Interventions in the House of Commons
 
 
 
RSS feed based on search criteria Export search results - CSV (plain text) Export search results - XML
Add search criteria
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-11-06 16:04 [p.23385]
Mr. Speaker, I am very pleased to rise. As usual, I would like to say hello to the many people of Beauport—Limoilou who are watching us live on CPAC or on platforms such as Facebook and Twitter later.
I would like to comment on the speech by the Minister of Status of Women. I found it somewhat hypocritical when she said that she hopes her opposition colleagues will support the bill and the budget's feminist measures, which she presented, when the Liberals actually and strategically included all these measures in an omnibus bill, the 2018 budget implementation bill. Clearly, we, the Conservatives, will not vote in favour of Bill C-86 because it once again presents a deficit budget that is devastating for Canada's economy and for Canadian taxpayers. It is somewhat hypocritical for the minister to tell us that she hopes we will support the measures to give women more power when she herself was involved in hiding these measures in an omnibus bill.
I would like say, as I often say, that it is a privilege for me to speak today, but not for the same reason this time. I might have been denied the opportunity to speak to Bill C-86 because this morning, the Liberal government imposed closure on the House. It imposed time allocation on the speeches on the budget. This is the first time in three years that I am seeing this in the House. Since 2015, we have had three budget presentations. This is the sixth time we are debating a budget since 2015 during this 42nd Parliament. This is the first time I have seen the majority of my Conservative colleagues and the majority of my NDP colleagues being denied speaking time to discuss something as important as Bill C-86 to implement budgetary measures. The budget implementation legislation is what formalizes the budget the government brought down in February. Implementation is done in two phases. This is the second phase and it implements the Liberal government's budget.
By chance, I have the opportunity to speak about the budget today and I want to do so because I would like to remind those listening about some key elements of this budget which, in our view, are going in the wrong direction. First, the Liberals are continuing with their habit, which has become ingrained in their psyches. They are continuing with their deficit approach. It appears that they are in a financial bind. That is why they are creating new taxes like the carbon tax. They also lack the personal ability to govern. You might say that it is not in their genes to balance a budget. The Liberals' budget measures are bad and their economic plan is bad. They are so incapable of balancing the budget that they cannot even give us a timeline. They cannot even tell us when they think they will balance the budget.
This is the first time that we have seen this in the history of our great Canadian parliamentary democracy, established in 1867, and probably before that, in the parliaments of the United Canadas. This is the first time since 1867 that a government has not been able to say when they will balance the budget. I am not one for political rhetoric, but this is not rhetoric, this is a fact.
The Liberals made big promises to us in that regard during the 2015 election. Unfortunately, the Liberals put off keeping those promises. They promised to balance the budget by 2019. Now, they have put that off indefinitely, or until 2045, according to the Parliamentary Budget Officer, a position that, let us not forget, was created by Mr. Harper. That great democrat wanted to ensure that there was budgetary accountability in Parliament. The Liberals also promised that they would run small deficits of $10 billion for the first three years and then balance the budget. The first year, they ran a deficit of $30 billion. The second year, they ran a deficit of $20 billion. The third year, they ran a deficit of $19 billion. Just a week or two ago, we found out from the Parliamentary Budget Officer that the Liberals miscalculated and another $4 billion in debt has been added to that amount. The Liberals have racked up a deficit of $22 billion. That is 6.5 times more than what they set out in their plan to balance the budget.
The other key budget promise the Liberals made was that the small deficits of $10 billion would be used to build new infrastructure as part of a $187-billion program.
To date, only $9 billion has flowed from the coffers to pay for infrastructure projects. Where is the other $170 billion? The Prime Minister is so acutely aware of the problem that he shuffled his cabinet this summer. He appointed the former international trade minister to the infrastructure portfolio, and the new infrastructure minister's mandate letter says he absolutely has to get on this troublesome issue of money not being used to fund infrastructure projects.
There is a reason the Liberals do not want to give us more than two or three days to discuss the budget. They do not want the Conservatives and the NDP to say quite as much about the budget as they would like to say because we have a lot of bad things to tell them and Canadians.
Fortunately, we live in a democracy, and we can express ourselves in the media, so all Canadians can hear what I have to say. However, it is important for us to express our ideas in the House too because listening to what we say here is how Canadians learn what happened in history.
Things are not as rosy as the Liberals claim when it comes to the economy and their plan. For instance, in terms of exports, they have not been able to export Canadian oil as they should. We have one of the largest reserves in the world, but the Liberals tightened rules surrounding the National Energy Board in recent years. As a result, several projects have died, such as the northern gateway project and energy east, and the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain project, which the Liberals managed to save in the end using $4.5 billion of taxpayers money. In short, our exports are not doing very well.
As for investments, from 2015 to 2017, Canadian investments in the U.S. increased by 65%, while American investments in Canada dropped by 52%.
On top of that, one thing that affects the daily lives of Canadians even more is the massive debt, which could jeopardize all our future projects for our glorious federation. In 2018, the total accumulated debt is $670 billion. That comes out to $47,000 per family. Not counting any student debt, car payments or mortgage, every family already has a debt of $47,000, and a good percentage of that has increased over the past three years because of the Liberals' fiscal mismanagement.
That is not to mention the interest on the debt. I am sure that Canadians watching at home are outraged by this. In 2020, the interest on the debt will be $39 billion a year. That is $3 billion more than we invest every year in health.
The government boasts about how it came up with a wonderful plan for federal health transfers with the provinces, but that plan does not respect provincial jurisdictions. What is more, it imposes conditions on the provinces that they must meet in order to be able to access those transfers. We did not do that in the Harper era. We are investing $36 billion per year in health care and spending $39 billion servicing debt. Imagine what we could have done with that money.
I will close by talking about the labour shortage. I would have liked to have 20 minutes so I could say more, but we cannot take the time we want because of the gag order. It is sad that I cannot keep going.
Quebec needs approximately 150,000 more workers. I am appalled that the minister would make a mockery of my questions on three occasions. Meanwhile, the member for Louis-Hébert had the nerve to say that the Conservatives oppose immigration. That has nothing to do with it. We support immigration, but that represents only 25% of the solution to the labour shortage. This is a serious crisis in Quebec.
There are many things under federal jurisdiction that the government could do and that, in combination with immigration, would help fill labour shortages. However, all the Liberals can do is make fun of me, simply because I am a member of the opposition. I hosted economic round tables in Quebec City with my colleagues, and all business owners were telling us that this is a serious crisis. The Liberals should act like a good government and stop making fun of us every time we speak. Actually, it is even worse; they want to prevent us from speaking.
Monsieur le Président, je suis très heureux de prendre la parole. J'aimerais, comme d'habitude, saluer tous les citoyens et les citoyennes de Beauport—Limoilou qui nous écoutent en grand nombre sur CPAC ou sur les plateformes comme Facebook et Twitter plus tard.
J'aimerais faire un commentaire sur le discours de la ministre de la Condition féminine. Je trouve un peu hypocrite qu'elle dise espérer que ses collègues de l'opposition appuieront le projet de loi et les mesures féministes de son budget, qu'elle nous a présentées, alors que les libéraux ont justement et stratégiquement inclus toutes ces mesures dans un projet de loi omnibus, le projet de loi d'exécution du budget de 2018. De toute évidence, nous, les conservateurs, ne voterons pas pour le projet de loi C-86, car il présente encore une fois un budget déficitaire et dévastateur pour l'économie canadienne, pour les payeurs de taxes canadiens. C'est un peu hypocrite que la ministre nous dise qu'elles espère que nous appuierons les mesures pour donner plus de pouvoir aux femmes, alors qu'elle a elle-même participé à cette stratégie de camouflage au sein d'un projet de loi omnibus.
Je voudrais dire aux citoyens que c'est un privilège pour moi de prendre la parole aujourd'hui, comme je le dis souvent, mais pas pour la même raison cette fois. J'aurais pu ne pas pouvoir parler du projet de loi C-86, puisque, ce matin, le gouvernement libéral a imposé un bâillon à la Chambre, comme on dit en bon québécois. Il a imposé une attribution de temps aux discours relatifs au budget. C'est la première fois en trois ans que je vois cela à la Chambre. Depuis 2015, nous avons eu trois présentations de budget. C'est la sixième fois que nous débattons d'un budget depuis 2015, en cette 42e législature. C'est la première fois que je constate que la majorité des mes collègues conservateurs et la majorité des mes collègues du NPD ne pourront pas prendre la parole pour s'exprimer sur une chose aussi importante que le projet de loi C-86, qui porte sur l'exécution des mesures budgétaires. La loi d'exécution du budget, en fait, c'est ce qui rend réel le budget présenté par le gouvernement en février. L'exécution se fait en deux temps. Nous sommes dans la deuxième partie, qui met en oeuvre le budget du gouvernement libéral.
Par hasard, j'ai la chance de parler du budget aujourd'hui et je veux en profiter, parce que je voudrais rappeler aux gens qui nous écoutent actuellement certains des attributs phares de ce projet de loi sur le budget qui, selon nous, vont dans la mauvaise direction. D'abord, les libéraux perpétuent leur habitude, qui est carrément rendue psychologique chez eux. Ils poursuivent cette approche déficitaire. Il apparaît qu'ils sont dans une incapacité financière. C'est pourquoi ils créent de nouvelles taxes comme la taxe sur le carbone. Ils ont aussi une incapacité gouvernementale qui semble personnelle. On dirait que ce n'est pas dans leurs gènes de pouvoir équilibrer un budget. Les mesures des budgétaires des libéraux sont mauvaises et leur plan économique est mauvais. Ils sont tellement incapables d'équilibrer le budget qu'ils ne peuvent même pas nous donner une date d'échéance. Ils ne peuvent même pas nous dire quand ils pensent arriver à un équilibre.
C'est la première fois qu'on voit cela dans l'histoire de notre belle démocratie parlementaire canadienne, depuis 1867, et probablement avant, dans les Parlements qui ont siégé avant cette date dans le Canada-Uni. Depuis 1867, c'est la première fois qu'un gouvernement ne peut pas donner une date de retour à l'équilibre budgétaire. Je n'aime pas faire de la rhétorique politique, mais ce n'est pas de la rhétorique, c'est un fait.
Les libéraux nous avaient fait de grandes promesses à cet égard en 2015 lors de l'élection. Malheureusement, les libéraux les ont reportées. Ils nous avaient promis un retour à l'équilibre budgétaire pour 2019. Maintenant, c'est remis aux calendes grecques, c'est-à-dire, à 2045, si l'on se fie au directeur parlementaire du budget, une institution créée par M. Harper, il faut le rappeler. Ce grand démocrate voulait qu'il y ait de la responsabilité budgétaire au Parlement. Également, les libéraux nous avaient promis qu'ils feraient des petits déficits de 10 milliards de dollars pour les trois premières années, avant d'atteindre l'équilibre budgétaire. La première année, ils ont fait un déficit de 30 milliards de dollars. La deuxième année, ils ont fait un déficit de 20 milliards de dollars. La troisième année, ils ont fait un déficit de 19 milliards de dollars. Or, le directeur parlementaire du budget nous annonce que, finalement, un montant de 4 milliards de dollars qui a été mal calculé par le gouvernement libéral se rajoute à la dette. On l'a su il y a une ou deux semaines. On est rendu à 22 milliards de dollars. C'est 6,5 fois plus que ce que les libéraux avaient prévu dans leur plan de retour à l'équilibre budgétaire.
L'autre promesse budgétaire phare des libéraux, c'était que les petits déficits de 10 milliards de dollars allaient être au service de la construction de nouveaux projets d'infrastructure, dans un programme de 187 milliards de dollars.
À ce jour, seulement 9 milliards de dollars sont sortis des coffres pour subvenir à des projets d'infrastructure. Il manque encore 170 milliards de dollars. Où sont-ils? Le premier ministre est tellement conscient du problème qu'il a lui-même fait un remaniement de son Cabinet l'été dernier. Il a nommé l'ancien ministre du Commerce international au poste de ministre de l'Infrastructure, et la lettre de mandat de ce dernier dit qu'il doit absolument se pencher sur cette fâcheuse situation de l'argent qui ne sort pas des coffres pour financer les projets d'infrastructure.
Ce n'est pas pour rien que les libéraux ne veulent pas que nous ayons plus que deux ou trois jours pour discuter du budget. Ils ne veulent pas que les conservateurs et le NPD s'expriment sur le budget autant qu'ils le pourraient, parce que nous aurions beaucoup de mauvaises choses à leur dire et à dire aux Canadiens.
Heureusement, nous sommes dans une démocratie et nous pouvons nous exprimer par l'entremise des médias, alors les Canadiens peuvent savoir ce que je vais dire. Toutefois, il est important que nous puissions nous exprimer à la Chambre également, car c'est en écoutant ce que nous disons ici que les Canadiens apprennent ce qui est arrivé dans l'histoire.
Les choses ne sont pas aussi roses que le prétendent les libéraux en ce qui a trait à l'économie et à leur plan. Par exemple, sur le plan des exportations, on est incapable d'exporter le pétrole canadien comme on le devrait. Nous possédons l'une des plus grandes réserves au monde, mais les libéraux ont resserré les règles à l'Office national de l'énergie au cours des dernières années. Cela a fait en sorte que de nombreux projets sont tombés à l'eau, comme le projet Trans Mountain de Kinder Morgan, que les libéraux ont finalement sauvé avec 4,5 milliards de dollars des contribuables, le projet Northern Gateway et le corridor de l'Est. Bref, en matière d'exportation, cela ne va pas très bien.
En ce qui a trait aux investissements, de 2015 à 2017, les investissements canadiens aux États-Unis ont augmenté de 65 %, alors que les investissements américains au Canada ont baissé de 52 %.
Par ailleurs, une chose qui touche davantage la vie quotidienne de nos concitoyens et nos concitoyennes, c'est la dette massive qui pourrait mettre à mal tous nos futurs projets pour notre glorieuse fédération. En 2018, la dette totale accumulée est de 670 milliards de dollars. Cela équivaut à 47 000 $ par famille. Alors, avant même de penser aux dettes étudiantes, aux paiements de voiture et à l'hypothèque, chaque famille a aussi une dette de 47 000 $, dont un bon pourcentage a augmenté au cours des trois dernières années à cause de la mauvaise gestion budgétaire des libéraux.
D'ailleurs, c'est sans parler des frais d'intérêt sur la dette. Je suis certain que cela enrage les citoyens qui nous écoutent. En 2020, les frais d'intérêt sur la dette seront de 39 milliards de dollars par année. C'est 3 milliards de dollars de plus que ce que nous investissons chaque année en santé.
Le gouvernement se targue d'avoir fait avec les provinces un merveilleux plan de transferts fédéraux en santé, mais ce plan ne respectait pas les champs de compétence provinciaux. De plus, il a imposé des conditions aux provinces pour avoir accès à l'argent des transferts fédéraux, ce que nous n'avions pas fait à l'époque du gouvernement Harper. Nous investissons 36 milliards de dollars par année en santé et notre service de la dette est de 39 milliards de dollars. Imaginons tout ce que nous pourrions faire avec cela.
Je terminerai sur la pénurie de main-d'oeuvre. J'aurais aimé avoir 20 minutes afin d'en dire plus, mais à cause du bâillon, il nous est impossible de parler autant que nous le voulons. C'est triste que je ne puisse pas continuer.
À Québec, on a besoin d'environ 150 000 travailleurs de plus. J'ai trouvé cela ahurissant que la ministre tourne mes questions en dérision à trois reprises. Le député de Louis-Hébert, quant à lui, a osé dire que nous, les conservateurs, n'aimions pas l'immigration. Cela n'a aucun rapport. Nous sommes pour l'immigration, mais cela représente seulement 25 % de la solution à la pénurie de main d'oeuvre. À Québec, la crise est grave.
Il y a plusieurs choses que le gouvernement fédéral peut faire qui relèvent de son champ de compétence et qui, combinées à l'immigration, aideront à pallier les pénuries de main-d'oeuvre. Toutefois, tout ce que les libéraux sont capables de faire, c'est se moquer de moi, seulement parce que je suis un député de l'opposition. J'ai pourtant organisé des tables rondes économiques à Québec avec mes collègues, et tous les entrepreneurs disaient que la crise est grave. Les libéraux devraient se comporter en bon gouvernement et arrêter de se moquer de nous chaque fois que nous prenons la parole. En fait, c'est encore pire; ils veulent nous empêcher de parler.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-11-06 16:15 [p.23387]
Mr. Speaker, that is such a dishonourable question. He is doing exactly what I just criticized his colleague from Louis-Hébert for doing. That is fearmongering. The Liberals are doing exactly what they are accusing us of doing. They are making a mockery of what we are saying and the work we are doing as Her Majesty's opposition.
When we were in power, over 300,000 immigrants entered Canada every year, and there were no crises at our borders because we made sure that the our immigration system was orderly, fair and peaceful.
At an economic round table, the executive director of the Association des économistes du Québec told us that immigration was only 25% of the solution to the labour shortage. Even if we welcomed 500,000 immigrants a year, that would still not completely solve the labour shortage.
We need to help seniors who want to return to the workforce. We need to allow foreign students in our universities to stay longer. We need to make sure that fewer young men in Quebec drop out of high school. All kinds of action could be taken, but all the Liberals are capable of doing is launching completely false insinuations and hyper-partisan attacks on us.
Monsieur le Président, c'est tellement déshonorant comme question. Il fait exactement ce que je viens de reprocher à son collègue de Louis-Hébert. C'est du fearmongering, pour employer le terme anglais. Les libéraux font exactement ce qu'ils nous accusent de faire. Ils tournent en dérision ce que nous disons et le travail que nous faisons ici en tant qu'opposition de Sa Majesté.
Lorsque nous étions au pouvoir, plus de 300 000 immigrants entraient chaque année au Canada et il n'y avait aucune crise à nos frontières, puisque nous, nous faisions en sorte que notre système d'immigration soit ordonné, juste et paisible.
Le directeur général de l'Association des économistes du Québec nous a dit, lors d'une table ronde économique, que l'immigration était seulement 25 % de la solution à la pénurie de main-d'oeuvre. Même si on faisait entrer 500 000 immigrants par année, cela ne réglerait pas complètement la pénurie de main-d'oeuvre.
Il faut aider les aînés qui veulent revenir sur le marché du travail. Il faut permettre aux étudiants étrangers dans nos universités de rester plus longtemps. Il faut faire en sorte que moins de jeunes hommes au Québec abandonnent l'école secondaire. Il y a toutes sortes de mesures à prendre, mais tout ce que les libéraux sont capables de faire, c'est de nous envoyer des insinuations complètement erronées et des attaques hyper partisanes.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-11-06 16:17 [p.23387]
Mr. Speaker, the government needs to be serious and show some leadership. That means being capable of making decisions for the future well being of Canadian society.
Why are the Liberals coming up with a carbon tax and bogus plans to fight climate change when they know a recession is coming? Everyone is talking about it. There will be a recession by 2020. What are they going to do in a recession with a $30-billion deficit? They have run up deficits or more than $100 billion in three and a half years. When the next recession hits, what are they going to do to get the economy moving again without any money?
We know what to do. From 2006 to 2015, the Conservative government managed to get through the worst economic crisis in history since the recession of the 1930s. We had the best result in the G7 and the OECD.
Monsieur le Président, il faut être sérieux et faire preuve de leadership. Cela signifie être capable de prendre des décisions pour le futur bien-être de la collectivité canadienne.
Pourquoi les libéraux inventent-ils une taxe sur le carbone et des plans de lutte contre les changements climatiques qui n'ont aucun effet sur ceux-ci, alors qu'ils savent qu'une récession s'en vient? Tout le monde en parle au pays: il y aura une récession d'ici 2020. Que vont-ils faire devant une récession avec un déficit de 30 milliards de dollars? Ils ont accumulé des déficits totalisant plus de 100 milliards de dollars en trois ans et demi. Lorsque arrivera la prochaine récession, que vont-ils faire pour redémarrer l'économie sans argent?
Nous, nous savons quoi faire. Le gouvernement conservateur, de 2006 à 2015, a réussi à traverser la pire crise économique de l'histoire depuis la récession des années 1930. Nous avons eu le meilleur résultat des pays du G7 et de l'OCDE.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-11-06 16:19 [p.23387]
Mr. Speaker, there is the expression that Conservatives times are tough times. Why is that? We always have to clean up the Liberals' mess every single time. They were in power more often than us because they do not have principles. All they want is power. We stand up for the people and principles.
Monsieur le Président, il existe une expression selon laquelle les temps sont durs sous les conservateurs. C'est le cas parce qu'il nous faut chaque fois réparer les dégâts causés par les libéraux. Ils ont été au pouvoir plus souvent que nous parce qu'ils n'ont aucun principe. Le pouvoir est tout ce qui les intéresse. Nous défendons les gens et les principes.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-11-01 11:34 [p.23157]
Madam Speaker, I thank the member for Louis-Hébert for his speech.
At the beginning of his speech he talked about historic investments in infrastructure. Sadly, it is historic in theory only, since we have seen just $9.3 billion of the $187 billion announced a few years ago.
Between 2010 and 2015, the Conservative government not only released the $80 billion from our economic action plan, but we also spent it in real time. Many observers even talked about how effective the plan was, since the money was getting out. I just wanted to set the record straight.
I would also like to ask my hon. colleague when the government plans to balance the budget. He did not mention that in his speech. One of the Liberal government's key promises in 2015 was to balance the budget by 2020. Promises must be kept if we want to reduce cynicism among Canadians instead of fuelling it. This is important to our democracy, and yet, it is clear that the government has shelved this promise and that it has absolutely no intention of keeping it.
When will the government balance the budget?
Madame la Présidente, je remercie le député de Louis-Hébert de son discours.
Au tout début, il a dit que les investissements prévus en infrastructure étaient historiques. Malheureusement, ce n'est historique que sur papier pour l'instant, puisque seulement 9,3 milliards des 187 milliards de dollars qui ont été annoncés il y a quelques années sont sortis.
De notre côté, entre 2010 et 2015, les 80 milliards de dollars de notre plan de relance économique ont non seulement été dégagés, ils ont été dépensés en temps réel. Plusieurs commentateurs disaient même à quel point ce plan était efficace, puisque l'argent sortait. J'aimerais donc remettre les pendules à l'heure à cet égard.
J'aimerais également demander à mon honorable collègue ce qu'il en est du retour à l'équilibre budgétaire. Il n'en a pas parlé dans son discours. En 2015, une des promesses phares du gouvernement libéral était d'équilibrer le budget avant 2020. Les promesses doivent être tenues pour que le cynisme canadien ne grandisse pas et pour qu'au contraire, il diminue. C'est une notion importante dans notre démocratie. Or, non seulement cette promesse a clairement été remise aux calendes grecques, mais le gouvernement ne compte pas la respecter du tout.
Quand allons-nous voir l'équilibre budgétaire?
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-10-26 10:49 [p.22914]
Madam Speaker, it is always an honour to rise to speak in the House.
I would like to say hello to the people of Beauport—Limoilou who are watching us now on CPAC or watching a rebroadcast on Facebook or Twitter.
Without further delay, I would like to address the previous speaker's comments. I find it interesting that he said their objective was to prevent foreign influence from third parties.
The bill will pass, since the Liberals have a majority. However, one problem I have with the bill is that it will allow more than 1.5 million Canadians who have been living outside of Canada for more than five years to vote in general elections, even if they have been outside Canada for 10 or 15 years.
These people have a privilege that even Canadians who have never left the country do not even have. The Liberals will let them randomly choose which riding they want to vote in. This is a massive privilege.
If I were living in the United States for 10 years and saw that the vote was really close in a certain riding, thanks to the new amendments made to the bill, I could decide to vote for the Liberal Party in order to ensure that a Liberal member gets elected. That seems like a very dangerous measure to me. It will give a lot of power to people who have been living abroad for a very long time. That still does not make them foreigners, since they are Canadian citizens.
For those watching us, I want to note that we are talking about Bill C-76 to modernize the Canada Elections Act.
This is an extremely important issue because it is the Canada Elections Act that sets the guidelines for our elections in our democracy. These elections determine the party that will form the next government of Canada.
I am sure that the people of Beauport—Limoilou watching us right now can hardly believe the Liberal government when it says that it wants to improve democracy or Canada's electoral system or allow a lot of people to exercise their right to vote. The Liberals' record on different elements of democracy has been deplorable the past three years.
Two years ago when the House was debating the issue, I was a member of the Standing Committee on Government Operations and Estimates. The Liberals introduced a parliamentary reform that included some rather surprising elements. They wanted to weaken the opposition, thereby weakening roughly 10 million Canadians who voted for the opposition parties, including the Conservative Party, the New Democratic Party, and the Green Party.
They wanted to cut speaking times in the House, which is completely ridiculous. I have said it many times before and I will say it again. An MP currently has the right to speak for 20 minutes. Most of the time, each MP speaks for 10 minutes. Through the reform, the Liberals wanted to cut speaking times from 20 minutes to 10 minutes at all times. The 20-minute speaking slot would no longer exist.
I have a book at home that I love called The Confederation Debates. It features speeches by Papineau, Doyon, George-Étienne Cartier, John A. MacDonald, Louis-Hippolyte La Fontaine, among many others that I could name. These great MPs would speak for four, five, six, seven or eight hours without stopping, long into the night.
With their parliamentary reforms, the Liberals wanted to reduce MPs' speaking time to 10 minutes. They wanted to take away our right to speak for 20 minutes. All this was intended to minimize the opposition's speaking time, to stifle debate on various issues.
What they did yesterday was even worse. It was a clear-cut example of their attitude towards parliamentary democracy. They imposed time allocation. In layman's terms, they placed a gag order on a debate on the modernization of the Canada Elections Act. No example could more blatantly demonstrate their ultimate intent, which is to ram the bill through as fast as possible. It is really a shame. They want to ram this down our throats.
There is also what they did in 2015 and 2016 with their practice of cash for access.
When big-time lobbyists want to meet with a minister or the Prime Minister to discuss an issue, they just have to register and pay $1,500, or $1,575 now, for the opportunity to influence them.
These are not get-togethers with ordinary constituents. These are get-togethers arranged for the express purpose of giving prominent lobbyists access to top government officials and enabling them to influence decisions.
Here is a great example. The Minister of Finance attended a get-together with Port of Halifax officials and people closely connected to the Port of Halifax. No other Liberal Party MP was there. That is a blatant conflict of interest and cash for access.
If Canadians have a hard time trusting the Liberals when they say they introduced this bill because they want to enfranchise people or improve democracy and civic engagement, it is also because of all of the promises the Liberals have broken since their election in 2015.
Elections and electoral platforms form the foundations of Canadian democracy. Each party's political platform contains election promises. Personally, I prefer to call them commitments. The Liberals made some big promises. They said they would run small $10-billion deficits for the first two years and then reduce the deficits. Year after year, however, as they are in their third year of a four-year mandate, they have been running deficits that are much worse: $30 billion, $20 billion and, this year, $19 billion, although their plan projected a $6-billion deficit.
They broke that promise, but worse still, they broke their promise to return to a balanced budget. As my colleague from Louis-Saint-Laurent has put it so well often enough, this is the first time we are seeing structural deficits outside wartime or a major recession. What is worse, this is the first time a government has had no plan to return to a balanced budget. It defies reason. The Parliamentary Budget Officer, an institution created by the Right Hon. Stephen Harper, said again recently that it is unbelievable to see a government not taking affairs of the state more seriously.
Meanwhile, with respect to infrastructure, the Liberals said they were introducing the largest infrastructure program in Canadian history—everything is always historic with them—worth $187 billion. What is the total amount spent to date? They have spent, at most, $7 billion on a few projects here and there, although this was supposed to be a pan-Canadian, structured and large-scale program.
The Liberals also broke their promise to reform the electoral system. They wanted a preferential balloting system because, according to analyses, surveys and their strategists, it would have benefited them. I did not support that promise, but it is probably why so many Canadians voted for the Liberals.
There is then a string of broken promises, but electoral reform was a fundamental promise and the Liberals reneged on it. It would have made changes to the Election Act and to how Canadians choose their government. That clearly shows once again that Canadians cannot trust the Liberals when they say they will reform the Election Act in order to strengthen democracy in Canada.
Let us now get back to the matter at hand, Bill C-76, which makes major fundamental changes that I find deplorable.
First, Bill C-76 would allow the Chief Electoral Officer to authorize the use of the voter information card as a piece of identification for voting. As one of my Conservative colleagues said recently, whether we like it or not, voter cards show up all over, even in recycling boxes. Sometimes voter cards are found sticking out of community mailboxes.
There are all kinds of ways that an individual can get hold of a voter card and go to the polling station with it. It is not that difficult. This Liberal bill enables that individual to vote, although there is no way of knowing if they are that person, unless they are asked to provide identification—and that is not even the biggest problem.
It does not happen often, thank goodness, but when I go to the CHUL in Quebec City—which is the hospital where I am registered—not only do I have to provide the doctor's requisition for blood work, but I also have to show a piece of ID and my hospital card.
Madame la Présidente, je suis toujours honoré de prendre la parole à la Chambre.
J'aimerais saluer tous les citoyens de Beauport—Limoilou qui nous écoutent en ce moment, par l'intermédiaire de CPAC, ou qui nous écouteront plus tard en rediffusion sur Facebook ou Twitter.
Sans plus tarder, j'aimerais répondre au commentaire qu'a fait le député qui vient de terminer son discours. C'est intéressant parce qu'il a précisé que leur objectif était de réduire l'influence et l'impact des tierces parties venant de l'extérieur, donc des gens venant de l'étranger.
Le projet de loi sera adopté, puisque les libéraux forment la majorité. Cependant, une des choses qui me titille le plus dans le projet de loi, c'est qu'il va dorénavant permettre à plus de 1,5 million de Canadiens vivant à l'extérieur du Canada depuis plus de 5 ans de voter lors des élections générales, même si cela fait 10 ou 15 ans qu'ils sont à l'extérieur du pays.
Ces personnes ont un privilège que même un Canadien qui vit ici et qui n'est jamais parti n'a pas. Les libéraux vont leur permettre de choisir aléatoirement une circonscription où voter. C'est un privilège complètement incommensurable.
Si j'étais aux États-Unis depuis 10 ans et que je voyais que le vote est très serré dans une circonscription, je pourrais, grâce aux amendements apportés au projet de loi, décider d'aller voter pour le Parti libéral, afin de m'assurer qu'un député libéral est élu. Cela m'apparaît être une mesure très dangereuse. Elle va justement donner du pouvoir à des gens qui vivent à l'étranger depuis fort longtemps. Ce ne sont tout de même pas des étrangers, puisqu'il s'agit de Canadiens.
À l'intention des citoyens qui nous écoutent, je précise que nous parlons du projet de loi C-76, qui vise à moderniser la Loi électorale du Canada.
Il s'agit d'un enjeu extrêmement important, parce que c'est la Loi électorale du Canada qui fixe les balises et les barèmes applicables à nos élections, dans notre démocratie. Ces élections déterminent le parti qui va former le prochain gouvernement du Canada.
Je suis sûr que les citoyens de Beauport—Limoilou qui nous écoutent en ce moment ont peine à croire le gouvernement libéral lorsqu'il dit vouloir améliorer la démocratie ou le système électoral du Canada ou permettre à de nombreuses personnes d'exercer leur droit de vote. L'historique libéral des trois dernières années, en ce qui a trait à différents attributs de la démocratie, est déplorable.
Il y a deux ans, alors que ce débat avait cours à la Chambre, je siégeais au Comité permanent des opérations gouvernementales et des prévisions budgétaires. Les libéraux ont mis en avant une réforme parlementaire dans laquelle il y avait certains éléments assez surprenants. Ils voulaient amoindrir le pouvoir de l'opposition, donc amoindrir le pouvoir d'environ 10 millions de Canadiens qui ont voté pour des partis de l'opposition, ce qui comprend le Parti conservateur, le Nouveau Parti démocratique et le Parti vert.
Ils voulaient réduire le temps de parole à la Chambre, ce qui est complètement ridicule. Je l'ai souvent dit à la Chambre, mais je veux le redire. En ce moment, un député a le droit de parler pendant 20 minutes. La plupart du temps, chaque député parle pendant 10 minutes. Au moyen de la réforme, les libéraux voulaient faire passer le droit de parole de 20 minutes à 10 minutes, à n'importe quel moment. Le droit de parole de 20 minutes n'aurait même plus existé.
Chez moi, j'ai un livre que j'adore, qui s'intitule Les Débats de la Confédération. On peut y lire Papineau, Doyon, George-Étienne Cartier, John A. MacDonald et Louis-Hippolyte La Fontaine. Je pourrais en nommer plusieurs autres. Ces grands députés parlaient quatre, cinq, six, sept ou huit heures d'affilée, sans arrêt, toute la nuit.
Au moyen de leur réforme parlementaire, les libéraux voulaient réduire le temps de parole des députés à 10 minutes. Ils voulaient annuler le droit de parole de 20 minutes. Tout cela pour empêcher le plus possible l'opposition de s'exprimer, pour empêcher des débats qui portent sur toutes sortes d'enjeux.
Ce qu'ils ont fait hier est encore pire que cela. C'est un exemple patent de leur attitude envers la démocratie parlementaire. Ils ont imposé une attribution de temps. En jargon populaire ou comme on dit au Québec, ils ont imposé un bâillon sur un débat qui porte sur la modernisation de la Loi électorale du Canada. Il n'y a pas d'exemple plus flagrant que cela de leur intention. Cette dernière est justement de faire adopter le projet de loi à toute vitesse. Cela est vraiment dommage. Ils veulent nous faire passer cela dans la gorge.
Il y a aussi ce qu'ils ont fait en 2015 et en 2016 avec leur pratique du cash for access.
Quand de grands lobbyistes voulaient rencontrer un ministre ou le premier ministre pour parler d'une question particulière, ils n'avaient qu'à s'inscrire sur une liste et à payer 1 500 $ — c'est 1 575 $ aujourd'hui — pour pouvoir les influencer.
On ne parle pas d'un cinq à sept avec des citoyens de tous les jours d'une circonscription. On parle de cinq à sept mis en place exclusivement pour permettre à de grands lobbyistes d'atteindre les plus hauts sommets de l'État et d'influencer les prises de décisions.
Voici un exemple important. Le ministre des Finances a pris part à un cinq à sept avec les autorités portuaires du Port d'Halifax et des gens qui avaient seulement un intérêt pour le port d'Halifax. Il n'y avait aucun député du Parti libéral. C'est un exemple flagrant de conflit d'intérêts et d'accès au comptant.
Par ailleurs, s'il est très difficile pour les Canadiens de faire confiance aux libéraux quand ils disent qu'avec ce projet de loi, ils veulent agrandir le suffrage ou améliorer la démocratie et la participation citoyenne, c'est aussi à cause de toutes les promesses qu'ils ont brisées depuis qu'ils ont été élus en 2015.
Les élections et les plateformes sont des fondements de la démocratie canadienne. Dans la plateforme politique de chaque parti, il y a des promesses électorales. Moi, je préfère appeler cela des engagements. Les libéraux avaient fait de grandes promesses. Ils ont dit qu'ils allaient faire des petits déficits de 10 milliards de dollars pour les deux premières années et qu'ils diminueraient par la suite. Or, année après année, puisqu'ils en sont à la troisième année de leur mandat de quatre ans, ils nous ont servi des déficits bien pires: 30 milliards de dollars, 20 milliards de dollars et, cette année, 19 milliards de dollars, alors que leur plan prévoyait un déficit de 6 milliards de dollars.
Ils ont brisé cette promesse, mais pire encore, ils ont brisé leur promesse du retour à l'équilibre budgétaire. Comme mon collègue de Louis-Saint-Laurent le dit si bien assez souvent, c'est la première fois de l'histoire qu'on voit des déficits structurels hors d'une récession économique importante ou d'une période de guerre. Le pire, c'est que c'est la première fois qu'un gouvernement ne prévoit aucun retour à l'équilibre budgétaire. C'est un non-sens. Le directeur parlementaire du budget, une institution créée par le très honorable M. Harper, a dit encore récemment qu'il était incroyable de voir un gouvernement qui ne prend pas les affaires de l'État plus au sérieux que cela.
D'autre part, en ce qui concerne les infrastructures, les libéraux disaient qu'ils avaient le plus grand programme d'infrastructure de l'histoire du Canada — avec eux, c'est toujours historique —, totalisant 187 milliards de dollars. Toutefois, de cette somme, qu'ont-ils dépensé à ce jour? Ce n'est pas plus que 7 milliards de dollars pour quelques projets ici et là, alors que ce programme était censé être pancanadien, structuré et de grande envergure.
Les libéraux ont aussi brisé leur promesse de réformer le mode de scrutin. Ils voulaient un mode de scrutin préférentiel, car selon les analyses, les sondages et leurs stratèges, cela les aurait avantagés. Je n'appuyais pas cette promesse, mais c'est probablement en raison de celle-ci qu'un grand pan de l'électorat canadien a voté pour les libéraux.
Ce sont donc des promesses brisées les unes après les autres, mais la réforme du mode de scrutin était une promesse fondamentale, et les libéraux l'ont reniée. Cela aurait touché la loi électorale et la façon dont les Canadiens sont appelés à choisir leur gouvernement. C'est un autre exemple patent qui démontre que les Canadiens ne peuvent pas faire confiance aux libéraux lorsqu'ils disent qu'ils vont réformer la loi sur les élections pour agrandir la démocratie au Canada.
Revenons maintenant au sujet qui nous intéresse plus particulièrement, c'est-à-dire le projet de loi C-76, qui apporte deux grands changements fondamentaux qui, selon moi, sont déplorables.
Premièrement, le projet de loi C-76 permettrait au directeur général des élections d'autoriser la carte d'électeur comme pièce d'identité pour voter. Comme l'a dit un de mes collègues conservateurs récemment, les cartes d'électeur peuvent, qu'on le veuille ou non, se retrouver un peu partout, comme dans les boîtes de recyclage. Parfois, il y a des cartes qui dépassent des boîtes postales communautaires.
Il y a donc toutes sortes de façons dont un citoyen peut trouver une carte d'électeur et se présenter au bureau de vote avec celle-ci. C'est même assez facile. Or, selon ce projet de loi libéral, cette personne-là pourrait voter, alors qu'il n'y aurait aucune façon de savoir si c'est la même personne, sauf en lui demandant de présenter une carte d'identité. Ce serait donc la moindre des choses.
Cela ne m'arrive pas souvent, Dieu merci, mais quand je vais au CHUL de Québec — c'est là que je suis inscrit —, je dois non seulement présenter la prescription du médecin pour une prise de sang, mais je dois aussi présenter une carte d'identité ainsi que la carte d'hôpital.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-10-26 12:00 [p.22927]
Madam Speaker, for the past two years, official language minority communities have been speaking out loud and clear to demand an in-depth review and modernization of the Official Languages Act.
The act was last reviewed in 1988 by us, the Conservatives.
Yesterday, the Senate tabled a report that reached the same conclusion. That conclusion was echoed by the Commissioner of Official Languages last week before the Standing Committee on Official Languages.
The Liberals announced some interesting measures yesterday, but they will not come into effect until 2023.
When will the Liberals stop taking linguistic communities hostage? When will they finally take action and start modernizing the Official Languages Act?
Madame la Présidente, depuis deux ans, les communautés de langue officielle en situation minoritaire réclament haut et fort qu'on revoie en profondeur et modernise la Loi sur les langues officielles.
Nous, les conservateurs, l'avons fait pour la dernière fois en 1988.
Hier, le Sénat a déposé un rapport qui en arrivait à la même conclusion. Le commissaire aux langues officielles en arrivait à la même conclusion la semaine dernière au Comité permanent des langues officielles.
Hier, les libéraux ont présenté des mesures intéressantes, mais elles vont seulement s'appliquer en 2023.
Quand les libéraux vont-ils cesser de prendre les communautés linguistiques en otage et enfin passer à l'action et commencer la modernisation de la Loi sur les langues officielles?
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-10-26 12:09 [p.22929]
Madam Speaker, just to check, I would like to know whether I have five minutes left. I am not sure.
Madame la Présidente, j'aimerais tirer quelque chose au clair. Est-ce qu'il reste cinq minutes à mon discours? Je n'en suis pas certain.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-10-26 12:09 [p.22929]
I believe you, of course, Madam Speaker.
That is completely ridiculous in the current context. My colleague is talking about something that happened a number of years ago. However, in the current context, there are practically no bills. The government's legislative agenda is practically non-existent. What is it introducing right now?
The Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership has been signed. We are waiting for the USMCA to be examined here in the House so that it can be ratified. We voted only once this week. We are beginning to wonder what we are doing here. The Liberal government is not introducing any meaningful legislation. This week, we had the opportunity to debate an extremely important bill, and the government imposed a gag order on us. Looking at the government's legislative agenda, it seems that we should have been able to take as much time as we needed to discuss that bill.
Madame la Présidente, je vous crois, bien entendu.
C'est complètement ridicule, dans le contexte actuel. Ma collègue revient sur ce qui s'est passé il y a plusieurs années. Or, dans le contexte actuel, il n'y a presque aucun projet de loi. Le programme législatif du gouvernement est actuellement quasi nul. Qu'est-ce qu'il présente en ce moment?
L'Accord de partenariat transpacifique global et progressiste a été signé. Nous attendons que l'AEUMC soit étudié ici pour être ratifié. Nous n'avons voté qu'une fois cette semaine. Nous nous demandons presque pourquoi nous sommes ici. Le gouvernement libéral ne présente absolument rien de significatif. Cette semaine, nous avons la chance de débattre d'un projet de loi fort important, et le gouvernement nous impose un bâillon. Sérieusement, en voyant son programme législatif, nous nous disons que nous devrions avoir tout le temps nécessaire pour discuter de ce projet de loi.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-10-26 12:11 [p.22929]
Madam Speaker, our critic for democratic institutions and other Conservative colleagues on the committee presented and tabled 200 possible amendments to the bill. These amendments would not only have strengthened the bill but possibly also given the Conservatives the privilege and honour of voting for the bill.
Concerning the citizens' voting cards, one million cards sent to citizens in the last election contained erroneous information. Also, as an Ipsos Reid poll indicates, 87% of Canadians do not see why it is a problem for them to be required to have another identification card when they present themselves at the polling booths.
It is at the basis of democracy that we make sure that the right person is on the card when someone goes to the polls to vote to choose the next government.
Madame la Présidente, la porte-parole des conservateurs dans le dossier des institutions démocratiques et les députés conservateurs membres du comité ont proposé 200 amendements au projet de loi. Ces amendements auraient renforcé le projet de loi et, de surcroît, ils auraient donné aux conservateurs le privilège et l'honneur de voter en faveur de la mesure législative.
Pour ce qui est des cartes d'information de l'électeur, un million de ces cartes envoyées à des citoyens lors des dernières élections contenaient des renseignements erronés. En outre, un sondage Ipsos Reid indique que 87 % des Canadiens ne voient aucun inconvénient à ce qu'on exige d'eux une autre carte d'identité lorsqu'ils vont voter.
Dans une démocratie solide, il est essentiel d'exiger une carte d'identité de chacun des électeurs qui se présentent aux bureaux de scrutin pour choisir le prochain gouvernement de leur pays.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-10-23 14:58 [p.22781]
Mr. Speaker, unlike the Liberal members from Quebec, the Canadian Federation of Independent Business believes that there is indeed a labour shortage in Quebec.
Ms. Hébert, vice-president of the CFIB, noted that some businesses have had to scale back their operations or even shut down temporarily.
In other words, in Quebec City and around the province, the labour shortage is definitely having an impact on the ground. A wide range of possible solutions are within the purview of the federal government.
Why, then, is the Liberal government not taking immediate concrete action to come up with a concrete solution to this serious problem?
Monsieur le Président, contrairement aux députés libéraux du Québec, la Fédération canadienne de l'entreprise indépendante estime qu'il y a bel et bien une pénurie de main-d'oeuvre à Québec.
La vice-présidente de la FCEI, Mme Hébert, précise que certaines entreprises « doivent réduire leurs activités, voire même fermer temporairement. »
En d'autres mots, à Québec et dans la province, la pénurie de main-d'oeuvre a bel et bien des contrecoups sur le terrain. Il y a une panoplie de solutions qui sont du ressort du champ de compétence fédéral.
Alors, pourquoi le gouvernement libéral ne prend-il pas des mesures concrètes dès maintenant pour trouver une solution concrète à cette grave situation?
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-10-22 17:44 [p.22735]
Mr. Speaker, I would like to clear something up.
I think the way the Liberals and Canadians use the word “radicalization” is dangerous. Let me explain why. It is a way to deny an important reality. One hundred and ninety Canadians have travelled overseas to commit acts of terrorism and contribute to a political movement.
Let us not forget that there are concrete ideologies based on arguments that can seem rational and objective to some. They want to create an Islamic state, and there is a political will to achieve that goal.
Some of those 190 Canadians went there not because they were reckless, had a troubled soul, or had been radicalized or brainwashed. We need to acknowledge that, on the contrary, some of them were fully conscious of what they were doing and knew exactly what they were going to be doing there. Their actions were objective and rational. They wanted to be part of a political movement that is probably anti-capitalist, anti-liberal democracy, and even anti-Christian.
My colleague from Winnipeg North needs to realize that some Canadians went there not because they were crazy, mentally ill or radicalized, but for rational reasons, because they were against our political system.
What does he have to say to that?
How would he suggest that we deal with these individuals?
Monsieur le Président, j'aimerais apporter une précision.
Je pense que la façon dont les libéraux et les Canadiens utilisent le mot « radicalisation » représente un danger. Je vais expliquer pourquoi. C'est une façon de nier une importante réalité. Cent quatre-vingt-dix Canadiens sont allés outre-mer pour commettre des actes de terrorisme et contribuer à une mouvance politique.
N'oublions pas qu'il existe des idéologies concrètes basées sur des arguments qui peuvent même sembler rationnels et objectifs. Ils veulent créer un état islamique. Il y a une volonté politique.
De ces 190 Canadiens, certains ne sont pas allés là-bas simplement par insouciance, parce qu'ils ont un esprit défaillant, qu'ils ont été radicalisés ou parce qu'on leur a fait subir un lavage de cerveau. Bien au contraire, on doit reconnaître que certains y sont allés en toute conscience, sachant exactement ce qu'ils allaient y faire. C'était objectif et rationnel. Ils voulaient participer à un mouvement politique qui est probablement anticapitaliste, anti-démocratie libérale, voire anti-chrétien.
Il est important que mon collègue de Winnipeg-Nord prenne acte du fait que certains Canadiens sont allés là-bas non pas pour des raisons de folie, de maladie mentale ou de radicalisation, mais bien pour des raisons rationnelles, puisqu'ils étaient contre notre système politique.
Qu'a-t-il à dire à ce sujet?
Comment veut-il qu'on agisse à l'égard de ces individus?
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-10-22 18:01 [p.22737]
Mr. Speaker, I am very pleased to speak this evening. I want to acknowledge the people of Beauport—Limoilou watching us in real time or watching a rebroadcast on Twitter or Facebook.
Dear citizens, this evening we are debating a very important motion on a topic that is very sensitive for all Canadians given that we are talking about other Canadians. We are talking about Canadian combatants who have joined the Islamic State since 2013. More than 190 Canadians have made the solemn decision to join the ranks of the Islamic State, sometimes unwittingly, sometimes fully consciously. We condemn their decision to go overseas to join Daesh, better known as the Islamic State, which shrank in size considerably following the western coalition attacks. The group is located primarily in Syria and Iraq, in the Middle East.
These 190 Canadians decided to go overseas to join the Islamic State, which fights western countries and their values, including liberal democracy and gender equality. These are values that are dear to Canadian parliamentary democracy.
Today, the member for Winnipeg North and a number of his Liberal colleagues stated that these 190 Canadians were radicalized on the Internet, by reading literature or by ISIS propagandists on social networks. The Liberals are telling us that we should help Canadians who went to fight against Canada's military members and liberal democracy. Who knows. Perhaps they went to fight in order to one day destroy Canada's political system because they espouse different views. Every time, the Liberals tell us that we need to take pity on them and hold their hands because they were radicalized.
Today, we have moved our motion to address the following reality. Some of them were radicalized. However, I would venture that the vast majority of Canadians who went overseas to join Daesh did so of their own volition and for reasons that are rational, objective and politically motivated and that they believe are good reasons. They did not do so because they were alienated or radicalized. They perhaps want to destroy liberal democracy and gender equality around the world. They had several reasons for joining ISIS. They are not necessarily crazy or alienated.
How are we going to deal with those Canadians who return to Canada? I am not talking about those who left because they were suffering from mental illness or alienation, but rather those who went to the areas where ISIS attacks and counterattacks were taking place, and went of their own free will, to fight Canadian soldiers and soldiers of our allied military partners.
Today the Liberals are saying that the Conservatives are inventing numbers. Journalist Manon Cornellier, a director with the parliamentary press gallery, is highly regarded in the journalism community. She is very professional. In her article in Le Devoir this morning, she writes:
Some 190 Canadians are active in overseas terrorist groups such as Islamic State, also known as Daesh, mostly in Syria and Iraq. About 60 have returned to Canada, but only four have faced charges to date.
A professional journalist, employed by a highly respected newspaper that has been around for decades in Canada, must check her sources and facts before publishing any articles. Ms. Cornellier is reporting exactly the same figures as the official opposition. These are concrete numbers: 190 Canadians left; 60 of those terrorists, who have deliberately committed horrific crimes like raping women and killing children, have returned to Canada; four of them have faced criminal charges; and no one knows where the other 56 are.
What we are asking for is perfectly reasonable and normal in a country governed by the rule of law like Canada. We are asking the government to bring forward a plan within 45 days for determining the whereabouts of the 56 terrorists, both known and unknown, and others who may be coming, finding out what they are doing, and making sure that in the days, weeks or months to come, they are formally charged for what they did. Many of them did what they did for objective, political reasons. They were on a kind of campaign or crusade that went against Canadian and international law.
I will continue quoting from Ms. Cornellier article's in Le Devoir:
Daesh meets the definition of a terrorist organization, and its actions meet the definition of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity. Under the international law that Canada helped formulate, a country can prosecute anyone who committed such crimes and is physically present on its territory, regardless of where the acts were committed. Furthermore, Canada passed its own universal jurisdiction law in 2000 after ratifying the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court. It used that law in 2005 to prosecute Désiré Munyaneza for crimes against humanity for his role in the Rwandan genocide.
This is not a first. She also writes:
According to Kyle Matthews, executive director of the Montreal Institute for Genocide and Human Rights Studies, Canada must not allow Canadian fighters to return to Canada or be repatriated without holding them responsible for the atrocities they helped perpetrate. They must be prosecuted to deter others from committing such crimes.
In other words, Ms. Cornellier and the executive director of the Montreal Institute for Genocide and Human Rights Studies are saying exactly what we, Her Majesty's loyal opposition, are saying: these crimes must be punished by the courts.
Here is one final excellent quote from her article that shines a light on what we are saying today:
Investigations and the gathering of admissible evidence are indeed difficult, but the government is responsible for finding a solution. It must devise a legal process that operates in accordance with the principles of fundamental justice and overcomes the unique constraints that interfere with punishing these crimes. Without that, there can be no justice, and barbaric acts will continue to go unpunished.
That was written by Manon Cornellier, who is with a rather left-wing paper, Le Devoir, and is a director of the Parliamentary Press Gallery here in Ottawa.
That was not the Conservatives talking. It was a professional journalist who provided the same figures we did and who, like us, says that these 190 Canadians who participated in attacks in Syria or Iraq with ISIS committed barbaric acts. She is saying that the government must absolutely bring these people to justice when they return to Canada, that it is a matter of fundamental principles and Canadian history.
I would like to read the motion we moved today and that the Liberals have agreed to support. That said, they have decided to support our motion on a number of occasions and then failed to produce any meaningful action. The motion reads as follows:
That the House support the sentiments expressed by Nadia Murad, Nobel Peace Prize Laureate, who in her book entitled The Last Girl: My Story of Captivity, and My Fight Against the Islamic State, stated: “I dream about one day bringing all the militants to justice, not just the leaders like Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi but all the guards and slave owners, every man who pulled a trigger and pushed my brothers’ bodies into their mass grave, every fighter who tried to brainwash young boys into hating their mothers for being Yazidi, every Iraqi who welcomed the terrorists into their cities and helped them, thinking to themselves, Finally we can be rid of those nonbelievers. They should all be put on trial before the entire world, like the Nazi leaders after World War II, and not given the chance to hide.”; and call on the government to: (a) refrain from repeating the past mistakes of paying terrorists with taxpayers’ dollars or trying to reintegrate returning terrorists back into Canadian society; and (b) table within 45 days after the adoption of this motion a plan to immediately bring to justice anyone who has fought as an ISIS terrorist or participated in any terrorist activity, including those who are in Canada or have Canadian citizenship.
That is the motion that we moved this morning and that we will soon be voting on.
Starting next week, if possible, we want the Liberal government to focus on bringing perpetrators of genocide and terrorist acts to justice and ensuring that courts have access to evidence gathered against suspected terrorists.
We want the Liberal government to keep Canadians safe from those who are suspected of committing acts of terrorism and to take special measures, like our previous Conservative government did in the wake of the terrorist attacks that took place here on Parliament Hill and nearby in Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu. We responded by bringing forward Bill C-51.
We want the Liberals to encourage greater use of the tools to place conditions on those suspected of committing terrorist acts or genocide, as we did with Bill C-51.
We want the Liberals to institute processes for bringing perpetrators of atrocities to justice, since the current process is too slow, fails victims and prevents them from going home.
Lastly, we want the Liberals to support initiatives like those proposed by Premier Doug Ford, to ensure that terrorists returning to Canada are restricted from taking advantage of Canada's generous social programs as part of their reintegration.
In my riding, every weekend, whether I am at a spaghetti dinner or going door to door, my constituents ask me how it is possible that the Liberal government's primary goal continues to be helping people who are not yet citizens or helping Canadians who have fought against our own soldiers.
In Canada, above all we should help Canadians who are struggling to make ends meet or to find employment, as well as those having a hard time joining the workforce because of disability or other reasons.
We hope that beyond their support for our motion, the Liberals will come up with a real plan to address the problem of returning Islamic combatants, those Canadians who sadly decided to fight our values and our country.
Monsieur le Président, je suis très content de prendre la parole ce soir. J'aimerais saluer tous les citoyens de Beauport—Limoilou qui nous écoutent en temps réel ou qui nous écouteront en rediffusion sur Twitter ou sur Facebook.
Chers citoyens, nous débattons ce soir d'une motion fort importante qui porte sur un sujet très sensible pour tous les Canadiens, étant donné qu'on parle d'autres Canadiens. Nous parlons des combattants canadiens qui ont rejoint le groupe État islamique depuis 2013. Plus de 190 Canadiens ont pris la décision solennelle de joindre les rangs du groupe État islamique, parfois malgré eux, parfois en toute clarté d'esprit. Bien entendu, nous déplorons leur décision d'aller outre-mer pour participer aux campagnes de Daech, plutôt connu sous le nom de groupe armé État islamique, dont la portée a rapetissé de manière importante à la suite des attaques de la coalition occidentale. Le groupe se situe principalement en Syrie et en Irak, au Moyen-Orient.
Ces 190 Canadiens ont décidé d'aller outre-mer pour rejoindre le groupe État islamique, qui combat les pays occidentaux et leurs valeurs, dont la démocratie libérale et l'égalité entre les hommes et les femmes. Ce sont des valeurs qui sont chères à la démocratie parlementaire canadienne.
Aujourd'hui, le député de Winnipeg-Nord et plusieurs de ses collègues libéraux ont mentionné que ces 190 Canadiens se sont radicalisés par l'entremise d'Internet, de lectures ou de propagandistes du groupe armé État islamique sur les réseaux sociaux. Les libéraux nous disent qu'il faut tendre la main aux Canadiens qui sont allés se battre contre les militaires canadiens et les valeurs de la démocratie libérale canadienne. Qui sait, ils sont peut-être allés combattre pour un jour détruire le système politique canadien, parce qu'ils en ont une vision différente. Chaque fois, les libéraux nous disent qu'il faut les prendre par la main parce qu'ils font pitié et qu'ils ont été radicalisés.
Aujourd'hui, nous déposons notre motion pour faire face à la réalité suivante. Certains d'entre eux ont effectivement été radicalisés. Cependant, je suis prêt à dire que la lourde majorité des Canadiens qui sont partis outre-mer pour rejoindre les rangs de Daech l'ont certainement fait pour des raisons qui leur sont propres, rationnelles, objectives et motivées par des raisons politiques qu'ils croient bonnes. Ils ne l'ont pas tous fait parce qu'ils ont été aliénés ou radicalisés. Ils veulent peut-être mettre fin à la démocratie libérale ainsi qu'à l'égalité entre les hommes et les femmes dans le monde. Ils ont plusieurs raisons d'avoir rejoint les rangs du groupe armé État islamique. Ils ne sont pas nécessairement fous ou aliénés.
Comment va-t-on répondre à ces Canadiens qui reviennent sur le territoire canadien? Je ne parle pas de ceux qui sont partis à cause de la maladie mentale ou de l'aliénation, mais bien de ceux qui sont partis sur le territoire où avaient lieu les offensives et les contre-offensives du groupe armé État islamique de leur plein gré pour combattre les militaires canadiens et d'autres militaires alliés à notre cher pays.
Aujourd'hui, les libéraux ont dit que les conservateurs inventent des chiffres. La journaliste Manon Cornellier, responsable de la Tribune de la presse parlementaire, est très reconnue dans le milieu journalistique. Elle est très professionnelle. Dans son article publié dans Le Devoir ce matin, elle écrit:
Ils seraient environ 190 Canadiens actifs à l’étranger, surtout en Syrie et en Irak, dans des groupes terroristes, comme le groupe armé État islamique, Daech. Une soixantaine seraient déjà revenus au pays, mais, jusqu’ici, seulement quatre ont fait l’objet d’accusations.
Une journaliste professionnelle, employée d'un journal de grande qualité qui existe depuis plusieurs décennies au Canada, doit vérifier les sources et les informations avant de publier ses articles. Mme Cornellier indique exactement les mêmes chiffres que l'opposition officielle. Ce sont des chiffres concrets: 190 Canadiens sont partis; 60 de ces terroristes, qui ont délibérément commis des crimes terribles comme violer des femmes et tuer des enfants, sont revenus au pays; quatre ont fait l'objet d'accusations; et on ne sait pas où sont les 56 autres.
Ce que nous demandons est tout à fait raisonnable et normal dans un État de droit comme le Canada. On demande au gouvernement de mettre de l'avant un plan d'ici 45 jours pour s'assurer de savoir ce que font et où sont les 56 terroristes, connus ou non, et les autres qui vont peut-être venir, et qu'on s'assure de porter, dans les jours, les semaines ou les mois à venir, à des accusations formelles eu égard à ce qu'ils ont fait. Nombreux sont ceux qui l'ont fait pour des raisons objectives, politiques. C'est une sorte de campagne ou une croisade qu'ils ont menée et qui va à l'encontre du droit canadien et du droit international.
Je vais continuer à citer le texte de Mme Cornellier dans Le Devoir:
Daech répond à la définition d'organisation terroriste et ses actions, à celles de génocide, de crimes de guerre et de crimes contre l'humanité. En vertu du droit international que le Canada a contribué à élaborer, un pays peut poursuivre quiconque a commis ces crimes et se trouve sur son territoire, peu importe où les actes ont été perpétrés. Le Canada a d'ailleurs adopté en 2000 sa propre loi de compétence universelle à la suite de sa ratification du Statut de Rome de la Cour pénale internationale. Il s'en est prévalu en 2005 pour poursuivre pour crime contre l'humanité Désiré Munyaneza, un complice du génocide rwandais.
On n'est pas dans une première, ici. Également, elle écrit:
Selon le directeur de l'Institut montréalais d'études sur le génocide et les droits de la personne, Kyle Matthews, le Canada ne doit pas permettre le retour ou le rapatriement de ces combattants canadiens sans les tenir responsables des atrocités dont ils se sont rendus complices. Ils doivent être traduits en justice pour décourager la perpétuation de ces crimes.
En d'autres mots, Mme Cornellier et le directeur de l'Institut montréalais d'études sur le génocide disent exactement ce que nous — la loyale opposition de Sa Majesté — disons, soit que ces crimes doivent être punis devant la justice.
Également, voici une dernière citation tirée de son article que je trouve excellent et qui met en lumière ce que nous disons aujourd'hui:
Les enquêtes et la récolte de preuves admissibles sont difficiles, soit, mais il revient au gouvernement de chercher une solution. Il doit envisager une procédure judiciaire qui permet à la fois de respecter les principes de justice fondamentale et de surmonter les contraintes uniques qui freinent la sanction de ces crimes. Sans cela, justice ne sera pas rendue, et l'impunité restera la règle face à la barbarie.
Je rappelle que je cite la journaliste Manon Cornellier, responsable de la Tribune de la presse parlementaire canadienne, ici, à Ottawa et d'un journal plus tôt à gauche, Le Devoir.
Ce ne sont pas des conservateurs qui parlent, c'est une journaliste professionnelle qui a donné les mêmes chiffres que nous et qui, comme nous, dit que ce sont des gestes barbares qui ont été perpétués par ces 190 Canadiens qui ont participé aux offensives en territoire syrien ou irakien avec le groupe État islamique. Elle dit qu'il est absolument fondamental et nécessaire que ceux-ci, lorsqu'ils sont rapatriés, soient traduits en justice pour des questions de principes fondamentaux et de l'histoire du Canada.
J'aimerais également lire la motion que nous présentons aujourd'hui et que les libéraux ont accepté d'appuyer. Cela dit, comme dans nombreux cas où ils ont décidé d'appuyer notre motion, aucune action concrète de leur part ne s'en est suivie:
Que la Chambre appuie les sentiments exprimés par Nadia Murad, lauréate du prix Nobel de la paix, qui, dans son livre intitulé Pour que je sois la dernière, déclare: « Je rêve qu’un jour tous les militants seront traduits en justice. Pas seulement les dirigeants, comme Abou Bakr al-Baghdadi, mais aussi tous les gardes et les propriétaires d’esclaves, tous les hommes qui ont appuyé sur une détente et ceux qui ont poussé mes frères dans leur charnier, tous les combattants qui ont essayé de mettre dans la tête de jeunes garçons qu’ils haïssaient leur mère parce qu’elle était yézidie, tous les Iraquiens qui ont accueilli les terroristes dans leur ville et qui les ont aidés en se disant qu’ils allaient enfin pouvoir se débarrasser des mécréants. Ils devraient tous être jugés devant le monde entier, comme les dirigeants nazis après la Deuxième Guerre mondiale, et ils ne devraient pas avoir la possibilité de se cacher. »; et exhorte le gouvernement à : a) éviter de répéter les erreurs du passé en payant des terroristes avec l’argent des contribuables ou en tentant de réintégrer dans la société canadienne des terroristes de retour au pays; b) déposer dans les 45 jours suivant l’adoption de la présente motion un plan visant à traduire immédiatement en justice quiconque a combattu au sein du groupe terroriste EIIL ou participé à une quelconque activité terroriste, y compris les personnes qui se trouvent au Canada ou qui ont la citoyenneté canadienne.
Voilà la motion que nous avons déposée ce matin et sur laquelle nous voterons très bientôt.
Dès la semaine prochaine, si possible, nous voulons que le gouvernement libéral se concentre sur les poursuites judiciaires contre les auteurs de génocides ou d'actes terroristes et qu'il s'assure que les tribunaux ont accès aux preuves recueillies sur certains terroristes soupçonnés.
Nous voulons qu'il cherche à protéger les Canadiens contre les gens soupçonnés d'avoir commis des actes terroristes et qu'il prenne des mesures spéciales comme celles que notre précédent gouvernement conservateur avait mises en place dans la foulée des attentats terroristes qui ont eu lieu ici même, sur la Colline du Parlement, ainsi qu'à Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, qui est tout près. Nous avions mis en place le projet de loi C-51.
Nous voulons que les libéraux encouragent l'utilisation accrue d'outils afin d'imposer des conditions aux gens soupçonnés d'activités terroristes ou de génocide, comme on le faisait dans le projet de loi C-51.
Nous voulons que les libéraux mettent en place des processus visant à traduire les auteurs d'atrocités en justice, puisque le processus actuel est trop lent, nuit aux victimes et les empêche de rentrer chez elles.
Enfin, nous voulons que les libéraux soutiennent des initiatives comme celles proposées par le premier ministre Doug Ford pour s'assurer que les terroristes qui reviennent au Canada ne peuvent pas profiter des généreux programmes sociaux du Canada dans le cadre de leur réintégration.
Dans ma circonscription, toutes les fins de semaine, que ce soit lors des soupers spaghetti ou quand je fais du porte-à-porte, à tous les événements où je vais à la rencontre de mes concitoyens, ceux-ci me demandent comment il est possible que le gouvernement libéral ait toujours comme objectif premier d'aider des gens qui ne sont pas encore citoyens ou d'aider des Canadiens qui ont combattu nos propres miliaires.
Au Canada, on devrait d'abord et avant tout aider les Canadiens qui peinent à joindre les deux bouts et à trouver un emploi, ainsi que ceux qui ont de la difficulté à entrer sur le marché du travail pour des raisons d'incapacité ou autres.
Nous espérons qu'au-delà de leur appui à l'égard de notre motion, les libéraux vont mettre en place un plan réel qui s'attaque au problème du retour des combattants islamiques, ces Canadiens qui ont pris la décision bien triste de combattre nos valeurs et notre pays.
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-10-18 11:30 [p.22578]
Madam Speaker, I understand what my colleague is saying when he talks about a sham and the protection of prisoners as a basic right. All that is entirely legitimate. However, we Conservatives have concerns, which we share with unionized prison guards. Historically, I think that the NDP has always promoted unionism and, more often than not, supported labour demands in our country.
I would like to know what my colleague thinks about the concerns and objections expressed publicly by prison guards, who say that the segregation of certain inmates helps them maintain discipline inside prisons, which is important. It is an exceptional measure, but a measure that is needed in order to remind inmates that there are serious consequences to some of their actions inside the prison walls when they are arrested and incarcerated.
What does my colleague think about the concerns expressed by the Union of Canadian Correctional Officers?
Madame la Présidente, je comprends ce que mon collègue dit quand il parle de show de boucane et de la protection des prisonniers en vertu de leurs droits fondamentaux. Tout cela est tout à fait légitime. Cependant, nous, les conservateurs, avons des préoccupations, et celles-ci sont partagées par les gardiens de prison syndiqués. Historiquement, je pense que le NPD est un parti qui prône le syndicalisme et qui, la plupart du temps, appuie les revendications syndicales dans notre pays.
J'aimerais savoir ce que mon collègue pense des préoccupations et des doléances qui ont été publiquement émises par les gardiens de prison qui disent que l'isolement de certains prisonniers est une mesure qui les aide à assurer la discipline au sein de la prison, ce qui est important. C'est une mesure exceptionnelle, mais qui doit peut-être exister pour rappeler aux prisonniers qu'il y a des conséquences graves à certaines de leurs actions au sein de l'établissement lorsqu'ils sont arrêtés et emprisonnés.
Que pense mon collègue de ces doléances du syndicat des gardiens de prison du Canada?
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
View Alupa Clarke Profile
2018-10-18 11:51 [p.22581]
Madam Speaker, in the last two years, we have seen time and again that the Liberal government has a propensity to always walk along the line of a court judgment. The role of the House of Commons is to reiterate, sometimes through the preamble of a new bill, to the courts and the judge the intent of a bill of a rule that was put forward, accepted and voted on in the House. Jean Chrétien did that many times. He did it for advertising in the tobacco sector. Companies wanted the Supreme Court decision and Jean Chrétien tabled a bill with a preamble saying that the judges were wrong.
In this instance, why are the Liberals again and again following the judgment when they could have just reiterated the intent of our purpose in the House of Commons, to protect the citizens of Canada and to ensure that guards had the necessary tools to apply discipline?
Madame la Présidente, nous avons constaté au cours des deux dernières années que le gouvernement libéral a tendance à se plier aux décisions des tribunaux. Or, le rôle de la Chambre des communes est de réitérer — parfois dans le préambule d'un projet de loi — auprès des tribunaux et des juges l'intention d'une nouvelle mesure législative qu'elle a proposée et adoptée à la suite d'un vote. Jean Chrétien l'a fait à plus d'une reprise, notamment pour la publicité sur le tabac. Les compagnies étaient en faveur de la décision de la Cour suprême et Jean Chrétien a présenté un projet de loi dont le préambule contredisait les juges.
Dans le cas qui nous occupe, pourquoi les libéraux s'entêtent-ils à suivre la décision de la cour alors qu'ils pourraient réitérer le souhait de la Chambre des communes, qui est de protéger les citoyens du Canada et de veiller à ce que les gardiens aient les outils nécessaires pour assurer la discipline?
Results: 61 - 75 of 415 | Page: 5 of 28

|<
<
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
>
>|