Interventions in the House of Commons
 
 
 
RSS feed based on search criteria Export search results - CSV (plain text) Export search results - XML
Add search criteria
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-11-27 16:41 [p.24089]
Madam Speaker, it is a bit unfortunate to notice that the parliamentary secretary cannot spontaneously speak without any notes about their supposedly great budget engagement.
I went out for a few seconds and I am sure I missed the point where the member said when his government would balance the budget. I am sure I missed that. The Liberals seem to want to be a responsible government, so I am sure I missed that point.
Could the member just repeat to me in which year the government will balance the budget?
Madame la Présidente, il est un peu malheureux de constater que le secrétaire parlementaire ne peut parler spontanément sans utiliser ses notes au sujet de leur prétendu engagement budgétaire important.
Je suis sorti quelques secondes et je suis sûr que j’ai manqué le moment où le député a dit quand son gouvernement allait équilibrer le budget. Je suis sûr que je l’ai manqué. Les libéraux semblent vouloir être un gouvernement responsable, alors je suis sûr que j’ai manqué ce moment important.
Le député pourrait-il me répéter en quelle année le gouvernement équilibrera le budget?
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-11-27 16:46 [p.24090]
Madam Speaker, I would like to respond to something the member for Saanich—Gulf Islands said. She said the government always has iconic and historical engagement announcements. I have come to think that it is all the government is about. It is always historical, amazing, so great, but we have never in Canadian history seen a government spend so much money to do so little.
I am very happy to speak today in the House of Commons on behalf of the citizens of Beauport—Limoilou.
Centre Block will soon be closing for complete renovations for 10 or 15 years. I wanted to mention that. There is no cause for concern, however, because we will be moving to West Block. I will therefore be able to continue to speak on behalf of my constituents.
Today I am discussing Bill C-86, a second act to implement certain provisions of the budget tabled in Parliament on February 27, 2018 and other measures.
I will focus on the fact that the members of the Conservative Party are extremely disappointed with the bill. We have witnessed a string of broken promises over the past three years. It is a little ironic that the hon. member for Papineau, the current head of the Liberal government, said during the election campaign that he wanted to do something to make people less cynical of politics, to help them have more confidence in politicians, in the ability of the executive branch, the legislative branch and members of Parliament to do things that are good for Canadians and especially to respect the major promises formally made during the campaign.
A group of researchers at Laval University have created what they call the Vote Compass. It shows the number of promises kept and broken by the provincial and federal governments.
I remember that, to their chagrin, a few months before the 2015 election, the research institute had to acknowledge that 97% of all promises made by Mr. Harper during the 2011 election campaign had been kept.
The Liberal government elected in 2015 broke three major promises and is continuing to break them in the 2018 budget. These were not trifling promises. They were major promises that were to set the guidelines for how the government was to behave and for the results Canadians would see.
The Canadians we talk to are familiar with the three major promises, since I often repeat them. I have to, because this is serious.
The Liberals promised to limit themselves to minor $10-billion deficits in the first two years and a $6-billion deficit in the third year.
What did they do? The first year, they posted a deficit of $30 billion. The second year, they posted a deficit of $20 billion. This year, the deficit is $18 billion, or three times what was announced.
That is the first broken promise, and it was not just some promise that was jotted down on the back of a napkin. In any case, I hope not. In fact, I remember quite well that the promise was made from a crane in the midst of the election campaign. The member for Papineau was in Toronto, standing on a crane when he said that he would run deficits to pay for infrastructure. That is the second broken promise. He said that the $10 billion a year in deficits would be used to inject more money into infrastructure. However, of the $60 billion in deficits this government has racked up to date, only $9 billion has gone to infrastructure. That is another problem, another broken promise.
That is why I was saying earlier that we have rarely seen, in the history of Canada, a government spend so much money for so few results. This is probably the first time we have seen this sort of thing.
I will give an example. He said that he would invest $10 billion in infrastructure in 2017, but he invested only $3 billion and yet racked up a deficit of $20 billion. Where did the other $17 billion go? It was used for all sorts of different things in order to satisfy very specific interest groups who take great pleasure in and boast ad nauseam about the Liberal ideology.
The third broken promise is an extremely important and strategic one. In fact, it was so obvious that we did not even really think of it as a promise before.
All Canadian governments, in a totally responsible manner and without questioning it, traditionally endorsed this practice. If there was a deficit, the document would indicate the date by which the budget would be balanced. There was a repayment date, just as there is for anyone in Canada. When the families of Beauport—Limoilou, many of whom are watching today, want to buy a car or appliance, such as a washer or dryer, not only does the seller ask them to get a bank loan, but he also asks them to sign a paper that indicates when the debt will be repaid in full.
Thus, it is quite normal to indicate when the budget will be balanced. We have been asking that question for three years, but what is even more interesting is that the Liberals had promised that the budget would be balanced in 2019, and now there are 45 days remaining in 2018. Telling us when the budget will be balanced is the least the Liberals could do.
There are consequences to running up large deficits, however. The Liberal government has been accumulating gigantic deficits at a time when the global economy is doing rather well, although forecasts indicate that we will enter a recession in the next 12 months. Although times are tough in Alberta and Ontario, where General Motors just closed a plant, the situation is positive. There are regions in Canada that are suffering tremendously, but the global economic context is nevertheless healthy. Knock on wood, which is everywhere in the House of Commons.
The first serious mistake is to run up deficits when times are good. When the global economy is doing well and our financial institutions are making money, we have to put money aside for an emergency fund and an assistance fund, especially for the employees of General Motors who lost their jobs and for all families in the riding of my Alberta colleague who have lost their jobs in the oil sector.
We have to have an emergency fund for the next economic crisis because that is how our capitalist system works. There are ups and downs. That is human nature. It is random. Agreements are signed, things are done, progress is made, and there are ups and downs. The current positive situation has been going on for five or six years now, so we need to be prepared. That is why growing the deficit during good economic times can have very serious consequences.
I would like to talk about another serious consequence, and I am sure this will strike a chord with the people of Beauport—Limoilou who are listening to us now. Does anyone know how many billions of dollars the government spends on federal health transfers? It is $33 billion per year. To service the debt, to pay back people around the world who lend us money, we spent $37 billion last year. We spent $4 billion more on servicing our debt than on health transfers.
An hon. member: That is shameful.
Mr. Alupa Clarke: Yes, Madam Speaker, it is shameful. It sure looks like bad management of public affairs. It makes no sense, and I am sure Canadians agree. I am sure they are sick and tired of hearing us talk about $10-billion, $20-billion, $30-billion deficits and so on.
Canada's total debt is now $670 billion. My fellow Canadians, that means that, at this point in time, your family owes $47,000. That is a debt you will have to pay.
The Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Canadian Heritage was very proud to announce that the government was giving nearly $6,000 a year per child, through the Canada child benefit, to people earning less than $45,000 a year. They are not giving money away, however; they are buying votes, which is unfortunate, since the very children this money is helping will end up having to pay it back. This is completely unacceptable on the part of the government.
I am proud to be part of a former Conservative government that was responsible, that granted benefits without running deficits and that also managed to balance the budget.
Madame la Présidente, j’aimerais réagir à quelque chose qu’a dit la députée de Saanich—Gulf Islands. Elle a dit que le gouvernement avait toujours des mesures symboliques et sans précédent à annoncer. J’en suis venu à penser que c’est tout ce que ce gouvernement fait. C’est toujours sans précédent, incroyable, extraordinaire, mais nous n’avons jamais vu dans l’histoire du Canada un gouvernement dépenser tant d’argent pour si peu de résultats.
Je suis très content de prendre aujourd'hui la parole à la Chambre des communes, au nom des citoyens de Beauport—Limoilou.
L'édifice du Centre va bientôt fermer durant 10 ou 15 ans, parce que tout sera rénové. Je tenais à le dire. Cependant, il n'y a pas de crainte à avoir, parce que nous allons déménager à l'édifice de l'Ouest. Je vais donc pouvoir continuer à débattre au nom de mes concitoyens.
Aujourd'hui, je prends la parole pour discuter du projet de loi C-86, Loi no 2 portant exécution de certaines dispositions du budget déposé au Parlement le 27 février 2018 et mettant en oeuvre d'autres mesures.
Je vais mettre l'accent sur le fait que les députés du Parti conservateur sont extrêmement déçus du projet de loi sur le budget. Depuis trois ans, on voit une série de promesses rompues. Ce qui est un peu paradoxal, c'est que le député de Papineau, l'actuel chef du gouvernement libéral, avait dit, pendant la campagne électorale, qu'il voulait faire en sorte que les gens soient moins cyniques envers la politique, que les gens croient plus en leurs politiciens, en la capacité de l'exécutif, du législatif et des représentants politiques d'effectuer des choses qui sont bonnes pour les gens et surtout de respecter les promesses phares faites en bonne et due forme lors de la campagne électorale.
À l'Université Laval, un groupe de recherche a créé ce qu'on appelle la Boussole électorale. Cela permet de connaître le nombre de promesses tenues ou non tenues par les gouvernements provinciaux et fédéral.
Je me rappelle que, quelques mois avant l'élection de 2015, à leur grand dam, cet institut de recherche avait dû confirmer que 97 % des promesses faites par M. Harper pendant la campagne de 2011 avaient été tenues.
Le gouvernement libéral de 2015 a rompu trois grandes promesses, et il continue de le faire dans le budget 2018. Il ne s'agit pas de promesse de pacotille, mais bien de promesses structurantes qui devaient permettre de fixer les balises quant à la façon dont le gouvernement allait se conduire et aux résultats pour les Canadiens.
Les citoyens qui nous écoutent connaissent ces trois grandes promesses, car je les répète souvent. Il faut le faire, parce que c'est grave.
Les libéraux avaient promis de faire seulement de petits déficits de 10 milliards de dollars durant les deux premières années et un déficit de 6 milliards de dollars la troisième année.
Qu'est-ce que nous avons vu? La première année, ils ont fait un déficit de 30 milliards de dollars. La deuxième année, ils ont fait un déficit de 20 milliards de dollars. Cette année, ils font un déficit trois fois plus élevé que ce qui était prévu, c'est-à-dire un déficit de 18 milliards de dollars.
C'est donc une première promesse rompue. On s'entend quand même pour dire qu'il ne s'agit pas d'une promesse faite sur le coin d'une table. En tout cas, je l'espère bien. En fait, je me rappelle très bien que la promesse a été faite sur une grue, en pleine campagne électorale. Le député de Papineau était à Toronto, sur une grue, quand il a dit qu'il ferait des déficits en faveur de l'infrastructure. Voilà la deuxième promesse rompue. Il a dit que les déficits de 10 milliards de dollars par année serviraient injecter davantage d'argent dans les infrastructures. Or sur les 60 milliards de dollars de déficit engrangés jusqu'à présent, seulement 9 milliards de dollars ont été dans les infrastructures. Voilà un autre point faible, une autre promesse rompue.
C'est pour la raison pour laquelle je disais plus tôt, en anglais, qu'on a rarement vu, dans l'histoire du Canada — c'est probablement la première fois qu'on le voit de cette manière —, un gouvernement dépenser autant pour en arriver à si peu de résultats.
Je vais donner un exemple. Il avait dit qu'il investirait 10 milliards de dollars dans les infrastructures en 2017, alors qu'il a investi seulement 3 milliards de dollars et qu'il a fait un déficit de 20 milliards de dollars. Où sont passés les 17 milliards de dollars? Ils ont servi à toutes sortes de fins pour satisfaire des groupes d'intérêt très précis qui se complaisent et se gargarisent à n'en plus finir dans l'idéologie libérale.
La troisième promesse rompue est une promesse structurante extrêmement importante. D'ailleurs, c'est une promesse qui, auparavant, n'était pas une promesse tellement cela allait de soi.
Tous les gouvernements canadiens, de manière tout à fait responsable et sans se poser de questions, adhéraient traditionnellement à cette pratique. Dans un budget, on indiquait, si déficit il y avait, une date de retour à l'équilibre budgétaire. Il y avait une date butoir, comme pour n'importe qui au Canada. Lorsque les familles de Beauport—Limoilou, qui nous écoutent en grand nombre, veulent s'acheter une voiture ou un appareil ménager, comme une laveuse ou une sécheuse, non seulement le vendeur leur demande de contracter un prêt à la banque, mais il leur demande aussi de signer un papier indiquant la date où la dette sera remboursée au complet.
Il n'y a donc rien de plus naturel que d'indiquer quand l'équilibre budgétaire sera atteint. Nous posons la question depuis trois ans, mais ce qui est encore plus intéressant, c'est que les libéraux avaient promis que l'équilibre budgétaire serait atteint en 2019, alors qu'il ne reste que 45 jours à l'année 2018. Ce serait la moindre des choses que les libéraux nous disent la date du retour à l'équilibre budgétaire.
Par ailleurs, quelles sont les conséquences de ces déficits importants? Le gouvernement libéral cumule des déficits gargantuesques dans une période économique mondiale plutôt favorable, bien que toutes les prévisions indiquent qu'on va tomber en récession d'ici 12 mois. Même s'il y a des situations difficiles en Alberta et en Ontario, où General Motors a fermé une usine, la situation est favorable. Il y a des régions du Canada qui souffrent énormément, mais le contexte économique mondial est quand même en santé. Touchons du bois; il y en a partout à la Chambre des communes.
La première erreur grave consiste donc à cumuler des déficits dans une bonne période. Lorsque nous sommes dans un contexte économique favorable sur le plan mondial et que nos institutions financières et le gouvernement font du fric, il faut mettre de l'argent de côté pour avoir des fonds d'urgence et des fonds d'aide, notamment pour les familles des employés de General Motors qui ont perdu leur emploi et pour toutes les familles de la circonscription de mon collègue de l'Alberta qui ont perdu leur emploi dans le secteur pétrolier.
Il faut surtout des fonds d'urgence pour la prochaine crise économique, puisque tel est fait notre système capitaliste: il y a des hauts et des bas. C'est la nature humaine. C'est aléatoire. On fait des ententes, on fait des choses, on avance et il y a des hauts et des bas. La situation favorable actuelle dure depuis cinq ou six ans, alors il faudrait se préparer. Voilà pourquoi cumuler des déficits dans un climat économique plutôt favorable a des conséquences très graves.
Je vais parler d'une autre conséquence grave, et je crois que cela va frapper l'imaginaire des citoyens de Beauport—Limoilou qui nous écoutent. Sait-on combien de milliards de dollars on consacre chaque année aux transferts fédéraux en santé? C'est 33 milliards de dollars par année. Quant au service de la dette, soit la somme que l'on doit rembourser aux gens de partout dans le monde qui nous prêtent de l'argent, on y a consacré 37 milliards de dollars l'année passée. On a donc consacré 4 milliards de dollars de plus au service de la dette qu'aux transferts en santé.
Une voix: C'est une honte.
M. Alupa Clarke: Oui, madame la Présidente, c'est une honte. De toute évidence, c'est une mauvaise gestion des affaires publiques. Cela n'a pas de sens et je suis convaincu que les Canadiens sont du même avis. Je suis convaincu qu'ils sont tannés de nous entendre parler des déficits de 10 milliards de dollars, de 20 milliards de dollars, de 30 milliards de dollars, etc.
D'autre part, la dette totale du Canada se chiffre à 670 milliards de dollars. Chers Canadiens, cela veut dire que vous avez une dette personnelle familiale de 47 000 $ en ce moment. C'est une dette que vous devez payer.
Le secrétaire parlementaire du ministre du Patrimoine canadien était très fier de dire que le gouvernement envoyait, par l'entremise de l'Allocation canadienne pour enfants, près de 6 000 $ par année par enfant aux personnes qui gagnent moins de 45 000 $ par année. Ce n'est pas donner de l'argent, c'est acheter des votes. C'est malheureux, car cet argent va devoir être remboursé par les mêmes enfants qui en bénéficient présentement. C'est complètement inacceptable d'agir de cette manière.
Personnellement, je suis fier d'appartenir à un ancien gouvernement conservateur qui était responsable, qui a consenti des allocations sans faire de déficits et qui a réussi à atteindre l'équilibre budgétaire.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-11-27 16:59 [p.24091]
Madam Speaker, I will respond to that, because the Conservatives do not hide and we are not afraid of the truth.
The fact is that the MP for Papineau, the Liberals' leader, the Prime Minister presently, said during the last campaign that never in the world would he present an omnibus bill. There was no nuance. It was, “no omnibus bill, ever”. The fact is that it is the biggest omnibus bill we have ever seen in this Parliament. It is bigger than an elephant. Seriously, it is huge. It is over 800 pages.
The blunt fact is that we were not ashamed of putting forward omnibus bills, because Canadians wanted the House to be efficient. Canadians wanted the House to go forward to make changes when necessary. Sometimes, when we had to debate every article, it did not go fast enough for the quickly changing pace of the world and all the needs of the Canadian people.
Right now the member is trying to engage with people to try to hide the fact that the Liberals are doing omnibus bills. They are ashamed of it.
Madame la Présidente, je vais répondre à cela parce que les conservateurs ne se cachent pas et n'ont pas peur de la vérité.
Le fait est que le député de Papineau, le chef du Parti libéral, le premier ministre actuel, a dit au cours de la dernière campagne électorale qu’il ne présenterait jamais de sa vie un projet de loi omnibus. Il n’y avait aucune nuance. C’était « pas de projet de loi omnibus, jamais ». Le fait est qu’il s’agit du plus important projet de loi omnibus que nous ayons jamais vu au cours de cette législature. C’est plus gros qu’un éléphant. Sérieusement, c’est énorme. Il compte plus de 800 pages.
En réalité, nous n’avions pas honte de présenter des projets de loi omnibus parce que les Canadiens voulaient que la Chambre soit efficace. Les Canadiens voulaient que la Chambre aille de l’avant pour apporter des changements nécessaires. Parfois, lorsque nous devions débattre de chaque article, nous n’allions pas assez vite pour tenir compte de l’évolution rapide du monde et de tous les besoins de la population canadienne.
À l’heure actuelle, le député essaie de divertir les gens pour essayer de cacher le fait que les libéraux présentent des projets de loi omnibus. Ils ont honte de ce qu’ils font.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-11-27 17:01 [p.24092]
Madam Speaker, I personally believe we should ensure that workers pensions are protected when a company files for bankruptcy.
As a society, we cannot tell workers who have worked for 30 or 40 years and who were counting on a pension that, all of a sudden, for purely capitalist reasons, their pension will be slashed.
There are people in my riding who suffered a great deal when White Birch Paper almost went under. There were unbelievable cuts to employees’ pensions. The only comfort I could find when I met with the people on the board of White Birch Paper, which employed 400 people, was when they told me that their pensions had been cut as well.
The NDP is working hard on this. Good for them, because it is an important issue.
Madame la Présidente, personnellement, je pense qu'on devrait protéger les pensions des travailleurs lorsqu'une entreprise fait faillite.
En tant que société, on ne peut pas se permettre de dire à des travailleurs qui ont travaillé pendant 30 ou 40 ans et qui avaient l'espoir d'avoir une pension que tout à coup, à cause de décisions purement capitalistes, leur pension sera coupée de manière importante.
Il y a des gens de ma circonscription qui ont extrêmement souffert quand Papiers White Birch a presque fait faillite. Il y a eu d'incroyables coupes relativement aux pensions. La seule chose qui m'a réconforté lorsque j'ai rencontré les gens du conseil d'administration de Papiers White Birch, qui employait 400 personnes, c'est qu'ils m'ont dit que leur pension avait aussi été coupée.
Effectivement, le NPD travaille fort sur ce dossier. C'est tant mieux pour eux car c'est quelque chose d'important.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-11-27 17:16 [p.24094]
Madam Speaker, I am sure that the member must have skipped one of the paragraphs in his speech where he was intending to announce when the government would balance the budget. That has always been the case in Canada's history. Maybe he could check his speech once more. All of my constituents are calling non-stop every single day about when the budget will be balanced.
Madame la Présidente, je suis convaincu que le député a sauté le paragraphe dans son discours où il prévoyait annoncer que le gouvernement rétablirait l'équilibre budgétaire. Au cours de l'histoire du Canada, le gouvernement a toujours précisé quand il comptait revenir à l'équilibre. Il devrait peut-être vérifier son discours. Les gens de ma circonscription ne cessent de téléphoner à mon bureau quotidiennement pour demander quand l'équilibre budgétaire sera rétabli.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-10-26 10:49 [p.22914]
Madam Speaker, it is always an honour to rise to speak in the House.
I would like to say hello to the people of Beauport—Limoilou who are watching us now on CPAC or watching a rebroadcast on Facebook or Twitter.
Without further delay, I would like to address the previous speaker's comments. I find it interesting that he said their objective was to prevent foreign influence from third parties.
The bill will pass, since the Liberals have a majority. However, one problem I have with the bill is that it will allow more than 1.5 million Canadians who have been living outside of Canada for more than five years to vote in general elections, even if they have been outside Canada for 10 or 15 years.
These people have a privilege that even Canadians who have never left the country do not even have. The Liberals will let them randomly choose which riding they want to vote in. This is a massive privilege.
If I were living in the United States for 10 years and saw that the vote was really close in a certain riding, thanks to the new amendments made to the bill, I could decide to vote for the Liberal Party in order to ensure that a Liberal member gets elected. That seems like a very dangerous measure to me. It will give a lot of power to people who have been living abroad for a very long time. That still does not make them foreigners, since they are Canadian citizens.
For those watching us, I want to note that we are talking about Bill C-76 to modernize the Canada Elections Act.
This is an extremely important issue because it is the Canada Elections Act that sets the guidelines for our elections in our democracy. These elections determine the party that will form the next government of Canada.
I am sure that the people of Beauport—Limoilou watching us right now can hardly believe the Liberal government when it says that it wants to improve democracy or Canada's electoral system or allow a lot of people to exercise their right to vote. The Liberals' record on different elements of democracy has been deplorable the past three years.
Two years ago when the House was debating the issue, I was a member of the Standing Committee on Government Operations and Estimates. The Liberals introduced a parliamentary reform that included some rather surprising elements. They wanted to weaken the opposition, thereby weakening roughly 10 million Canadians who voted for the opposition parties, including the Conservative Party, the New Democratic Party, and the Green Party.
They wanted to cut speaking times in the House, which is completely ridiculous. I have said it many times before and I will say it again. An MP currently has the right to speak for 20 minutes. Most of the time, each MP speaks for 10 minutes. Through the reform, the Liberals wanted to cut speaking times from 20 minutes to 10 minutes at all times. The 20-minute speaking slot would no longer exist.
I have a book at home that I love called The Confederation Debates. It features speeches by Papineau, Doyon, George-Étienne Cartier, John A. MacDonald, Louis-Hippolyte La Fontaine, among many others that I could name. These great MPs would speak for four, five, six, seven or eight hours without stopping, long into the night.
With their parliamentary reforms, the Liberals wanted to reduce MPs' speaking time to 10 minutes. They wanted to take away our right to speak for 20 minutes. All this was intended to minimize the opposition's speaking time, to stifle debate on various issues.
What they did yesterday was even worse. It was a clear-cut example of their attitude towards parliamentary democracy. They imposed time allocation. In layman's terms, they placed a gag order on a debate on the modernization of the Canada Elections Act. No example could more blatantly demonstrate their ultimate intent, which is to ram the bill through as fast as possible. It is really a shame. They want to ram this down our throats.
There is also what they did in 2015 and 2016 with their practice of cash for access.
When big-time lobbyists want to meet with a minister or the Prime Minister to discuss an issue, they just have to register and pay $1,500, or $1,575 now, for the opportunity to influence them.
These are not get-togethers with ordinary constituents. These are get-togethers arranged for the express purpose of giving prominent lobbyists access to top government officials and enabling them to influence decisions.
Here is a great example. The Minister of Finance attended a get-together with Port of Halifax officials and people closely connected to the Port of Halifax. No other Liberal Party MP was there. That is a blatant conflict of interest and cash for access.
If Canadians have a hard time trusting the Liberals when they say they introduced this bill because they want to enfranchise people or improve democracy and civic engagement, it is also because of all of the promises the Liberals have broken since their election in 2015.
Elections and electoral platforms form the foundations of Canadian democracy. Each party's political platform contains election promises. Personally, I prefer to call them commitments. The Liberals made some big promises. They said they would run small $10-billion deficits for the first two years and then reduce the deficits. Year after year, however, as they are in their third year of a four-year mandate, they have been running deficits that are much worse: $30 billion, $20 billion and, this year, $19 billion, although their plan projected a $6-billion deficit.
They broke that promise, but worse still, they broke their promise to return to a balanced budget. As my colleague from Louis-Saint-Laurent has put it so well often enough, this is the first time we are seeing structural deficits outside wartime or a major recession. What is worse, this is the first time a government has had no plan to return to a balanced budget. It defies reason. The Parliamentary Budget Officer, an institution created by the Right Hon. Stephen Harper, said again recently that it is unbelievable to see a government not taking affairs of the state more seriously.
Meanwhile, with respect to infrastructure, the Liberals said they were introducing the largest infrastructure program in Canadian history—everything is always historic with them—worth $187 billion. What is the total amount spent to date? They have spent, at most, $7 billion on a few projects here and there, although this was supposed to be a pan-Canadian, structured and large-scale program.
The Liberals also broke their promise to reform the electoral system. They wanted a preferential balloting system because, according to analyses, surveys and their strategists, it would have benefited them. I did not support that promise, but it is probably why so many Canadians voted for the Liberals.
There is then a string of broken promises, but electoral reform was a fundamental promise and the Liberals reneged on it. It would have made changes to the Election Act and to how Canadians choose their government. That clearly shows once again that Canadians cannot trust the Liberals when they say they will reform the Election Act in order to strengthen democracy in Canada.
Let us now get back to the matter at hand, Bill C-76, which makes major fundamental changes that I find deplorable.
First, Bill C-76 would allow the Chief Electoral Officer to authorize the use of the voter information card as a piece of identification for voting. As one of my Conservative colleagues said recently, whether we like it or not, voter cards show up all over, even in recycling boxes. Sometimes voter cards are found sticking out of community mailboxes.
There are all kinds of ways that an individual can get hold of a voter card and go to the polling station with it. It is not that difficult. This Liberal bill enables that individual to vote, although there is no way of knowing if they are that person, unless they are asked to provide identification—and that is not even the biggest problem.
It does not happen often, thank goodness, but when I go to the CHUL in Quebec City—which is the hospital where I am registered—not only do I have to provide the doctor's requisition for blood work, but I also have to show a piece of ID and my hospital card.
Madame la Présidente, je suis toujours honoré de prendre la parole à la Chambre.
J'aimerais saluer tous les citoyens de Beauport—Limoilou qui nous écoutent en ce moment, par l'intermédiaire de CPAC, ou qui nous écouteront plus tard en rediffusion sur Facebook ou Twitter.
Sans plus tarder, j'aimerais répondre au commentaire qu'a fait le député qui vient de terminer son discours. C'est intéressant parce qu'il a précisé que leur objectif était de réduire l'influence et l'impact des tierces parties venant de l'extérieur, donc des gens venant de l'étranger.
Le projet de loi sera adopté, puisque les libéraux forment la majorité. Cependant, une des choses qui me titille le plus dans le projet de loi, c'est qu'il va dorénavant permettre à plus de 1,5 million de Canadiens vivant à l'extérieur du Canada depuis plus de 5 ans de voter lors des élections générales, même si cela fait 10 ou 15 ans qu'ils sont à l'extérieur du pays.
Ces personnes ont un privilège que même un Canadien qui vit ici et qui n'est jamais parti n'a pas. Les libéraux vont leur permettre de choisir aléatoirement une circonscription où voter. C'est un privilège complètement incommensurable.
Si j'étais aux États-Unis depuis 10 ans et que je voyais que le vote est très serré dans une circonscription, je pourrais, grâce aux amendements apportés au projet de loi, décider d'aller voter pour le Parti libéral, afin de m'assurer qu'un député libéral est élu. Cela m'apparaît être une mesure très dangereuse. Elle va justement donner du pouvoir à des gens qui vivent à l'étranger depuis fort longtemps. Ce ne sont tout de même pas des étrangers, puisqu'il s'agit de Canadiens.
À l'intention des citoyens qui nous écoutent, je précise que nous parlons du projet de loi C-76, qui vise à moderniser la Loi électorale du Canada.
Il s'agit d'un enjeu extrêmement important, parce que c'est la Loi électorale du Canada qui fixe les balises et les barèmes applicables à nos élections, dans notre démocratie. Ces élections déterminent le parti qui va former le prochain gouvernement du Canada.
Je suis sûr que les citoyens de Beauport—Limoilou qui nous écoutent en ce moment ont peine à croire le gouvernement libéral lorsqu'il dit vouloir améliorer la démocratie ou le système électoral du Canada ou permettre à de nombreuses personnes d'exercer leur droit de vote. L'historique libéral des trois dernières années, en ce qui a trait à différents attributs de la démocratie, est déplorable.
Il y a deux ans, alors que ce débat avait cours à la Chambre, je siégeais au Comité permanent des opérations gouvernementales et des prévisions budgétaires. Les libéraux ont mis en avant une réforme parlementaire dans laquelle il y avait certains éléments assez surprenants. Ils voulaient amoindrir le pouvoir de l'opposition, donc amoindrir le pouvoir d'environ 10 millions de Canadiens qui ont voté pour des partis de l'opposition, ce qui comprend le Parti conservateur, le Nouveau Parti démocratique et le Parti vert.
Ils voulaient réduire le temps de parole à la Chambre, ce qui est complètement ridicule. Je l'ai souvent dit à la Chambre, mais je veux le redire. En ce moment, un député a le droit de parler pendant 20 minutes. La plupart du temps, chaque député parle pendant 10 minutes. Au moyen de la réforme, les libéraux voulaient faire passer le droit de parole de 20 minutes à 10 minutes, à n'importe quel moment. Le droit de parole de 20 minutes n'aurait même plus existé.
Chez moi, j'ai un livre que j'adore, qui s'intitule Les Débats de la Confédération. On peut y lire Papineau, Doyon, George-Étienne Cartier, John A. MacDonald et Louis-Hippolyte La Fontaine. Je pourrais en nommer plusieurs autres. Ces grands députés parlaient quatre, cinq, six, sept ou huit heures d'affilée, sans arrêt, toute la nuit.
Au moyen de leur réforme parlementaire, les libéraux voulaient réduire le temps de parole des députés à 10 minutes. Ils voulaient annuler le droit de parole de 20 minutes. Tout cela pour empêcher le plus possible l'opposition de s'exprimer, pour empêcher des débats qui portent sur toutes sortes d'enjeux.
Ce qu'ils ont fait hier est encore pire que cela. C'est un exemple patent de leur attitude envers la démocratie parlementaire. Ils ont imposé une attribution de temps. En jargon populaire ou comme on dit au Québec, ils ont imposé un bâillon sur un débat qui porte sur la modernisation de la Loi électorale du Canada. Il n'y a pas d'exemple plus flagrant que cela de leur intention. Cette dernière est justement de faire adopter le projet de loi à toute vitesse. Cela est vraiment dommage. Ils veulent nous faire passer cela dans la gorge.
Il y a aussi ce qu'ils ont fait en 2015 et en 2016 avec leur pratique du cash for access.
Quand de grands lobbyistes voulaient rencontrer un ministre ou le premier ministre pour parler d'une question particulière, ils n'avaient qu'à s'inscrire sur une liste et à payer 1 500 $ — c'est 1 575 $ aujourd'hui — pour pouvoir les influencer.
On ne parle pas d'un cinq à sept avec des citoyens de tous les jours d'une circonscription. On parle de cinq à sept mis en place exclusivement pour permettre à de grands lobbyistes d'atteindre les plus hauts sommets de l'État et d'influencer les prises de décisions.
Voici un exemple important. Le ministre des Finances a pris part à un cinq à sept avec les autorités portuaires du Port d'Halifax et des gens qui avaient seulement un intérêt pour le port d'Halifax. Il n'y avait aucun député du Parti libéral. C'est un exemple flagrant de conflit d'intérêts et d'accès au comptant.
Par ailleurs, s'il est très difficile pour les Canadiens de faire confiance aux libéraux quand ils disent qu'avec ce projet de loi, ils veulent agrandir le suffrage ou améliorer la démocratie et la participation citoyenne, c'est aussi à cause de toutes les promesses qu'ils ont brisées depuis qu'ils ont été élus en 2015.
Les élections et les plateformes sont des fondements de la démocratie canadienne. Dans la plateforme politique de chaque parti, il y a des promesses électorales. Moi, je préfère appeler cela des engagements. Les libéraux avaient fait de grandes promesses. Ils ont dit qu'ils allaient faire des petits déficits de 10 milliards de dollars pour les deux premières années et qu'ils diminueraient par la suite. Or, année après année, puisqu'ils en sont à la troisième année de leur mandat de quatre ans, ils nous ont servi des déficits bien pires: 30 milliards de dollars, 20 milliards de dollars et, cette année, 19 milliards de dollars, alors que leur plan prévoyait un déficit de 6 milliards de dollars.
Ils ont brisé cette promesse, mais pire encore, ils ont brisé leur promesse du retour à l'équilibre budgétaire. Comme mon collègue de Louis-Saint-Laurent le dit si bien assez souvent, c'est la première fois de l'histoire qu'on voit des déficits structurels hors d'une récession économique importante ou d'une période de guerre. Le pire, c'est que c'est la première fois qu'un gouvernement ne prévoit aucun retour à l'équilibre budgétaire. C'est un non-sens. Le directeur parlementaire du budget, une institution créée par le très honorable M. Harper, a dit encore récemment qu'il était incroyable de voir un gouvernement qui ne prend pas les affaires de l'État plus au sérieux que cela.
D'autre part, en ce qui concerne les infrastructures, les libéraux disaient qu'ils avaient le plus grand programme d'infrastructure de l'histoire du Canada — avec eux, c'est toujours historique —, totalisant 187 milliards de dollars. Toutefois, de cette somme, qu'ont-ils dépensé à ce jour? Ce n'est pas plus que 7 milliards de dollars pour quelques projets ici et là, alors que ce programme était censé être pancanadien, structuré et de grande envergure.
Les libéraux ont aussi brisé leur promesse de réformer le mode de scrutin. Ils voulaient un mode de scrutin préférentiel, car selon les analyses, les sondages et leurs stratèges, cela les aurait avantagés. Je n'appuyais pas cette promesse, mais c'est probablement en raison de celle-ci qu'un grand pan de l'électorat canadien a voté pour les libéraux.
Ce sont donc des promesses brisées les unes après les autres, mais la réforme du mode de scrutin était une promesse fondamentale, et les libéraux l'ont reniée. Cela aurait touché la loi électorale et la façon dont les Canadiens sont appelés à choisir leur gouvernement. C'est un autre exemple patent qui démontre que les Canadiens ne peuvent pas faire confiance aux libéraux lorsqu'ils disent qu'ils vont réformer la loi sur les élections pour agrandir la démocratie au Canada.
Revenons maintenant au sujet qui nous intéresse plus particulièrement, c'est-à-dire le projet de loi C-76, qui apporte deux grands changements fondamentaux qui, selon moi, sont déplorables.
Premièrement, le projet de loi C-76 permettrait au directeur général des élections d'autoriser la carte d'électeur comme pièce d'identité pour voter. Comme l'a dit un de mes collègues conservateurs récemment, les cartes d'électeur peuvent, qu'on le veuille ou non, se retrouver un peu partout, comme dans les boîtes de recyclage. Parfois, il y a des cartes qui dépassent des boîtes postales communautaires.
Il y a donc toutes sortes de façons dont un citoyen peut trouver une carte d'électeur et se présenter au bureau de vote avec celle-ci. C'est même assez facile. Or, selon ce projet de loi libéral, cette personne-là pourrait voter, alors qu'il n'y aurait aucune façon de savoir si c'est la même personne, sauf en lui demandant de présenter une carte d'identité. Ce serait donc la moindre des choses.
Cela ne m'arrive pas souvent, Dieu merci, mais quand je vais au CHUL de Québec — c'est là que je suis inscrit —, je dois non seulement présenter la prescription du médecin pour une prise de sang, mais je dois aussi présenter une carte d'identité ainsi que la carte d'hôpital.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-10-26 12:09 [p.22929]
I believe you, of course, Madam Speaker.
That is completely ridiculous in the current context. My colleague is talking about something that happened a number of years ago. However, in the current context, there are practically no bills. The government's legislative agenda is practically non-existent. What is it introducing right now?
The Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership has been signed. We are waiting for the USMCA to be examined here in the House so that it can be ratified. We voted only once this week. We are beginning to wonder what we are doing here. The Liberal government is not introducing any meaningful legislation. This week, we had the opportunity to debate an extremely important bill, and the government imposed a gag order on us. Looking at the government's legislative agenda, it seems that we should have been able to take as much time as we needed to discuss that bill.
Madame la Présidente, je vous crois, bien entendu.
C'est complètement ridicule, dans le contexte actuel. Ma collègue revient sur ce qui s'est passé il y a plusieurs années. Or, dans le contexte actuel, il n'y a presque aucun projet de loi. Le programme législatif du gouvernement est actuellement quasi nul. Qu'est-ce qu'il présente en ce moment?
L'Accord de partenariat transpacifique global et progressiste a été signé. Nous attendons que l'AEUMC soit étudié ici pour être ratifié. Nous n'avons voté qu'une fois cette semaine. Nous nous demandons presque pourquoi nous sommes ici. Le gouvernement libéral ne présente absolument rien de significatif. Cette semaine, nous avons la chance de débattre d'un projet de loi fort important, et le gouvernement nous impose un bâillon. Sérieusement, en voyant son programme législatif, nous nous disons que nous devrions avoir tout le temps nécessaire pour discuter de ce projet de loi.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-10-26 12:11 [p.22929]
Madam Speaker, our critic for democratic institutions and other Conservative colleagues on the committee presented and tabled 200 possible amendments to the bill. These amendments would not only have strengthened the bill but possibly also given the Conservatives the privilege and honour of voting for the bill.
Concerning the citizens' voting cards, one million cards sent to citizens in the last election contained erroneous information. Also, as an Ipsos Reid poll indicates, 87% of Canadians do not see why it is a problem for them to be required to have another identification card when they present themselves at the polling booths.
It is at the basis of democracy that we make sure that the right person is on the card when someone goes to the polls to vote to choose the next government.
Madame la Présidente, la porte-parole des conservateurs dans le dossier des institutions démocratiques et les députés conservateurs membres du comité ont proposé 200 amendements au projet de loi. Ces amendements auraient renforcé le projet de loi et, de surcroît, ils auraient donné aux conservateurs le privilège et l'honneur de voter en faveur de la mesure législative.
Pour ce qui est des cartes d'information de l'électeur, un million de ces cartes envoyées à des citoyens lors des dernières élections contenaient des renseignements erronés. En outre, un sondage Ipsos Reid indique que 87 % des Canadiens ne voient aucun inconvénient à ce qu'on exige d'eux une autre carte d'identité lorsqu'ils vont voter.
Dans une démocratie solide, il est essentiel d'exiger une carte d'identité de chacun des électeurs qui se présentent aux bureaux de scrutin pour choisir le prochain gouvernement de leur pays.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-06-13 21:56 [p.20919]
Mr. Speaker, seriously, it is almost embarrassing to have to follow my colleague from Huron—Bruce, who listed many athletes of Latin American heritage living in Canada and North America who have accomplished amazing things in baseball, football, hockey, and soccer. I loved his fantastic presentation and his fine speech.
As usual, I would like to begin by saying hello to all my constituents in Beauport—Limoilou, many of whom are listening this evening, I am sure.
I am very proud to participate in this debate on Bill S-218, which was introduced in the other place by our valiant and very honourable colleague, Senator Enverga, who sadly passed away over a year ago. God rest his soul. Our colleague from Thornhill is now sponsoring this bill in the House of Commons.
The Liberals are not participating in tonight's debate, which is unfortunate. As a number of my colleagues have pointed out this evening, there are more than half a million people of Hispanic American heritage living in Canada. They have an incredible history, and they play an extraordinary role in our society in many different ways. It is therefore important to talk about the cultural, political, and economic contributions they have made to our country.
I would like to point out that Quebec City is no exception in that regard. Quebec City is home to a large Colombian community, and every year, they host a wonderful fiesta in Beauport Bay, in my riding. I am sure it will be happening again this summer.
I would like to make a comparison and share it with all the members of the House this evening. I would actually like to talk about some of the similarities that unite North America and South America. There are historical, political, geopolitical, economic, sociological, and even anthropological similarities. It is, after all, the Americas. We share two continents and a very common history.
First of all, from an anthropological perspective, this is an important debate, and there are several theories. There is the Clovis First theory, which holds that nomadic peoples came from Asia via the Bering Strait about 10,000 years ago and populated all of America. As a result, the first settlers in North America or South America would have been descendants of those same nomadic peoples from Asia. There are also counter-theories that claim they arrived via the Pacific coast 30,000 years ago. Regardless, the two continents certainly share similarities, anthropologically speaking.
We also share similar histories. This is the New World. Christopher Columbus landed near Cuba, if I am not mistaken. At the time, he discovered the Americas on behalf of the Europeans. He discovered the New World. Jacques Cartier, Jean Cabot, and all those explorers revealed the existence of new, albeit already inhabited, lands to all of humanity, meaning Europeans, philosophers, writers, explorers, and monarchs. They discovered vast lands that were then colonized. We know the history. One very tangible historical legacy that both North America and South America share is colonialism. Conquistadors from South America conquered Central America and even parts of California and Florida, all the way to Tierra del Fuego in South America.
There were the colonialists in New France, which is where I am from, and in New England. Once again, we share similar histories and experiences with colonialism.
Another aspect of our shared history is the earliest form of modern capitalism: mercantilism. In this triangular trade, Europeans sailed to Africa to acquire slaves and brought resources back to England on the same ships. It was all deeply tragic, of course, but it is a historical fact. We must not fear history. Mercantilism is another thing we have in common with South America.
From a geopolitical perspective, it is interesting to note that, around the same time, in the 15th, 16th, or 17th century, South America was divided in two by the pope, though I do not remember which one. The pope divided South America into two vast geopolitical regions, one Portuguese and the other Spanish.
In North America, the treaty that ended the Seven Years' War divided the territory between the British and the French, so from a geopolitical perspective, we have that part of our history in common with South America.
From a political and sociological point of view, there are people's revolutions, such as the American Revolution of 1776. Canada never really had a revolution, but the Patriotes did kill people and spark revolutionary movements that led to ministerial responsibility in Canada. That was a kind of people's revolution.
In South America, Simón Bolívar strove to build a continent-wide federation called Gran Colombia. He even became a dictator. Some commentators portray him as a liberal who became a dictator. Anyway, there were people's revolutions in both North America and South America. That is something else we have in common with the people of Latin America.
Furthermore, economically speaking, we share a willingness with these people to trade between countries and reduce borders when it comes to tariffs and even the sharing of cultures and political systems. In North America, we have NAFTA, which was created in 1988 and ratified in 1992. South America has an equivalent, Mercosur, which was created in 1991 and ratified in 1995.
These two agreements share a similar economic annexation model, but the Latin American countries go a step further because they try to share best policy practices and standardize their social policies, which is no easy feat considering that some South American countries are not quite what we could call democratic.
I would also like to talk about Canada's relationship with South America. Canada was late in discovering South America for one very simple reason. In 1823, Republican American President Monroe implemented the Monroe doctrine, which was very important over the next two centuries. In one of the speeches he gave to Congress, President Monroe told Europeans that all of the Americas were under American imperial control. In other words, Mr. Monroe told the European powers that any European designs on the Americas would be regarded as nothing less than a hostile attack on the United States.
From that point on, the United States started treating South America like their back yard. We saw that in the way they behaved toward Chile, in the days of Pinochet, and in Honduras, when Mr. Reagan brought down that country's government. The Americans treated South America like their back yard.
Here, as great economic and political allies of the United States, we kept our distance from South America because the Americans would not have been happy to see Canada try to foster agreements or diplomatic relations with South American countries since that was their back yard.
All that changed in 1984 with the creation of the Organization of American States, which Canada did not join until 1990. It took all that time for Canada to open up to South American countries because of the Monroe doctrine. It was only in 1990 that Canada, after 30 years of observer status, became a full fledged member state.
Today, after more than 28 years as a member of the OAS, Canada does interesting work exporting its democratic values to South American countries and creating bilateral free trade agreements, including with Peru. That was one of Mr. Harper's many fine accomplishments. There are also the summits of the Americas, including the one that was held in Quebec City in 2001.
That is what I wanted to present this evening. In North America and in South America, we have our particularities and we share some very real similarities on economic, geopolitical, sociological, anthropological and historical levels. In Canada, we are pleased that a growing number of Hispanics are heading to our border to immigrate to our country in order to participate in our beautiful cultural, political, and economic life.
Canada was closed to South America for a very long time because of the Monroe doctrine and U.S. policy, which jealously treated South America as its backyard.
Hurray for Senator Enverga's initiative. Hurray for the initiative of my colleague from Thornhill, who sponsored the bill. Hurray for the Columbian community in Quebec City, which is going to party this summer in Baie de Beauport in my riding.
Monsieur le Président, sérieusement, c'est presque gênant de parler après mon collègue de Huron—Bruce, parce qu'il a énuméré les nombreuses personnes d'origine latino-américaine qui vivent au Canada et en Amérique du Nord et qui ont réalisé des exploits extraordinaires dans le sport, par exemple, le baseball, le football, le hockey et le soccer. J'ai adoré cette belle présentation et ce bon discours.
J'aimerais d'abord et avant tout, comme d'habitude, dire bonjour à tous mes concitoyens de Beauport—Limoilou, qui nous écoutent en grand nombre ce soir, j'en suis certain.
Je suis très fier de participer à ce débat pour parler du projet de loi S-218, déposé dans l'autre Chambre par notre valeureux et très honorable collègue, le sénateur Enverga, malheureusement décédé il y a plus d'un an. Que Dieu ait son âme. C'est maintenant notre collègue de Thornhill qui parraine ce projet de loi à la Chambre des communes.
Ce soir, on constate que les libéraux ne participent pas à ce débat, et c'est malheureux. Comme plusieurs de mes collègues l'ont mentionné ce soir, il y a plus d'un demi million de personnes d'origine hispano-américaine au Canada. Ils ont une histoire incroyable. Ils se sont impliqués de manière extraordinaire au Canada à bien des égards. Il est donc important de parler de leur apport culturel, politique et économique à notre pays.
J'aimerais dire que la ville de Québec ne fait pas défaut à cet égard. Il y a une communauté colombienne très importante. Chaque année, elle organise une fiesta incroyable, à la baie de Beauport, dans ma circonscription. Cet été, cette fête va certainement se répéter.
Ce soir, j'aimerais partager un genre de comparaison avec tous les députés de la Chambre. En fait, j'aimerais faire un pont et démontrer certaines similitudes que l'Amérique du Nord partage avec l'Amérique du Sud. Ce sont des similitudes historiques, politiques, géopolitiques, économiques, sociologiques et même anthropologiques. Oui, ce sont les Amériques. Nous partageons quand même deux continents et une histoire très commune.
D'abord, d'un point de vue anthropologique, c'est un débat important et il y a plusieurs thèses. Il y a la thèse de Clovis, à l'effet que des peuples nomades de l'Asie seraient arrivés par le détroit de Béring il y a environ 10 000 ans, et qu'ils auraient peuplé l'Amérique entière. Par conséquent, les premiers arrivants en Amérique du Nord ou en Amérique du Sud proviendraient des mêmes sources de peuplement nomade, soit les peuples nomades d'Asie. Il y a également des théories qui disent qu'au contraire, les gens sont arrivés par la côte du Pacifique il y a 30 000 ans. On peut quand même dire que d'un point de vue anthropologique, les deux continents partagent sans contredit une similitude.
Il y a aussi une similitude sur le plan historique. Ici, c'est le Nouveau Monde. Christophe Colomb est arrivé près de Cuba, il me semble bien. À l'époque, il a découvert les Amériques au nom des occidentaux. Il a découvert le Nouveau Monde. Jacques Cartier, Jean Cabot, enfin tous ces explorateurs, ont fait découvrir ensemble à l'humanité, soit aux Occidentaux, aux philosophes, aux écrivains, aux explorateurs et aux monarques, l'existence de nouveaux territoires déjà peuplés, bien entendu. Ils ont découvert de vastes territoires qui ont été colonisés. On connaît l'histoire. Il y a donc une autre chose que le Nord et le Sud partagent du point de vue historique et de manière très tangible: le colonialisme. Les conquistadors de l'Amérique du Sud ont conquis l'Amérique centrale, et même une partie de la Californie et de la Floride, en allant jusqu'à la Terre de Feu, en Amérique du Sud.
Il y a eu les colonialistes de la Nouvelle-France, dont je suis issu, et de la Nouvelle-Angleterre. Encore une fois, on peut dire que du point de vue historique et colonialiste, on partage cela avec nos compatriotes de l'Amérique du Sud.
Nous partageons assurément l'histoire concernant la première forme de capitalisme moderne, soit le mercantilisme. C'est un genre de triangle où on partait de l'Europe vers l'Afrique pour amener des esclaves, et on ramenait des ressources en Angleterre par les mêmes bateaux. Tout cela était bien malheureux, bien entendu, mais c'est l'histoire. Il ne faut pas avoir peur de l'histoire. Le mercantilisme est une autre chose que nous partageons avec l'Amérique du Sud.
Du point de vue géopolitique, il est intéressant de constater qu'à peu près en même temps, au XVe, XVIe et XVIIe siècle, l'Amérique du Sud a été divisée en deux grandes régions par le pape, j'oublie lequel. Le pape a donc divisé l'Amérique du Sud entre les Portugais et les Espagnols, soit en deux grandes régions géopolitiques.
Pour ce qui est de l'Amérique du Nord, avec le traité issu de la guerre de Sept Ans, on a divisé le territoire entre les Britanniques et les Français. Alors, d'un point de vue géopolitique, nous partageons quand même un historique avec l'Amérique du Sud.
D'un point de vue politique et sociologique, il y a les révolutions populaires, comme la révolution américaine de 1776. Au Canada, on n'a pas vraiment eu de révolution, mais les Patriotes ont tout de même tué des gens et ont déclenché des mouvements révolutionnaires qui ont mené à la responsabilité ministérielle au Canada. C'était une sorte de mouvement révolutionnaire populaire.
En Amérique du Sud, Simon Bolivar a voulu créer une fédération pancontinentale de la Grande Colombie. Il a même été dictateur. Selon certains écrits, c'était un libéral, mais il est devenu dictateur. Il y a donc eu des révolutions populaires autant dans le Nord que dans le Sud. C'est une autre chose que nous partageons avec les gens de l'Amérique latine.
Par ailleurs, d'un point de vue économique, nous partageons avec ces gens une volonté de faire des échanges entre pays et d'amenuiser les frontières en ce qui concerne les tarifs douaniers ou même le partage de culture et de systèmes politiques. En Amérique du Nord, il y a eu l'ALENA en 1988, qui a été ratifié en 1992. En Amérique du Sud, il y a un équivalent, le Mercosur, qui a été créé en 1991 et ratifié en 1995.
Ces deux accords partagent un peu le même modèle d'annexion économique, mais les pays d'Amérique latine vont un peu plus loin, puisqu'ils tentent d'échanger de bonnes façons de faire en matière de politique et d'uniformiser leurs politiques sociales, ce qui est certainement difficile à faire, étant donné qu'il y a des pays plus ou moins démocratiques en Amérique du Sud.
J'aimerais aussi parler du Canada par rapport à l'Amérique du Sud. Le Canada a très tardivement découvert l'Amérique du Sud pour une raison très simple. En 1823, le président américain républicain Monroe a mis en place la doctrine de Monroe, une doctrine extrêmement importante pour les deux siècles qui ont suivi. Dans un de ses discours devant le Congrès, le président Monroe a dit aux Européens que toutes les Amériques étaient sous le joug impérial américain. En d'autres mots, M. Monroe a indiqué aux puissances européennes que toute visée européenne dans les Amériques serait dorénavant perçue comme une attaque belligérante envers les États-Unis, ni plus ni moins.
À partir de ce moment-là, les États-Unis ont commencé à traiter l'Amérique du Sud comme leur cour arrière. On l'a vu dans leur comportement au Chili, à l'époque de Pinochet, et au Honduras, lorsque M. Reagan a fait tomber le gouvernement. Les Américains agissaient comme si l'Amérique du Sud était leur cour arrière.
Ici, en tant que grands alliés économiques et politiques des États-Unis, nous avions pris nos distances par rapport à l'Amérique du Sud, car les Américains auraient été très mécontents de voir le Canada tenter de créer des ententes ou des rapprochements diplomatiques avec les pays d'Amérique du Sud, puisque c'était pour eux leur cour arrière.
Tout cela changé en 1948, lorsqu'on a créé l'Organisation des États américains, à laquelle le Canada s'est rallié seulement en 1990. Cela a pris tout ce temps au Canada pour s'ouvrir aux pays d'Amérique du Sud à cause de la doctrine de Monroe. C'est seulement en 1990 que le Canada, après 30 ans d'observation auprès de l'organisation, en est devenu un vrai État membre.
Aujourd'hui, après plus de 28 ans comme membre de l'OEA, le Canada fait un travail intéressant afin d'exporter ses valeurs démocratiques vers les pays d'Amérique du Sud et de créer des traités de libre-échange bilatéraux, notamment avec le Pérou — c'était l'un des beaux accomplissements de M. Harper. Il y a également les Sommets des Amériques, dont celui qui a eu lieu à Québec en 2001.
Voilà donc ce que je voulais mettre en évidence ce soir. En Amérique du Nord et en Amérique du Sud, nous avons des particularités et nous partageons des similitudes de manière très concrète, que ce soit sur le plan économique, géopolitique, sociologique, anthropologique ou historique. Au Canada, nous sommes contents que de plus en plus d'hispaniques se dirigent vers nos frontières pour immigrer dans notre pays afin de participer à notre belle vie culturelle, politique et économique.
Le Canada a très longtemps été fermé à l'Amérique du Sud à cause de la doctrine de Monroe et de la politique américaine, qui traitait jalousement l'Amérique du Sud comme sa cour arrière.
Vive l'initiative du sénateur Enverga! Vive l'initiative de mon collègue de Thornhill, qui a parrainé le projet de loi ici! Vive la communauté colombienne de Québec, qui va faire la fête cet été dans mon comté, à la Baie de Beauport!
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-05-31 16:21 [p.20030]
Mr. Speaker, thank you for recognizing me. First of all, I would like to say hello to all the people of Beauport—Limoilou, many of whom are listening today, and to thank them for all their work. They are definitely listening. When I go door to door, many of them tell me that they watch CPAC.
I would like to say something about what the hon. Liberal member for Hamilton West—Ancaster—Dundas said in response to the speech of my colleague from Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan. She engaged in the usual Liberal demagoguery. She asked if we believed in climate change. I really would like my constituents to listen closely, because I want to make this clear to them and to all Canadians: we, the Conservatives, believe so strongly in climate change that, in 2007, Mr. Harper held a joint press conference with Mr. Charest to announce the implementation of the new Canada ecotrust program, supported by a total investment of $1.5 billion. The aim of the program was to give each province hundreds of millions of dollars to help with their respective climate change plans. It is easy to look this up on Google by entering “ecoTrust,” “2007,” “Harper,” “Charest.” Not only did Mr. Charest commend the Conservative government’s initiative, but even Steven Guilbeault from Greenpeace at the time—and I am certain that my colleague from Mégantic—L’Érable will find this hard to believe—saluted the initiative as something unheard of.
There is a reason why greenhouse gas emissions decreased by 2% under the decade-long Conservative reign. We had a plan, a plan with bold targets that the Liberals made their own.
Now let us talk a bit about the 2018-19 budget, which continues in the same vein as the other two budgets presented so far by the hon. member for Papineau's Liberal government. I would like to begin by saying that the government has been in reaction mode for the past three years and almost never in action mode.
It is in reaction mode when it comes to the softwood lumber crisis, although we do not hear much about it because the softwood lumber rates are still pretty attractive. However, the fact remains that this is a crisis and that, right now, industrial producers in the U.S. are collecting billions of dollars that they will eventually recover, as they do in every softwood lumber crisis.
The Liberal government is in reaction mode when it comes to NAFTA. They will say that they are not the ones who put Mr. Trump in office, but this is yet another major issue that has been taking up their time in the past year, and they are still in reaction mode. They are also in reaction mode when it comes to the imminent tariffs on aluminum and steel.
The Liberals are in reaction mode when it comes to almost every major issue in Canada. They are in reaction mode when it comes to natural resources development, for example with regard to Kinder Morgan’s Trans Mountain pipeline. Once again they were in reaction mode, because Kinder Morgan said that it would walk if the government could not assume responsibility and tell British Columbia in no uncertain terms that this was a matter of federal jurisdiction.
All of this shows that the Prime Minister is not the great diplomat he pretends to be across the globe, and in celebrity news and other media. He is such a poor diplomat that he was unable to avoid the softwood lumber crisis with Obama. He is such a poor diplomat that he has supposedly had a wonderful relationship with Mr. Trump for the past year and a half. He speaks to him on the telephone I do not know how many times a month, but that did not prevent Mr. Trump from taking deliberate action against Canada, as we saw today with the tariffs on steel and aluminum.
I would like to make a comparison. We, the Conservatives, were a government of action. We negotiated 46 free-trade agreements. We sent Canadian troops to Kandahar to demonstrate our willingness to co-operate with NATO and the G7 and to make a show of military force. We invested hugely in national defence, increasing our investments from 0.8% to almost 1.2% of the GDP following the dark days of Jean Chrétien’s Liberal government. We settled the softwood lumber issue in 2007, during the last crisis. We implemented the national shipbuilding strategy, investing more than $30 billion to renew our military fleet, to renew the Canadian Coast Guard’s exploration fleet in the Canadian Arctic, and to renew the fleet of icebreakers. The first of these icebreakers, the majestic Diefenbaker, will soon be under construction.
Let us not forget that we also told Mr. Putin to get out of Ukraine. There is no doubt that we were a government of action.
When the budget was tabled, several journalists said that it was more of a political platform than a budget. I find that interesting. In their opinion, the political platform contained no concrete fiscal measures to prepare Canada for tomorrow, for the next 10 years, or for the next century, as our founding fathers intended in 1867. Rather, it contained proposals, in particular concerning social housing. The NDP must be very happy. The Liberals promised billions of dollars if the provinces gave their assent. That was a promise.
The Liberals also made proposals concerning pharmacare. Once again, they were conditional on studies demonstrating the usefulness of such a plan. That, too, was a promise. The promises go on page after page in the budget, and it is obvious that it is a political platform. That is why the Liberals used the word “woman” more than 400 times, 30 times on each page. That is just demagoguery and totally abusive.
I would like to quote a very interesting CBC journalist, Chris Hall. Since he works at the CBC, the Liberals will surely believe him. He said that the government recently spent $233,000 to organize round table discussions to find out whether Canadians understood the message, and not the content, of their budget. I will quote Mr. Hall:
In particular, the report said the findings suggest middle-class Canadians—the very demographic the Liberals have been courting since their election with both policy initiatives and political messaging—don't feel their lives are getting better.
They are correct in thinking that their lives are not getting better. Even Chris Hall concluded, in light of these studies, that the 2018-19 budget is not a document that provides guidelines, includes concrete measures, or outlines actual achievements in progress. It is a political document that proposes ideologies.
The budget also contains a number of disappointments and shortcomings, precisely because it does not contain any actions. It does not respond to the fiscal reforms enacted by U.S. President Trump that give American companies an undue competitive advantage.
The 2018-19 federal budget does not address the tariffs on aluminum and steel either, although we all saw them coming. It does not specify what measures will be taken to implement carbon pricing. Most of all, it does not say how much it will cost every single Canadian. You would think it would at least do that. Some analysts say that it will cost approximately $2,500 per Canadian per year.
This budget is full of proposals but has no concrete measures, and it perpetuates broken promises. Instead of $10-billion deficits for two consecutive years, we have $19-billion deficits accumulating year over year until 2045. This year, we were supposed to have a deficit of $6 billion, but it has reached almost $20 billion. The Liberals also broke their promise to balance the budget. This is the first time that the federal government has not had a concrete plan to balance the budget.
We were supposed to run up deficits in order to invest in the largest infrastructure program in history, because with the Liberals everything is historic. Only $7 billion of the $180 billion of this program has been injected into the Canadian economy.
This is a very disappointing budget and, unfortunately, dear people of Beauport—Limoilou, taxes keep going up and the Liberal carbon tax is just the start.
Monsieur le Président, je vous remercie de m'accorder la parole. D'entrée de jeu, je voudrais dire un gros bonjour à tous les citoyens de Beauport—Limoilou qui nous écoutent en grand nombre, et les remercier pour tout leur travail. C'est vrai qu'ils sont bien à l'écoute. Souvent, quand je fais du porte-à-porte, ils m'en parlent et disent qu'ils regardent CPAC.
Je voudrais juste revenir sur ce qu'a dit la députée libérale d'Hamilton-Ouest—Ancaster—Dundas en réponse au discours de mon collègue de Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan. Elle faisait encore de la démagogie propre aux libéraux. Elle demandait si on croyait aux changements climatiques. Je voudrais vraiment que mes citoyens m'entendent bien, car je veux mettre cela au clair pour eux epour tous les Canadiens: nous, les conservateurs, croyons tellement aux changements climatiques qu'en 2007, M. Harper a fait une conférence de presse conjointe avec M. Charest où il a annoncé la mise en oeuvre du nouveau programme Éco-Fiducie Canada, doté d'un investissement total de 1,5 milliard de dollars. Le programme avait pour objectif de fournir des centaines de millions de dollars à chaque province, afin de contribuer à leurs plans respectifs pour répondre aux changements climatiques. Cela peut se vérifier dans Google en inscrivant « Éco-Fiducie », « 2007 », « Harper », « Charest ». Charest a non seulement fait l'éloge de cette approche du gouvernement fédéral sous les conservateurs, mais même Steven Guilbeault, de Greenpeace à l'époque — et je suis sûr que mon collègue de Mégantic—L'Érable va trouver cela incroyable —, a salué cette initiative comme étant quelque chose d'incroyable.
Ce n'est pas pour rien que sous le règne conservateur qui a duré 10 ans, on a réduit de 2 % les gaz à effet de serre au Canada, parce qu'il y avait un plan. Notre plan contenait d'ailleurs des cibles audacieuses que les libéraux ont gardées.
Discutons maintenant quelque peu du budget de 2018-2019, qui continue dans la même lignée que les deux autres budgets présentés jusqu'à ce jour par le gouvernement libéral du député de Papineau. J'aimerais dire au préalable que depuis trois ans, ce gouvernement est en mode réaction et presque jamais en mode action.
Il est en mode réaction par rapport à la crise du bois d'oeuvre, bien qu'on n'en entende pas trop parler, parce qu'en ce moment les taux sur le bois d'oeuvre demeurent substantiellement intéressants. Toutefois, il n'en demeure pas moins que c'est une crise et qu'actuellement, les producteurs industriels américains ramassent des milliards de dollars qu'ils vont recouvrir par la suite, comme ils le font à chaque crise du bois d'oeuvre.
Le gouvernement libéral est en mode réaction face à l'ALENA. Les libéraux vont nous dire que ce n'est pas eux qui ont élu le gouvernement de M. Trump, mais c'est quand même un autre gros dossier qui les accapare jour après jour depuis un an et dans lequel ils sont en mode réaction. Ils sont aussi en mode réaction depuis hier par rapport aux tarifs douaniers éminents sur l'aluminium et l'acier.
Les libéraux sont en mode réaction concernant presque tous les grands enjeux du Canada. Ils sont en mode réaction par rapport au développement économique des ressources naturelles, par exemple pour l'oléoduc Trans Mountain de Kinder Morgan. Ils étaient encore une fois en mode réaction, parce que Kinder Morgan a dit qu'il allait partir si le gouvernement était incapable de prendre ses responsabilités et de dire clairement à la Colombie-Britannique que c'était de compétence fédérale.
Tout cela démontre en fait que le premier ministre n'est pas le grand diplomate comme on aime le faire croire partout sur la planète, dans tous les médias de stars et dans les autres médias. Il n'est tellement pas diplomate qu'avec Obama, il a été incapable de faire éviter la crise du bois d'oeuvre. Il n'est tellement pas diplomate qu'il entretient supposément depuis un an et demi une belle relation avec M. Trump. Il lui parle au téléphone je ne sais pas combien de fois par mois, mais cela n'empêche pas M. Trump d'agir de manière délibérée contre le Canada comme on le voit aujourd'hui avec les tarifs douaniers sur l'acier et l'aluminium.
J'aimerais faire une comparaison: nous, les conservateurs, sommes un gouvernement d'action. Nous avons conclu 46 traités de libre-échange. Nous avons envoyé les troupes canadiennes à Kandahar pour démontrer notre bonne volonté aux pays de l'OTAN et du G7, et la force militaire des Canadiens. Nous avons investi massivement dans la défense nationale, faisant passer les investissements de 0,8 à presque 1,2 % du PIB, à la suite de la période de noirceur des libéraux de Jean Chrétien. Nous avons réglé le dossier du bois d'oeuvre en 2007, soit lors de la crise précédente. Nous avons mis en place la Stratégie nationale de construction navale, en investissant plus de 30 milliards de dollars pour renouveler les flottes militaires, pour renouveler les flottes d'exploration de la Garde côtière canadienne dans l'Arctique canadien, et pour renouveler les flottes de brise-glaces, dont la construction du premier commencera bientôt, soit le majestueux Diefenbaker.
N'oublions pas non plus que nous avons dit à M. Poutine de sortir de l'Ukraine. Nous étions un gouvernement d'action, sans aucun doute.
Quand le budget a été déposé, plusieurs journalistes ont dit qu'il s'agissait d'une plateforme politique et non d'un budget à proprement parler. J'ai trouvé cela intéressant. Selon eux, cette plateforme politique n'énonçait pas de mesures concrètes budgétaires visant à faire avancer le pays pour demain, pour les 10 prochaines années ou pour le prochain siècle, comme le faisaient nos pères fondateurs en 1867. Elle contenait plutôt des propositions, notamment sur les logements sociaux. Cela fait sans doute plaisir au NPD. On promettait des milliards de dollars à condition que les provinces donnent leur accord. C'était donc une promesse.
Les libéraux ont également fait des propositions concernant une assurance médicaments. Encore une fois, c'était conditionnel à des études démontrant la pertinence d'un tel régime. C'est encore une promesse. Cela se poursuit ainsi de page en page dans le budget, et on constate que c'est une plateforme politique. C'est notamment pour cette raison que les libéraux ont utilisé le mot « femme » plus de 400 fois. On le relève 30 fois par page. C'est démagogique et totalement abusif.
J'aimerais citer un journaliste très intéressant de CBC, Chris Hall. Puisqu'il est de CBC, les libéraux vont sans doute le croire. Il nous dit que le gouvernement a dépensé 233 000 $ dernièrement pour organiser des tables rondes afin de savoir si les Canadiens comprenaient le message, et non le contenu, de leur budget. Je cite M. Hall en anglais:
En particulier, le rapport révèle que, selon les conclusions, les Canadiens de la classe moyenne — le groupe démographique que les libéraux courtisent depuis leur élection au moyen d'initiatives stratégiques et de messages politiques — n'ont pas l'impression que leur vie s'améliore.
Ils ont raison de penser que leur vie ne va pas mieux. Même ce journaliste conclut, à la lumière de ces études, que le budget de 2018-2019 n'est pas un document qui donne des directives, qui prévoit des mesures concrètes ou qui met sur la table de vraies réalisations en cours. C'est un document politique qui propose des idéologies.
Le budget contient aussi beaucoup de déceptions et de lacunes, puisqu'il est justement dépourvu d'action. Il ne répond pas aux réformes fiscales perpétrées par le président Trump aux États-Unis et qui donnent un avantage compétitif indûment immense aux compagnies américaines.
Le budget fédéral de 2018-2019 ne répondait pas non plus aux tarifs sur l'aluminium et l'acier. Il était pourtant évident que cela allait arriver. Il ne nous dit pas non plus quelles mesures seront prises pour mettre en oeuvre la tarification du carbone. Surtout, il ne nous dit pas combien cela va coûter à chaque habitant du Canada. Ce serait pourtant la moindre des choses. Certains analystes nous disent qu'elle va coûter environ 2 500 $ par année par habitant.
C'est un budget qui n'a que des propositions et aucune mesure concrète, et il perpétue des promesses brisées. Au lieu d'avoir des déficits de 10 milliards de dollars pour deux années consécutives, on a des déficits de 19 milliards qui s'accumulent d'année en année, et ce, jusqu'en 2045. Cette année, on devait avoir un déficit de 6 milliards de dollars, or il atteint presque 20 milliards de dollars. Par ailleurs, les libéraux ont également rompu leur promesse d'équilibrer le budget. C'est la première fois que le gouvernement fédéral n'a aucun plan concret pour équilibrer le budget.
Tous ces déficits étaient censés servir à investir dans le plus grand programme d'infrastructure de l'histoire, puisque avec les libéraux, tout est toujours historique. Or seulement 7 milliards des 180 milliards de dollars de ce programme ont été injectés dans l'économie canadienne.
C'est un budget fort décevant et malheureusement, chers concitoyens de Beauport—Limoilou, les taxes et les impôts augmentent, et cela ne fait que commencer avec la taxe libérale sur le carbone.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-05-31 16:32 [p.20031]
Mr. Speaker, it is quite funny. The hon. member spoke about the Canada child benefit and the income tax for workers. The CBC report I spoke about previously said that at the round tables, Canadians said they do not know how much that helped them, and they do not even know that this is going on right now.
People I meet in my riding, Beauport—Limoilou, say they are aware that the Canada child benefit is a way to buy votes, and that is it. That is the basic thing the Liberals are doing with that. It is hard for people to make the choice. Of course, it is a lot of money, but they know that it is a lot of money that their kids will have to pay in 30 years, so it is a poison gift. That is all it is about.
Most of the Liberals' measures are not in action but in reaction, and when they are in action, as some surely are, it is a poison gift for the future. How can the government be proud of those kinds of measures, when that is the case?
C’est vraiment drôle, monsieur le Président. Le député parle de l'Allocation canadienne pour enfants et du crédit d’impôt pour les travailleurs. Selon le rapport de la CBC dont j’ai déjà parlé, à l’occasion des tables rondes, les Canadiens ont affirmé qu’ils ne savaient pas dans quelle mesure ces programmes les aidaient et quelquefois, ils n’en connaissaient même pas l’existence.
Les gens que je rencontre dans ma circonscription, Beauport—Limoilou, sont conscients du fait que l’Allocation canadienne pour enfants est un moyen d’acheter des votes, et c’est ce que c’est. C’est l’usage principal que les libéraux en font. C’est dur pour les gens de choisir. Évidemment, c’est beaucoup d’argent, mais ils savent aussi que c’est beaucoup d’argent que leurs enfants auront à rembourser dans 30 ans. C’est donc un cadeau empoisonné. Voilà ce que c’est.
La plupart des mesures que prennent les libéraux ne visent pas à prendre les devants, mais simplement à réagir et lorsqu’elles visent à prendre les devants, ce sont des cadeaux empoisonnés. Comment le gouvernement peut-il être fier de ce genre de mesures?
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-05-31 16:35 [p.20032]
Mr. Speaker, I thank my colleague for his questions. Questions like these are why I have been urging him to join the Conservatives for three years, along with the member for Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, though I am not too sure about him, since his socialism is a little too intense. I think he may be too deeply entrenched in socialism.
About Davie, it takes political leadership. In 2015, one month before the election, we awarded the contract for the Asterix. It was the crowning achievement of Canada's largest shipyard, which is located in Lévis. Social transfers are also very important. The Conservative government provided health and education transfers with no strings attached. We fixed the fiscal imbalance by giving $800 million to Quebec. Charest acknowledged that in no uncertain terms.
First and foremost, as we have been proving since 1867, and as the history books will surely show, we are a Conservative political government when we form government. We support decentralization and respect the spirit and the letter of the Constitution, the British North America Act, our greatest constitutional document. We respect provincial and federal areas of jurisdiction. That is what is so great about the Conservatives.
Monsieur le Président, je remercie mon collègue de ses questions. C'est pour cette raison que je l'invite depuis trois ans à se joindre aux conservateurs, de même que le député de Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, bien que je ne suis pas sûr par contre, car son socialisme est un peu trop intense. Je pense qu'il est trop ancré dans le socialisme.
Pour la Davie, cela prend un leadership politique. En 2015, un mois avant les élections, nous avons octroyé le contrat pour l'Asterix. C'est la grande réussite du plus grand chantier naval du Canada, à Lévis. Les transferts sociaux sont très importants. Sous le gouvernement conservateur, nous avons fait des transferts en matière de santé et d'éducation, sans aucune condition. Nous avons réglé le déséquilibre fiscal en accordant une enveloppe budgétaire de 800 millions de dollars au Québec. Charest l'avait reconnu sans détour.
D'abord et avant tout, et depuis 1867, nous le prouvons, et je crois que les annales historiques en sont garantes. Nous sommes un gouvernement conservateur et politique lorsque nous formons un gouvernement qui est décentralisateur, qui respecte l'esprit et la lettre de la Constitution, l'Acte de l'Amérique du Nord britannique, notre plus beau document constitutif. Nous respectons les champs de compétence provinciale et fédérale. C'est ce qui est beau avec les conservateurs.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-05-30 18:55 [p.19946]
Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to address the member for Québec, whose riding borders mine. They are both very beautiful ridings.
The minister said something that deeply troubled me. It is one of the Liberals' recurring themes. He said that Canada was back on the world stage; however, we never left it. We simply have a different public policy, a different understanding, and a different approach.
I do not see how they can claim that we left the world stage when we signed 47 international treaties and we sent the Canadian Armed Forces to Kandahar on one of the most dangerous missions. It was a great success. My brother went there in 2006 to fight the Taliban and then al Qaeda.
I do not understand how they can say that given that we established the free trade agreement with the European Union. If that is not an international commitment, I do not know what it is. As I often say in the House, according to the Liberals' rhetoric, they have a monopoly on virtue.
I would like to know if the Liberals are going to move another time allocation motion this evening or if we are going to start a serious debate of their proposed legislation.
Monsieur le Président, je suis content de pouvoir m'adresser au député de Québec dont la circonscription partage une frontière avec la mienne. Ce sont deux très belles circonscriptions.
Le ministre a dit une chose qui me dérange profondément. C'est un thème récurrent chez les libéraux. Il a dit que le Canada était de retour sur la scène internationale, mais nous ne l'avons jamais quittée. Nous avons simplement une différente politique publique, une différente compréhension et une différente approche.
Je ne vois pas comment on peut prétendre que nous avions quitté la scène internationale, alors que nous avons signé 47 traités internationaux et que nous avons déployé les Forces armées canadiennes à Kandahar dans le cadre d'une des plus dangereuses missions. C'était d'ailleurs une grande réussite. Mon frère y a été, en 2006, pour combattre les talibans et Al-Qaïda par la suite.
Je ne vois pas comment on peut dire cela, alors que nous avons créé le traité de libre-échange avec l'Union européenne. Si cela n'est pas un engagement sur la scène internationale, je ne sais pas ce que cela peut être. Comme je le dis souvent à la Chambre, les libéraux tiennent un discours démagogique en prétendant avoir le monopole de la vertu.
J'aimerais savoir si les libéraux vont déposer une autre motion d'attribution de temps ce soir ou si nous allons commencer à débattre sérieusement leurs projets législatifs.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-05-30 20:38 [p.19956]
Mr. Speaker, I really appreciated the speech by my colleague from Calgary Shepard, who adroitly set out to deconstruct that worn-out Liberal platitude about the environment and the economy going hand in had. It is patently obvious that they do, because we human beings come from the environment, our resources come from the environment, and the economy comes from the environment.
The economy is both a process and a product of the environment we live in. The resources we export, such as oil, are natural resources that come from the environment. The Liberals' platitude is purely political PR.
As I recall, under the Conservative government, we did not sweet-talk anyone. We took concrete action that produced excellent results. For example, we reduced Canada's greenhouse gas emissions by 2% while we grew the GDP by 16%.
I would like the member for Calgary Shepard to tell us more about the strides our government made on both the environmental and economic fronts.
Monsieur le Président, j'apprécie énormément le discours de mon collègue de Calgary Shepard qui, avec justesse, a voulu déconstruire la métaphore que les libéraux utilisent jour après jour en disant que l'environnement et l'économie vont de pair. Toutefois, c'est l'évidence même, parce que nous-mêmes, les êtres humains, sommes issus de l'environnement, nos ressources proviennent de l'environnement et l'économie est issue de l'environnement.
L'économie est un processus et un produit de l'environnement dans lequel on vit. Les ressources qu'on exporte, par exemple, le pétrole, sont des ressources naturelles qui proviennent de l'environnement. Bref c'est une métaphore démagogique et politique.
Je me rappelle quand même que sous le gouvernement conservateur, sans avoir un discours édulcoré, nous posions des actions tangibles qui ont donné des résultats fort intéressants. Par exemple, nous avons réduit de 2 % les émissions de gaz à effet de serre au Canada, tout en augmentant le PIB de 16 %.
J'aimerais que le collègue de Calgary Shepard parle un peu des progrès réalisés sous notre gouvernement sur le plan de l'environnement et de l'économie.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-05-30 20:43 [p.19956]
Mr. Speaker, here we are in the House, on Wednesday, May 30, at 8:45. I should mention that it is 8:45 p.m., for the many residents of Beauport—Limoilou who I am sure are tuning in. To all my constituents, good evening.
We are debating this evening because the Liberal government tabled very few significant government bills over the winter. Instead, they tabled an astounding number of private members' bills on things like swallows' day and beauty month. Sometimes my colleagues and I can hardly help laughing at this pile of utterly trivial bills. I also think that this process of randomly selecting the members who get to table bills is a bit past its prime. Maybe it should be reviewed. At the same time, I understand that it is up to each member to decide what kind of bill is important to him or her.
The reason we have had to sit until midnight for two days now is that, as my colleague from Perth—Wellington said, the government has been acting like a typical university student over the past three months. That comparison is a bit ridiculous, but it is true. The government is behaving like those students who wait until the last minute to do their assignments and are still working on them at 3 a.m. the day before they are due because they were too busy partying all semester. Members know what I mean, even though that paints a rather stereotypical picture of students; most of them do not do things like that.
In short, we have a government that, at the end of the session, has realized that time is running out and that it only has three weeks left to pass some of its legislative measures, some of which are rather lengthy bills that are key to the government's legislative agenda. One has to wonder about that.
The Liberals believe these bills to be important. However, because of their lack of responsibility over the past three months, we were unable to debate these major bills that will make significant changes to our society. Take for example, Bill C-76, which has to do with the electoral reforms that the Liberals want to make to the voting system, the way we vote, protection of the vote, and identification. There is also Bill C-49 on transportation in Canada, a very lengthy bill that we have not had time to examine properly.
Today we are debating Bill C-57 on sustainable development. This is an important topic, but for the past three years I have been getting sick and tired of seeing the Liberal government act as though it has a monopoly on environmental righteousness. I searched online to get an accurate picture of the record of Mr. Harper's Conservative government from 2006 to 2015, and I came across some fascinating results. I want to share this information very honestly with the House and my Liberal colleagues so that they understand that even though we did not talk incessantly about the environment, we achieved some excellent concrete results.
I want to read a quote from www.mediaterre.org, a perfectly legitimate site:
Stephen Harper's Canadian government released its 2007 budget on March 19. The budget allocated $4.5 billion in new investments to some 20 environmental projects. These measures include a $2,000 rebate for all electronic-vehicle or alternative-fuel purchases, and the creation of a $1.5-billion EcoTrust program to help provinces reduce greenhouse gas emissions.
The Liberals often criticize us for talking about the environment, but we did take action. For example, we set targets. We proposed reducing emissions to 30% below 2005 levels by 2030. The Liberals even retained these same targets as part of the Paris agreement.
They said we had targets, but no plan. That is not true. Not only did we have the $1.5-billion ecotrust program, but we also had a plan that involved federal co-operation.
Allow me to quote the premier of Quebec at the time, Jean Charest, who was praising the plan that was going to help Quebec—his province, my province—meet its greenhouse gas emissions targets. Jean Charest and Mr. Harper issued a joint press release.
Mr. Harper said, “Canada's New Government is investing to protect Canadians from the consequences of climate change, air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions.” He was already recognizing it in 2007.
Mr. Charest said, “In June 2006, our government adopted its plan to combat climate change. This plan has been hailed as one of the finest in North America. With Ottawa contributing financially to this Quebec initiative, we will be able to achieve our objectives.”
It was Mr. Charest who said that in 2007, at a press conference with the prime minister.
I will continue to read the joint press release from the two governments, “As a result of this federal funding, the Government of Quebec has indicated that it will be able to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 13.8 million tonnes of carbon dioxide or equivalent below its anticipated 2012 level.”
What is more, the $1.5-billion ecotrust that was supposed to be allocated and was allocated to every province provided $339 million to Quebec alone. That was going to allow Quebec to engage in the following: investments to improve access to new technologies for the trucking sector; a program to develop renewable energy sources in rural regions; a pilot plant for production of cellulosic ethanol; promotion of geothermal heat pumps in the residential sector; support for technological research and innovation for the reduction and sequestration of greenhouse gases. This is probably one of those programs that is helping us make our oil sands increasingly environmentally friendly by allowing us to capture the carbon that comes from converting the sands to oil. There are also measures for the capture of biogas from landfill sites, for waste treatment and energy recovery, and finally for Canada ecotrust.
I invite our Liberal colleagues to listen to what I am going to say. In 2007, Steven Guilbeault of Greenpeace said the following: “We are pleased to see that after negotiating for more than a year, Quebec has finally obtained the money it needs to move towards meeting the Kyoto targets.”
Who made it possible for Quebec to move towards meeting its Kyoto objectives? It was the Harper government, a Conservative government, which established the $1.5-billion ecotrust fund in 2007 with monies from the budget surplus.
Not only did we have a plan to meet the targets we proposed, but this was also a plan that could only be implemented if the provinces agreed to the targets. It was a plan that was funded through the budget surplus, that did not further tax Canadians, and that provided money directly, without any conditions, other than the fundamental requirement that it had to help reduce climate change, which was philosophically important. Any and all measures taken to reach that goal were left entirely to the discretion of the provinces.
Mr. Harper, like a good Conservative who supported decentralization and like a true federalist leader, said that he was giving $400 million to each province so it could move forward with its plan.
By 2015, after 10 years of Conservative government, the country had not only weathered the worst economic crisis, the worst recession in history since the 1930s, but it had also reduced greenhouse gas emissions by 2% and increased the gross domestic product for all Canadians while lopping three points off the GST and lowering income taxes for families with two children by an average of $2,000 per year.
If that is not co-operative federalism, if those are not real results, if that is not a concrete environmental plan, then I do not know what is. Add to that the fact that we achieved royal assent for no less than 25 to 35 bills every session.
In contrast, during this session, in between being forced to grapple with scandals involving the carbon tax, illegal border crossings, and the Trans Mountain project, this government has barely managed to come up with four genuinely important bills.
By contrast, we expanded parks and protected Canada's wetlands. Our environmental record is exceptional.
Furthermore, we allowed debate. For example, we debated Bill C-23 on electoral reform for four days. The Liberals' electoral reform was debated for two hours.
I am sad, but I am happy to debate until midnight because debating is my passion.
Monsieur le Président, nous voici à la Chambre le mercredi 30 mai à 20 h 45. Je dois préciser que c'est le soir, pour tous les résidants de Beauport—Limoilou qui nous écoutent en grand nombre, j'en suis sûr. Je les salue.
Nous débattons ce soir parce que le gouvernement libéral, tout au long de la session d'hiver, a proposé peu de projets de loi gouvernementaux d'envergure. On a plutôt vu un nombre incroyable de projets de loi d'initiative parlementaire sur le jour des hirondelles ou sur le mois de la beauté. Parfois, mes collègues et moi rigolons presque de cette accumulation de projets de loi presque complètement anodins. D'ailleurs, je trouve un peu moribond ce processus de sélection aléatoire du député qui va pouvoir présenter un projet de loi. Peut-être qu'on devrait le revoir. En même temps, je comprends qu'il revient à chaque député de déterminer quel genre de projet de loi est important pour lui.
Si nous devons siéger jusqu'à minuit depuis maintenant deux jours, c'est parce que, tout comme l'a dit mon collègue de Perth—Wellington, le gouvernement, au cours des trois derniers mois, a agi comme un étudiant universitaire typique. C'est un parallèle un peu loufoque, mais cela tient quand même debout. Il s'est comporté comme un étudiant qui se rend compte que la remise du travail a lieu le lendemain matin et qui commence à le faire à 3 heures du matin parce qu'il a fait la fête tout le long de la session. On voit un peu ce que je veux dire, même si c'est une image un peu tronquée des étudiants, puisque la plupart ne font pas cela.
Bref, on se retrouve avec un gouvernement qui, en fin de session, prend conscience que le temps file et qu'il lui reste à peine trois semaines pour faire adopter certaines de ses mesures législatives qu'on pourrait juger plus volumineuses et importantes pour son programme législatif. Encore là, on pourrait se poser des questions.
Même si certains projets de loi sont importants aux yeux des libéraux, à cause de leur manque de sérieux des trois derniers mois, nous n'avons pas pu débattre des projets de loi majeurs qui vont apporter de grands changements dans notre société, comme le projet de loi C-76. Celui-ci porte sur les réformes électorales que les libéraux veulent appliquer relativement au mode de scrutin, à notre façon de voter, à la protection du vote et à l'identification, par exemple. Mentionnons aussi le projet de loi C-49 sur le transport au Canada, un projet de loi très volumineux que nous n'avons pas eu le temps d'évaluer convenablement.
Aujourd'hui, nous parlons du projet de loi C-57 sur le développement durable. C'est donc très intéressant. Cependant, j'en ai un peu marre d'entendre le gouvernement libéral nous répéter, depuis trois ans, qu'il a le monopole de la vertu en ce qui a trait à l'environnement. J'ai fait quelques recherches sur Internet pour voir le bilan précis et tangible du gouvernement conservateur de M. Harper de 2006 à 2015. J'ai fait des découvertes assez incroyables. J'aimerais en faire part de manière très honnête à la Chambre et à mes collègues libéraux pour qu'ils comprennent que, bien que nous ne nous gargarisions pas d'un discours environnementaliste, nous avons obtenu des résultats tangibles fort intéressants.
Voici donc ce que j'ai trouvé sur www.mediaterre.org, un site Web parfaitement légitime:
Le gouvernement canadien de Stephen Harper a rendu public le 19 mars dernier son budget 2007. Celui-ci prévoit 4,5 milliards de nouveaux investissements liés à une vingtaine de projets environnementaux. Ces mesures impliquent notamment la déduction de 2000$ liée à tout achat de véhicule écoénergétique ou à carburant de remplacement, mais également la mise sur pied d’une Éco-fiducie de 1,5 milliards afin d’aider les provinces à diminuer l’émission de gaz à effet de serre.
Souvent, les libéraux nous accusent d'avoir parlé d'environnement, puisque nous l'avons quand même fait à quelques égards. Nous avons notamment proposé des cibles. Par exemple, nous avons proposé de baisser les émissions de 30 % d'ici 2030 par rapport aux niveaux de 2005. Or les libéraux ont conservé ces mêmes cibles par l'entremise de l'Accord de Paris.
Ils nous disaient que nous avions des cibles, mais pas de plan. Ce n'est pas vrai. Non seulement nous avions l'écoFiducie de 1,5 milliard de dollars, mais c'était aussi un plan qui s'inscrivait dans une collaboration fédérale.
Je vais citer des passages du premier ministre du Québec à l'époque, Jean Charest, qui faisait l'éloge de ce plan qui allait aider le Québec — sa province, ma province — à atteindre ses objectifs de réduction de gaz à effet de serre. Jean Charest et M. Harper ont difusé ensemble un communiqué.
M. Harper a dit: « Le nouveau gouvernement du Canada investit afin de protéger les Canadiennes et les Canadiens des répercussions des changements climatiques, — il le reconnaissait d'emblée en 2007 — de la pollution atmosphérique et des émissions de gaz à effet de serre. »
M. Charest a dit: « En juin 2006, notre gouvernement a adopté son Plan de lutte aux changements climatiques. Ce plan a été salué comme l'un des meilleurs en Amérique du Nord. Avec la contribution financière du gouvernement fédérale à cet effort québécois, nous pourrons atteindre nos objectifs. »
C'est M. Charest qui a dit cela en 2007, lors d'une conférence de presse tenue avec le premier ministre.
Je continue la lecture du communiqué de presse conjoint des deux gouvernements: « Grâce au financement fédéral, le gouvernement du Québec a indiqué qu'il sera en mesure de réduire de 13,8 millions de tonnes de dioxyde de carbone ou de substances équivalentes les émissions de gaz à effet de serre, soit en dessous des niveaux prévus pour 2012. »
En outre, l'écoFiducie de 1,5 milliard de dollars qui devait s'appliquer et qui s'est appliquée à toutes les provinces prévoyait 339 millions de dollars juste pour le Québec. Cela allait permettre au Québec de faire tout ce que je vais énumérer: des investissements destinés à faciliter l'accès à de nouvelles technologies dans le secteur du camionnage; un programme visant à trouver de nouvelles sources d'énergie renouvelable dans les régions rurales; une usine pilote de fabrication d'éthanol à partir de matières cellulosiques; la promotion de pompes géothermiques dans le secteur résidentiel; l'appui à la recherche technologique et à l'innovation pour la réduction et la séquestration des gaz à effet de serre — c'est probablement un de ces programmes qui nous aident à avoir des sables bitumineux de plus en plus proenvironnmentaux parce qu'on capte le carbone qui est issu de la transformation des sables vers le pétrole. Il y a également des mesures destinées à promouvoir le captage de la biomasse provenant des sites d'enfouissement, des mesures destinées à favoriser la récupération des déchets traités et de l'énergie et finalement l'ÉcoFiducie du Canada.
J'invite les collègues libéraux à écouter ce que je vais dire. M. Steven Guilbeault de Greenpeace a dit en 2007: « Nous sommes heureux de constater qu'après plus d'une année de négociation, Québec a finalement obtenu les sommes qui lui permettront de se rapprocher davantage des objectifs de Kyoto. »
Qui a permis au Québec de se rapprocher de ces objectifs de Kyoto? C'est le gouvernement de M. Harper, un gouvernement conservateur qui a créé l'écoFiducie en 2007 de 1,5 milliard de dollars provenant d'un budget basé sur des surplus budgétaires.
Non seulement nous avions un plan pour atteindre les cibles que nous avions mises en avant, mais c'était un plan qui ne s'appliquait pas sans le consentement des provinces. C'était un plan qui prenait des surplus budgétaires, qui ne taxait pas davantage les Canadiens et qui envoyait de l'argent directement, sans aucune condition, mis à part la condition fondamentale de contribuer à réduire les changements climatiques, qui était quand même philosophiquement importante. Toutes les mesures pour y arriver étaient laissées complètement à la discrétion des provinces.
M. Harper, comme un bon conservateur décentralisateur, un vrai leader fédéraliste, a dit qu'il donnait 400 millions de dollars à chaque province pour qu'elle mette en oeuvre son projet.
En 2015, après 10 ans de gouverne conservatrice, on a constaté qu'on avait non seulement passé à travers la pire crise économique, la pire récession de l'histoire depuis les années 1930, mais qu'on avait aussi réduit les émissions de gaz à effet de serre de 2 % et augmenté le produit intérieur brut pour tous les Canadiens, tout en baissant la TPS de trois points et les impôts de 2 000 $ en moyenne, par année, pour une famille ayant deux enfants.
Si cela n'est pas du fédéralisme coopératif, si ce ne sont pas des résultats tangibles, si cela n'est pas un plan environnemental concret, je me demande ce que c'est. C'est sans parler du fait que nous avions un minimum de 25 à 35 projets législatifs qui passaient sous le sceau de la reine à chaque session.
Cette session-ci, à part les scandales de la taxe sur le carbone, les passages illégaux, le projet de Trans Mountain — tous des enjeux qui se présentent au gouvernement contre son propre désir — les libéraux ont à peine mis en avant quatre projets de loi véritablement importants.
Bref, on a agrandi les parcs et on a protégé les terres humides du Canada. On a un bilan exceptionnel en matière d'environnement.
En outre, nous, on permettait les débats. Par exemple, quand on a fait le débat sur le projet de loi C-23, qui concernait les réformes électorales, on a débattu pendant quatre jours. La réforme électorale des libéraux, quant à elle, a été débattue pendant deux heures.
Je suis attristé, mais content de débattre jusqu'à minuit, parce que c'est ma grande passion.
Results: 1 - 15 of 39 | Page: 1 of 3

1
2
3
>
>|