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Results: 1 - 60 of 459
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
I'm not talking about what's already happened. I'm talking about what's going to happen next. That's what worries people. I want to know whether the Canadian Centre for Cyber Security has the capacity to deal with international or national fraudsters who send text messages or whatever it may be.
Does your centre have the capacity to deal with that?
View Alupa Clarke Profile
CPC (QC)
I'm going to take advantage of your cybersecurity expertise.
Is Canada's current social insurance number regime appropriate in a modern age dominated by the Internet? We are at the point now where people shop on their cell phones and pay for their purchases at the cash in mere seconds. Is our system of social insurance numbers adequate in the world we live in?
View Rhéal Fortin Profile
BQ (QC)
Sorry, I don't mean to rush you, but as you know, two minutes isn't much time.
Are any investments planned, and if so, how much? Has the federal government made so many millions available to work with Quebec on a training program or other cybercrime initiative, for example?
View Glen Motz Profile
CPC (AB)
Thank you, Chair.
Again, thank you to the departmental officials for being here.
I have just two quick questions for the Department of Finance. You say that your first objective is to prevent data breaches. We know the reality is that these happen and are not localized to the financial sector.
Ms. Ryan, you said that when cybe events occur at a federally regulated institution, which is what we're talking about, control and oversight mechanisms are in place to manage them. Can you explain to Canadians in practical terms what that actually means when you play that out?
View Glen Motz Profile
CPC (AB)
Basically, it's just oversight. Now, in this particular circumstance, it's oversight of what's happened to make sure that—
View Glen Motz Profile
CPC (AB)
Okay, so that's one question. The other question is for Ms. Ryan, or whoever might....
I'm just going to read the summary that you gave. You said that “cybersecurity is an area of critical importance for the Department of Finance. We are actively working with partners across government and the private sector to ensure that Canadians are well-protected from cybe -incidents and that when incidents do occur, they're managed in a way that mitigates the impact on consumers and the financial sector as a whole.”
What does that actually look like to impacted consumers, to consumers at large, to the financial institution, to the banking industry, to various government departments? You can say that, but what does it actually look like?
View Glen Motz Profile
CPC (AB)
I have just one quick follow-up question to that. If I were one of the 2.9 million Canadians impacted by this circumstance, or one of the millions in this country who have already been impacted by data breaches of various varieties, I would want assistance in getting my life back, like them. Right now there is a lot of talk about what that looks like, but in practical terms, Canadians want to know how to get their lives back. They want to mitigate the risks and the impacts that a breach like this has on their personal lives, on their financial futures and on those of their families.
I'm curious; it seems that the Department of Finance has a role to play in having a location from which Canadians can find the information they need, follow a template, call numbers, or whatever it may be to help get their lives in order, because this is, and will be, devastating to those whom these criminals are going to take advantage of.
As government, we have a responsibility to ensure that we protect Canadians as well as we can. This is not going to go away.
View Pat Kelly Profile
CPC (AB)
I've read many of your reports, of course, at public accounts. We're going to make progress, we hope, on call centres. That's the purpose of the report.
What I am worried about are the reports that we are not going to see—cybersecurity. We will not have a cybersecurity report, which your office has identified as an important area that needs to be studied. What can you tell Canadians about areas that they ought to be concerned about, for lack of audit and lack of information, and to let parliamentarians hold their government to account?
View Pierre Paul-Hus Profile
CPC (QC)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Here is my first question.
Mr. Johnson, you mentioned that PayPal has existed since 1998. You have therefore been in existence since the beginnings of the Internet.
We know that cybersecurity issues have evolved in parallel with the Internet. Is PayPal able to follow that evolution and counter those threats?
View Pierre Paul-Hus Profile
CPC (QC)
You also mentioned that people trust PayPal.
What measures have you undertaken to ensure that those who do business with PayPal do so with complete trust?
View Pierre Paul-Hus Profile
CPC (QC)
Excellent.
Among the witnesses who have appeared before our committee for this study, we have had representatives from a number of banks, including the Toronto-Dominion Bank. One of its representatives informed us that cyber attacks against the bank come from a number of different countries.
Can you name the countries attacking PayPal's system?
View Pierre Paul-Hus Profile
CPC (QC)
I understand the difference between an individual's country of origin and the country from which an attack comes, but my question was more about the countries than the individuals. Has PayPal been subject to attacks from states?
View Pierre Paul-Hus Profile
CPC (QC)
Okay, perfect.
Your company is based in the United States and deals with many different countries, all of which have different regulations. Given that we are studying this from a Canadian perspective, do Canadian laws and regulations have an effect on PayPal's activities? For example, are our privacy laws too restrictive or not restrictive enough?
View Pierre Paul-Hus Profile
CPC (QC)
In your opinion, are there aspects that Canada should improve? You have said that our country has strong laws, but do you still have recommendations for us on the legislative level?
View Jim Eglinski Profile
CPC (AB)
View Jim Eglinski Profile
2019-05-29 16:50
I'd like to thank the witness for being here.
Brian, I want to follow through with what Mr. Picard was stating.
You stated earlier in your evidence that the money put into the PayPal accounts goes into the United States. Is that true for all countries where you do transactions?
View Jim Eglinski Profile
CPC (AB)
View Jim Eglinski Profile
2019-05-29 16:50
Let's deal with the Canadian customers.
Do all the funds from which we do transactions with you go into the United States, or is some of it done here in Canada?
View Jim Eglinski Profile
CPC (AB)
View Jim Eglinski Profile
2019-05-29 16:51
All right.
Is there a regulatory body in the United States that requires you to report breaches in your program? As you mentioned to Mr. Picard earlier, you have a program that will kick out if a transaction is made and a second transaction is withdrawn from a different locale.
Is that requirement for you? Do you report those to certain security agencies within the United States or Canada?
View Jim Eglinski Profile
CPC (AB)
View Jim Eglinski Profile
2019-05-29 16:52
Are you a member of the Canadian Cyber Threat Exchange?
View Jim Eglinski Profile
CPC (AB)
View Jim Eglinski Profile
2019-05-29 16:53
Okay, thank you.
I've been a member of PayPal, I think since about 2000, and have used it quite often over the years.
View Jim Eglinski Profile
CPC (AB)
View Jim Eglinski Profile
2019-05-29 16:53
How much of my personal information, or other users', goes through your service? Where is that information stored? Is it all stored in the United States, or is it stored in individual countries?
View Jim Eglinski Profile
CPC (AB)
View Jim Eglinski Profile
2019-05-29 16:54
You mentioned that all the data is stored in the United States. Is it stored in only one facility, or do you have a backup-type system?
View Glen Motz Profile
CPC (AB)
Thank you, Chair.
Thank you to both groups for being here today.
I was intrigued with your plan to connect. You indicated your connectivity to the line that's being built through your fibre network is time sensitive. When do you anticipate the decision on that connection so you get in the queue to make sure you're connected prior to the line being installed?
View Glen Motz Profile
CPC (AB)
And that's when it's anticipated that line will be put through.
View Glen Motz Profile
CPC (AB)
One of the things that you mentioned, sir, in your concluding remarks, was hardware. You're obviously going to need some hardware as part of this line. How do you ensure that your hardware is secure, and that it's reliably sourced? This is a cybersecurity issue. The study we're doing for this committee is primarily focused on the financial end, but it involves lots of different components of cybersecurity. How do you intend to ensure that the hardware you receive is secure?
View Glen Motz Profile
CPC (AB)
As your organization plans this and moves forward—and I think this is an incredible project to participate in—obviously there will be some expectations. As a proponent of this, you will be expected to ensure that the hardware you use is secure. I'm just curious to know.... That was the line of my questioning.
View Glen Motz Profile
CPC (AB)
In your material, Mr. Tony Gull, I think you mentioned that one of your businesses is called Creenet. I think that's an incredible business, but I suspect you had some significant challenges when you first started the process in becoming a service provider, especially in the area you're providing it. How have you been able to secure that network, given the challenges you had?
View Glen Motz Profile
CPC (AB)
In your opinion, sir, do you believe that your critical infrastructure—this and other critical infrastructure included— is sufficiently protected in the north by government? Does government take the protection of that critical infrastructure in your part of Canada as seriously as it needs to?
View Glen Motz Profile
CPC (AB)
Mr. Jarry, my last question to you is, given your experience and your current role, do you feel governments do an adequate job in ensuring that our critical infrastructure is resilient to an attack in Canada? Is there anything, from your perspective, that we can do better?
View Pierre Paul-Hus Profile
CPC (QC)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
My first question is for the representatives of Tawich Development Corporation.
We did some research on you. We discovered that you went to China recently and that you have photos of your meeting with the people from Alibaba.
Can you tell us if you reached agreements with them? If so, what kind of agreements?
View Pierre Paul-Hus Profile
CPC (QC)
I believe that the photograph shows the Cree nation signing an agreement with the Chinese. Have you already signed a memorandum of understanding?
View Pierre Paul-Hus Profile
CPC (QC)
All right.
The company would be established in Quebec. Have you calculated the economic benefits for Canada or Quebec of the project you are undertaking?
View Pierre Paul-Hus Profile
CPC (QC)
In the North, we already have the North Warning System, the Canadian portion of which is run by National Defence under NORAD. Would the proposed optical fibre telecommunication link be linked to the 47 existing radar stations?
View Pierre Paul-Hus Profile
CPC (QC)
Perfect, thank you.
Mr. Jarry, when we talk about the Internet of Things, we are also talking about the supply chain. My colleague asked a question about checking the devices that are purchased. What do you think of the Chinese corporation Huawei?
View Pierre Paul-Hus Profile
CPC (QC)
Is it the deployment of the 5G network that is problematic? The older devices were different. Could the new devices and 5G technology have a different impact?
View Pierre Paul-Hus Profile
CPC (QC)
Okay.
Concerning the Internet of Things, you spoke about various remote controls for things. There are definitely some of us who have remote locking systems. These things are controlled by home automation systems. Can the equipment be programmed when installed and controlled afterwards, or must you control the automated system to control the thing?
View Jim Eglinski Profile
CPC (AB)
View Jim Eglinski Profile
2019-05-15 16:26
Thank you.
I'd like to thank our witnesses for being here today.
I'll start with this line you're proposing through the High Arctic and over to China. It's going to Japan? Good. All right.
Why would you have gone along the Arctic and not crossed along the bottom of Hudson Bay and then come across Canada, when there's been a lot of talk of a transportation corridor along the northern provinces and the bottom of the Northwest Territories, and connect it in...? It seems that there's a lot of extra work to go up toward the top and around, when you could tie into the bottom of Alaska and then follow the Aleutians out. It's the same with connecting to your European....
Was there a rationale for wanting to go so much higher up?
View Jim Eglinski Profile
CPC (AB)
View Jim Eglinski Profile
2019-05-15 16:29
I'm glad to hear that coming from the business community, because it is a concern. It's a concern with our caucus that the sovereignty of the north must be looked after. Thank you for planning that in your strategy.
You talk about the power you need—some parts here say 300 and then 200 megawatts. Is that to feed the power to the line all the way across, or are you going to have to add more power as it continues? That's quite a distance that we're shooting, from your part of the country right around the top.
View Jim Eglinski Profile
CPC (AB)
View Jim Eglinski Profile
2019-05-15 16:30
I take it from what you're saying here that your data centres will be located in your traditional territorial lands and then you'll be feeding that data back into Canada and other locations.
View Jim Eglinski Profile
CPC (AB)
View Jim Eglinski Profile
2019-05-15 16:31
Thank you.
Mr. Jarry, in your professional experience, do you think we everyday users of the Internet services can protect ourselves adequately? Are there proper programs that we can buy to protect our home security, or is that just a fallacy of someone selling me a product that probably is not going to do the job?
View Jim Eglinski Profile
CPC (AB)
View Jim Eglinski Profile
2019-05-15 16:32
Security is only as good as the service that is being provided to Canadians, and in parts of Canada we know that the service is terrible, or almost to the point of rotten, whereas in other areas you have a very good service.
View Erin O'Toole Profile
CPC (ON)
You've touched on the information warfare that Russia engages in. I'm wondering if you could talk a little bit about how we may be able to partner there, efforts by Latvia to counter the information warfare propaganda and cybersecurity threats within the region and whether there's a role for Canada on a cyber-front. You mentioned the permanence of a forward-operating location for NATO, but I think NATO needs to harden our collective efforts on info and cyberwar as well. Do you have any comments?
View John Nater Profile
CPC (ON)
I think the U.K. is far ahead of us, in terms of that interaction.
I have about 30 seconds left, and you may not have time to answer this in full, but I want to talk about cybersecurity. In the lead-up to the upcoming election, the concept of foreign influence is top of mind for a lot of Canadians. There is a lot of personal data, confidential data and extremely important data kept on computers and servers here within the parliamentary precinct. I'm curious to know what steps have been undertaken by the House, and perhaps by PPS, to ensure that this data is safe, and is not going to be seen as a problem going into the election, and more generally for Canadians on a day-to-day basis.
View Pierre Paul-Hus Profile
CPC (QC)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Good afternoon, gentlemen.
Mr. Fadden, in 2010, you gave an interview on CBC that was reported in the Globe and Mail. You said that there was interference from foreign governments against officials in provincial ministries and in areas of Canadian politics. At that time, people from the NDP and the Liberal Party demanded your resignation. Fortunately, you remained in office.
This morning, we learned that the report of the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians, which has just been tabled, confirms what you said and very clearly confirms that China is a danger for Canada’s security.
In your presentation, you talked about problems, but I would also like to know about potential solutions. You talked about the “dysfunctional West”, if I heard the interpretation correctly. Could you shed some more light on what we could do? What does that mean?
View Pierre Paul-Hus Profile
CPC (QC)
Thank you.
Let us go back to our basic topic, the financial sector, the banks.
We have met with a number of interested parties, various banks and various other groups. We have the banks, the government’s administration system, and the political side. In terms of security, issues, potential enemies, the political side is always hesitant. The banks take their own measures.
In your opinion, is the administration, the people we do not see, the people in the shadows, currently effective enough to make up for the political side? It can be on one side or the other; I am talking generally. Sometimes, politically, we don’t dare.
After the years you have spent in the political apparatus, do you feel that we are effective or that we need to be taking very vigorous measures?
View Glen Motz Profile
CPC (AB)
Thank you, Chair.
Thank you, gentlemen, for being here.
Mr. Fadden, when we were talking previously about combatting terrorism, you referred to our current Canadian model as more like a whack-a-mole where we suppress a problem after it has begun. Is there a mechanism to be more proactive in preventing cybersecurity attacks than just education or literacy?
View Glen Motz Profile
CPC (AB)
Okay, to take that further, you recently suggested that we're kind of on the margins when it comes to our ability to monitor ISIS terrorists or foreign fighters who have returned or are returning to our soil. Would you say that we are in a better position when it comes to cybersecurity?
View Glen Motz Profile
CPC (AB)
We have silos in law enforcement in fighting some battles, sometimes, and in sharing information. You've already alluded to the fact that in Canada, we have a lack of resources applied to this issue.
Do you see the same issue of siloing when it comes to cybersecurity?
View Glen Motz Profile
CPC (AB)
Thank you, Chair, and thank you, Mr. Drennan, for being here.
As you indicated, your group works with government, industry and law enforcement on issues of security, including national security. Last year, one expert in our security study noted that he had “Zero confidence” in Canada's readiness for emerging technology threats like AI and quantum computing.
In your experience with your work in Canada, how ready do you think we are with respect to that statement?
View Glen Motz Profile
CPC (AB)
Canada, and I guess the world, for that matter, is said to have major gaps in talent with respect to cybersecurity. What is your group doing to try to develop more talent? How and where are you investing in skills and target groups in what is certainly an emerging field?
View Glen Motz Profile
CPC (AB)
Last week, I believe, we had a gentleman here from Ryerson. Some could argue that there might be some gaps in what they're going to try to roll out as far as their academic program is concerned. Does your group, or do groups like yours in industry, sit down with educational institutions and help them develop curriculum that will help to develop the types of employees and skill sets that you want coming out of our schools?
View Glen Motz Profile
CPC (AB)
Can you explain the difference, if there is any, between cybersecurity in the defence sector and cybersecurity in the IT sector? Is there even a difference?
View Jim Eglinski Profile
CPC (AB)
View Jim Eglinski Profile
2019-04-10 17:16
You were talking about security along with Mr. Dubé. At your company, which works a lot with many government agencies, what security level do you look at for your people, or do you have to get them a secret or a top secret level?
View Jim Eglinski Profile
CPC (AB)
View Jim Eglinski Profile
2019-04-10 17:17
You seem to be a little on the negative side. There seems to be a lot of.... I used to do top secret investigations for security clearances, and a lot of work is involved in them. But you think that we should be reducing our level or our standard?
View Jim Eglinski Profile
CPC (AB)
View Jim Eglinski Profile
2019-04-10 17:17
There's no standard with a national set of rules that you have to meet to get to a certain level?
View Jim Eglinski Profile
CPC (AB)
View Jim Eglinski Profile
2019-04-10 17:18
You spoke briefly about artificial intelligence. I've studied it in a couple of different committees other than this one. Do you think that in time artificial intelligence will be able to do cybersecurity better than we can do it personally ourselves right now?
View Pierre Paul-Hus Profile
CPC (QC)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
I want to thank everyone for being here. We're sorry about the disruption resulting from the votes in the House.
In the case of Interac, if I make a transfer, the recipient will have 30 days to accept the funds. Where is the money from my bank account stored on a virtual level? How does this work?
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