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Results: 16 - 30 of 560
View Rhéal Fortin Profile
BQ (QC)
Couldn't we include criminal provisions in the act for this, whether it be a fine or some other sanction?
View Rhéal Fortin Profile
BQ (QC)
All right. Fine.
I have one last question if you...
View Marilène Gill Profile
BQ (QC)
View Marilène Gill Profile
2019-05-14 12:09
Thank you very much, Mr. Iacono, for giving me some speaking time.
I thank all of the witnesses for being here with us.
Hello, Mr. Jones. Thank you for taking part in this meeting. We have spoken before on several occasions. I also thank you for playing the role of ambassador for the Lower North Shore. I wanted to say that today because it's historic for us and for the Lower North Shore, which is located in my riding. It's a very vast area. It covers 350,000 square kilometres and includes 400 kilometres of coast. I wanted to provide some context.
Within those 400 coastal kilometres, there are people who refer to themselves as “coasters”. There are also two Innu nations who live there, the Unamen Shipu and Pakua Shipu nations. We talked about people who live in remote areas, but on top of everything, these people are cut off from the continent. We do say “continent” back home, both in English or French, and Innu. We talked about the consequences of climate change. I think that Mr. Jones would agree with me that all of the consequences, be they economic, social or cultural, are immense. We're talking about survival. We aren't just talking about development, which is the key to survival.
I'm going to open a sidebar to my colleague Mr. Aubin's intervention; he spoke about climate change and its repercussions on the development of infrastructure. We can't consider development in remote areas like this in the same way as we look at development in urban areas. It is different.
Mr. Jones, you are the ambassador for the Lower North Shore, Gros-Mecatina and La Tabatière. I would like you to give us an idea of what development means in the region of the Long Range mountains, notably what is called “ the buckle”, not only from the economic perspective, but also the social one.
When you say that the population is cut off from the continent, that does not only mean that the food isn't fresh, but that sometimes there simply isn't any. It happens that people can't get out when they are sick and deprived of all services. The young people, who don't have access to education, are leaving.
I would like you to describe the situation on the Lower North Shore further, and what it means. We aren't making additional requests; we don't even have basic infrastructure. You will agree with me, since you tried to mention it several times, that the Government of Quebec, the people of the North Shore, as well as all of the elected representatives, federal and provincial, and the Innu and Naskapi chiefs, are favourable to the project and are themselves applying the necessary pressure to see it go forward.
I'm sorry I spoke so long. Could you, for the people who are present here, give us the real picture of the situation on the Lower North Shore?
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
I know I can't legally oppose the motion, but I'm very disappointed that one of the two official languages hasn't been entirely respected.
I'm not opposing the motion because I don't have the power to do so as I'm not a member of a recognized party.
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Thank you, Mr. Chair.
Earlier we talked about the Privy Council Office's request for a legal opinion that you moreover prepared—you said so earlier—and that, at the minister's request, you didn't forward to the Privy Council Office.
Now that the minister is no longer here, could you send us that legal opinion so the committee can take note of it?
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Something has been bothering me since these discussions started. In eight days after returning from a trip, the minister decides to paint yourself into a corner: she decides to start a prosecution and accepts no advice.
You offer her the option of seeking an outside legal opinion and you tell her she can even discuss the case directly with the prosecutor. However, she accepts no advice and stubbornly maintains that she will go to trial.
A little later, SNC-Lebanon loses $1.6 billion in three months, and its stock falls 35%. That doesn't prompt her either to consider whether she might perhaps reconsider the matter.
Did she give you a reason why she remained so resolute in her decision, not wanting to listen to anyone?
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Chair, my answer is the same as the one I gave earlier. I'm surprised we can't table it in both languages, but I don't want to object to it being circulated.
I've been in Parliament for 35 years, and I understood a long time ago that the two official languages are English and translation.
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
It seems to be working.
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
I'm going to give you a taste of our interpretation in the House of Commons.
If my understanding is correct, the minister made the decision not to use this new legislation on deferred prosecution agreements after only 12 days, that is to say, in early September, September 16.
When did you, in the Prime Minister's Office, become certain that she would not change her mind or, first of all, that she had made that decision? When were you informed that she had made the decision not to use the act but instead to allow the prosecution to proceed?
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
During your dinner on December 5, was it she who raised the matter at the end of the meal, or was it you? It was she who raised the matter?
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
She raised it, even though, in her mind, at that time, her final decision had been made since September.
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Did the two resigning ministers vote for the bill a year ago, the bill that would allow these agreements?
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Results: 16 - 30 of 560 | Page: 2 of 38

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