Interventions in the House of Commons
 
 
 
RSS feed based on search criteria Export search results - CSV (plain text) Export search results - XML
Add search criteria
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-04-29 13:17 [p.27091]
Mr. Speaker, I am very pleased to rise today to speak to the NDP motion. I would first like to say hello to the many people of Beauport—Limoilou who are watching us live or who will watch later on social media.
I just spent two weeks in my riding, where I met thousands of my constituents at events and activities organized by different organizations. Last Thursday, the Corporation de développement communautaire de Beauport, or CDCB, held a unique and innovative event. For the first time, all elected municipal, provincial and federal officials in the riding attended a breakfast meet and greet for constituents and representatives of organizations. It was a type of round table with elected members from all levels of government. It was an exemplary exercise in good democratic practices for our country. We had some great conversations. I would like to congratulate the CDCB for this very interesting event, which I hope will become an annual tradition.
I also want to mention that my beautiful Quebec is experiencing serious flooding across the province. When I left Quebec City this morning around six  o'clock I could see damage all along the road between Trois-Rivières and Montreal and in the Maskinongé area. There is always a little water there in the spring, but there is a lot of water this year. When I got to the Gatineau-Ottawa area I saw houses flooded. Nearly 8,000 people, men, women and families, have been displaced. These are tough times, and I want them to know that my heart is with them. I wish them much strength. I am pleased to see that the Government of Quebec has announced assistance, as has the federal government, of course.
The NDP's motion is an interesting one. It addresses the fact that the current Prime Minister of Canada tried to influence the course of justice a couple of ways, in particular with the SNC-Lavalin matter, which has had a lot of media coverage in the past three months.
The NDP also raised the issue of drug prices. Conservatives know that, in NAFTA 2.0, which has not yet been ratified by any of the countries involved, the Liberals sadly gave in to pressure from President Trump to extend drug patents. If the agreement is ratified, Canadians will pay more for prescription drugs. People are also wondering when the Liberals will initiate serious talks about the steel and aluminum tariffs and when they will bring NAFTA ratification to the House for debate.
The NDP motion also mentions Loblaws' lobbying activities. People thought it was some kind of joke. They could not believe their eyes or their ears. The government gave Loblaws, a super-rich company, $12 million to replace its fridges. The mind boggles.
The NDP also talks about banking practices in Canada. Conservatives know that banks are important, but we think some of them, especially those run by the government, are unnecessary. As NDP members often point out, for good reason, the Canada Infrastructure Bank is designed to help big interest groups, but Canadians should not have to finance private infrastructure projects.
We could also talk about the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank, which is totally ridiculous. Canada sends nearly $250 million offshore to finance infrastructure projects, when right here at home, the federal government's $187-billion infrastructure plan is barely functioning. Over the past three years, only $14 billion of that $187 billion has been spent. It is deplorable, considering how great the needs are in that area. The issue of banking practices mentioned in the NDP's motion is therefore interesting to me.
Another thing that really bothers me as a citizen is tax evasion. Combatting tax evasion should really begin with education in our schools. Unfortunately, that is more of a provincial responsibility. We need to put patriotism back on the agenda. Many wealthy Canadians shamelessly and unscrupulously evade taxes because they have no sense of patriotism. They have no love for their country.
Schools and people in positions of authority should have instilled this notion at a very young age by teaching them that patriotism includes making sure that Canadian money stays in Canada for Canadians, for our social programs, our companies, our roads and our communities.
In my opinion, a lack of love for one's country is one of the main causes of tax evasion. Young people must be taught that they should not be complaining about our democratic system, but rather participating in it. They should be taught to love Canada.
That is my opinion piece for today.
It is difficult for us to support the NDP's fine motion, however, because, as usual, it includes a direct attack against the Canadian oil industry and all oil-related jobs.
Canadian oil is the most ethical oil in the world. Of course, in the past, there were some concerns about how the oil sands were processed, but I think a lot of effort has been made in recent years to find amazing technologies to capture the carbon released in the oil sands production process.
Since the government's mandate is almost at an end, I would like to take this opportunity to mention that this motion reminded me of some of the rather troubling ethical problems that the Liberal government has had over the past few years.
First the Prime Minister, the member for Papineau took a trip to a private island that belongs to our beloved and popular Aga Khan. The trip was not permissible under Canadian law, under our justice system. For the first time in Canadian history, a prime minister of Canada was found guilty of several charges under federal law because he took a private family vacation that had nothing to do with state interests and was largely paid by the Aga Khan. It was all very questionable, because at the very same time he was making this trip to the Aga Khan's private island, the Prime Minister was involved in dealings with the Aga Khan's office regarding certain investments.
Next we have the fascinating tale of the Minister of Finance, who brought forward a reform aimed at small and medium-sized businesses, a reform that was supposed to be robust and rigorous, when all the while he was hiding shares of his former family business, Morneau Shepell, in numbered companies in Alberta. On top of that, he forgot to tell the Ethics Commissioner about a villa he owned in France.
The young people watching us must find it rather unbelievable that someone could forget to tell the Ethics Commissioner about a wonderful villa on the Mediterranean in France, on some kind of lake or the sea, I assume.
Then there is the clam scandal as well. The former minister of fisheries and oceans is in my thoughts since he is now fighting cancer. It is sad, but that does not excuse his deplorable ethics behaviour two years ago when he tried to influence a bidding process for clam harvesters in order to award a clam fishing quota to a company with ties to his family.
SNC-Lavalin is another case. It seems clear that there were several ethics problems all along. What I find rather unbelievable is that the Liberals are still trying to claim that there was absolutely nothing fishy going on. I am sorry, but when two ministers resign, when the Prime Minister's principal secretary resigns, and when the Clerk of the Privy Council resigns, something fishy is going on.
I want to close with a word on ethics and recent media reports about judicial appointments. There is something called the “Liberalist”, a word I find a bit strange. It is a list of everyone who has donated to the Liberal Party of Canada. Of course, all political parties have lists of their members, but the Liberals use their list to vet candidates and identify potential judicial appointees.
In other words, those who want the Prime Minister and member for Papineau to give them a seat on the bench would be well advised to donate to the Liberal Party of Canada so their name appears on the Liberalist. If not, they can forget about it because actual legal skills are not a factor in gaining access to the highest court in the land and other superior federal courts.
When it comes to lobbying, I just cannot believe how often the Liberals have bowed down to constant pressure from big business, like they did with Loblaws. It is a shame. Unfortunately, the NDP motion is once again attacking the people who work in our oil industry.
Monsieur le Président, je suis très heureux de prendre la parole aujourd'hui au sujet de la motion du NPD. J'aimerais d'abord saluer tous les citoyens et les citoyennes de Beauport—Limoilou qui nous écoutent en grand nombre et ceux qui le feront plus tard en regardant la rediffusion sur les médias sociaux.
Je viens de passer deux semaines dans ma circonscription et j'ai rencontré plusieurs milliers de mes concitoyens lors de divers événements et activités organisés par différents organismes. Jeudi dernier, la Corporation de développement communautaire de Beauport, la CDCB, a tenu un événement tout à fait audacieux et unique en son genre. Pour la première fois, tous les élus de la circonscription, soit les élus municipal, provincial et fédéral, étaient réunis lors d'un déjeuner afin de rencontrer des citoyens et des représentants d'organismes. C'était une sorte de table ronde qui réunissait l'ensemble des élus des différents ordres de gouvernement. C'était un exercice exemplaire en ce qui a trait à la bonne conduite démocratique de notre pays. Nous avons eu de belles conversations. Je voudrais féliciter la Corporation de développement communautaire de Beauport pour cet exercice fort intéressant qui, je l'espère, deviendra une tradition dans les années à venir.
Je voudrais également souligner que dans ma belle province, le Québec, il y a actuellement de très importantes inondations un peu partout. Ce matin, lorsque j'ai quitté la ville de Québec, vers six heures, j'ai constaté moi-même les dégâts tout le long de la route entre Trois-Rivières et Montréal et dans la région de Maskinongé. Il y a toujours un peu d'eau là-bas au printemps, mais cette fois-ci, il y en a énormément. Ensuite, quand je suis arrivé dans la région de Gatineau-Ottawa, j'ai vu des maisons inondées. Ce sont presque 8 000 personnes, des femmes, des hommes et des familles, qui ne sont pas chez elles en ce moment. Ce sont des moments très difficiles. Je tiens donc à leur dire que je suis avec eux de tout coeur. Je leur souhaite toute la force qu'ils peuvent avoir et trouver en eux. Je suis content de voir que le gouvernement du Québec a déjà annoncé son aide, de même que le gouvernement fédéral, bien entendu.
La motion présentée par le NPD aujourd'hui est quand même intéressante. On y retrouve des questions concernant le fait que l'actuel premier ministre du Canada a tenté d'influencer le cours de la justice à quelques égards, notamment dans l'affaire SNC-Lavalin, qui a été très médiatisée au cours des trois derniers mois.
Le NPD aborde également la question du coût des médicaments. Nous, les conservateurs, avons constaté que dans l'ALENA 2.0, qui n'a toujours été ratifié par aucun pays, les libéraux ont malheureusement cédé aux pressions de M. Trump, le président américain, qui leur demandait de prolonger la durée des brevets sur les médicaments. Si le traité était ratifié, cela ferait en sorte que les Canadiens paieraient plus cher pour leurs médicaments. D'ailleurs, on se demande quand les libéraux vont commencer à engager des discussions sérieuses au sujet des tarifs sur l'acier et l'aluminium et quand ils vont présenter à la Chambre le débat sur la ratification de l'ALENA.
La motion du NPD parle également du lobbying de la part de Loblaws. Cette histoire était presque une blague. Les citoyens n'en croyaient pas leurs yeux ni leurs oreilles: on a versé 12 millions de dollars à Loblaws, une compagnie extrêmement riche qui voulait remplacer ses réfrigérateurs. C'est hallucinant.
D'autre part, le NPD nous parle aussi des pratiques bancaires au Canada. À cet égard, nous, les conservateurs, pensons que les banques sont importantes, mais que certaines d'entre elles n'ont pas nécessairement lieu d'être, surtout celles qui émanent du gouvernement. La Banque de l'infrastructure du Canada, comme les néo-démocrates le disent souvent à juste titre, est une manière de favoriser les grands groupes d'intérêt, et les Canadiens ne devraient pas avoir à financer des projets d'infrastructure privés.
On pourrait aussi mentionner la Banque asiatique d'investissement dans les infrastructures, qui est totalement ridicule. On envoie presque 250 millions de dollars outre-mer pour financer des projets d'infrastructure, alors qu'ici même, le plan d'infrastructure du fédéral de 187 milliards de dollars peine à fonctionner. Au cours des trois dernières années, on n'a dépensé que 14 milliards de ces 187 milliards de dollars. C'est déplorable, car les besoins étaient grands à cet égard. Alors, en ce qui a trait aux pratiques bancaires, je trouve la motion du NPD intéressante.
Par ailleurs, l'une des choses qui me dérangent le plus en tant que citoyen, c'est l'évasion fiscale. La lutte contre l'évasion fiscale devrait notamment passer par l'éducation dans nos écoles. Malheureusement, cela relève davantage des gouvernements provinciaux. Il faudrait remettre le patriotisme à l'ordre du jour. Si beaucoup de riches Canadiens font de l'évasion fiscale sans aucune vergogne et de manière tout à fait honteuse, c'est parce qu'ils n'ont aucun esprit patriotique. Ils n'ont aucun amour pour leur pays.
L’école et les autorités auraient dû inculquer cette notion, dès leur jeune âge, en leur disant qu’être patriotique, c’est faire en sorte que l’argent canadien reste au Canada pour les Canadiens, pour nos programmes sociaux, pour nos entreprises, pour nos rues et pour nos communautés.
À mon avis, l’évasion fiscale est d’abord et avant tout causée par un manque d’amour pour son pays. Il faudrait inculquer aux jeunes qu’il ne faut pas se plaindre du système démocratique, mais qu’il faut y participer et aimer le Canada.
C'était mon éditorial de la journée.
Par contre, là où il sera difficile d’appuyer la motion du NPD, c’est que, comme d’habitude, ils ont inséré dans leur belle motion une attaque frontale contre le marché pétrolier canadien et contre tous les emplois liés au pétrole au Canada.
Le pétrole canadien est le pétrole le plus éthique au monde. Certes, auparavant, il y a eu des questions sur la façon de traiter les sables bitumineux, mais je pense qu’on a fait beaucoup d’efforts, au cours des dernières années, pour trouver d’incroyables technologies pour capter le carbone, lorsqu’on nettoie la terre pour en faire sortir du pétrole.
Comme on arrive à la fin du mandat très rapidement, j’aimerais quand même saisir la balle au bond. Cette motion m’a permis de me remémorer certains problèmes d’éthique assez troublants qu'a connus le gouvernement libéral au cours des dernières années.
D’abord, le premier ministre et député de Papineau a fait un voyage sur une île privée de notre très cher et populaire Aga Khan. Ce voyage a été sanctionné par le droit canadien, par la justice canadienne. C’est la première fois de l’histoire du Canada qu’un premier ministre du Canada est reconnu coupable, en vertu d’une loi fédérale, de plusieurs chefs, parce qu’il a fait un voyage privé familial qui n’avait rien à voir avec les intérêts étatiques, en grande partie aux frais de l’Aga Khan. On peut se questionner, parce qu’au moment même où il effectuait ce voyage sur une île privée de l’Aga Khan, il y avait des tractations entre le bureau de l’Aga Khan et lui-même au sujet de certains investissements.
Ensuite, il y a eu une belle chronique sur l’histoire du ministre des Finances, lequel nous avait présenté une réforme pour les petites et moyennes entreprises qui était censée être robuste et faite avec rigueur, alors qu'au même moment, il cachait des actions de son ancienne compagnie familiale Morneau Shepell dans des compagnies à numéro, en Alberta. De plus, il avait omis de dire à la commissaire à l’éthique qu’il avait une villa en France.
Aux chers jeunes qui nous écoutent, je dirai que c’est quand même incroyable d’oublier de dire à la commissaire à l’éthique qu’on a une superbe villa en France sur le bord de la Méditerranée, j’imagine. Ce devait être sur le bord d’un lac ou de la mer.
Il y a également le scandale des palourdes. Je suis de tout coeur avec le ministre des Pêches et des Océans de l’époque, parce qu’il a un cancer actuellement. C’est triste, mais cela n’empêche pas qu’il a agi de façon déplorable sur le plan de l'éthique, il y a deux ans, lorsqu’il a tenté d’influencer le processus d’appel d’offres pour des compagnies de pêche à la palourde, afin d’octroyer le contrat à quelqu’un qui avait un lien familial avec lui.
Il y a aussi le cas de SNC-Lavalin. De toute évidence, il y a eu plusieurs problèmes d’éthique dans toute cette histoire. Ce qui est quand même incroyable, c’est qu’encore aujourd’hui les libéraux tentent de nous faire croire qu’il n’y avait absolument pas anguille sous roche. Je suis désolé, mais quand deux ministres démissionnent, quand le secrétaire personnel du premier ministre démissionne, quand le greffier du Conseil privé démissionne, il y a anguille sous roche.
En ce qui concerne l’éthique, je terminerai en parlant du cas vu récemment dans les médias, celui de la nomination des juges. Il y a ce qu’ils appellent « Libéraliste ». C’est un mot que je trouve un peu étrange. C’est une liste sur laquelle on retrouve les noms de tous ceux qui ont déjà fait un don au Parti libéral du Canada. Tous les partis politiques ont évidemment des listes de leurs membres, mais eux, ils utilisent carrément cette liste pour faire du triage. Ils filtrent, à partir de cette liste, les noms des juges en vue de nominations.
Cela veut dire que, si on veut devenir juge sous le premier ministre et député de Papineau, il vaut mieux faire un don au Parti libéral du Canada pour avoir son nom sur « Libéraliste », sinon, on peut oublier cela, puisque les compétences judiciaires n’auront aucun rôle à jouer dans l'accès à la plus haute cour du pays ou aux autres cours supérieures du fédéral.
En ce qui concerne le lobbying, je dois dire que c'est incroyable de voir à quel point les libéraux s'agenouillent devant la pression constante des grandes compagnies, comme on l'a vu avec Loblaws. C'est dommage. Malheureusement, la motion du NPD s'attaque encore une fois aux gens qui travaillent dans notre industrie pétrolière.
Result: 1 - 1 of 1