Interventions in Committee
 
 
 
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View Rhéal Fortin Profile
BQ (QC)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
I'll start with Ms. Boisjoly.
If we consider that the social insurance number was created in 1964 to govern employer-employee and government-to-government relations, we see that it is used in every way now, but in any case, much more widely than before.
Wouldn't it be necessary to review the security regulations concerning its use? For example, there could be a PIN that matches the health card, fingerprints or other data, for example.
In your opinion, can anything be done with this?
View Rhéal Fortin Profile
BQ (QC)
Correct me if I'm wrong, but the social insurance number is valid, regardless of whether or not we have matching questions.
I am asked for my social insurance number for a transaction, whatever it is, with a bank, or whatever. I don't have a PIN. I just have the number.
View Rhéal Fortin Profile
BQ (QC)
It depends on the companies we request services from, but, I agree, you're right.
Wouldn't a penalty be appropriate? We see that retailers or banks frequently ask for social insurance numbers, and this is not always necessary. Shouldn't there be a system of penalties for those who ask for a social insurance number when they don't need it?
View Rhéal Fortin Profile
BQ (QC)
Couldn't we include criminal provisions in the act for this, whether it be a fine or some other sanction?
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