Hansard
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Consult the user guide
For assistance, please contact us
Add search criteria
Results: 1 - 7 of 7
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, Mario Beaulieu, president and leader of the Bloc Québécois, and Gilles Duceppe were on Parliament Hill this afternoon together with 18 candidates to send a simple message: the Bloc Québécois is making a strong comeback.
Mario Beaulieu's generosity and selflessness show that separatists believe that the cause is more important than the individuals. It is noble and admirable, as is the decision by Gilles Duceppe to once again serve Quebec and the separatist movement. Congratulations to these two men and to all who put Quebec ahead of their own interests. A new political cycle is starting up in Quebec.
View Jean-François Fortin Profile
FD (QC)
Mr. Speaker, it was with shock, sadness and compassion that my colleagues and I learned yesterday of the death of Jim Flaherty, who had been a member of the House of Commons since 2006 and the finance minister for the Conservative government until just recently. Jim also held senior ministerial positions within the Ontario provincial government, where his talents were recognized.
Jim Flaherty left his mark on Canadian politics. In his own way and in a manner consistent with his values, he did what he thought was right and just for Canadians and his party. We will remember him and the economic legacy he left as finance minister, which marked the beginning of the 21st century.
Like any good politician, he did some good and some not so good things, depending on your political point of view, but he was always respectful and honest in his approach. Jim Flaherty was a great man with many good qualities. He was a man with heart.
With his intelligent sense of humour, he was sometimes able to make even his strongest opponents smile.
He was without a doubt a man who was respected by all of his peers in the House of Commons. He was an engaging man with bright eyes and a sharp mind who gave a lot to the community.
On behalf of my Bloc Québécois colleagues, I would like to express my sincere condolences to Jim's family, friends, and relatives, as well as to all of his Conservative Party colleagues.
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, I would like to join my colleagues in saying farewell to our friend. Twenty-five years in politics is quite a commitment. It is also very rare. Twenty-five years of service to our constituents, regardless of the political party we serve and the political ideas we defend, is always an honour for the person who achieves it.
It is with regret that I see him go. I think that every time a member leaves, the entire House of Commons loses a member of its big democratic family.
I know that he has some regret about leaving us because he had hoped to become the dean of the House of Commons. Indeed, he would have been my successor had I left. At one point, he told me that I should not run in the next election because he wanted to be in the chair for the first day of a new Parliament. He wanted me to leave so that he could hold that position. Today, he is the one leaving and I am the one who will run again in the next election. It is the opposite, but I know that he would have made a very good dean of the House.
I wish him all the best in the new municipal career he wants to start in beautiful Toronto. I will close by thanking him for helping democracy grow and develop in the House of Commons with through his actions, suggestions and wonderful speeches.
View Louis Plamondon Profile
BQ (QC)
Mr. Speaker, the appointment of the new Minister of Finance does not bode well for Quebeckers.
Since he was the former executive director of the Ontario Securities Commission, it is very likely that he will pursue his predecessor's desire to create a Canada-wide securities commission and that he will continue attempts to take away Quebec's jurisdiction to benefit Toronto.
Furthermore, his ties to the oil industry and his attempts to reduce environmental requirements are well known, which means that we could end up seeing measures that are even more lenient towards the big oil companies.
By calling those who are opposed to blindly increasing oil sands production radicals, he has proven once again that our public finances will be managed based on ideology instead of fact.
View Jean-François Fortin Profile
FD (QC)
Mr. Speaker, I want to start by saying that the Bloc Québécois will support the motion to refer this question of privilege to committee.
As we have already heard, there are two contradictory statements before the House, and that makes it difficult for members to rule on the integrity and veracity of the statements that were made.
It is important for the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs to examine the statements and all relevant information that would help them to shed light on this contempt of Parliament. Given the circumstances, it is increasingly difficult to determine what is true and what is false in the debate on Bill C-23.
It is increasingly difficult for the public to understand and assess the credibility of the information they get from the government. We all remember the government's false advertising to promote a training program that did not even exist.
Does the member also disapprove of the increasing amount of misinformation we are seeing from his government?
View Jean-François Fortin Profile
FD (QC)
Mr. Speaker, I ask for unanimous consent to move the following motion: That, in the opinion of this House, the government should set up an independent public inquiry to review the involvement of staff of the Prime Minister's Office and the Prime Minister himself in the actions that led to the repayment of expenses fraudulently claimed by Senator Duffy.
View André Bellavance Profile
Ind. (QC)
Mr. Speaker, I agree with my colleagues who have already spoken, but I disagree with the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons, who just spoke to this question of privilege.
The House of Commons is governed by its own rules, found in O'Brien-Bosc. On page 111, it states that no member of Parliament, including the Prime Minister, who is one of the 308 members of Parliament in this House, shall provide misleading information to the House, whether or not it is deliberate.
In this case—and this may also be the case in civil society—ignorance of the law is no excuse. The Prime Minister should be aware of the rules governing the House of Commons.
Mr. Speaker, there is new information that you must take into account. When the Prime Minister was answering questions and when the RCMP was getting deeper into its investigation, some information started to be made public. That information must be brought to your attention.
You must look at the answers the Prime Minister gave about his chief of staff, his senior aide, who gave a large amount of money—$90,000—to a senator for inappropriate expenses.
The government and the Prime Minister must take responsibility. This government introduced an accountability bill—rightfully so—and could not stop bragging about this legislation. Now it needs to be consistent by making sure that elected members of this House are accountable and responsible.
I think it makes sense to consider as a question of privilege the responses given by the Prime Minister and some information that came out before and especially after these events.
I leave this in your hands and good judgment.
Results: 1 - 7 of 7

Export As: XML CSV RSS

For more data options, please see Open Data