Interventions in the House of Commons
 
 
 
RSS feed based on search criteria Export search results - CSV (plain text) Export search results - XML
Add search criteria
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-05-09 15:27 [p.27635]
Mr. Speaker, as always, I would like to salute all the people of Beauport—Limoilou tuning in this afternoon. I would also like to salute my colleague from Saint Boniface—Saint Vital, who just gave a speech on Bill C-91. We worked together for a time on the Standing Committee on Official Languages. I know languages in general are important to him. I also know that, as a Métis person, his personal and family history have a lot to do with his interest in advocating for indigenous languages. That is very honourable of him.
For those watching who are not familiar with Bill C-91, it is a bill on indigenous languages. Enacted in 1969, Canada's Official Languages Act is now 50 years old. That makes this a big year for official languages, and the introduction of this bill on indigenous languages, which is now at third reading, is just and fitting. That is why my colleague from Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo, the Conservative Party's indigenous affairs critic, said she would support the bill when it was introduced back in February. Nevertheless, we do have some criticisms, which I will lay out shortly.
The bill's purpose is twofold. Its primary purpose is to protect indigenous languages and ensure their survival. Did you know that there are 70 indigenous languages spoken in Canada? The problem is that while some languages are still spoken more or less routinely, others are disappearing. Beyond ensuring their survival, this bill seeks to promote the development of indigenous languages that have all but disappeared for the many reasons we are discussing.
The second purpose of the bill, which is just as commendable, is to directly support reconciliation between our founding peoples and first nations, or in other words, reconciliation between federal institutions and indigenous peoples. As the bill says, the purpose is to support and promote the use of indigenous languages, including indigenous sign languages. It seeks to support the efforts of indigenous peoples to reclaim, revitalize, maintain and strengthen indigenous languages, especially the more commonly-spoken ones.
Canada's official opposition obviously decided to support the principles of this bill right from the beginning for four main reasons. The first involves the Conservative Party's record on indigenous matters. Our record may not have been the same in the 19th century, and the same could be said of all parties, but during our 10 years in power, Prime Minister Harper recognized the profound tragedy and grave error of the residential schools. He offered an official apology in 2008.
I want to share a quote from Prime Minister Harper, taken from the speech by my colleague from Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo:
The government now recognizes that the...Indian residential schools policy...has had a lasting and damaging impact on aboriginal culture, heritage and language.
That is why my colleague from Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo said:
We acknowledged in 2008 that [the Canadian government at the time was] part of the destruction of these languages and cultures. Therefore, the government must be part of the solution in terms of helping to bring the languages [and culture] back, and part of that is Bill C-91.
This is why I said that reconciliation is one of the objectives of this bill, beyond the more tangible objective. That is the first reason the Conservatives will support this bill on indigenous languages.
The second reason is that, under Mr. Harper's fantastic tenure, we created the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. It was an important and highly enlightening process.
There were some very sad moments. Members of indigenous nations came to talk about their background and share their stories. They put their cards on the table for all to see. They bared their souls and told the Canadian government what they go through today and what their ancestors went through in the 19th century. Not only did the Conservatives offer a formal apology in 2008, but they also created the Truth and Reconciliation Commission to promote reconciliation between indigenous peoples and the Government of Canada and all Canadians. Our legacy is a testament to our sincere belief in reconciliation. I am sure that is true for all MPs and all Canadians.
Now I will move on to the third reason we support this bill. I am the critic for Canada's official languages, French and English. That is one of the reasons I am speaking today. When I first saw Bill C-91 on the legislative agenda, I considered the issue and then read the Official Languages Act of 1969. The final paragraph of the preamble to the Official Languages Act states that the act:
...recognizes the importance of preserving and enhancing the use of languages other than English and French while strengthening the status and use of the official languages....
When members examine constitutional or legislative matters in committee or in debates such as this one, we need to take the intent of the legislators into consideration. When the Official Languages Act was introduced and passed in 1969, the legislators had already clearly indicated that they intended the protection of official languages to one day include the promotion, enhancement and maintenance of every other language in Canada, including the 70 indigenous languages. Clearly that took some time. That was 50 years ago.
Those are the first three reasons why we support this bill.
The fourth reason goes without saying. We have a duty to make amends for past actions. Those who are familiar with Canada's history know that both French and English colonizers lived in relative harmony with indigenous peoples for the first two or three centuries after Jacques Cartier's arrival in the Gaspé in 1534 and Samuel de Champlain's arrival in Quebec City in 1608. Indigenous peoples are the ones who helped us survive the first winters, plain and simple. They helped us to clear the land and grow crops. Unfortunately, in the late 19th century, when we were able to thrive without the help of indigenous peoples, we began implementing policies of cultural alienation and residential schools. All of that happened in an international context involving cultural theories that have since been debunked and are now considered preposterous.
Yes, we need to make amends for Canada's history and what for what the founding peoples, our francophone and anglophone ancestors, did. It is a matter of justice. The main goal of Bill C-91 is to ensure the development of indigenous languages in Canada, to keep them alive and to prevent them from disappearing.
In closing, for the benefit of Canadians watching us this afternoon, I would like to summarize what Bill C-91 would ultimately achieve. Part of it is about recognition. The bill provides that:
(a) the Government of Canada recognizes that the rights of Indigenous people recognized and affirmed by section 35 of the Constitution Act, 1982 include rights related to Indigenous languages.
This is a bit like what happened with the Official Languages Act, which, thanks to its section 82, takes precedence over other acts. It is also related to section 23 on school boards and the protection of anglophone and francophone linguistic minorities across the country. This bill would create the same situation with respect to section 35 and indigenous laws in Canada.
The legislation also states that the government may enter into agreements to protect languages. The Minister of Canadian Heritage and Multiculturalism may enter into different types of agreements or arrangements in respect of indigenous languages with indigenous governments or other indigenous governing bodies or indigenous organizations, taking into account the unique circumstances and needs of indigenous groups, communities and peoples.
Lastly, the bill would ensure the availability of translation and interpretation services like those available for official languages, but probably not to the same degree. Federal institutions can cause documents to be translated into an indigenous language or provide interpretation services to facilitate the use of an indigenous language.
Canadians listening to us should note one important point. I myself do not speak any indigenous languages, but for the past year, anyone, especially indigenous members, can speak in indigenous languages in the House. Members simply need to give translators 24- or 48-hour notice. That aspect of the bill is about providing translation and interpretation services, but those services will not be offered to the same standard as services provided under the Official Languages Act. However, it is patently clear that an effort is being made to encourage the development of indigenous languages, not only on the ground or in communities where indigenous people live, but also within federal institutions.
I would also point out that the bill provides for a commissioner's office. I find that a little strange. As my colleague from Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo said, for the past four years, the Liberals have been telling us that their most important relationship is the one they have with indigenous peoples. I understand that as a policy statement, but I think it would be more commendable for a government to say that its most important relationship is the one it has with all Canadians.
Now I will talk briefly about the current Commissioner of Official Languages. Many will understand the link I am trying to make with the new indigenous languages commissioner position that will be created. Right when all official language minority communities across the country are talking about the need to modernize the act, today the Commissioner of Official Languages released his annual report and his report on modernizing the act. Most Canadians want bilingualism that is even more vibrant and more wide-spread across Canada. At the same time, there are clearly important gaps in terms of implementing the Official Languages Act across the entire government apparatus.
I have a some examples. A few months ago, the National Energy Board published a report in English only in violation of the OLA. At the time, the Minister of Tourism, Official Languages and La Francophonie said that was unacceptable. The government's job is not to simply say so, however. She should have taken action to ensure that the National Energy Board complies with the Official Languages Act. Then, there were the websites showing calls for tender by Public Services and Procurement Canada that are often riddled with mistakes, grammatical, syntax, and translation errors and misinterpretation. Again, the Minister of Tourism, Official Languages and La Francophonie told us that this was unacceptable.
There is also the Canada Infrastructure Bank, in Toronto. The Conservatives oppose such an institution. We do not believe it will produce the desired results. In its first year, the Canada Infrastructure Bank struggled to serve Canadians in both official languages. Again, the minister stated that this is unacceptable.
These problems keep arising because of cabinet's reckless approach to implementing, as well as ensuring compliance with and enforcement of, the Official Languages Act across the government apparatus. It has taken its duties lightly. The minister responsible is not showing any leadership within cabinet.
When cabinet is not stepping up, we should be able to count on the commissioner. I met with the Commissioner of Official Languages, Mr. Théberge, yesterday, and he gave me a summary of the report he released this morning. He said that he had a lot of investigative powers, including the power to subpoena. However, he said that he has no coercive power. This is one of the main issues with enforcement. For example, the majority of Canadians abide by the Criminal Code because police officers exercise coercive powers, ensuring that everyone complies with Canadian laws and the Criminal Code.
The many flaws and shortcomings in the implementation of the Official Languages Act are due not only to a lack of leadership in cabinet, but also to the commissioner not having adequate coercive power. The Conservatives will examine this issue very carefully to determine whether the commissioner should have coercive power.
The provisions of Bill C-91, an act respecting indigenous languages, dealing with the establishment of the office of the commissioner of indigenous languages are quite vague. Not only will the commissioner not have any coercive power, but he or she will also not have any well-established investigative powers.
The Liberals waited until the end of their four-year term to bring this bill forward, even though they spent those four years telling us that the relationship with indigenous peoples is their most important relationship. Furthermore, in committee, they frantically rushed to table 20-odd amendments to their own bill, as my colleague from Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo pointed out.
How can the Liberals say their most important relationship is their relationship with indigenous peoples when they waited four years to table this bill? What is more, not only did they table the bill in a slapdash way, but they had to get their own members to propose amendments to improve it. It is not unusual for members to propose amendments, but the Liberals had to table a whole stack of them because the bill had all kinds of flaws.
In closing, I think this bill is a good step towards reconciliation, but there are no tangible measures for the commissioner. For instance, if members have their speeches to the House translated into an indigenous language and the translation is bad, what can the commissioner do? If an indigenous community signs an agreement with the federal government and then feels that the agreement was not implemented properly, who can challenge the government on their behalf?
There is still a lot of work to be done, but we need to pass this bill as quickly as possible, despite all of its flaws, because the end of this Parliament is approaching. Once again, the government has shown its lack of seriousness, as it has with many other bills. To end on a positive note, I would like to say that this bill is a step toward reconciliation between indigenous peoples and the founding peoples, which is very commendable and necessary.
Monsieur le Président, comme d’habitude, j’aimerais saluer tous les citoyens et les citoyennes de Beauport—Limoilou qui nous écoutent. J’aimerais également saluer mon collègue de Saint-Boniface—Saint-Vital, qui vient de faire un discours sur le projet de loi C-91. Nous avons siégé ensemble au Comité permanent des langues officielles. Je sais que les langues sont importantes pour lui en général. Je sais aussi qu'en tant que Métis, son histoire familiale et personnelle contribue énormément à cet intérêt qu'il porte à la défense des langues autochtones. C’est très honorable de sa part.
Pour les citoyens qui nous écoutent et qui ne connaissent pas le projet de loi C-91, il s’agit d'un projet de loi sur les langues autochtones. Au Canada, nous avons une loi sur les langues officielles depuis 1969. Cette année, c’est le 50 anniversaire de la Loi sur les langues officielles. C’est donc une grande année pour les langues officielles, et le dépôt de ce projet de loi sur les langues autochtones, qui en est à la troisième lecture, est de bon aloi et juste. C’est pourquoi ma collègue de Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo, qui est porte-parole du Parti conservateur en matière d'affaires autochtones, a mentionné qu'elle appuierait le projet de loi dès qu'il a été déposé, en février. Cependant, nous avons quelques critiques, que je vais mentionner un peu plus tard.
L'objectif du projet de loi est double. Il s’agit d’abord de protéger les langues autochtones et d’assurer leur survie. Sait-on qu’il y a 70 langues autochtones parlées? Le problème, c’est que, tandis que certaines d'entre elles sont plus ou moins parlées, voire courantes, d'autres sont en voie de disparition. Ce projet de loi vise non seulement à assurer la protection et la survie de toutes ces langues qui existent, mais aussi à favoriser l'épanouissement des langues autochtones qui, pour de nombreuses raisons dont nous discuterons, sont presque disparues.
Le deuxième objectif du projet de loi, qui est tout aussi louable, c'est de contribuer directement à la réconciliation entre les peuples fondateurs et les Premières Nations. En d'autres mots, il s'agit de la réconciliation entre les institutions qui forment le gouvernement fédéral et les Autochtones. Comme le projet de loi le dit, l'objectif est de soutenir et de promouvoir l’usage des langues autochtones, y compris les langues des signes autochtones. Par ailleurs, il veut soutenir les peuples autochtones dans leurs efforts visant à se réapproprier les langues autochtones, à les revitaliser, à les maintenir et à les renforcer, notamment ceux qui visent une utilisation courante.
De toute évidence, dès le départ, l’opposition officielle du Canada a décidé d’appuyer tous les principes énoncés dans ce projet de loi, pour quatre raisons principales. D’abord, il s'agit du bilan du Parti conservateur du Canada en ce qui concerne les Autochtones. Ce bilan n'était peut-être pas le même au XIXe siècle — on pourrait en dire autant de tous les partis —, mais lors de nos 10 dernières années au pouvoir, le premier ministre Harper a reconnu la grande tragédie et la grave erreur des pensionnats autochtones. Il a donné des excuses officielles en 2008.
Voici une citation du premier ministre Harper tirée du discours de ma collègue de Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo:
Le gouvernement reconnaît [...] que cette politique [c'est-à-dire les pensionnats autochtones] a causé des dommages durables à la culture, au patrimoine et à la langue autochtones.
C'est pourquoi ma collègue de Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo a dit:
En 2008, nous avons reconnu que nous avions participé à la destruction de ces langues et cultures [elle parle du gouvernement canadien de l’époque]. Par conséquent, le gouvernement doit faire partie de la solution pour aider à les raviver [c’est-à-dire les langues et la culture autochtones]. Le projet de loi C-91 est une partie de la solution.
Voilà pourquoi j’ai dit que l'un des objectifs de ce projet de loi, au-delà de ce qu’il tente de faire de manière tangible et palpable, est la réconciliation. C’est la première raison pour laquelle nous, les conservateurs, appuierons le projet de loi sur les langues autochtones.
La deuxième raison, c’est que sous le règne formidable de M. Harper, nous avons mis en place la Commission de vérité et réconciliation. Cela a été un exercice non seulement important, mais très révélateur.
Il y a eu des moments extrêmement tristes. Des individus des nations autochtones se sont présentés pour raconter leur parcours et leur histoire. Ils ont publiquement mis cartes sur table. Ils se sont vidé le coeur et ont expliqué au gouvernement canadien ce qu'ils avaient vécu en ces temps modernes et ce qu'avaient vécu leurs aïeux au XIXe siècle. Non seulement les conservateurs ont-ils offert des excuses en 2008, mais ils ont également mis sur pied la Commission de vérité et réconciliation, entre les peuples autochtones et le gouvernement du Canada et tous les Canadiens. La marque que nous avons laissée témoigne de notre bonne foi envers la réconciliation. C'est également le cas de tous les députés et de tous les Canadiens, j'en suis certain.
Je vais parler de la troisième raison pour laquelle nous appuyons ce projet de loi. Je suis porte-parole des langues officielles du Canada, le français et l'anglais. C'est l'une des raisons pour lesquelles je prends la parole aujourd'hui. Lorsque j'ai vu pour la première fois le projet de loi C-91 inscrit à l'ordre du jour législatif, j'ai réfléchi et j'ai lu la Loi sur les langues officielles de 1969. Dans le dernier paragraphe du préambule de la Loi sur les langues officielles, on dit que la Loi:
[...] reconnaît l’importance, parallèlement à l’affirmation du statut des langues officielles et à l’élargissement de leur usage, de maintenir et de valoriser l’usage des autres langues [...]
Quand les députés étudient des questions constitutionnelles ou législatives, en comité ou lors de débats comme celui-ci, il est important de prendre en considération l'intention des législateurs. Quand la Loi sur les langues officielles a été déposée et votée, en 1969, les législateurs avaient déjà clairement exprimé leur intention que la protection des langues officielles inclue, un jour ou l'autre, la promotion, la valorisation et le maintien de toutes les autres langues qui existent au Canada, dont les 70 langues autochtones. On s'entend que cela a pris du temps. Cela se fait 50 ans plus tard.
Ce sont donc les trois premières raisons pour lesquelles nous appuyons ce projet de loi.
Je dirais que la quatrième raison va de soi. Il s'agit du devoir que nous avons de réparer l'histoire. Quand on lit l'histoire canadienne, on constate, dans les cas de Jacques Cartier, qui est arrivé en 1534 en Gaspésie, et de Samuel de Champlain, qui est arrivé à Québec en 1608, que, dans les deux ou trois premiers siècles de coexistence entre les peuples autochtones et les colonisateurs français ou anglais, il y avait quand même une harmonie. Ce sont les Autochtones qui nous ont aidés à survivre aux premiers hivers, ni plus ni moins. Ce sont les Autochtones qui nous ont aidés à cultiver et à défricher la terre. Bien malheureusement, à la fin du XIXe siècle, lorsque nous étions à même de nous épanouir sans l'aide des Autochtones, nous avons commencé à mettre en place des politiques d'aliénation culturelle et des pensionnats autochtones. Tout cela s'est passé dans la foulée d'un contexte international où des théories culturelles n'avaient aucun sens et qui sont aujourd'hui complètement contredites.
Oui, il faut réparer l'histoire du Canada et ce qu'ont fait les peuples fondateurs, nos aïeux francophones et anglophones. C'est une question de justice. Le projet de loi C-91 vise d'abord et avant tout à garantir l'épanouissement des langues autochtones au Canada et à maintenir leur existence pour ne pas qu'elles disparaissent.
En terminant, j'aimerais indiquer de manière sommaire aux Canadiens qui nous écoutent ce que le projet de loi C-91 fera au bout du compte. D'abord, il y a un aspect de reconnaissance. De par ce projet de loi:
a) le gouvernement du Canada reconnaît que les droits des peuples autochtones reconnus et confirmés par l’article 35 de la Loi constitutionnelle de 1982 comportent des droits relatifs aux langues autochtones;
C'est un peu comme ce qui est arrivé dans le cas de la Loi sur les langues officielles, qui, grâce à son article 82, prime sur les autres lois. De plus, elle est reliée à l'article 23 sur les commissions scolaires et la protection des minorités linguistiques francophones et anglophones de partout au pays. Ce projet de loi vise à créer la même situation en ce qui a trait à l'article 35 et aux lois autochtones au Canada.
La loi prévoit également que le gouvernement peut faire des accords pour protéger les langues. Le ministre du Patrimoine canadien et du Multiculturalisme peut conclure divers types d'accords concernant les langues autochtones avec des gouvernements autochtones, d'autres dirigeants autochtones et des organismes autochtones, tout en tenant compte de la situation et des besoins propres aux groupes, aux collectivités et aux peuples autochtones.
Finalement, le projet de loi prévoit offrir des services de traduction et d'interprétation, comme c'est le cas pour les langues officielles, mais sûrement pas au même niveau que celles-ci. Les institutions fédérales peuvent veiller à ce que les documents soient traduits dans une langue autochtone et à ce que des services d'interprétation soient offerts afin de faciliter l'usage d'une telle langue.
Les Canadiens et les Canadiennes qui nous écoutent devraient noter un fait important. Personnellement, je ne parle aucune langue autochtone, mais depuis un an, n'importe qui, et surtout les députés autochtones, peut s'exprimer en langue autochtone à la Chambre. Le député n'a qu'à envoyer un avis de 24 ou de 48 heures aux traducteurs. Cet élément du projet de loi prévoit offrir des services de traduction et d'interprétation, mais ils ne seront pas au même niveau que ceux prévus par la Loi sur les langues officielles. Cependant, on voit de manière très nette qu'il y a une tentative de permettre l'épanouissement des langues autochtones, pas seulement sur le terrain ou dans les communautés où vivent les Autochtones, mais également au sein des institutions fédérales.
De plus, on peut constater que le projet de loi prévoit un bureau de commissaire. Je trouve cela un peu particulier. Comme ma collègue de Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo le disait, depuis quatre ans, les libéraux nous disent que leur relation la plus importante est celle qu'ils entretiennent avec les peuples autochtones. Je peux comprendre cet énoncé politique, mais je pense qu'il serait plus louable de dire que la relation la plus importante du gouvernement est celle qu'il entretient avec tous les Canadiens.
Maintenant, je vais parler brièvement du commissaire aux langues officielles actuel. On pourra comprendre le lien que je tente de faire avec le nouveau commissariat aux langues autochtones qui sera créé. Au moment où l'ensemble des communautés linguistiques officielles en situation minoritaire, d'un océan à l'autre, discute de l'importance de moderniser la loi, le commissaire aux langues officielles a déposé aujourd'hui son rapport annuel ainsi que son rapport sur la modernisation de la loi. De plus, la plupart des Canadiens ont la volonté de voir un bilinguisme plus vivant et plus répandu partout au Canada. Au même moment, on constate qu'il y a des lacunes importantes en ce qui concerne la mise en œuvre de la Loi sur les langues officielles au sein de l'appareil gouvernemental.
Je vais donner quelques exemples. Il y a quelques mois, l'Office national de l'énergie a publié un rapport uniquement en anglais, ce qui va à l'encontre de la Loi. À l'époque, la ministre du Tourisme, des Langues officielles et de la Francophoniea dit que c'était inacceptable. Cependant, il ne revient pas au gouvernement de dire cela. Elle aurait dû agir et s'assurer que l'Office national de l'énergie applique la Loi sur les langues officielles. On a aussi vu que les sites Internet sur lesquels sont publiés les appels d'offres de Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada sont plus souvent qu'autrement truffés d'erreurs, de fautes grammaticales et de syntaxe et d'erreurs de traduction et d'interprétation. Encore une fois, la ministre du Tourisme, des langues officielles et de la Francophonie nous a dit que cela était inacceptable.
Il y a aussi la Banque de l'infrastructure du Canada, à Toronto. Nous, les conservateurs, sommes contre ce type d'institution. Nous pensons qu'elle ne donnera pas les résultats escomptés. Dans sa première année d'existence, la Banque de l'infrastructure du Canada a eu peine à servir dans les deux langues officielles les Canadiens qui la contactaient. Encore une fois, la ministre a dit que cela était inacceptable.
Ces problèmes surviennent constamment parce que le Cabinet, dans un contexte délétère, ne prend pas au sérieux la mise en œuvre, le respect et l'application de la Loi sur les langues officielles au sein de l'appareil gouvernemental. La ministre qui est en poste n'applique pas son leadership au sein du Cabinet.
Quand cette réalité n'existe pas au sein du Cabinet, on voudrait pouvoir compter sur le commissaire. J'ai rencontré le commissaire aux langues officielles, M. Théberge, hier, et il m'a fait le compte rendu du rapport qu'il a déposé ce matin. Il a dit qu'il possédait une tonne de pouvoirs d'enquête, dont celui d'émettre une citation à comparaître. Il peut donc forcer des gens à comparaître dans le cadre d'une enquête. Cependant, il a dit qu'il n'avait aucun pouvoir coercitif. C'est l'un des gros problèmes en ce qui a trait à l'application d'une loi. Par exemple, si le Code criminel est respecté par la majorité des Canadiens, c'est bien parce qu'il y a un pouvoir coercitif, c'est-à-dire les forces policières, qui assurent le respect du droit canadien et du Code criminel.
Si on observe autant de manquements et de lacunes en ce qui concerne la mise en œuvre de la Loi sur les langues officielles, c'est non seulement à cause d'un manque de leadership au sein du Cabinet, mais également parce que le commissaire n'a pas de pouvoir coercitif adéquat. Nous, les conservateurs, allons nous pencher très sérieusement sur cette question afin d'évaluer si le commissaire devrait avoir un pouvoir coercitif.
Quand je lis la partie du projet de loi C-91, Loi concernant les langues autochtones, qui porte sur la mise en place du Bureau du commissaire aux langues autochtones, je constate qu'il y a très peu de détails. Non seulement il n'aura pas de pouvoir coercitif, mais il n'aura pas non plus de pouvoirs d'enquête bien établis.
Les libéraux ont attendu jusqu'à la fin de leur mandat de quatre ans pour déposer ce projet de loi, alors qu'ils nous disent depuis autant d'années que la relation avec les peuples autochtones est la relation la plus importante qu'ils entretiennent. De plus, en comité, ils ont déposé à la hâte et d'une manière chaotique une vingtaine d'amendements à leur propre projet de loi, comme ma collègue de Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo l'a si bien dit.
Alors, comment est-ce possible que la relation la plus importante des libéraux soit celle qu'ils entretiennent avec les Autochtones, alors qu'ils ont attendu quatre ans pour déposer ce projet de loi? De plus, non seulement ils ont déposé le projet de loi de façon chaotique, mais ils ont dû dire eux-mêmes à leurs députés de déposer des amendements afin de renforcer le projet de loi. Il est normal que des députés proposent des amendements, mais les libéraux ont dû en déposer une multitude, parce que le projet de loi avait toutes sortes de lacunes.
En terminant, je trouve que ce projet de loi est un bon pas vers la réconciliation, mais il n'y a aucune mesure tangible pour le commissaire. Par exemple, si des députés font traduire leur discours en langue autochtone à la Chambre et que le travail est mal fait, qu'est-ce que le commissaire va pouvoir dire? Si jamais des communautés autochtones concluent des accords avec le gouvernement fédéral et qu'ils ne sont pas mis en place convenablement, qui pourra se battre contre le gouvernement en leur nom?
Il restait donc encore beaucoup de travail à faire, mais nous allons devoir adopter ce projet de loi le plus rapidement possible, malgré toutes ses lacunes, puisque la fin de la législature approche. Encore une fois, le gouvernement a fait preuve d'un manque de sérieux, comme dans le cas de plusieurs projets de loi. Pour terminer sur une bonne note, je dirai que ce projet de loi contribue effectivement à la réconciliation entre les peuples autochtones et les peuples fondateurs, ce qui est très louable et nécessaire.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-05-09 15:48 [p.27637]
Mr. Speaker, the member is right. We are celebrating 50 years of having two official languages in Canada. They are official languages in terms of status and institutionalization of the facts, because historically, there were two languages three centuries ago. They were part of our identity in Canada, and they are still part of it.
There are a few ways to ensure that the Commissioner of Official Languages has more powers. As legislators, we have to do our due diligence and look at this carefully. Specialists have said that we should have pecuniary and administrative sanctions. For example, some governmental agencies and private enterprises go against the law. Only one private enterprise in Canada is under the law, which is Air Canada. Some of them constantly go against the law in their behaviour and actions, on a monthly basis sometimes. Although the commissioner is constantly making recommendations, 20% of his recommendations are never followed, as was said this morning. Why? It is because he does not have the power to tell organizations to stop or they will pay a fine.
Another option is to have an executory deal. It is less coercive. The governmental agency or private enterprise could be asked to make a deal, such as being in accordance with the law within five months.
If my colleague is interested, he can look into how it is done in Wales, England. It has a commissioner who has huge coercive powers.
Monsieur le Président, le député a raison. Nous célébrons les 50 ans de l'établissement des deux langues officielles au Canada. Ce sont des langues officielles pour ce qui est de leur statut et de leur institutionnalisation; en effet, elles étaient également présentes il y a de cela trois siècles. Elles faisaient et font toujours partie de notre identité canadienne.
Il y a plusieurs façons de faire en sorte que le commissaire aux langues officielles ait un pouvoir accru. En tant que législateurs, nous devons faire preuve de diligence raisonnable et examiner la question attentivement. Les spécialistes ont dit que nous devrions prévoir des sanctions pécuniaires et administratives. Par exemple, certains organismes gouvernementaux et certaines entreprises privées — et il y en a une seule au Canada qui est assujettie à la loi, soit Air Canada —, vont à l'encontre de la loi. Ils enfreignent constamment la loi dans leur comportement et leurs actions, et ce, parfois sur une base mensuelle. Malgré les recommandations constantes du commissaire, 20 % de celles-ci ne sont pas suivies, comme on l'a dit ce matin. Pourquoi? Parce qu'il n'a pas le pouvoir de dire aux organismes d'arrêter sous peine de devoir payer une amende.
Une autre option est de conclure un accord exécutoire, ce qui est moins coercitif. L'entreprise privée ou l'organisme gouvernemental pourrait être invité à conclure un accord, par exemple d'accepter de se conformer à la loi dans un délai de cinq mois.
Si mon collègue est intéressé, il peut se renseigner sur la façon de faire au pays de Galles, en Angleterre, où se trouve un commissaire qui détient un énorme pouvoir de coercition.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-05-09 15:51 [p.27638]
Mr. Speaker, if I correctly understood what the member said, there is, in fact, a part at the beginning of the law that speaks about the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, UNDRIP, which does not bind the government to this law, and maybe she finds that unfortunate. However, I voted against UNDRIP.
There were some indigenous people in my riding who came to my office, and with courage and pride I sat in front of them and explained to them why it was actually a courageous act as a legislator in 2018 to vote against the ratification of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples by Canada. Why? It is because most constitutionalists would say that it goes against some of our own constitutional conventions and laws, and I think that a courageous legislator must tell the truth to Canadians.
Although we might like UNDRIP, it is not in accordance with Canadian law. What is most important for a legislator is not to protect United Nations accords; it is to protect the Canadian law. I explained that to my constituent, who was an indigenous person, and I think we had huge respect for each other. Although he did not agree with me, I understand why he could not agree with me, which was because of the history he had with us and the founding people. Maybe that is why UNDRIP is not so clearly enshrined in this law.
Monsieur le Président, si j'ai bien compris la députée, il y a une partie au début du projet de loi qui porte sur la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones. Cependant, cette partie n'a pas force exécutoire, ce que la députée trouve peut-être regrettable. J'ai toutefois voté contre la Déclaration.
Quelques Autochtones de ma circonscription sont venus à mon bureau, et je leur ai expliqué fièrement et courageusement pourquoi il était courageux pour un législateur de voter contre la ratification de la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones par le Canada en 2018. Pourquoi? C'est parce que la plupart des constitutionnalistes estiment que la Déclaration va à l'encontre de certaines de nos propres conventions et lois constitutionnelles, et je pense qu'un législateur courageux doit dire la vérité aux Canadiens.
Bien que nous puissions aimer la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones, elle n'est pas conforme au droit canadien. Il est plus important pour un législateur de protéger les lois canadiennes que de protéger les accords des Nations unies. J'ai expliqué cette réalité à mon concitoyen autochtone et je pense que nous avions énormément de respect l'un pour l'autre. Il n'était pas d'accord avec moi, mais je comprends pourquoi il ne pouvait pas l'être. C'est en raison de son passé par rapport à nous et aux peuples fondateurs. C'est peut-être pour cette raison que la Déclaration n'est pas si clairement inscrite dans le projet de loi.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-05-09 15:54 [p.27638]
Mr. Speaker, to the first question on the importance of language, I know what it means, because I am a Quebecker. I am a French Canadian, and I am able to speak in French in this institution, but I like to show respect and answer in English when someone talks to me in English. My father is an anglophone, by the way.
When my daughter was born five years ago, I intended to speak to her in English, and I told my wife that she could speak to her in French, but I could not do it, because when I speak in English to my daughter, it is not from my heart. I do not feel the connection. Therefore, yes, a language is fundamental to a person's identity. It is fundamental to carry the culture we are from. It is impossible for me to speak to my kids in English. I do not see them that much, because I am here, but when I speak to my kids, I want my heart to be speaking.
Second, it is obvious that there were a lot of mistakes in the bill, because the government had to present more than 20 amendments. We should be afraid that there are other mistakes in the bill, which we did not have time to discuss or analyze correctly. I think that could be something troublesome that the next government, which will be Conservative, will have to repair.
Monsieur le Président, pour ce qui est de la première question, concernant l'importance de la langue, je sais ce que cela veut dire parce que je suis Québécois. Je suis un Canadien français et je peux m'exprimer en français dans cette institution, mais, par respect, je réponds en anglais lorsque quelqu'un m'adresse la parole en anglais. Mon père est anglophone, en passant.
Lorsque ma fille est née, il y a cinq ans, j'avais l'intention de lui parler en anglais et j'ai dit à ma femme qu'elle pourrait lui parler en français. Cependant, je n'y suis pas arrivé parce que lorsque je parlais à ma fille en anglais, ce n'était pas aussi senti que lorsque je lui parle en français. Je ne ressentais pas de connexion. Une langue est donc effectivement fondamentale dans l'identité d'une personne. Porter la culture dont nous sommes issus est fondamental. Je suis simplement incapable de parler à mes enfants en anglais. Je ne les vois pas très souvent parce que je suis ici, mais lorsque je parle à mes enfants, je veux que cela vienne du coeur.
Ensuite, il est évident que le projet de loi comportait de nombreuses erreurs parce que le gouvernement a dû présenter plus de 20 amendements. On est en droit de craindre qu'il y ait d'autres erreurs, que nous n'aurons pas le temps d'aborder et d'analyser comme il se doit. Je crois qu'il s'agira d'un problème que le prochain gouvernement — qui sera conservateur — devra régler.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-04-10 17:21 [p.26995]
Mr. Speaker, I must say that in this case, I also appreciated the speech made by my colleague from Sherbrooke. I agree with him, much to the chagrin of my colleague from Sackville—Preston—Chezzetcook.
As the member for Sherbrooke said, this budget is dragging up broken promises, such as the promise to return to a balanced budget this year, which is rather unbelievable. It does not even include a timeline for balancing the budget. This is a first in our country's history.
The government is budgeting $41 billion to deflect attention from its mistakes, including its bungled foreign and domestic policy. Once again, the budget favours the major interest groups, as the member for Sherbrooke pointed out. We saw more evidence of this today, when the government gave Loblaws $12 million for refrigerators. It is absolutely ridiculous.
Does my colleague from Sherbrooke agree that this budget shows a lack of respect for Quebeckers?
In 2015, the member for Papineau, the Prime Minister, told a New York newspaper that Canada was postnational. This is an outright affront to Quebeckers, whose historical and political reality is very much alive and well.
There are also no measures in this bill to address the Quebec premier's concerns about the cost of the arrival of a huge number of illegal refugees. I know he does not like that term, but Quebec wants to be reimbursed for some of those costs. There is also nothing in the budget about a single tax return or the Quebec Bridge, and there is nothing to address the discriminatory measure wherein larger cities will get more money for sustainable mobility infrastructure than smaller ones like Quebec City.
Does my colleague agree that the 2019 budget implementation bill once again shows the government's lack of respect for all our fellow Quebeckers?
Monsieur le Président, je dois dire dans ce cas-ci que j'ai aussi apprécié le discours de mon collègue de Sherbrooke. Je suis d'accord avec lui, au grand dam de mon collègue de Sackville—Preston—Chezzetcook.
Comme le député de Sherbrooke le disait, c'est un budget qui réitère des promesses brisées, dont celle du retour à l'équilibre budgétaire cette année, ce qui est assez incroyable. Il n'y a même pas d'échéance concernant un retour éventuel à l'équilibre budgétaire. C'est du jamais vu dans l'histoire du pays.
On voit dans ce budget que 41 milliards de dollars sont dépensés pour détourner l'attention des erreurs de ce gouvernement, que ce soit en matière de politique étrangère ou de politique interne. Encore une fois, c'est un budget qui favorise les grands groupes d'intérêt, comme l'a dit le député de Sherbrooke. On l'a vu encore aujourd'hui, alors que 12 millions de dollars ont été octroyés à Loblaws pour des réfrigérateurs. C'est totalement ridicule.
Est-ce que mon collègue de Sherbrooke trouve aussi que ce budget illustre un non-respect envers les Québécois?
En 2015, le député de Papineau, le premier ministre, a dit à un journal de New York que le Canada était postnational. C'est un affront total envers les Québécois, qui se considèrent comme un peuple historico-politique toujours bien vivant.
Par ailleurs, dans ce budget, aucune mesure ne répond aux doléances du premier ministre du Québec concernant les coûts de l'arrivée massive de réfugiés illégaux. Je sais qu'il n'aime pas ce terme, mais il y a des coûts que le Québec veut se faire rembourser. Ensuite, il n'y a rien non plus au sujet de la déclaration d'impôt unique, il n'y a rien pour le pont de Québec et il n'y a rien pour pallier la discrimination en ce qui a trait aux infrastructures de mobilité durable, qui fait que les grandes villes vont recevoir plus d'argent que les petites villes comme Québec.
Mon collègue est-il d'accord avec moi que ce projet de loi de mise en oeuvre du budget de 2019 illustre encore une fois un non-respect envers tous nos compatriotes québécois?
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2019-02-20 16:21 [p.25608]
Mr. Speaker, I want to point out how disappointed I am. I could hardly wait to speak about this bill today, mainly for personal reasons. I have an Inuit first name, Alupa, which means “strong man”. My entire family is very aware of and attuned to indigenous matters. My wife is an anthropologist who has worked with the Inuit for many years, and my father is a forensic historian, who has defended indigenous people in many cases by locating treaties or doing research for them.
The minister said that this is an extremely important bill that will protect and promote indigenous languages, some of which are dying out. That much is true. The Liberals have also said that no relationship is more important than the relationship with indigenous peoples. They have said it over and over, but this bill was introduced only a few months before the election, at the end of their mandate and four years after they were elected. Yes, it is urgent that we take action, but it is not true that we will all be able to state our position and discuss it in committee. As there are only three spots for opposition members, I do not think I will have the opportunity to debate the bill or to suggest amendments in committee.
Although we support this bill on the face of it, it deals with some very serious issues. There is a very clear reason why we support this bill, and that appears in the last paragraph of the preamble to the Official Languages Act, which states that the government recognizes the importance of preserving and enhancing the use of languages other than English and French while strengthening the status and use of the official languages.
This bill is therefore perfectly aligned with Canada's political doctrine. However, there are some very important issues that need clarification, and I will talk about them now. Why is the Official Languages Act quasi-constitutional? That is because it is linked to sections 16 to 23 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. The minister told us that Bill C-91, an act respecting indigenous languages, is linked to section 35 of the Constitution. Does that mean that this bill will become quasi-constitutional legislation like the Official Languages Act? If so, we will have to discuss this for weeks because it will have a major impact on our society. It will be a very positive impact, to be sure, but when we say that the bill could be quasi-constitutional we need to know where that takes us.
The bill also states that there would be a commissioner of indigenous languages. Will this commissioner have duties similar to those of the Commissioner of Official Languages? Will they have a joint office?
The bill also talks about funding to protect, preserve and promote indigenous languages. Will that involve developing action plans as we do for official languages? Will this cost billions of dollars over five years every five years, as is the case with the action plan for official languages? Will the department also receive $1 billion in recurring funding every five years?
There are all kinds of questions to which we have no answers today. Could we maybe get an inkling of an answer right now?
Monsieur le Président, je tiens à souligner ma déception. J'étais très impatient de parler de ce projet de loi aujourd'hui, d'abord pour des raisons très personnelles. J'ai un prénom inuit, Alupa, qui veut dire « homme fort », et dans ma famille, nous sommes très sensibilisés à toutes les questions autochtones. Ma femme, qui est anthropologue, travaille auprès des Inuits depuis plusieurs années, et mon père est un historien légiste qui a défendu les Autochtones dans plusieurs causes en trouvant des traités ou en faisant des recherches pour ceux-ci.
Le ministre a dit que c'était un projet de loi extrêmement important pour protéger et promouvoir les langues autochtones, dont certaines sont en train de disparaître. C'est vrai. Auparavant, les libéraux nous ont aussi dit que le lien le plus important de ce gouvernement est celui qu'il a avec les Autochtones. Ils l'ont dit à maintes reprises, mais on constate que ce projet de loi n'apparaît que quelques mois avant les élections, à la fin de leur mandat, quatre ans plus tard. Oui, il y a urgence d'agir, mais ce n'est pas vrai que nous pourrons tous et toutes prendre position et en discuter au sein du comité. Comme il n'y a que trois places réservées à l'opposition, je ne pense pas avoir la chance d'y débattre ou d'y apporter mes suggestions d'amendement.
Bien que nous appuyons ce projet de loi de prime abord, celui-ci est lié à des questions très sérieuses. La raison pour laquelle nous l'appuyons est très claire. Elle se trouve dans le préambule de la Loi sur les langues officielles, au dernier paragraphe, où il est écrit que le gouvernement reconnaît l'importance, parallèlement à l'affirmation du statut des langues officielles et à l'élargissement de leur usage, de maintenir et de valoriser l'usage des autres langues.
Ce projet de loi s'insère donc parfaitement dans la doctrine politique canadienne. Toutefois, il y a des questions très importantes à éclaircir, et je vais les énumérer dès maintenant. Pourquoi la Loi sur les langues officielles est-elle quasi constitutionnelle? C'est parce qu'elle est liée aux articles 16 à 23 de la Charte canadienne des droits et libertés. Le ministre nous a dit que le projet de loi C-91, Loi concernant les langues autochtones, est lié à l'article 35 de la Constitution. Est-ce que cela en fera une loi quasi constitutionnelle comme c'est le cas pour la Loi sur les langues officielles? Si tel est le cas, il faudra en discuter pendant des semaines, parce que cela aura de grandes conséquences dans notre société. Ce seront des conséquences sûrement très positives, soit, mais il faut savoir où on s'en va lorsqu'on dit qu'un projet de loi pourrait être quasi constitutionnel.
Par ailleurs, le projet de loi stipule qu'il y aura un commissaire aux langues autochtones. Aura-t-il des fonctions similaires à celles du commissaire aux langues officielles? Auront-ils un bureau conjoint?
On nous parle également de financement visant à protéger, préserver et valoriser les langues autochtones. Est-ce que ce seront des plans d'action comme c'est le cas pour les langues officielles? Est-ce que ce seront des milliards de dollars sur cinq ans tous les cinq ans, comme dans le cas du plan d'action pour les langues officielles? Est-ce que le ministère va recevoir une somme récurrente de 1 milliard de dollars tous les cinq ans également?
Bref, il y a toutes sortes de questions auxquelles on n'a pas de réponse aujourd'hui. Peut-être pourrions-nous avoir des balbutiements de réponse dès maintenant.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-12-13 13:07 [p.24860]
Mr. Speaker, I had the honour and privilege to be chosen, among the 338 members of Parliament, to speak today on the last day we will be sitting in this building, the Centre Block, in the House of Commons, in our wonderful Parliament, in our great federation.
Before I go any further and talk a bit about Centre Block, I should say that I will be sharing my time with the excellent member for Portneuf—Jacques-Cartier, one of my esteemed colleagues, whose riding is quite close to my own. We share a border, between Sainte-Brigitte-de-Laval and Beauport. I am very happy to work with him on various issues that affect our respective constituents.
I would like to wish a very merry Christmas to everyone in Beauport—Limoilou who is watching us right now or who might watch this evening on Facebook, Twitter or other social media. I wish everyone a wonderful time with their family, and I hope they take some time to rest and relax. That is important. This season can be a time to focus a little more on ourselves and our families, and to spend time together, to catch up and to rest up. I wish all my constituents the very best for 2019. Of course we will be seeing one another next week in our riding. I will be in my office and out in the community all week. I invite all my constituents to the Christmas party I am hosting on Wednesday, December 19, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m., at my office, which is located at 2000 Sanfaçon Avenue. Refreshments will be served and we will celebrate Christmas together. Over 200 people attended the event last year. I hope to see just as many people out this year. Merry Christmas and happy new year to everyone.
Today I want to talk about Bill C-76. I think this is the third time I speak to this bill. This is the first time I have had the opportunity to speak at all three readings of the same bill, and I am delighted I have been able do so.
This is somewhat ironic, because we have every reason to feel nostalgic today. The Centre Block of the House of Commons has been the centre of Canadian democracy since 1916, or rather, since its reconstruction, which was completed in 1920 after the fire. We have been sitting in this place for over a century, for 102 years. We serve to ensure the well-being of our constituents and to discuss democracy, to discuss legislation and the issues that matter to our country every day.
Today, rather ironically, we are discussing Bill C-76, which seeks to amend the Canada Elections Act. This is the legislation that sets the guidelines, standards, conditions and guarantees by which we, the 338 members of Parliament, were elected by constituents to sit here in the House of Commons. It is an interesting bill that we are discussing on our last day here, but this situation is indeed somewhat ironic, as my NDP colleague so rightly said in his question to the parliamentary secretary. He asked why, if this bill is so important to the Liberals, they waited until the last minute to rush it through after three years in power. The same version appeared in Bill C-33 in 2015-16, and the Liberals delayed implementation of that bill.
Since we are talking about Bill C-76, which affects the Elections Act and democracy, I must say I find it a shame that only six out of the 200 amendments the Conservatives proposed in committee were accepted.
We have concrete grievances based on real concerns and even the opinion of the majority. I will share with the House some of the surveys I have here. I just want to take a minute to say to all those watching us on CPAC or elsewhere right now, that it has been my dream ever since I was 15 to serve Canadians first and foremost. That is why I enrolled in the Canadian Armed Forces. That is why I dreamed of becoming an MP since I was 15. In 2015, I had the exceptional honour of earning the confidence of the majority of the 92,000 constituents of Beauport—Limoilou. I would like to tell them that, in my view, the House of Commons represents the opposite of what the Prime Minister said yesterday. He said it was just a room.
I did not like that because the House of Commons, which will close for renovations for 15 years in a few days, is not just a room, as the Prime Minister said. I find it unfortunate that he used that term. It is the chamber of the people. That is why it is green. The colour green represents the people and the colour red represents aristocracy. Hence the Senate chamber is red.
I hope I am not mistaken. Perhaps the parliamentary guides could talk to me about this.
It is unfortunate that the Prime Minister said that it is not the centre of democracy, because that is not true. I will explain to Canadians why it is wrong to say that Parliament is not the centre of democracy.
The Prime Minister was right when he said that democracy resides everywhere, whether in protests in the streets, meetings of political associations or union meetings. Of course, democracy happens there. However, the centre of democracy is here, because it is here that elected members sit and vote on the laws that govern absolutely everything in the country. It is also here that we can even change Canada's Constitution. The country's Constitution cannot be changed anywhere else or as part of political debates by a political association or a protest. No, it can only be done here or in the other legislative assemblies of the provinces in Canada. It is only in those places that we can make amendments and change how democracy works or deal with problems to address current issues. Yes, by definition, in a practical manner, the centre of democracy is right here. It is not, as the Prime Minister said, just a room like so many others. No, it is the House of Commons.
Just briefly, before I get back to Bill C-76, I want to talk about the six sculptures on the east wall. The first represents civil law; the second, freedom of speech; the third, the Senate; the fourth, the governor general; the fifth, Confederation; and the sixth, the vote. On the west wall, there are sculptures representing bilingualism, education, the House of Commons, taxation—it says “IMPÔT — TAX” up top—criminal law and, lastly, communications. Those sculptures are here because we are at the centre of democracy. The 12 sculptures represent elements of how our federation works.
With respect to Bill C-67, we have three main complaints.
First, Bill C-76 would make it possible for a Canadian to use a voter card as their only document at a polling station. To be clear, the voter card is the paper people get for registering as an eligible voter. From now on, the Liberals will let people vote using that card only. Currently, and until this bill is passed, voters have to present a piece of identification to vote.
There are risks in letting people vote without an ID card like a driver's licence, health card or passport. First, in 2015, the information on over one million voter identification cards was incorrect. That is a major concern. Second, it is easy to vote with a card displaying incorrect information. That creates a significant problem. It is serious. We need to make sure that voting remains a protected, powerful and serious privilege in Canada.
Our second concern—and this is why we have no choice but to vote against the bill and what upsets me the most personally—is that the government is going to allow Canadians who live outside the country to vote, regardless of how long they have been living abroad. There used to be a five-year limit. In Australia, it is six years. Many countries have limits.
Now, the Liberals want to allow 1.4 million Canadians who live abroad to participate in Canadian elections, even if they have not lived in Canada for 20 or 30 years. They will even be allowed to choose what riding they want to vote in.
Do the Liberals realize the incredible power they are giving to Canadian citizens who have not lived in Canada for 20 years? Those individuals could potentially choose a riding where the polls indicate that the race is very close and change which party is chosen to govern.
Our third concern about this bill is that the Liberals want to prevent third parties, such as labour groups, from accepting money from individuals or groups outside the country during the pre-writ period.
That is good, but there is nothing stopping this from happening before the pre-writ period. People will be able to take in money and receive money from groups outside the country before the start of the pre-writ period.
I thank all Canadians who are watching us for their trust. I look forward to seeing them in the riding next week.
Monsieur le Président, aujourd'hui, j'ai l'honneur, la chance et le privilège d'avoir été choisi parmi 338 députés pour prendre la parole au cours de la dernière journée où nous siégeons au sein de cet édifice, l'édifice du Centre, au sein de la Chambre des communes, dans notre grand Parlement, dans notre grande Fédération.
Avant d'aller un peu plus loin et de parler un peu de l'édifice du Centre, je dois dire que je vais partager mon temps de parole avec le très grand député de Portneuf—Jacques-Cartier, un de mes très chers collègues, dont la circonscription est très proche de la mienne. Nous partageons une frontière, entre Sainte-Brigitte-de-Laval et Beauport. Je suis très content de collaborer avec lui sur divers enjeux qui touchent nos concitoyens respectifs.
À tous les citoyens et les citoyennes de Beauport—Limoilou qui nous écoutent actuellement ou qui nous écouteront ce soir sur Facebook, Twitter ou d'autres réseaux sociaux, je souhaite un très joyeux Noël. Je leur souhaite de passer de très bons moments en famille et je leur souhaite de se reposer. C'est important. C'est une occasion de se recentrer un peu sur soi-même et sur la famille et de prendre du temps pour être ensemble, pour discuter et se reposer. Je souhaite une belle année 2019 à mes concitoyens. Bien entendu, nous nous reverrons dans la circonscription la semaine prochaine. Je serai à mon bureau et sur le terrain toute la semaine. Le mercredi 19 décembre, j'invite mes concitoyens au réveillon de Noël du député, qui aura lieu à mon bureau situé au 2000, avenue Sanfaçon, de 18 heures à 21 heures. Des bouchées et des boissons seront servies. Nous fêterons Noël ensemble. L'année dernière, plus de 200 personnes y étaient présentes. J'espère que l'événement aura le même succès cette année. Joyeux Noël à tous! Bonne année 2019!
Aujourd'hui, je vais parler du projet de loi C-76. Je crois bien que c'est la troisième fois que je parle de ce projet de loi. C'est la première fois que j'ai l'occasion de prendre la parole lors des trois étapes de la lecture d'un même projet de loi. J'en suis fort content.
C'est assez ironique, parce que, aujourd'hui, il y a matière à nostalgie. L'édifice du Centre de la Chambre des communes est le centre de la démocratie canadienne depuis 1916, ou plutôt depuis la reconstruction qui a été terminée en 1920 à la suite de l'incendie. Nous siégeons ici depuis plus d'un siècle, depuis 102 ans. Nous siégeons pour le bien-être de tous les citoyens et pour discuter de la démocratie, pour discuter de nos projets de loi et des enjeux qui font tressaillir notre pays de jour en jour.
Aujourd'hui, la situation est très ironique, car nous discutons du projet de loi C-76, qui vise à modifier la Loi électorale du Canada. Cette dernière met en place les balises, les barèmes, les conditions et les garanties de par lesquelles nous, les 338 députés, avons été élus par nos concitoyens pour siéger ici-même à la Chambre des communes. C'est quand même un projet de loi intéressant dont nous discutons en dernier ici, mais c'est aussi un peu paradoxal, comme mon collègue du NPD l'a si bien dit dans une question qu'il a posée au secrétaire parlementaire. Il lui a demandé pourquoi les libéraux déposaient ce projet de loi, qui semblait si important pour eux, à la hâte, après trois ans au pouvoir. La même version existait dans le projet de loi C-33 en 2015-2016, et les libéraux ont tardé à mettre en place ce projet de loi.
Puisque nous parlons du projet de loi C-76, qui vise la Loi électorale et la démocratie, je dois dire que je trouve dommage que seulement 6 amendements sur les 200 amendements présentés par les conservateurs en comité aient été acceptés.
Nous avons des doléances concrètes qui sont basées sur de vraies inquiétudes et même sur une opinion majoritaire. Je vais faire état à la Chambre des sondages que j'ai en main. J'aimerais quand même prendre une minute pour dire à tous mes collègues et à tous les concitoyens qui nous écoutent en ce moment sur CPAC ou ailleurs que depuis depuis que j'ai 15 ans, je caresse un rêve, soit celui d'être d'abord et avant tout au service des citoyens et des citoyennes du Canada. C'est pourquoi je me suis enrôlé dans les Forces armées canadiennes. C'est pourquoi je rêve de devenir député depuis l'âge de 15 ans. En 2015, j'ai eu l'honneur exceptionnel d'avoir la confiance de la majorité des 92 000 citoyens de la circonscription de Beauport—Limoilou. J'aimerais leur dire qu'à mes yeux, la Chambre des communes représente tout le contraire de ce que le premier ministre a dit hier. Il a dit que ce n'était qu'une salle.
Cela m'a déplu d'entendre cela, parce que la Chambre des communes, qui va fermer pour 15 ans dans quelques jours pour des rénovations, n'est pas juste une salle, comme l'a dit le premier ministre. Je trouve dommage qu'il ait employé ce mot. C'est la Chambre du peuple. C'est pour cela qu'elle est de couleur verte. Le vert représente le peuple et le rouge représente l'aristocratie, d'où la couleur rouge du Sénat.
J'espère que je ne me trompe pas. Les guides du Parlement pourraient peut-être m'en parler.
C'est dommage que le premier ministre dise que ce n'est pas le centre de la démocratie, parce que c'est faux. Je vais expliquer aux citoyens et aux citoyennes pourquoi c'est erroné de dire que le Parlement n'est pas le centre de la démocratie.
Le premier ministre avait raison de dire que la démocratie se vit partout, que ce soit dans les manifestations dans la rue, les réunions d'associations politiques ou les réunions syndicales. Bien entendu, la démocratie s'exerce dans ces lieux, mais le centre de la démocratie est ici parce que c'est ici que les élus siègent et qu'on vote les lois qui régissent absolument tout au pays. C'est ici également qu'on peut même changer la Constitution du pays. On ne peut pas changer la Constitution du pays à tout autre endroit ou dans le cadre de débats politiques dans une association politique ou d'une manifestation. Non, cela peut se faire seulement ici ou dans les autres assemblées législatives provinciales dans le pays. C'est dans ces seuls lieux qu'on peut véritablement faire des amendements et modifier le fonctionnement de la démocratie ou pallier les problématiques pour répondre aux enjeux courants. Oui, par définition, d'une manière pratique, c'est bel et bien ici que se situe le centre de la démocratie. Ce n'est pas, comme le premier ministre l'a dit, une simple salle parmi tant d'autres. Non, c'est la Chambre des communes.
Très rapidement, avant de retourner au projet de loi C-76, sur le mur est, on voit six sculptures. L'une parle du droit civil, l'autre de la liberté de parole, la troisième du Sénat, la quatrième du gouverneur général, la cinquième de la Confédération, de notre grand pays, et la sixième du vote. Sur le mur ouest sont représentés le bilinguisme, l'éducation, la Chambre des communes, le régime fiscal — c'est écrit « IMPÔT — TAX » en haut — le droit criminel et en dernier la communication. Toutes ces sculptures ne sont pas ici par hasard. Elles sont ici parce qu nous sommes au centre de la démocratie. Ces 12 sculptures représentent d'une manière ou d'une autre le fonctionnement de la fédération.
En ce qui a trait au projet de loi C-67, nous avons trois doléances principales.
Premièrement, le projet de loi C-76 prévoit de permettre à un Canadien ou à une Canadienne de se présenter à un bureau de vote avec une carte de l'électeur comme seul document. Comprenons-nous bien, une carte d'électeur, c'est le papier qu'on reçoit pour être enregistré à titre d'ayant droit pour voter. Dorénavant les libéraux vont permettre qu'une personne vienne voter seulement avec cette carte. Pour le moment, et jusqu'à nouvel ordre parce que la loi n'est pas encore passée, il faut présenter une carte d'identification de l'électeur pour voter.
Il y a des risques au fait de permettre que quelqu'un puisse voter sans carte d'identification comme un permis de conduire, une carte d'assurance-maladie ou un passeport. Premièrement, en 2015, plus de 1 million de cartes d'électeur étaient erronées. C'est quand même une préoccupation importante. Deuxièmement, il est facile de voter avec une simple carte erronée. Cela crée un grave problème. C'est sérieux. Il faut faire en sorte que le vote reste quelque chose de privilégié, de fort et de protégé et de sérieux au Canada.
La deuxième préoccupation qui fait en sorte que nous n'avons pas le choix de voter contre ce projet de loi — c'est ce qui me dérange le plus personnellement — c'est qu'on va permettre aux Canadiens qui vivent à l'extérieur du pays de voter peu importe depuis combien d'années ils vivent à l'extérieur du pays. Avant, il y avait une limite de cinq ans. En Australie, c'est six ans. Dans plein de pays, il y a des limites.
Là, les libéraux veulent faire en sorte que 1,4 million de Canadiens qui vivent à l'extérieur du pays, après même 20 ou 30 ans, puissent voter aux élections canadiennes. Ils vont même pouvoir choisir la circonscription dans laquelle ils veulent voter.
Se rend-t-on compte du pouvoir incroyable qu'on donne à un citoyen canadien qui ne vit pas au Canada depuis 20 ans? Il pourrait choisir une circonscription où le vote est très serré, selon le sondage, et il pourrait faire toute la différence dans la sélection du gouvernement.
Enfin, une troisième chose nous préoccupe dans ce projet de loi. On veut empêcher pendant la période préélectorale les tierces parties comme les groupes syndicaux d'engranger des gains monétaires venant des gens ou des groupes de l'extérieur du pays.
C'est bien, mais rien n'empêche que cela se fasse avant la période préélectorale. Les gens vont pouvoir encaisser les fonds et avoir l'argent de groupes de l'extérieur du pays avant que la période préélectorale débute.
Je remercie tous les Canadiens et toutes les Canadiennes qui nous écoutent de leur confiance. Au plaisir de se voir dans la circonscription la semaine prochaine.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-12-13 13:19 [p.24861]
Mr. Speaker, I am glad to know the member opposite had the same dream as I did, starting at age 15. I am glad to see that she went all the way to realizing this dream. Good for her. Marvellous.
The Liberals speak about this bill as if it is something fundamental, so why did they wait three years? We are three years into their mandate right now, three years of failures. We have three years of failure on the border, where we have almost 100,000 illegal border crossings happening right now. There is huge financial pressure on provincial governments to deal with this crisis. We have three years of failure concerning deficits. They promised that they would run a small $10-billion deficit, and now the Parliamentary Budget Officer, an institution created by Mr. Harper, something we should never forget, who brings accountability to the government every day he acts, has informed us this week that the deficit is way larger than what was announced two weeks ago. It will be about $26 billion just for 2018-19.
I completely disagree with the member. Yes, the right to vote is fundamental. However, the responsibility of the government is to make sure that voting is respected and protected for everyone.
Monsieur le Président, je me réjouis d'apprendre que la députée d'en face entretenait le même rêve que moi dès l'âge de 15 ans. Quel plaisir de voir que son rêve est devenu réalité. Tant mieux pour elle. C'est merveilleux.
Les libéraux parlent de ce projet de loi comme s'il s'agissait d'une mesure fondamentale. Force est de se demander alors pourquoi il leur a fallu trois ans avant de le présenter. Nous sommes maintenant dans la troisième année de leur mandat, qui, soit dit en passant, se caractérise par une succession d'échecs. Depuis trois ans, les échecs se succèdent à la frontière, puisque, à ce jour, près de 100 000 personnes sont entrées illégalement au Canada. Cette situation exerce d'énormes pressions financières sur les gouvernements provinciaux, qui doivent composer avec une crise migratoire. Nous avons également été témoins de trois années d'échecs au chapitre des déficits. Les libéraux avaient promis de limiter le déficit à 10 milliards de dollars, mais, aujourd'hui, le directeur parlementaire du budget — dont le poste a été créé par M. Harper, ce qu'il ne faudrait jamais oublier —, qui exige au quotidien que le gouvernement rende des comptes, a informé la Chambre cette semaine que l'ampleur du déficit dépasse considérablement ce qui a été annoncé il y a deux semaines. En fait, le déficit se chiffrera à quelque 26 milliards de dollars, uniquement pour l'exercice 2018-2019.
Enfin, je suis totalement en désaccord avec la députée. Le droit de vote est effectivement fondamental. Cependant, le gouvernement a la responsabilité de veiller à ce que ce droit soit respecté et à ce que tous les Canadiens puissent s'en prévaloir.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-12-13 13:22 [p.24862]
Mr. Speaker, as I said, from day one we contributed to this bill. We proposed over 200 amendments, and only six of them were accepted. It is disappointing to see that now the Liberals will be going forward without the acceptance of all members. We are talking about a bill that would have an impact on future elections. We should require all members to stand behind such an important bill. We think it should have been a must for the government to accept many more of our amendments.
Yes, with respect to what the member just told us, if those kinds of situations happened during the last election, which was completely unacceptable, why not give more powers to the election directorate if we are able to? Why was the government so negative toward all the other amendments we brought forward?
Monsieur le Président, comme je l'ai dit, nous avons tenté d'améliorer ce projet de loi depuis le début. Nous avons proposé plus de 200 amendements, mais seulement 6 d'entre eux ont été acceptés. C'est décevant de constater que les libéraux ont décidé de faire adopter ce projet de loi sans obtenir l'unanimité de la Chambre. On parle ici d'un projet de loi qui va avoir une incidence sur les prochaines élections. Il faudrait absolument que tous les députés approuvent un projet de loi aussi important. Nous sommes d'avis que le gouvernement aurait dû accepter un nombre beaucoup plus élevé de nos recommandations.
Pour en revenir aux propos du député, qui a dit que des situations totalement inacceptables s'étaient produites au cours des dernières élections, je pense que, effectivement, il faudrait accorder plus de pouvoirs au directeur général des élections, si c'est possible de le faire. Pourquoi le gouvernement a-t-il rejeté tous les autres amendements que nous avions proposés?
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-11-27 16:41 [p.24089]
Madam Speaker, it is a bit unfortunate to notice that the parliamentary secretary cannot spontaneously speak without any notes about their supposedly great budget engagement.
I went out for a few seconds and I am sure I missed the point where the member said when his government would balance the budget. I am sure I missed that. The Liberals seem to want to be a responsible government, so I am sure I missed that point.
Could the member just repeat to me in which year the government will balance the budget?
Madame la Présidente, il est un peu malheureux de constater que le secrétaire parlementaire ne peut parler spontanément sans utiliser ses notes au sujet de leur prétendu engagement budgétaire important.
Je suis sorti quelques secondes et je suis sûr que j’ai manqué le moment où le député a dit quand son gouvernement allait équilibrer le budget. Je suis sûr que je l’ai manqué. Les libéraux semblent vouloir être un gouvernement responsable, alors je suis sûr que j’ai manqué ce moment important.
Le député pourrait-il me répéter en quelle année le gouvernement équilibrera le budget?
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-11-27 16:46 [p.24090]
Madam Speaker, I would like to respond to something the member for Saanich—Gulf Islands said. She said the government always has iconic and historical engagement announcements. I have come to think that it is all the government is about. It is always historical, amazing, so great, but we have never in Canadian history seen a government spend so much money to do so little.
I am very happy to speak today in the House of Commons on behalf of the citizens of Beauport—Limoilou.
Centre Block will soon be closing for complete renovations for 10 or 15 years. I wanted to mention that. There is no cause for concern, however, because we will be moving to West Block. I will therefore be able to continue to speak on behalf of my constituents.
Today I am discussing Bill C-86, a second act to implement certain provisions of the budget tabled in Parliament on February 27, 2018 and other measures.
I will focus on the fact that the members of the Conservative Party are extremely disappointed with the bill. We have witnessed a string of broken promises over the past three years. It is a little ironic that the hon. member for Papineau, the current head of the Liberal government, said during the election campaign that he wanted to do something to make people less cynical of politics, to help them have more confidence in politicians, in the ability of the executive branch, the legislative branch and members of Parliament to do things that are good for Canadians and especially to respect the major promises formally made during the campaign.
A group of researchers at Laval University have created what they call the Vote Compass. It shows the number of promises kept and broken by the provincial and federal governments.
I remember that, to their chagrin, a few months before the 2015 election, the research institute had to acknowledge that 97% of all promises made by Mr. Harper during the 2011 election campaign had been kept.
The Liberal government elected in 2015 broke three major promises and is continuing to break them in the 2018 budget. These were not trifling promises. They were major promises that were to set the guidelines for how the government was to behave and for the results Canadians would see.
The Canadians we talk to are familiar with the three major promises, since I often repeat them. I have to, because this is serious.
The Liberals promised to limit themselves to minor $10-billion deficits in the first two years and a $6-billion deficit in the third year.
What did they do? The first year, they posted a deficit of $30 billion. The second year, they posted a deficit of $20 billion. This year, the deficit is $18 billion, or three times what was announced.
That is the first broken promise, and it was not just some promise that was jotted down on the back of a napkin. In any case, I hope not. In fact, I remember quite well that the promise was made from a crane in the midst of the election campaign. The member for Papineau was in Toronto, standing on a crane when he said that he would run deficits to pay for infrastructure. That is the second broken promise. He said that the $10 billion a year in deficits would be used to inject more money into infrastructure. However, of the $60 billion in deficits this government has racked up to date, only $9 billion has gone to infrastructure. That is another problem, another broken promise.
That is why I was saying earlier that we have rarely seen, in the history of Canada, a government spend so much money for so few results. This is probably the first time we have seen this sort of thing.
I will give an example. He said that he would invest $10 billion in infrastructure in 2017, but he invested only $3 billion and yet racked up a deficit of $20 billion. Where did the other $17 billion go? It was used for all sorts of different things in order to satisfy very specific interest groups who take great pleasure in and boast ad nauseam about the Liberal ideology.
The third broken promise is an extremely important and strategic one. In fact, it was so obvious that we did not even really think of it as a promise before.
All Canadian governments, in a totally responsible manner and without questioning it, traditionally endorsed this practice. If there was a deficit, the document would indicate the date by which the budget would be balanced. There was a repayment date, just as there is for anyone in Canada. When the families of Beauport—Limoilou, many of whom are watching today, want to buy a car or appliance, such as a washer or dryer, not only does the seller ask them to get a bank loan, but he also asks them to sign a paper that indicates when the debt will be repaid in full.
Thus, it is quite normal to indicate when the budget will be balanced. We have been asking that question for three years, but what is even more interesting is that the Liberals had promised that the budget would be balanced in 2019, and now there are 45 days remaining in 2018. Telling us when the budget will be balanced is the least the Liberals could do.
There are consequences to running up large deficits, however. The Liberal government has been accumulating gigantic deficits at a time when the global economy is doing rather well, although forecasts indicate that we will enter a recession in the next 12 months. Although times are tough in Alberta and Ontario, where General Motors just closed a plant, the situation is positive. There are regions in Canada that are suffering tremendously, but the global economic context is nevertheless healthy. Knock on wood, which is everywhere in the House of Commons.
The first serious mistake is to run up deficits when times are good. When the global economy is doing well and our financial institutions are making money, we have to put money aside for an emergency fund and an assistance fund, especially for the employees of General Motors who lost their jobs and for all families in the riding of my Alberta colleague who have lost their jobs in the oil sector.
We have to have an emergency fund for the next economic crisis because that is how our capitalist system works. There are ups and downs. That is human nature. It is random. Agreements are signed, things are done, progress is made, and there are ups and downs. The current positive situation has been going on for five or six years now, so we need to be prepared. That is why growing the deficit during good economic times can have very serious consequences.
I would like to talk about another serious consequence, and I am sure this will strike a chord with the people of Beauport—Limoilou who are listening to us now. Does anyone know how many billions of dollars the government spends on federal health transfers? It is $33 billion per year. To service the debt, to pay back people around the world who lend us money, we spent $37 billion last year. We spent $4 billion more on servicing our debt than on health transfers.
An hon. member: That is shameful.
Mr. Alupa Clarke: Yes, Madam Speaker, it is shameful. It sure looks like bad management of public affairs. It makes no sense, and I am sure Canadians agree. I am sure they are sick and tired of hearing us talk about $10-billion, $20-billion, $30-billion deficits and so on.
Canada's total debt is now $670 billion. My fellow Canadians, that means that, at this point in time, your family owes $47,000. That is a debt you will have to pay.
The Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Canadian Heritage was very proud to announce that the government was giving nearly $6,000 a year per child, through the Canada child benefit, to people earning less than $45,000 a year. They are not giving money away, however; they are buying votes, which is unfortunate, since the very children this money is helping will end up having to pay it back. This is completely unacceptable on the part of the government.
I am proud to be part of a former Conservative government that was responsible, that granted benefits without running deficits and that also managed to balance the budget.
Madame la Présidente, j’aimerais réagir à quelque chose qu’a dit la députée de Saanich—Gulf Islands. Elle a dit que le gouvernement avait toujours des mesures symboliques et sans précédent à annoncer. J’en suis venu à penser que c’est tout ce que ce gouvernement fait. C’est toujours sans précédent, incroyable, extraordinaire, mais nous n’avons jamais vu dans l’histoire du Canada un gouvernement dépenser tant d’argent pour si peu de résultats.
Je suis très content de prendre aujourd'hui la parole à la Chambre des communes, au nom des citoyens de Beauport—Limoilou.
L'édifice du Centre va bientôt fermer durant 10 ou 15 ans, parce que tout sera rénové. Je tenais à le dire. Cependant, il n'y a pas de crainte à avoir, parce que nous allons déménager à l'édifice de l'Ouest. Je vais donc pouvoir continuer à débattre au nom de mes concitoyens.
Aujourd'hui, je prends la parole pour discuter du projet de loi C-86, Loi no 2 portant exécution de certaines dispositions du budget déposé au Parlement le 27 février 2018 et mettant en oeuvre d'autres mesures.
Je vais mettre l'accent sur le fait que les députés du Parti conservateur sont extrêmement déçus du projet de loi sur le budget. Depuis trois ans, on voit une série de promesses rompues. Ce qui est un peu paradoxal, c'est que le député de Papineau, l'actuel chef du gouvernement libéral, avait dit, pendant la campagne électorale, qu'il voulait faire en sorte que les gens soient moins cyniques envers la politique, que les gens croient plus en leurs politiciens, en la capacité de l'exécutif, du législatif et des représentants politiques d'effectuer des choses qui sont bonnes pour les gens et surtout de respecter les promesses phares faites en bonne et due forme lors de la campagne électorale.
À l'Université Laval, un groupe de recherche a créé ce qu'on appelle la Boussole électorale. Cela permet de connaître le nombre de promesses tenues ou non tenues par les gouvernements provinciaux et fédéral.
Je me rappelle que, quelques mois avant l'élection de 2015, à leur grand dam, cet institut de recherche avait dû confirmer que 97 % des promesses faites par M. Harper pendant la campagne de 2011 avaient été tenues.
Le gouvernement libéral de 2015 a rompu trois grandes promesses, et il continue de le faire dans le budget 2018. Il ne s'agit pas de promesse de pacotille, mais bien de promesses structurantes qui devaient permettre de fixer les balises quant à la façon dont le gouvernement allait se conduire et aux résultats pour les Canadiens.
Les citoyens qui nous écoutent connaissent ces trois grandes promesses, car je les répète souvent. Il faut le faire, parce que c'est grave.
Les libéraux avaient promis de faire seulement de petits déficits de 10 milliards de dollars durant les deux premières années et un déficit de 6 milliards de dollars la troisième année.
Qu'est-ce que nous avons vu? La première année, ils ont fait un déficit de 30 milliards de dollars. La deuxième année, ils ont fait un déficit de 20 milliards de dollars. Cette année, ils font un déficit trois fois plus élevé que ce qui était prévu, c'est-à-dire un déficit de 18 milliards de dollars.
C'est donc une première promesse rompue. On s'entend quand même pour dire qu'il ne s'agit pas d'une promesse faite sur le coin d'une table. En tout cas, je l'espère bien. En fait, je me rappelle très bien que la promesse a été faite sur une grue, en pleine campagne électorale. Le député de Papineau était à Toronto, sur une grue, quand il a dit qu'il ferait des déficits en faveur de l'infrastructure. Voilà la deuxième promesse rompue. Il a dit que les déficits de 10 milliards de dollars par année serviraient injecter davantage d'argent dans les infrastructures. Or sur les 60 milliards de dollars de déficit engrangés jusqu'à présent, seulement 9 milliards de dollars ont été dans les infrastructures. Voilà un autre point faible, une autre promesse rompue.
C'est pour la raison pour laquelle je disais plus tôt, en anglais, qu'on a rarement vu, dans l'histoire du Canada — c'est probablement la première fois qu'on le voit de cette manière —, un gouvernement dépenser autant pour en arriver à si peu de résultats.
Je vais donner un exemple. Il avait dit qu'il investirait 10 milliards de dollars dans les infrastructures en 2017, alors qu'il a investi seulement 3 milliards de dollars et qu'il a fait un déficit de 20 milliards de dollars. Où sont passés les 17 milliards de dollars? Ils ont servi à toutes sortes de fins pour satisfaire des groupes d'intérêt très précis qui se complaisent et se gargarisent à n'en plus finir dans l'idéologie libérale.
La troisième promesse rompue est une promesse structurante extrêmement importante. D'ailleurs, c'est une promesse qui, auparavant, n'était pas une promesse tellement cela allait de soi.
Tous les gouvernements canadiens, de manière tout à fait responsable et sans se poser de questions, adhéraient traditionnellement à cette pratique. Dans un budget, on indiquait, si déficit il y avait, une date de retour à l'équilibre budgétaire. Il y avait une date butoir, comme pour n'importe qui au Canada. Lorsque les familles de Beauport—Limoilou, qui nous écoutent en grand nombre, veulent s'acheter une voiture ou un appareil ménager, comme une laveuse ou une sécheuse, non seulement le vendeur leur demande de contracter un prêt à la banque, mais il leur demande aussi de signer un papier indiquant la date où la dette sera remboursée au complet.
Il n'y a donc rien de plus naturel que d'indiquer quand l'équilibre budgétaire sera atteint. Nous posons la question depuis trois ans, mais ce qui est encore plus intéressant, c'est que les libéraux avaient promis que l'équilibre budgétaire serait atteint en 2019, alors qu'il ne reste que 45 jours à l'année 2018. Ce serait la moindre des choses que les libéraux nous disent la date du retour à l'équilibre budgétaire.
Par ailleurs, quelles sont les conséquences de ces déficits importants? Le gouvernement libéral cumule des déficits gargantuesques dans une période économique mondiale plutôt favorable, bien que toutes les prévisions indiquent qu'on va tomber en récession d'ici 12 mois. Même s'il y a des situations difficiles en Alberta et en Ontario, où General Motors a fermé une usine, la situation est favorable. Il y a des régions du Canada qui souffrent énormément, mais le contexte économique mondial est quand même en santé. Touchons du bois; il y en a partout à la Chambre des communes.
La première erreur grave consiste donc à cumuler des déficits dans une bonne période. Lorsque nous sommes dans un contexte économique favorable sur le plan mondial et que nos institutions financières et le gouvernement font du fric, il faut mettre de l'argent de côté pour avoir des fonds d'urgence et des fonds d'aide, notamment pour les familles des employés de General Motors qui ont perdu leur emploi et pour toutes les familles de la circonscription de mon collègue de l'Alberta qui ont perdu leur emploi dans le secteur pétrolier.
Il faut surtout des fonds d'urgence pour la prochaine crise économique, puisque tel est fait notre système capitaliste: il y a des hauts et des bas. C'est la nature humaine. C'est aléatoire. On fait des ententes, on fait des choses, on avance et il y a des hauts et des bas. La situation favorable actuelle dure depuis cinq ou six ans, alors il faudrait se préparer. Voilà pourquoi cumuler des déficits dans un climat économique plutôt favorable a des conséquences très graves.
Je vais parler d'une autre conséquence grave, et je crois que cela va frapper l'imaginaire des citoyens de Beauport—Limoilou qui nous écoutent. Sait-on combien de milliards de dollars on consacre chaque année aux transferts fédéraux en santé? C'est 33 milliards de dollars par année. Quant au service de la dette, soit la somme que l'on doit rembourser aux gens de partout dans le monde qui nous prêtent de l'argent, on y a consacré 37 milliards de dollars l'année passée. On a donc consacré 4 milliards de dollars de plus au service de la dette qu'aux transferts en santé.
Une voix: C'est une honte.
M. Alupa Clarke: Oui, madame la Présidente, c'est une honte. De toute évidence, c'est une mauvaise gestion des affaires publiques. Cela n'a pas de sens et je suis convaincu que les Canadiens sont du même avis. Je suis convaincu qu'ils sont tannés de nous entendre parler des déficits de 10 milliards de dollars, de 20 milliards de dollars, de 30 milliards de dollars, etc.
D'autre part, la dette totale du Canada se chiffre à 670 milliards de dollars. Chers Canadiens, cela veut dire que vous avez une dette personnelle familiale de 47 000 $ en ce moment. C'est une dette que vous devez payer.
Le secrétaire parlementaire du ministre du Patrimoine canadien était très fier de dire que le gouvernement envoyait, par l'entremise de l'Allocation canadienne pour enfants, près de 6 000 $ par année par enfant aux personnes qui gagnent moins de 45 000 $ par année. Ce n'est pas donner de l'argent, c'est acheter des votes. C'est malheureux, car cet argent va devoir être remboursé par les mêmes enfants qui en bénéficient présentement. C'est complètement inacceptable d'agir de cette manière.
Personnellement, je suis fier d'appartenir à un ancien gouvernement conservateur qui était responsable, qui a consenti des allocations sans faire de déficits et qui a réussi à atteindre l'équilibre budgétaire.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-11-27 16:59 [p.24091]
Madam Speaker, I will respond to that, because the Conservatives do not hide and we are not afraid of the truth.
The fact is that the MP for Papineau, the Liberals' leader, the Prime Minister presently, said during the last campaign that never in the world would he present an omnibus bill. There was no nuance. It was, “no omnibus bill, ever”. The fact is that it is the biggest omnibus bill we have ever seen in this Parliament. It is bigger than an elephant. Seriously, it is huge. It is over 800 pages.
The blunt fact is that we were not ashamed of putting forward omnibus bills, because Canadians wanted the House to be efficient. Canadians wanted the House to go forward to make changes when necessary. Sometimes, when we had to debate every article, it did not go fast enough for the quickly changing pace of the world and all the needs of the Canadian people.
Right now the member is trying to engage with people to try to hide the fact that the Liberals are doing omnibus bills. They are ashamed of it.
Madame la Présidente, je vais répondre à cela parce que les conservateurs ne se cachent pas et n'ont pas peur de la vérité.
Le fait est que le député de Papineau, le chef du Parti libéral, le premier ministre actuel, a dit au cours de la dernière campagne électorale qu’il ne présenterait jamais de sa vie un projet de loi omnibus. Il n’y avait aucune nuance. C’était « pas de projet de loi omnibus, jamais ». Le fait est qu’il s’agit du plus important projet de loi omnibus que nous ayons jamais vu au cours de cette législature. C’est plus gros qu’un éléphant. Sérieusement, c’est énorme. Il compte plus de 800 pages.
En réalité, nous n’avions pas honte de présenter des projets de loi omnibus parce que les Canadiens voulaient que la Chambre soit efficace. Les Canadiens voulaient que la Chambre aille de l’avant pour apporter des changements nécessaires. Parfois, lorsque nous devions débattre de chaque article, nous n’allions pas assez vite pour tenir compte de l’évolution rapide du monde et de tous les besoins de la population canadienne.
À l’heure actuelle, le député essaie de divertir les gens pour essayer de cacher le fait que les libéraux présentent des projets de loi omnibus. Ils ont honte de ce qu’ils font.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-11-27 17:01 [p.24092]
Madam Speaker, I personally believe we should ensure that workers pensions are protected when a company files for bankruptcy.
As a society, we cannot tell workers who have worked for 30 or 40 years and who were counting on a pension that, all of a sudden, for purely capitalist reasons, their pension will be slashed.
There are people in my riding who suffered a great deal when White Birch Paper almost went under. There were unbelievable cuts to employees’ pensions. The only comfort I could find when I met with the people on the board of White Birch Paper, which employed 400 people, was when they told me that their pensions had been cut as well.
The NDP is working hard on this. Good for them, because it is an important issue.
Madame la Présidente, personnellement, je pense qu'on devrait protéger les pensions des travailleurs lorsqu'une entreprise fait faillite.
En tant que société, on ne peut pas se permettre de dire à des travailleurs qui ont travaillé pendant 30 ou 40 ans et qui avaient l'espoir d'avoir une pension que tout à coup, à cause de décisions purement capitalistes, leur pension sera coupée de manière importante.
Il y a des gens de ma circonscription qui ont extrêmement souffert quand Papiers White Birch a presque fait faillite. Il y a eu d'incroyables coupes relativement aux pensions. La seule chose qui m'a réconforté lorsque j'ai rencontré les gens du conseil d'administration de Papiers White Birch, qui employait 400 personnes, c'est qu'ils m'ont dit que leur pension avait aussi été coupée.
Effectivement, le NPD travaille fort sur ce dossier. C'est tant mieux pour eux car c'est quelque chose d'important.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-11-27 17:16 [p.24094]
Madam Speaker, I am sure that the member must have skipped one of the paragraphs in his speech where he was intending to announce when the government would balance the budget. That has always been the case in Canada's history. Maybe he could check his speech once more. All of my constituents are calling non-stop every single day about when the budget will be balanced.
Madame la Présidente, je suis convaincu que le député a sauté le paragraphe dans son discours où il prévoyait annoncer que le gouvernement rétablirait l'équilibre budgétaire. Au cours de l'histoire du Canada, le gouvernement a toujours précisé quand il comptait revenir à l'équilibre. Il devrait peut-être vérifier son discours. Les gens de ma circonscription ne cessent de téléphoner à mon bureau quotidiennement pour demander quand l'équilibre budgétaire sera rétabli.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-11-06 16:04 [p.23385]
Mr. Speaker, I am very pleased to rise. As usual, I would like to say hello to the many people of Beauport—Limoilou who are watching us live on CPAC or on platforms such as Facebook and Twitter later.
I would like to comment on the speech by the Minister of Status of Women. I found it somewhat hypocritical when she said that she hopes her opposition colleagues will support the bill and the budget's feminist measures, which she presented, when the Liberals actually and strategically included all these measures in an omnibus bill, the 2018 budget implementation bill. Clearly, we, the Conservatives, will not vote in favour of Bill C-86 because it once again presents a deficit budget that is devastating for Canada's economy and for Canadian taxpayers. It is somewhat hypocritical for the minister to tell us that she hopes we will support the measures to give women more power when she herself was involved in hiding these measures in an omnibus bill.
I would like say, as I often say, that it is a privilege for me to speak today, but not for the same reason this time. I might have been denied the opportunity to speak to Bill C-86 because this morning, the Liberal government imposed closure on the House. It imposed time allocation on the speeches on the budget. This is the first time in three years that I am seeing this in the House. Since 2015, we have had three budget presentations. This is the sixth time we are debating a budget since 2015 during this 42nd Parliament. This is the first time I have seen the majority of my Conservative colleagues and the majority of my NDP colleagues being denied speaking time to discuss something as important as Bill C-86 to implement budgetary measures. The budget implementation legislation is what formalizes the budget the government brought down in February. Implementation is done in two phases. This is the second phase and it implements the Liberal government's budget.
By chance, I have the opportunity to speak about the budget today and I want to do so because I would like to remind those listening about some key elements of this budget which, in our view, are going in the wrong direction. First, the Liberals are continuing with their habit, which has become ingrained in their psyches. They are continuing with their deficit approach. It appears that they are in a financial bind. That is why they are creating new taxes like the carbon tax. They also lack the personal ability to govern. You might say that it is not in their genes to balance a budget. The Liberals' budget measures are bad and their economic plan is bad. They are so incapable of balancing the budget that they cannot even give us a timeline. They cannot even tell us when they think they will balance the budget.
This is the first time that we have seen this in the history of our great Canadian parliamentary democracy, established in 1867, and probably before that, in the parliaments of the United Canadas. This is the first time since 1867 that a government has not been able to say when they will balance the budget. I am not one for political rhetoric, but this is not rhetoric, this is a fact.
The Liberals made big promises to us in that regard during the 2015 election. Unfortunately, the Liberals put off keeping those promises. They promised to balance the budget by 2019. Now, they have put that off indefinitely, or until 2045, according to the Parliamentary Budget Officer, a position that, let us not forget, was created by Mr. Harper. That great democrat wanted to ensure that there was budgetary accountability in Parliament. The Liberals also promised that they would run small deficits of $10 billion for the first three years and then balance the budget. The first year, they ran a deficit of $30 billion. The second year, they ran a deficit of $20 billion. The third year, they ran a deficit of $19 billion. Just a week or two ago, we found out from the Parliamentary Budget Officer that the Liberals miscalculated and another $4 billion in debt has been added to that amount. The Liberals have racked up a deficit of $22 billion. That is 6.5 times more than what they set out in their plan to balance the budget.
The other key budget promise the Liberals made was that the small deficits of $10 billion would be used to build new infrastructure as part of a $187-billion program.
To date, only $9 billion has flowed from the coffers to pay for infrastructure projects. Where is the other $170 billion? The Prime Minister is so acutely aware of the problem that he shuffled his cabinet this summer. He appointed the former international trade minister to the infrastructure portfolio, and the new infrastructure minister's mandate letter says he absolutely has to get on this troublesome issue of money not being used to fund infrastructure projects.
There is a reason the Liberals do not want to give us more than two or three days to discuss the budget. They do not want the Conservatives and the NDP to say quite as much about the budget as they would like to say because we have a lot of bad things to tell them and Canadians.
Fortunately, we live in a democracy, and we can express ourselves in the media, so all Canadians can hear what I have to say. However, it is important for us to express our ideas in the House too because listening to what we say here is how Canadians learn what happened in history.
Things are not as rosy as the Liberals claim when it comes to the economy and their plan. For instance, in terms of exports, they have not been able to export Canadian oil as they should. We have one of the largest reserves in the world, but the Liberals tightened rules surrounding the National Energy Board in recent years. As a result, several projects have died, such as the northern gateway project and energy east, and the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain project, which the Liberals managed to save in the end using $4.5 billion of taxpayers money. In short, our exports are not doing very well.
As for investments, from 2015 to 2017, Canadian investments in the U.S. increased by 65%, while American investments in Canada dropped by 52%.
On top of that, one thing that affects the daily lives of Canadians even more is the massive debt, which could jeopardize all our future projects for our glorious federation. In 2018, the total accumulated debt is $670 billion. That comes out to $47,000 per family. Not counting any student debt, car payments or mortgage, every family already has a debt of $47,000, and a good percentage of that has increased over the past three years because of the Liberals' fiscal mismanagement.
That is not to mention the interest on the debt. I am sure that Canadians watching at home are outraged by this. In 2020, the interest on the debt will be $39 billion a year. That is $3 billion more than we invest every year in health.
The government boasts about how it came up with a wonderful plan for federal health transfers with the provinces, but that plan does not respect provincial jurisdictions. What is more, it imposes conditions on the provinces that they must meet in order to be able to access those transfers. We did not do that in the Harper era. We are investing $36 billion per year in health care and spending $39 billion servicing debt. Imagine what we could have done with that money.
I will close by talking about the labour shortage. I would have liked to have 20 minutes so I could say more, but we cannot take the time we want because of the gag order. It is sad that I cannot keep going.
Quebec needs approximately 150,000 more workers. I am appalled that the minister would make a mockery of my questions on three occasions. Meanwhile, the member for Louis-Hébert had the nerve to say that the Conservatives oppose immigration. That has nothing to do with it. We support immigration, but that represents only 25% of the solution to the labour shortage. This is a serious crisis in Quebec.
There are many things under federal jurisdiction that the government could do and that, in combination with immigration, would help fill labour shortages. However, all the Liberals can do is make fun of me, simply because I am a member of the opposition. I hosted economic round tables in Quebec City with my colleagues, and all business owners were telling us that this is a serious crisis. The Liberals should act like a good government and stop making fun of us every time we speak. Actually, it is even worse; they want to prevent us from speaking.
Monsieur le Président, je suis très heureux de prendre la parole. J'aimerais, comme d'habitude, saluer tous les citoyens et les citoyennes de Beauport—Limoilou qui nous écoutent en grand nombre sur CPAC ou sur les plateformes comme Facebook et Twitter plus tard.
J'aimerais faire un commentaire sur le discours de la ministre de la Condition féminine. Je trouve un peu hypocrite qu'elle dise espérer que ses collègues de l'opposition appuieront le projet de loi et les mesures féministes de son budget, qu'elle nous a présentées, alors que les libéraux ont justement et stratégiquement inclus toutes ces mesures dans un projet de loi omnibus, le projet de loi d'exécution du budget de 2018. De toute évidence, nous, les conservateurs, ne voterons pas pour le projet de loi C-86, car il présente encore une fois un budget déficitaire et dévastateur pour l'économie canadienne, pour les payeurs de taxes canadiens. C'est un peu hypocrite que la ministre nous dise qu'elles espère que nous appuierons les mesures pour donner plus de pouvoir aux femmes, alors qu'elle a elle-même participé à cette stratégie de camouflage au sein d'un projet de loi omnibus.
Je voudrais dire aux citoyens que c'est un privilège pour moi de prendre la parole aujourd'hui, comme je le dis souvent, mais pas pour la même raison cette fois. J'aurais pu ne pas pouvoir parler du projet de loi C-86, puisque, ce matin, le gouvernement libéral a imposé un bâillon à la Chambre, comme on dit en bon québécois. Il a imposé une attribution de temps aux discours relatifs au budget. C'est la première fois en trois ans que je vois cela à la Chambre. Depuis 2015, nous avons eu trois présentations de budget. C'est la sixième fois que nous débattons d'un budget depuis 2015, en cette 42e législature. C'est la première fois que je constate que la majorité des mes collègues conservateurs et la majorité des mes collègues du NPD ne pourront pas prendre la parole pour s'exprimer sur une chose aussi importante que le projet de loi C-86, qui porte sur l'exécution des mesures budgétaires. La loi d'exécution du budget, en fait, c'est ce qui rend réel le budget présenté par le gouvernement en février. L'exécution se fait en deux temps. Nous sommes dans la deuxième partie, qui met en oeuvre le budget du gouvernement libéral.
Par hasard, j'ai la chance de parler du budget aujourd'hui et je veux en profiter, parce que je voudrais rappeler aux gens qui nous écoutent actuellement certains des attributs phares de ce projet de loi sur le budget qui, selon nous, vont dans la mauvaise direction. D'abord, les libéraux perpétuent leur habitude, qui est carrément rendue psychologique chez eux. Ils poursuivent cette approche déficitaire. Il apparaît qu'ils sont dans une incapacité financière. C'est pourquoi ils créent de nouvelles taxes comme la taxe sur le carbone. Ils ont aussi une incapacité gouvernementale qui semble personnelle. On dirait que ce n'est pas dans leurs gènes de pouvoir équilibrer un budget. Les mesures des budgétaires des libéraux sont mauvaises et leur plan économique est mauvais. Ils sont tellement incapables d'équilibrer le budget qu'ils ne peuvent même pas nous donner une date d'échéance. Ils ne peuvent même pas nous dire quand ils pensent arriver à un équilibre.
C'est la première fois qu'on voit cela dans l'histoire de notre belle démocratie parlementaire canadienne, depuis 1867, et probablement avant, dans les Parlements qui ont siégé avant cette date dans le Canada-Uni. Depuis 1867, c'est la première fois qu'un gouvernement ne peut pas donner une date de retour à l'équilibre budgétaire. Je n'aime pas faire de la rhétorique politique, mais ce n'est pas de la rhétorique, c'est un fait.
Les libéraux nous avaient fait de grandes promesses à cet égard en 2015 lors de l'élection. Malheureusement, les libéraux les ont reportées. Ils nous avaient promis un retour à l'équilibre budgétaire pour 2019. Maintenant, c'est remis aux calendes grecques, c'est-à-dire, à 2045, si l'on se fie au directeur parlementaire du budget, une institution créée par M. Harper, il faut le rappeler. Ce grand démocrate voulait qu'il y ait de la responsabilité budgétaire au Parlement. Également, les libéraux nous avaient promis qu'ils feraient des petits déficits de 10 milliards de dollars pour les trois premières années, avant d'atteindre l'équilibre budgétaire. La première année, ils ont fait un déficit de 30 milliards de dollars. La deuxième année, ils ont fait un déficit de 20 milliards de dollars. La troisième année, ils ont fait un déficit de 19 milliards de dollars. Or, le directeur parlementaire du budget nous annonce que, finalement, un montant de 4 milliards de dollars qui a été mal calculé par le gouvernement libéral se rajoute à la dette. On l'a su il y a une ou deux semaines. On est rendu à 22 milliards de dollars. C'est 6,5 fois plus que ce que les libéraux avaient prévu dans leur plan de retour à l'équilibre budgétaire.
L'autre promesse budgétaire phare des libéraux, c'était que les petits déficits de 10 milliards de dollars allaient être au service de la construction de nouveaux projets d'infrastructure, dans un programme de 187 milliards de dollars.
À ce jour, seulement 9 milliards de dollars sont sortis des coffres pour subvenir à des projets d'infrastructure. Il manque encore 170 milliards de dollars. Où sont-ils? Le premier ministre est tellement conscient du problème qu'il a lui-même fait un remaniement de son Cabinet l'été dernier. Il a nommé l'ancien ministre du Commerce international au poste de ministre de l'Infrastructure, et la lettre de mandat de ce dernier dit qu'il doit absolument se pencher sur cette fâcheuse situation de l'argent qui ne sort pas des coffres pour financer les projets d'infrastructure.
Ce n'est pas pour rien que les libéraux ne veulent pas que nous ayons plus que deux ou trois jours pour discuter du budget. Ils ne veulent pas que les conservateurs et le NPD s'expriment sur le budget autant qu'ils le pourraient, parce que nous aurions beaucoup de mauvaises choses à leur dire et à dire aux Canadiens.
Heureusement, nous sommes dans une démocratie et nous pouvons nous exprimer par l'entremise des médias, alors les Canadiens peuvent savoir ce que je vais dire. Toutefois, il est important que nous puissions nous exprimer à la Chambre également, car c'est en écoutant ce que nous disons ici que les Canadiens apprennent ce qui est arrivé dans l'histoire.
Les choses ne sont pas aussi roses que le prétendent les libéraux en ce qui a trait à l'économie et à leur plan. Par exemple, sur le plan des exportations, on est incapable d'exporter le pétrole canadien comme on le devrait. Nous possédons l'une des plus grandes réserves au monde, mais les libéraux ont resserré les règles à l'Office national de l'énergie au cours des dernières années. Cela a fait en sorte que de nombreux projets sont tombés à l'eau, comme le projet Trans Mountain de Kinder Morgan, que les libéraux ont finalement sauvé avec 4,5 milliards de dollars des contribuables, le projet Northern Gateway et le corridor de l'Est. Bref, en matière d'exportation, cela ne va pas très bien.
En ce qui a trait aux investissements, de 2015 à 2017, les investissements canadiens aux États-Unis ont augmenté de 65 %, alors que les investissements américains au Canada ont baissé de 52 %.
Par ailleurs, une chose qui touche davantage la vie quotidienne de nos concitoyens et nos concitoyennes, c'est la dette massive qui pourrait mettre à mal tous nos futurs projets pour notre glorieuse fédération. En 2018, la dette totale accumulée est de 670 milliards de dollars. Cela équivaut à 47 000 $ par famille. Alors, avant même de penser aux dettes étudiantes, aux paiements de voiture et à l'hypothèque, chaque famille a aussi une dette de 47 000 $, dont un bon pourcentage a augmenté au cours des trois dernières années à cause de la mauvaise gestion budgétaire des libéraux.
D'ailleurs, c'est sans parler des frais d'intérêt sur la dette. Je suis certain que cela enrage les citoyens qui nous écoutent. En 2020, les frais d'intérêt sur la dette seront de 39 milliards de dollars par année. C'est 3 milliards de dollars de plus que ce que nous investissons chaque année en santé.
Le gouvernement se targue d'avoir fait avec les provinces un merveilleux plan de transferts fédéraux en santé, mais ce plan ne respectait pas les champs de compétence provinciaux. De plus, il a imposé des conditions aux provinces pour avoir accès à l'argent des transferts fédéraux, ce que nous n'avions pas fait à l'époque du gouvernement Harper. Nous investissons 36 milliards de dollars par année en santé et notre service de la dette est de 39 milliards de dollars. Imaginons tout ce que nous pourrions faire avec cela.
Je terminerai sur la pénurie de main-d'oeuvre. J'aurais aimé avoir 20 minutes afin d'en dire plus, mais à cause du bâillon, il nous est impossible de parler autant que nous le voulons. C'est triste que je ne puisse pas continuer.
À Québec, on a besoin d'environ 150 000 travailleurs de plus. J'ai trouvé cela ahurissant que la ministre tourne mes questions en dérision à trois reprises. Le député de Louis-Hébert, quant à lui, a osé dire que nous, les conservateurs, n'aimions pas l'immigration. Cela n'a aucun rapport. Nous sommes pour l'immigration, mais cela représente seulement 25 % de la solution à la pénurie de main d'oeuvre. À Québec, la crise est grave.
Il y a plusieurs choses que le gouvernement fédéral peut faire qui relèvent de son champ de compétence et qui, combinées à l'immigration, aideront à pallier les pénuries de main-d'oeuvre. Toutefois, tout ce que les libéraux sont capables de faire, c'est se moquer de moi, seulement parce que je suis un député de l'opposition. J'ai pourtant organisé des tables rondes économiques à Québec avec mes collègues, et tous les entrepreneurs disaient que la crise est grave. Les libéraux devraient se comporter en bon gouvernement et arrêter de se moquer de nous chaque fois que nous prenons la parole. En fait, c'est encore pire; ils veulent nous empêcher de parler.
Results: 1 - 15 of 155 | Page: 1 of 11

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
>
>|