Interventions in Committee
 
 
 
RSS feed based on search criteria Export search results - CSV (plain text) Export search results - XML
Add search criteria
View Robert Kitchen Profile
CPC (SK)
This committee, over the years that I've been involved with it, has looked at issues of service delivery. A couple of comments that we've made have been dealing with the issue of being provided information from the moment you sign up and enlist. As you progress, that information is continually given to you as to what you can obtain if certain things should happen. As you progress, you continually learn that. Some of the recommendations that we've made in the past were to do with such information providing that service.
Do you see that as a value or do you see that as a hindrance?
View Robert Kitchen Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you all for coming to visit us again. We appreciate your coming back and having the additional opportunity to chat.
I've spent the last 30 years of my life treating a lot of RCMP officers in my practice as a chiropractor. Fortunately, it's nice to see that lumbar disc disease is your fourth priority, as I've had to deal with that many times.
Regrettably, we see that PTSD is an issue. I'm wondering if you can comment a little more on that. It's obviously something we're very interested in, and in particular, when we're dealing with your officers when they return from theatre. I wonder if you could comment on that. Do you have any numbers you could provide us with, percentages you might see, and the steps or the procedures that you might follow with an individual?
View Robert Kitchen Profile
CPC (SK)
One of the things we've gone through in the studies is an introduction.... What we've heard a lot of times, when we're dealing with VAC, is how do we get this done beforehand. How do we educate the soldier right from day one about the process they have to access for services once they retire?
I come from Saskatchewan, so Depot is very familiar to me. In Depot, do you spend time educating your officers on the steps that would happen during that training program, or does that happen once they start into the force?
View Robert Kitchen Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Thank you all for coming today; we greatly appreciate it.
As you're aware, we are doing this study on service delivery. We can look at what's been there, what we can and can't do, and recommendations we can make for improvement.
Mr. Mac Culloch, you mentioned a little about health care and providing services for your veterans. I'm a chiropractor, and I spent many years providing services for veterans. I went into practice and I learned from the school of hard knocks. I would send a bill to Blue Cross and they'd send it back, saying I hadn't filled it out right, and then I'd finally figure out how to fill out the paperwork and get it sent in. Other than the length of time getting payment, there was never any issue as to someone in Blue Cross saying yea or nay to what was requested. That may be because the veterans I was serving didn't have complicated files; I buy that.
A lot of health care practitioners aren't trained in how to deal with veterans. We go through school, we learn diagnosis, we learn how to treat, we learn how to make prognostic assessments, but we're not given the paperwork, in many cases, on how to do the actual administrative work of providing those services. I see that as being of value in providing that service. Can you comment on that and what you see? Would it be of value? Mr. Gannon, as well, after Mr. Mac Culloch, do you see that as being of any value?
View Robert Kitchen Profile
CPC (SK)
Mr. Gannon, do you feel comfortable commenting on providing services and training your caseworkers so they're continually getting further training and they're up to standards as things advance?
View Robert Kitchen Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you.
Ms. Michaud, you mentioned two categories of veterans, which are, I'm assuming, those who are released for medical reasons and those who aren't. Are those the two categories you're classifying or are they the two categories in terms of the old and new Veterans Charters?
View Robert Kitchen Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you both for coming back to visit us and thank you for your reports. After I read them I said to myself, were they sitting in all our committee meetings? A lot of the information we've heard here.
Your report is very good, and I appreciate it and your comments on medically releasing members, not releasing them until such time as all the benefits are in place and all the processes are there.
Throughout this committee we've heard from a number of organizations that have presented to us on the services they've been providing for veterans and for our releasing soldiers. A lot of these services are volunteer. Not to negate your proposal of having a concierge service, because I think that's a great idea, but the thought that pops into my head right now is, if all of a sudden you're creating what we would like to see being done, what about all these volunteer organizations that are out there providing a lot of these services, that are helping veterans go through the steps that they need to go through, the endless paperwork with someone actually sitting there with them to do that paperwork, or dealing with getting the services that they need and are entitled to? Can you comment on where you see that role might be for those organizations, and how they might perhaps roll into part of what you're doing?
View Robert Kitchen Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you.
Your third recommendation talked about a tool to be there. I'm not a computer guy, but there are a lot of people who are. There are a lot of veterans who aren't. The younger generation is much more attuned to that, and so they find that those issues are much easier for them.
Can you describe that tool for us and what you see it doing? We've talked about providing the information on the benefits that soldiers should be getting from the day they enlist and having some program that's following them through as they go to the very end.
I'm assuming that the tool would probably be part of that. It would have some of that information on that. I'm assuming we're talking that this would be a secure tool that only the soldier could access continuously to know where they are as they progress through the command.
View Robert Kitchen Profile
CPC (SK)
That's what I'm trying to lead into, amalgamating your tool with VAC's tool so that it's a smooth transition right there. We've talked about having a number that the soldier gets from the moment they enlist following them right through to the end so they don't end up changing numbers, because that is confusing. Do you see a potential there? Is there a way that it might be something to start, if it hasn't been started?
View Robert Kitchen Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Thank you, all of you, for your service to your country and to us. That comes from my heart.
Mr. Doucette, you mentioned that it takes about a year to get through the transitioning process, if I'm correct in what you were saying. We've heard an awful lot throughout our meetings on service delivery about how long it takes a veteran to get from transitioning from the Forces to the veteran and going through VAC. One of the suggestions we heard was to start educating the soldier from the moment they enter into the military on the process, the steps they would need to follow, the process that will happen, and what they will be entitled to as they come through, so that by the time they actually finish their career and transition, they're well aware of that.
Do you have any comments on that, whether you think that's a good idea or not?
View Robert Kitchen Profile
CPC (SK)
We've had a lot of talk about family, and I appreciate you bringing up the issue of bringing your wife with you. I think we're all becoming very aware.
Just so that you're aware, I come from a family background with the military, and I truly believe even though I didn't serve. My father did, my brother did, my sister did, and I've grown up with that mentality and understanding the language and understanding the culture. It is a culture, and the family is part of that culture.
When we talk about the two programs—and I'll address this to Captain Garsch and Mr. Bungay—your programs are great. It's good to see that. You have talked about putting the family into the program. Captain Garsch, you have put that into your presentation to us.
Can you comment on how important you see that role?
View Robert Kitchen Profile
CPC (SK)
Unfortunately, you do lose that, as you say. Sometimes that happens before you get to that stage. Including the family earlier would be beneficial.
View Robert Kitchen Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you very much.
Thank you for the chance to ask you again.
We heard it from Mr. Doucette, and comments from all of you.... The comment was about second-guessing by VAC after DND has made decisions on health care issues. Is that a common consensus from the people you talk to?
View Robert Kitchen Profile
CPC (SK)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Ms. Dussault, Mr. Simard, I do not speak a lot of French, but I am learning. I learn a new word each day. Thank you for your presentation.
That's as far as I'm going to go, because if I do, then we'll never get any questions in.
What we've talked about a lot in our committee has been about dealing with family members, and in your presentation I see there's some talk about family members.
If I understand you correctly, there are not a lot of family members who are participating in your program. Is that correct?
Results: 1 - 15 of 126 | Page: 1 of 9

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
>
>|