Interventions in the House of Commons
 
 
 
RSS feed based on search criteria Export search results - CSV (plain text) Export search results - XML
Add search criteria
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-04-29 13:29 [p.27093]
Mr. Speaker, the Liberal government has no climate change plan. It has a taxation plan. That is exactly what it is doing.
On the reverse side, under Stephen Harper, a great and honourable Canadian, we had the ecoENERGY efficiency initiative. All the young guys listening to us should google that right now, please. The ecoENERGY efficiency initiative in 2007 was even recognized by Steven Guilbeault, a great ecologist in Canada.
The ecoENERGY efficiency initiative was a decentralized way of doing things in Canada to make sure that we were strong on the climate change problem in the world. For example, there was an envelope of $1.3 billion that was divided among the provinces. About $300 million or $400 million was sent to Quebec at the time, to the Charest government, which used this money to put forward the province's ecological plan. At the same time, there were other projects in Ontario that received money from the ecoENERGY efficiency initiative.
All that put together gave us one important result that Canadians should remember every single day: There was a reduction of carbon dioxide in Canada of 2.2% under the great leadership of the Conservative Party from 2006 to 2015.
We did not do that by taxing more Canadians; we did it through decentralization and through respect for federalism.
Monsieur le Président, le gouvernement libéral n'a aucun plan de lutte contre les changements climatiques. Il a un plan visant à imposer les Canadiens, et c'est exactement ce qu'il fait.
À l'inverse, les conservateurs de Stephen Harper, un grand et honorable Canadien, ont mis en oeuvre l'Initiative écoÉNERGIE sur l'efficacité énergétique. J'invite tous les jeunes qui sont à l'écoute à faire une petite recherche Google à ce sujet. Cette initiative, qui a été lancée en 2007, a même reçu le sceau d'approbation de Steven Guilbeault, un éminent écologiste canadien.
L'Initiative écoÉNERGIE sur l'efficacité énergétique était une mesure décentralisée au Canada pour veiller à ce que nous puissions nous attaquer sérieusement au problème des changements climatiques dans le monde. Par exemple, les provinces se partageaient une enveloppe de 1,3 milliard de dollars. À ce moment-là, environ 300 ou 400 millions de dollars avaient été envoyés à Québec, au gouvernement Charest, qui s'est servi de cet argent pour mettre en oeuvre le plan écologique du Québec. Au cours de la même période, l'Initiative écoÉNERGIE sur l'efficacité énergétique a permis d'accorder une aide financière à d'autres projets en Ontario.
Toutes ces mesures réunies ont permis d'atteindre un résultat dont les Canadiens devraient se souvenir chaque jour: il y a eu une réduction de 2,2 % des émissions de dioxyde de carbone au Canada de 2006 à 2015, sous l'excellente gouverne des conservateurs.
Ce n'est pas en augmentant les impôts des Canadiens que nous y sommes parvenus. Nous y sommes parvenus au moyen de la décentralisation et dans le respect du fédéralisme.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-05-30 20:38 [p.19928]
Mr. Speaker, I really appreciated the speech by my colleague from Calgary Shepard, who adroitly set out to deconstruct that worn-out Liberal platitude about the environment and the economy going hand in had. It is patently obvious that they do, because we human beings come from the environment, our resources come from the environment, and the economy comes from the environment.
The economy is both a process and a product of the environment we live in. The resources we export, such as oil, are natural resources that come from the environment. The Liberals' platitude is purely political PR.
As I recall, under the Conservative government, we did not sweet-talk anyone. We took concrete action that produced excellent results. For example, we reduced Canada's greenhouse gas emissions by 2% while we grew the GDP by 16%.
I would like the member for Calgary Shepard to tell us more about the strides our government made on both the environmental and economic fronts.
Monsieur le Président, j'apprécie énormément le discours de mon collègue de Calgary Shepard qui, avec justesse, a voulu déconstruire la métaphore que les libéraux utilisent jour après jour en disant que l'environnement et l'économie vont de pair. Toutefois, c'est l'évidence même, parce que nous-mêmes, les êtres humains, sommes issus de l'environnement, nos ressources proviennent de l'environnement et l'économie est issue de l'environnement.
L'économie est un processus et un produit de l'environnement dans lequel on vit. Les ressources qu'on exporte, par exemple, le pétrole, sont des ressources naturelles qui proviennent de l'environnement. Bref c'est une métaphore démagogique et politique.
Je me rappelle quand même que sous le gouvernement conservateur, sans avoir un discours édulcoré, nous posions des actions tangibles qui ont donné des résultats fort intéressants. Par exemple, nous avons réduit de 2 % les émissions de gaz à effet de serre au Canada, tout en augmentant le PIB de 16 %.
J'aimerais que le collègue de Calgary Shepard parle un peu des progrès réalisés sous notre gouvernement sur le plan de l'environnement et de l'économie.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-05-04 12:42 [p.19136]
Mr. Speaker, it is always an honour to speak in the House of Commons.
On a more serious note, I would like to take a moment to talk about my colleague from Leeds—Grenville—Thousand Islands and Rideau Lakes, who passed away very suddenly this week. I never imagined this could happen. I share his family's sorrow, though of course mine could never equal theirs. His young children will not get to share amazing moments in their lives with their father, and that is staggeringly sad. I would therefore like to publicly state that I encourage them to hang in there. One day, they will surely find joy in living again, and we are here for them.
As usual, I want to say acknowledge all of the residents of Beauport—Limoilou who are tuning in. I would like to let them know that there will be a press conference Monday morning at my office. I will be announcing a very important initiative for our riding. I urge them to watch the news or read the paper when the time comes.
Bill C-48 would essentially enact a moratorium on the entire Pacific coast. It would apply from Prince Rupert, a fascinating city that I visited in 2004 at the age of 18, to Port Hardy, at the northern tip of Vancouver Island. This moratorium is designed to prevent oil tankers, including Canadian ones, that transport more than 12,500 tons of oil from accessing Canada's inland waters, and therefore our ports.
This moratorium will prohibit the construction of any pipeline project or maritime port beyond Port Hardy, on the northern tip of Vancouver Island, to export our products to the west. In the past three weeks, the Liberal government has slowly but surely been trying to put an end to Canada's natural resources, and oil in particular. Northern Gateway is just one example.
The first thing the Liberals did when they came to power was to amend the environmental assessment process managed by the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency; they even brag about it. Northern Gateway was in the process of being accepted, but as a result of these amendments, the project was cancelled, even though the amendments were based on the cabinet's political agenda and not on scientific facts, as the Liberal government claims.
When I look at Bill C-48, which would enact a moratorium on oil tankers in western Canada, it seems clear to me that the Liberals had surely been planning to block the Northern Gateway project for a while. Their argument that the project did not clear the environmental assessment is invalid, since they are now imposing a moratorium that would have prevented this project from moving forward regardless.
The Prime Minister and member for Papineau has said Canada needs to phase out the oil sands. Not only did he say that during the campaign, but he said it again in Paris, before the French National Assembly, in front of about 300 members of the Macron government, who were all happy to hear it. I can guarantee my colleagues that Canadians were not happy to hear that, especially people living in Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta who benefit economically from this natural resource. Through their hard work, all Canadians benefit from the incredible revenues and spinoffs generated by that industry.
My colleague from Prince Albert gave an exceptional speech this morning. He compassionately explained how hard it has been for families in Saskatchewan to accept and understand the decisions being made one after the other by this Liberal government. The government seems to be sending a message that is crystal clear: it does not support western Canada's natural resources, namely oil and natural gas. What is important to understand, however, is that this sector represents roughly 60% the economy of the western provinces and 40% of Canada's entire economy.
I can see why the Minister of Environment and Climate Change says we need to tackle climate change first. The way she talks to us every day is so arrogant. We believe in climate change. That is not the issue. Climate change and natural resources are complex issues, and we must not forget the backdrop to this whole debate. People are suffering because they need to put food on the table. Nothing has changed since the days of Cro-Magnon man. People have to eat every day. People have to find ways to survive.
When the Liberals go on about how to save the planet and the polar bears, that is their post-modern, post-materialist ideology talking. Conservatives, in contrast, talk about how to help families get through the day. That is what the Canadian government's true priority should be.
Is it not completely absurd that even now, in 2018, most of the gas people buy in the Atlantic provinces, Quebec, and Ontario comes from Venezuela and Saudi Arabia even though we have one of the largest oil reserves in the world? Canada has the third-largest oil reserve in the world, in fact. That is not even counting the Arctic Ocean, of which we own a sizeable chunk and which has not yet been explored. Canada has tremendous potential in this sector.
As I have often told many of my Marxist-Leninist, leftist, and other colleagues, the price of oil is going to continue to rise dramatically until 2065 because of China's and India's fuel consumption. Should Canada say no to $1 trillion in economic spinoffs until then? Absolutely not.
How will we afford to pay for our hospitals, our schools, and our social services that are so dear to the left-wing advocates of the welfare state in Canada? As I said, the priority is to meet the needs of Canadians and Canada, a middle power that I adore.
To get back to the point I was making, as my colleague from Prince Albert said, the decision regarding Bill C-48 and the moratorium was made by cabinet, without any consultation or any study by a parliamentary committee. Day after day, the Liberals brag about being the government that has consulted more with Canadians over the past three years than any government in history. It is always about history with them.
The moratorium will have serious consequences for Canada's prosperity and the economic development of the western provinces, which represent a growing segment of the population. How can the Liberals justify the fact that they failed to conduct any environmental or scientific impact assessments, hold any Canada-wide consultations, or have a committee examine this issue? They did not even consult with the nine indigenous nations that live on the land covered by the moratorium. The NDP ought to be alarmed about that. That is the point I really want to talk about.
I have here a legal complaint filed with the B.C. Supreme Court by the Lax Kw'alaams first nation—I am sorry if I pronounced that wrong—represented by John Helin. The plaintiffs are the indigenous peoples living in the region covered by the moratorium. Only nine indigenous nations from that region are among the plaintiffs. The defendant is the Government of British Columbia.
The lawyer's argument is very interesting from a historical perspective.
The claim area includes and is adjacent to an open and safe deepwater shipping corridor and contains lands suitable for development as an energy corridor and protected deepwater ports for the development and operation of a maritime installation, as defined in Bill C-48, the oil tanker moratorium act.
“The plaintiffs' aboriginal title encompasses the right to choose to what uses the land can be put, including use as a marine installation subject only to justifiable environmental assessment and approval legislation.”
He continues:
The said action by Canada “discriminates against the plaintiffs by prohibiting the development of land...in an area that has one of the best deepwater ports and safest waterways in Canada, while permitting such development elsewhere”, such as in the St. Lawrence Gulf, the St. Lawrence River, and the Atlantic Ocean.
My point is quite simple. We have a legal argument here that shows that not only does the territory belong to the indigenous people and the indigenous people were not consulted, but that the indigenous people, whom the Liberals are said to love, are suing the Government of British Columbia. This will likely go all the way to the Supreme Court because this moratorium goes against their ancestral rights on their territory, which they want to develop for future oil exports. This government is doing a very poor job of this.
Monsieur le Président, c'est toujours un honneur de prendre la parole à la Chambre.
Sur un ton plus serein, j'aimerais prendre le temps de parler de mon collègue de Leeds—Grenville—Thousand Islands et Rideau Lakes, qui est mort cette semaine d'une façon extrêmement subite. Jamais je n'aurais cru que cela pourrait arriver. Je partage la tristesse de sa famille, même si la mienne ne peut être aussi profonde, bien sûr. Ses jeunes enfants ne pourront pas partager des moments incroyables de leur vie avec leur père, et c'est d'une tristesse ahurissante. Je voudrais donc dire publiquement que je les encourage à persévérer. Un jour, ils vont sûrement retrouver le goût de vivre, et nous sommes là pour les soutenir.
Comme d'habitude, j'aimerais saluer tous les citoyens de Beauport—Limoilou qui nous écoutent en grand nombre. Je voudrais leur dire que, lundi matin, il y aura une conférence de presse à mon bureau. J'y annoncerai une initiative très importante pour la circonscription. Je les invite donc à écouter la télévision et à lire les journaux au moment opportun.
Le projet de loi C-48 vise à appliquer un moratoire, ni plus ni moins, sur l'ensemble de la côte pacifique. Il s'appliquera de Prince Rupert, une ville intéressante que j'ai visitée en 2004, quand j'avais 18 ans, jusqu'à Port Hardy, au nord de l'île de Vancouver. Ce moratoire vise à empêcher tous les pétroliers de ce monde, y compris les pétroliers canadiens qui transportent au-delà de 12 500 tonnes de pétrole, d'accéder aux eaux intérieures et donc aux ports du Canada.
Ce moratoire empêchera la construction, au-delà de la ville de Port Hardy, au nord de l'île de Vancouver, de tout projet d'oléoduc ou de port maritime pour exporter nos produits vers l'Ouest. Depuis les trois dernières années, le gouvernement libéral tente de mettre fin, lentement mais sûrement, aux ressources naturelles canadiennes, s'agissant particulièrement du pétrole. On n'a qu'à penser au projet Northern Gateway.
La première chose que les libéraux ont faite lorsqu'ils sont arrivés au pouvoir — et ils s'en vantent — a été de modifier les processus d'évaluation environnementale régis par l'Agence canadienne d'évaluation environnementale, qui se penche sur les projets énergétiques au Canada. Northern Gateway était en voie d'être accepté, mais à cause de ces modifications, qui n'étaient pas basées sur des faits scientifiques, comme le gouvernement libéral le dit toujours, mais plutôt sur des visées politiques du Cabinet, il a été annulé.
Quand je regarde le projet de loi C-48, qui vise à établir un moratoire sur les pétroliers dans l'Ouest canadien, je me dis que les libéraux songeaient assurément depuis longtemps à barrer la route au projet Northern Gateway. Leur argument selon lequel celui-ci n'a pas passé le test de l'évaluation environnementale est caduc, puisqu'ils imposent maintenant un moratoire qui aurait empêché ce projet de voir le jour de toute manière.
Le premier ministre et député de Papineau a dit qu'il fallait éliminer progressivement les sables bitumineux. Non seulement il l'a dit lors des élections, mais il l'a redit à Paris, à l'Assemblée nationale française, devant environ 300 membres de la députation du président Macron, qui étaient bien contents de l'entendre. Je peux garantir à mes collègues que les Canadiens n'étaient pas contents de l'entendre, encore moins ceux qui vivent au Manitoba, en Saskatchewan et en Alberta et qui bénéficient des retombées des ressources naturelles du pétrole. Grâce à leur travail, tous les Canadiens bénéficient des redevances et des retombées incroyables liées à cette industrie.
Mon collègue de la circonscription de Prince Albert a fait un discours remarquable, ce matin. Il a expliqué avec compassion combien il était difficile pour les familles de la Saskatchewan d'accepter et de comprendre les décisions prises l'une après l'autre par le gouvernement libéral. Ce dernier semble envoyer un message clair comme de l'eau de roche: il est contre les ressources naturelles du pétrole et du gaz naturel dans l'Ouest canadien. Toutefois, ce qu'il faut comprendre, c'est que cela correspond à environ 60 % de l'économie des provinces de l'Ouest et à 40 % de l'économie du Canada dans son entièreté.
Je peux bien comprendre que la ministre de l'Environnement et du Changement climatique dit qu'il faut d'abord s'attaquer aux changements climatiques. D'ailleurs, jour après jour, la manière dont elle nous parle est tellement arrogante, parce que nous croyons aux changements climatiques, là n'est pas la question. Les changements climatiques et les ressources naturelles sont des enjeux complexes, et il ne faut jamais oublier qu'au coeur de ce litige des individus souffrent, car ils doivent mettre de la nourriture sur la table. Rien n'a changé depuis le temps de l'homme de Cro-Magnon: il faut manger tous les jours. C'est vrai, il faut vivre.
Les libéraux sont toujours dans une idéologie postmoderne, postmatérialiste où ils nous parlent de comment sauver la planète et les ours polaires. Cependant, nous, les conservateurs, parlons de comment faire en sorte qu'une famille puisse vivre sa journée. C'est cela qui est la vraie priorité d'un gouvernement canadien.
En outre, n'est-ce pas une absurdité totale de penser qu'encore aujourd'hui, en 2018, la majorité du pétrole consommé dans les provinces de l'Atlantique, ainsi qu'au Québec et en Ontario, provient du Venezuela et de l'Arabie saoudite, alors que nous avons parmi les plus grandes réserves de pétrole au monde? En effet, le Canada possède la troisième plus grande réserve de pétrole du monde. Et cela, c'est sans compter l'océan Arctique, dont nous possédons une bonne partie, et qui n'a pas encore été exploré. Le Canada a donc un énorme potentiel dans ce domaine.
Comme je le dis souvent à plusieurs de mes collègues marxistes-léninistes, gauchistes et autres, le prix du pétrole va continuer à augmenter de façon spectaculaire à cause de la consommation chinoise et indienne, jusqu'en 2065. Est-ce que le Canada devrait dire non à 1 000 milliards de dollars en retombées économiques d'ici 2065? Absolument pas.
Comment allons-nous payer nos hôpitaux, nos écoles et nos services sociaux qui sont si chers aux pourfendeurs de l'État providence de la gauche canadienne? Comme je l'ai dit, la priorité est de subvenir aux besoins des Canadiens et du Canada, en tant que puissance moyenne que j'adore.
Je dois absolument arriver au point dont je veux parler. Comme mon collègue de Prince Albert l'a dit, la décision concernant le projet de loi C-48 et le moratoire a été prise au Cabinet, sans consultation et sans étude par un comité parlementaire. Jour après jour, les libéraux se targuent d'être le gouvernement qui, dans l'histoire du Canada — c'est toujours historique avec eux —, a consulté le plus les Canadiens au cours des trois dernières années.
Le moratoire aura des conséquences draconiennes sur la prospérité du Canada et sur l'évolution économique des provinces de l'Ouest qui représentent de plus en plus une partie importante de la population canadienne. Comment les libéraux peuvent-ils justifier n'avoir fait aucune étude environnementale ou sur l'impact scientifique possible, aucune consultation pancanadienne et aucune étude par un comité? Ils n'ont même pas consulté les neuf nations autochtones qui vivent sur les territoires visés par le moratoire. Le NPD devrait s'alarmer de cela. C'est justement à cela que je veux arriver.
J'ai entre les mains une plainte légale déposée à la Cour suprême de la Colombie-Britannique par la Première Nation Lax Kw'alaams —  je m'excuse de la prononciation —, représentée par John Helin. Les plaintifs sont les Autochtones de la région où le moratoire s'applique. Seulement neuf des nations autochtones de cette région font partie des plaintifs. Le défendeur est le gouvernement de la Colombie-Britannique.
Ce que l'avocat démontre est fort intéressant d'un point de vue historique:
« La zone revendiquée comprend un couloir de navigation en eaux profondes ouvert et sûr et y est adjacente, et couvre des terres convenant à la mise en valeur d'un couloir de transport de l'énergie, ainsi que de ports en eaux profondes protégés pour la mise en valeur et l'exploitation d'une installation maritime telle que définie dans le projet de loi C-48, Loi sur le moratoire relatif aux pétroliers. »
« Le titre ancestral du plaignant comprend le droit de déterminer l'utilisation des terres, y compris pour y construire une installation maritime sujette à une évaluation environnementale justifiable et aux lois sur l'approbation. »
Il continue:
Ladite action intentée par le Canada « est discriminatoire à l'égard des plaignants en interdisant la mise en valeur des terres [...] dans une région où se trouvent l'un des meilleurs ports en eaux profondes et l'une des routes maritimes les plus sûres au Canada, tout en permettant la même mise en valeur ailleurs », comme dans le golfe du Saint-Laurent, le fleuve Saint-Laurent et l'océan Atlantique.
Mon argument est très simple. On a ici un argument légal: non seulement le territoire appartient au peuple autochtone et celui-ci n'a pas été consulté, mais les Autochtones, que les libéraux sont censés adorer, vont poursuivre le gouvernement de la Colombie-Britannique. Cela ira certainement jusqu'en Cour suprême, car le moratoire va à l'encontre de leurs droits ancestraux sur le territoire, alors qu'ils veulent exploiter celui-ci pour d'éventuelles exportations pétrolières. C'est un très mauvais travail de la part de ce gouvernement.
Results: 1 - 3 of 3