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View Andrew Scheer Profile
CPC (SK)

Question No. 1031--
Mr. MacAulay (Cardigan):
With regard to government funding since April 1, 2011: (a) how much has been allocated for (i) the AgriFlexibility Fund, (ii) the AgriMarketing Program, (iii) the Agriculture Development Fund, (iv) the Canadian Agricultural Adaptation Program, (v) the Canadian Wheat Board – Transition Costs Program, (vi) Apprenticeship Grants, (vii) the Canada Summer Job Program, (viii) the Homelessness Partnering Strategy, (ix) the Opportunities Fund for Persons with Disabilities, (x) the Skills and Partnership Fund Aboriginal Skills and Employment Strategy, (xi) the Automotive Innovation Fund, (xii) the Automotive Partnership Canada, (xiii) Canada Excellence Research Chairs, (xiv) Canada Research Chairs, (xv) the Strategic Aerospace and Defence Initiative, (xvi) the Building Canada Fund – Communities Component, (xvii) the Building Canada Fund – Major Infrastructure Component, (xviii) the Gas Tax Fund, (xix) the Green Infrastructure Fund, (xx) the Atlantic Integrated Commercial Fisheries Initiative, (xxi) the Pacific Integrated Commercial Fisheries Initiative, (xxii) the Fleet Operational Readiness Program, (xxiii) the Shore-Based Asset Readiness Program, (xxiv) the Small Craft Harbours Program; (b) how much has been transferred to the intended recipients for each element mentioned in (a); (c) how much has been lapsed for each element in (a); and (d) how much has been spent on advertising and promotion for each element in (a)?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 1046--
Mr. Cotler (Mount Royal):
With regard to the use of administrative segregation in Canadian federal prisons: (a) how does the government define “administrative segregation”; (b) how has the government’s definition of “administrative segregation” changed over the past ten years; (c) with regard to the changes in (b), (i) when were they made, (ii) who made them, (iii) for what reason were they made; (d) what are the objectives of administrative segregation; (e) over the last five years, how has the use of administrative segregation met the objectives in (d); (f) over the last five years, what means of achieving the objectives in (d), other than administrative segregation, has the government (i) considered, (ii) implemented; (g) what are the costs of the means in (f); (h) what factors are considered when determining (i) whether to place an inmate in administrative segregation, (ii) the length of time an inmate spends in administrative segregation, (iii) whether to remove an inmate from administrative segregation, (iv) the conditions of an inmate’s administrative segregation; (i) if any factors in (h) have changed over the last 10 years, (i) which factors changed, (ii) when did they change, (iii) who changed them, (iv) what was the objective of the change, (v) in what way has the objective been met; (j) who determines (i) whether to place an inmate in administrative segregation, (ii) the length of time an inmate spends in administrative segregation, (iii) whether to remove an inmate from administrative segregation, (iv) the conditions of an inmate’s administrative segregation; (k) in what ways does the government ensure that the use of administrative segregation in Canada complies with (i) the United Nations Convention against Torture, (ii) the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, (iii) the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, (iv) other international laws and standards; (l) over the last five years, what evaluations or studies of the use of administrative segregation has the government conducted, commissioned, or consulted; (m) what are the conclusions of the evaluations and studies in (l); (n) by what amount does placement in administrative detention increase or decrease the cost of housing an inmate;
(o) for the last five years, how many inmates were held in administrative segregation, broken down by (i) year, (ii) facility; (p) for the last five years, how many inmates were held in the general population, broken down by (i) year, (ii) facility; (q) of the inmates in (o), broken down by year and facility, how many were held in administrative segregation for (i) less than two consecutive days, (ii) between two and seven consecutive days, (iii) between eight and 30 consecutive days, (iv) between 31 and consecutive 100 days, (v) more than 100 consecutive days; (r) of the inmates in (o), broken down by year and facility, how many were held in administrative segregation for a total of (i) less than two days, (ii) between two and seven days, (iii) between eight and 30 days, (iv) between 30 and 100 days, (v) over 100 days; (s) of the inmates in (o), broken down by year and facility, how many were placed in administrative segregation at the their own request; (t) of the inmates in (o), broken down by year and facility, how many were (i) visible minorities, (ii) aboriginals; (u) of the inmates in (o), broken down by year and facility, how many, at the time of their placement in administrative segregation, were (i) under 20 years old, (ii) between 21 and 25 years old, (iii) between 26 and 35 years old, (iv) over 36 years old; (v) of the inmates in (o), broken down by year and facility, how many had been sentenced to prison terms of (i) less than two years, (ii) between two and five years, (iii) between five and 10 years, (iv) between 10 and 20 years, (v) over 20 years; (w) what procedures or guidelines are in place for assessing the mental health of inmates (i) prior to their placement in administrative segregation, (ii) during their placement in administrative segregation, (iii) following their placement in administrative segregation; (x) of the inmates in (o), broken down by year and facility, how many were diagnosed with a mental illness (i) prior to their placement in administrative segregation, (ii) during their placement in administrative segregation, (iii) following their placement in administrative segregation;
(y) of the inmates in (o), broken down by year and facility, how many attempted suicide (i) prior to their placement in administrative segregation, (ii) during their placement in administrative segregation, (iii) in the year following their placement in administrative segregation, (iv) more than a year after their placement in administrative segregation; (z) of the inmates in (o), broken down by year and facility, how many committed suicide (i) prior to their placement in administrative segregation, (ii) during their placement in administrative segregation, (iii) in the year following their placement in administrative segregation, (iv) more than a year after their placement in administrative segregation; (aa) of the inmates in (o), broken down by year and facility, how many committed acts of self-injury (i) prior to their placement in administrative segregation, (ii) during their placement in administrative segregation, (iii) in the year following their placement in administrative segregation, (iv) more than a year after their placement in administrative segregation; (bb) of the inmates in (o), broken down by year and facility, how many committed acts of violence against other inmates (i) prior to their placement in administrative segregation, (ii) during their placement in administrative segregation, (iii) in the year following their placement in administrative segregation, (iv) more than a year after their placement in administrative segregation; (cc) of the inmates in (o), broken down by year and facility, how many committed acts of violence against prison personnel (i) prior to their placement in administrative segregation, (ii) during their placement in administrative segregation, (iii) in the year following their placement in administrative segregation, (iv) more than a year after their placement in administrative segregation; (dd) while an inmate is in administrative segregation, what measures are taken to prevent the inmate from committing acts of (i) self-injury, (ii) violence against other inmates, (iii) violence against prison personnel; (ee) after an inmate is removed from administrative segregation, what measures are taken to prevent the inmate from committing acts of (i) self-injury, (ii) violence against other inmates, (iii) violence against prison personnel; (ff) of the inmates in (o), how many developed health problems while in administrative segregation, broken down by (i) year, (ii) facility; (gg) of the inmates in (o), how many died while in administrative segregation, broken down by (i) year, (ii) facility; (hh) what review of policies and practices, if any, is the government undertaking or will the government undertake; (ii) who has conducted, is conducting, or will conduct the reviews in (hh); (jj) what are the objectives of the reviews in (hh); (kk) when will the reviews in (hh) be completed; (ll) when will the results of the reviews in (hh) be made public; and (mm) what is the cost of the reviews in (hh)?
Response
(Return tabled)
View Barry Devolin Profile
CPC (ON)

Question No. 653--
Mr. John Carmichael:
With regard to questions on the Order Paper numbers Q-264 through Q-644, what is the estimated cost of the government's response for each question?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 947--
Hon. Ralph Goodale:
With regard to the RCMP’s Integrated National Security Enforcement Teams (INSET), by month and by year, since 2003: (a) how many employees were there in (i) each unit, (ii) each city, (iii) total; (b) of those employees in (a), how many were (i) permanent, (ii) transferred or temporary; (c) how much was spent on salaries; (d) of the amount in (c), how much was overtime; (e) how much funding was allocated to each office; (f) how much funding was lapsed; and (g) were any additional funds granted, and if so, how much?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 949--
Hon. Ralph Goodale:
With regard to Finance Canada’s forecasting of corporate tax losses for each federal budget since 2007: (a) how was the forecast prepared; (b) what were the results of that forecast; (c) what was the difference between the forecast and the actual result; (d) what was the total amount of the corporate tax base to which the losses apply; and (e) for the calculation, what were the (i) parameters, (ii) assumptions, (iii) formulas?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 963--
Hon. Wayne Easter:
With regard to the Government Operations Centre: for each protest or demonstration reported to the Centre by government departments or agencies since June 5, 2014, what was the (i) date, (ii) location, (iii) description or nature, (iv) department or agency making the report?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 964--
Hon. Wayne Easter:
With regard to the Correctional Service of Canada: (a) what is the current policy on the use of administrative segregation; (b) what changes to this policy are being considered; (c) who has been consulted with regards to any proposed changes, and when did these consultations take place; (d) has the Correctional Service of Canada received any analysis or advice on the constitutionality of the current administrative segregation policy and, if so, (i) when was it received, (ii) who provided the advice, (iii) what were the results or recommendations; (e) what is the proposed timeline for announcing any such proposed policy change; (f) what is the proposed timeline for implementing any such proposed policy change; (g) how many inmates will be affected by any such proposed policy change, broken down by (i) facility type, (ii) location; (h) what additional public costs are projected to be incurred as a result of any such proposed policy change; and (i) what are the titles, dates, and file numbers of any reports, memoranda, briefing notes, dockets, studies, or other records pertaining to any such proposed policy change?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 971--
Mr. Rodger Cuzner:
With regard to contracts under $10 000 granted by Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency and Enterprise Cape Breton Corporation since March 31, 2014: what are the (a) vendors' names; (b) contracts' reference numbers; (c) dates of the contracts; (d) descriptions of the services provided; (e) delivery dates; (f) original contracts' values; and (g) final contracts' values if different from the original contracts' values?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 973--
Hon. Judy Sgro:
With regard to contracts under $10 000 granted by the Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario since March 27, 2014: what are the (a) vendors' names; (b) contracts' reference numbers; (c) dates of the contracts; (d) descriptions of the services provided; (e) delivery dates; (f) original contracts' values; and (g) final contracts' values if different from the original contracts' values?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 979--
Mr. Emmanuel Dubourg:
With regard to contracts under $10 000 granted by the Canada Revenue Agency since March 27, 2014: what are the (a) vendors' names; (b) contracts' reference numbers; (c) dates of the contracts; (d) descriptions of the services provided; (e) delivery dates; (f) original contracts' values; and (g) final contracts' values if different from the original contracts' values?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 980--
Mr. Sean Casey:
With regard to contracts under $10 000 granted by Justice Canada since April 1, 2014: what are the (a) vendors' names; (b) contracts' reference numbers; (c) dates of the contracts; (d) descriptions of the services provided; (e) delivery dates; (f) original contracts' values; and (g) final contracts' values, if different from the original contracts' values?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 981--
Mr. Sean Casey:
With regard to contracts under $10 000 granted by the Public Prosecution Service of Canada since May 30, 2014: what are the (a) vendors' names; (b) contracts' reference numbers; (c) dates of the contracts; (d) descriptions of the services provided; (e) delivery dates; (f) original contracts' values; and (g) final contracts' values, if different from the original contracts' values?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 987--
Mr. Rodger Cuzner:
With regard to contracts under $10 000 granted by Employment and Social Development Canada since May 30, 2014: what are the (a) vendors' names; (b) contracts' reference numbers; (c) dates of the contracts; (d) descriptions of the services provided; (e) delivery dates; (f) original contracts' values; and (g) final contracts' values if different from the original contracts' values?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 988--
Mr. David McGuinty:
With regard to contracts under $10 000 granted by the National Capital Commission since March 27, 2014: what are the (a) vendors' names; (b) contracts' reference numbers; (c) dates of the contracts; (d) descriptions of the services provided; (e) delivery dates; (f) original contracts' values; and (g) final contracts' values if different from the original contracts' values?
Response
(Return tabled)

Question No. 990--
Mr. David McGuinty:
With regard to contracts under $10 000 granted by the Privy Council Office since March 27, 2014: what are the (a) vendors' names; (b) contracts' reference numbers; (c) dates of the contracts; (d) descriptions of the services provided; (e) delivery dates; (f) original contracts' values; and (g) final contracts' values if different from the original contracts' values?
Response
(Return tabled)
8555-412-653 Questions on the Order Paper8555-412-947 Counter terrorism resources8555-412-949 Corporate tax losses8555-412-963 Government Operations Centre8555-412-964 Correctional Service Canada8555-412-971 Government contracts8555-412-973 Government contracts8555-412-979 Government contracts8555-412-980 Government contracts8555-412-981 Government contracts8555-412-987 Government contracts
...Show all topics
View Nycole Turmel Profile
NDP (QC)
View Nycole Turmel Profile
2014-12-12 11:21 [p.10537]
Mr. Speaker, the inquest into Ashley Smith's death painted a troubling picture, yet Conservatives have taken a year to even respond.
Instead of listening to the jury, the government is rejecting key recommendations. Conservatives will not even agree to reduce solitary confinement for the mentally ill.
Instead of recycling old announcements, will the minister acknowledge a problem, listen to the inquest, and put an end to the use of solitary confinement for the mentally ill?
View Roxanne James Profile
CPC (ON)
View Roxanne James Profile
2014-12-12 11:21 [p.10537]
Mr. Speaker, what happened in this case was in fact a tragedy, and our thoughts remain with the Smith family in this instance.
To answer the opposition's question, the government has actually already implemented over half of the recommendations in the coroner's report. We stand very proud on that particular record.
In fact, earlier this year, our government launched a mental health action plan for federal offenders that includes action on timely assessment, effective management, sound intervention, ongoing training, and robust government oversight.
View Nycole Turmel Profile
NDP (QC)
View Nycole Turmel Profile
2014-12-12 11:22 [p.10537]
Mr. Speaker, her parents have waited a year for nothing, a year for the same old thing. Nevertheless, the jury was clear:
That there should be an absolute prohibition on the practice of placing female inmates in conditions of long-term segregation, clinical seclusion, isolation, or observation. Long-term should be defined as any period in excess of 15 days.
The jury is not alone. Leading human rights experts, such as the Honourable Louise Arbour, are calling on the government to put an end to its dependence on solitary confinement.
Why does the minister insist on defending the indefensible and why is he refusing to put an end to this abusive practice?
View Roxanne James Profile
CPC (ON)
View Roxanne James Profile
2014-12-12 11:22 [p.10537]
Mr. Speaker, administrative segregation is a common practice that is used in many western countries, not just here in Canada.
I would like to speak again about the mental health action plan for federal offenders.
It is a five-pillar strategy that was introduced earlier this year. It actually builds on our strong record in the Conservative government of ensuring faster mental health assessment, which is critical, as well as improved staff training and extended psychological counselling.
View Wayne Easter Profile
Lib. (PE)
View Wayne Easter Profile
2014-12-12 11:39 [p.10540]
Mr. Speaker, the government's response yesterday, with respect to the Ontario coroner's inquest into the death of Ashley Smith, was nothing short of shameful. How many reports, how many inquiries will it take to get the government out of the dark ages?
Retired Supreme Court Justice Arbour slammed the practice of solitary confinement as a barbaric cultural practice. The inquiry recommended that indefinite solitary confinement be abolished.
How could the government reject that key recommendation?
View Roxanne James Profile
CPC (ON)
View Roxanne James Profile
2014-12-12 11:40 [p.10540]
Mr. Speaker, as I stated earlier in question period, this case is indeed a tragedy. Our thoughts and prayers continue to be with the Smith family.
The question that has been asked is what the government has done. We have implemented more than half of the recommendations from that coroner's report. In fact, we are going through many of the other recommendations and looking at up to three-quarters of them at this very moment.
However, what our government did earlier this year was launch a mental health action plan for federal offenders, which includes action on timely assessment, effective management, sound intervention, ongoing training, and robust governance and oversight.
View Wayne Easter Profile
Lib. (PE)
View Wayne Easter Profile
2014-12-12 11:40 [p.10541]
Mr. Speaker, the fact is that the government rejected the key recommendation. Beyond Justice Arbour's point that solitary confinement was a barbaric cultural practice, the Correctional Investigator said that using solitary confinement to manage mental illness was unsafe and should be prohibited. His finding showed 14 of the 30 suicides reviewed occurred in segregation cells.
When will the minister realize the correctional action he allows is killing people under his care and custody?
View Roxanne James Profile
CPC (ON)
View Roxanne James Profile
2014-12-12 11:41 [p.10541]
Mr. Speaker, the member knows well that administrative segregation is a common practice in many western countries, not just in Canada.
Having said that, I again want to speak for a moment about the mental health action plan for federal offenders, which is a five-pillar strategy. As part of that strategy, and we saw this earlier this week, is a two-bed memorandum of understanding between Correctional Service of Canada and a local facility. Two in-patient beds are be available for people with the most serious mental needs in women's penitentiaries. That is in addition to the 32 that are already across Canada, including Saskatchewan and Quebec.
View Dennis Bevington Profile
NDP (NT)
View Dennis Bevington Profile
2014-12-10 14:57 [p.10422]
Mr. Speaker, in 2010, Eddie Snowshoe of Fort McPherson, Northwest Territories, committed suicide in the Edmonton Institution's segregation unit. His mother still grieves. Though he had been diagnosed with mental health issues and as suicidal, he was in solitary confinement for 162 days straight.
The UN Special Rapporteur on Torture has stated that solitary confinement is contrary to one of the essential aims of the penitentiary system.
How many more Eddie Snowshoe's will there be? How many more deaths will it take before this minister takes some action?
View Steven Blaney Profile
CPC (QC)
View Steven Blaney Profile
2014-12-10 14:57 [p.10422]
Mr. Speaker, every death in custody is taken seriously and there is always an inquiry.
Let me comment on a procedure that is done in all western countries, called administrative segregation. It is done for safety reasons: the safety of the inmate, the safety of the personnel, and the safety of the facility.
This procedure is applied with a lot of common sense by our correctional officers. We expect to have more development of our mental health strategy, an action we have taken to make sure that those who have serious mental health issues are well taken care of.
View Randall Garrison Profile
NDP (BC)
View Randall Garrison Profile
2014-12-10 14:58 [p.10422]
Mr. Speaker, it is way simpler than that. This minister needs to stop putting the mentally ill in solitary confinement and start getting them the treatment they need.
It has now been almost a year since the inquest into Ashley Smith's death. That inquest made 104 recommendations to prevent similar tragedies.
We have heard nothing from the minister by way of response. How many more tragedies will it take before the minister does respond? When will he put an end to the use of solitary confinement for the treatment of the mentally ill in Canadian prisons?
View Steven Blaney Profile
CPC (QC)
View Steven Blaney Profile
2014-12-10 14:59 [p.10423]
Mr. Speaker, I invite my colleague to read through the action plan that we implemented more than six months ago. I can send the press release to him.
First and foremost, I would like to say that we have put processes in place to assess and screen inmates as soon as they arrive. Staff have received training. Inmates are medically monitored at all stages as soon as they are identified as having mental health issues. It is something that we are taking seriously.
I look forward to seeing how Correctional Service Canada will respond to the coroner's report on the tragic death of Ashley Smith.
View Rosane Doré Lefebvre Profile
NDP (QC)
View Rosane Doré Lefebvre Profile
2014-12-10 14:59 [p.10423]
Mr. Speaker, for a year we have been waiting for the Conservatives to take action and respond to the recommendations from the inquiry into the tragic death of Ashley Smith, but the minister prefers to continue to avoid the question.
In the meantime, tragic mistakes keep happening. People like Edward Snowshoe continue to be put in solitary confinement.
How many more inmates with mental health issues will have to die before the Minister of Public Safety finally takes action?
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