Interventions in Committee
 
 
 
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View Hunter Tootoo Profile
Ind. (NU)
I know this is something I've had discussions with harbour authorities on.
I'll let Leslie take it from here.
View Hunter Tootoo Profile
Ind. (NU)
Are you talking more about the conservation and protection program?
View Hunter Tootoo Profile
Ind. (NU)
I think we have about 110 or 109 locations across the country carrying out compliance and monitoring to protect fisheries, fish habitat, species at risk, and aquaculture. This work is accomplished through the use of compliance and monitoring tools, including land and sea-based patrols, and aerial surveillance in some areas. Actually, I was invited to go on a surveillance this summer where they do the [Inaudible—Editor] and the offshore fisheries out there, out of Iqaluit, intelligence gathering and sometimes investigations. I think we have about 525 front-line fisheries officers, including I think about another 33 officer cadets who will graduate this year. These officers are also supported by approximately 200 contract and aboriginal fisheries guardians. Those are successful programs, both on the east and the west coast.
View Hunter Tootoo Profile
Ind. (NU)
That was the second thing that everyone in the industry I met with had in common: they all felt that—
View Hunter Tootoo Profile
Ind. (NU)
—they didn't have their fair share of the quota. What I have told them is that we are going to look at stuff based on science and based on going through whatever species it is. There is an advisory committee of stakeholders in that area: for example, for northern shrimp. We will sit down with them and look at how it will be divided up based on the science.
The one thing I have committed to is to ensure that we have a system in place that, one, everyone agrees with—they may not all like it, but they will all agree with it—and, two, has certainty, so it is not going to change. I am not going to go in and change it tomorrow. I think there needs to be the ability for that process to determine what those quotas are, and to be strong and in place, so that it makes it more difficult for someone like me, as the minister, to go in and fiddle with it and change it. These are discussions that I am having, and have been having, with industry on how we can move forward and strengthen that.
View Hunter Tootoo Profile
Ind. (NU)
I think it's premature to respond either way, but the one thing I would say from a departmental perspective is that whatever direction this is going in, the needs of the commercial fishermen must be met, and there needs to be some stability not just in Manitoba, but in Alberta and NWT as well. I think whatever direction goes forward with whatever government, we'll need to ensure that the needs of those commercial fishermen are met.
View Hunter Tootoo Profile
Ind. (NU)
The evidence, as far as the science on biomass, is down. That's not a secret, and you are correct that the inshore and the offshore are polar opposites on last in, first out policy. We made a commitment to review that policy. I've met with them, but the one thing they do have in common is they both want to ensure the sustainability of the stock for the future. It's in both their interests, so they can use that as a building block. They do have something in common.
I assured them it would be set up as a minister's advisory panel. It would be independent, it would be done in an open and transparent manner, and the panel would do its consultations, do its work, and provide me with a report. I'm hoping to have that report by the end of June. No decision is going to be made on any allocation for SFA6 until after that.
View Hunter Tootoo Profile
Ind. (NU)
As you all know, I made a decision in December to leave things the way they were for this year, and to look at more science before making a decision whether to allow more entrants into that fishery. This work is under way right now in conjunction with the offshore clam advisory committee. I think they're meeting next month, some time in May, as part of that process. A science meeting on the Arctic surfclam will be held in June to review the available science information and assess the potential approaches for a spatial management plan for that fishery. Managing fisheries based on robust scientific evidence is a priority for this government, and I won't be making any decisions on new entrants until this work is done.
View Hunter Tootoo Profile
Ind. (NU)
It will be May 1 for search and rescue, and then the other stuff will continue on. They have to refit the building. That work is going to go on during this year, and the other enhancements will be going on over the next year, year and a half, as well. There will be people on the ground there May 1.
View Hunter Tootoo Profile
Ind. (NU)
Yes, I know we have a peer-reviewed science process right now where we'll get data, and that has helped us in a number of areas. Whenever we do our science it's shared around with other groups to be able to review and ensure that we got it right. Let's ask Ms. MacLean if she would like to elaborate on that.
View Hunter Tootoo Profile
Ind. (NU)
As I said earlier, I'm working with my colleague Minister McKenna, Minister of Environment and Climate Change, on developing a plan to achieve this. We'll hopefully be launching in the next three to four weeks, if not sooner. I can't really say anything until then.
View Hunter Tootoo Profile
Ind. (NU)
Absolutely. As I said earlier, everyone, to my surprise, wants to help us achieve these targets. I assured all the different stakeholders, all the different jurisdictions, that there will be an open, transparent, and consultative process.
Results: 151 - 165 of 168 | Page: 11 of 12

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