dit au sujet d'Énergie Est est totalement faux. Énergie Est est mort et n'existera plus jamais. Par contre, il a dit que la commissaire à l’environnement avait suggéré que les résultats étaient attribuables aux efforts des provinces. Or c'est justement cela, l'approche des conservateurs. Nous estimons que les provinces sont les mieux placées pour baliser leur secteur industriel et faire les changements adéquats en ce qui concerne leur population, leurs industries et le secteur environnemental.
C’est exactement ce que nous avons fait. Au moyen du programme ÉcoFiducie, nous avons alloué des enveloppes aux provinces leur permettant de financer, à certains taux, leurs programmes de lutte contre les changements climatiques. Mon collègue a donc raison lorsqu'il dit que ce sont les provinces qui ont fait des efforts, mais il faut aussi reconnaître la belle collaboration du fédéral, qui a agi comme l'auraient voulu les pères fondateurs de 1867.
Results: 1 - 3 of 3